Cafe Society Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Cafe Society. Here they are! All 26 of them:

Las Vegas: It was not cafe society, it was Nescafe society.
Noël Coward
I guess I´m too used to sitting in a small room and making words do a few things. I see enough of humanity at the racetracks, the supermarkets, gas stations, freeways, cafes, etc. This can´t be helped. But I feel like kicking myself in the ass when I go to gatherings, even if the drinks are free. It never works for me. I´ve got enough clay to play with. People empty me. I have to get away to refill. I´m what´s best for me, sitting here slouched, smoking a beedie and watching this creen flash the words. Seldom do you meet a rare or interesting person. It´s more than galling, it´s a fucking constant shock. It´s making a god-damned grouch out of me. Anybody can be a god-damned grouch and most are. Help!
Charles Bukowski (The Captain is Out to Lunch and the Sailors Have Taken Over the Ship)
Its magnificence was indescribable, and its magnitude was inconceivable. She felt overwhelmed in the presence of its greatness. Pg 87
Mona Rodriguez
Why are you perpetuating a childhood you grew up despising?
Mona Rodriguez (Forty Years in a Day)
Confession is good for the soul even after the soul has been claimed” (p. 381).
Mona Rodriguez
I felt that the magical people must be in the hidden back roads and dusty cubby holes of life; on highways, in hostels, and in shabby, smoky cafes. These enchanting people are in trees, around fires and under hand-knit hats and street lamps reflecting gold on rain soaked pavement. They dance while others dangle; they vibrantly sing the songs that get jumbled and stuck in the subconscious of others who only wish to catch tune. They are the rare ones whose uncommon experiences touch your heart through just a wink of their eye, the stories stitched in the holes of their shoes, invoking a longing for the unknown, taking others to a place of missing what they've never even had -- they do not settle, they do not compromise.
Jackie Haze (Borderless)
I love America for its bourgeois comfort. If I was as heavily in debt as they are, I wouldn't be drinking tea or coffee anywhere. I would be sipping tap water from an old bottle and serving others tea or coffee in a cafe somewhere.
Vann Chow (Shanghai Nobody (Master Shanghai, #1))
Communism made through the will of a government instead of through the direct and voluntary work of groups of workers does not really appeal to me. If it was possible, it would be the most suffocating tyranny to which human society has ever been subjected.
Errico Malatesta (At the Cafe: Conversations on Anarchism)
The continent has embraced a spiritual death long before the demographic one. In those seventeen European countries that have fallen into the "lowest-low fertility," where are the children? In a way, you're looking at them: the guy sipping espresso at a sidewalk cafe listening to his iPod, the eternal adolescent charges of the paternalistic state. The government makes the grown-up decisions and we spend our pocket money on our record collection...the long-term cost of welfare is the infantilization of the population. The populations of wealthy democratic societies expect to have total choice over their satellite TV package, yet think it perfectly normal to allow the state to make all the choices in respect of their health care. It's a curious inversion of citizenship to demand control over peripheral leisure activities but to contract out the big life-changing stuff to the government. And it's hard to come up with a wake-up call for a society as dedicated as latter-day Europe to the belief that life is about sleeping in.
Mark Steyn (America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It)
But most of all," she said, "I like to watch people. Sometimes I ride the subway all day and look at them and listen to them. I just want to figure out who they are and what they want and where they're going. Sometimes I even go to the Fun Parks and ride in the jet cars when they race on the edge of town at midnight and the police don't care as long as they're insured. As long as everyone has ten thousand insurance everyone's happy. Sometimes I sneak around and listen in subways. Or I listen at soda fountains, and do you know what?" "What?" "People don't talk about anything." "Oh, they must!" "No, not anything. They name a lot of cars or clothes or swimming-pools mostly and say how swell! But they all say the same things and nobody says anything different from anyone else. And most of the time in the cafes they have the jokeboxes on and the same jokes most of the time, or the musical wall lit and all the coloured patterns running up and down, but it's only colour and all abstract. And at the museums, have you ever been? All abstract. That's all there is now.
Ray Bradbury (Fahrenheit 451)
Someone has to unbutton the stuffed shirts of the beau monde.
Pamela Hamilton (Lady Be Good: The Life and Times of Dorothy Hale)
I sensed the unsettling aura, the stillness giving way to silent pandemonium of a crowd that could no longer be seen—the nights of posh black-tie parties, laughter and scandal, champagne and cigarettes long since gone.
Pamela Hamilton (Lady Be Good: The Life and Times of Dorothy Hale)
An air of malaise had spread through Café Society and quite acutely in her coterie, friends impatient to find their way to the lightness, their place in the sun. The Great Depression cast shadows on the city. The roar of the Twenties had quieted to a soulful cry of the blues.
Pamela L Hamilton (Lady Be Good Lib/E: The Life and Times of Dorothy Hale)
Someone has to unbutton the stuffed shirts of the beau monde.
Pamela L Hamilton (Lady Be Good Lib/E: The Life and Times of Dorothy Hale)
Oh good, the Algonquin Twit isn’t here.
Pamela L Hamilton (Lady Be Good Lib/E: The Life and Times of Dorothy Hale)
Well-functioning cafes make a significant contribution to the mental health of their communities.
Donna Goddard (Nanima: Spiritual Fiction (Nanima Series, #1))
It was hard to force people to give up their rights to apartments, and predictably, this radical Utopian ideal failed. But it does illustrate how the concept of social injustice in a communist society works: those who have are exceptions, and they should feel guilty and ashamed - the others are entitled to have, too, because it has been promised to them.
Slavenka Drakulić (Cafe Europa: Life After Communism)
Even at his age he knew that there are basically two categories of people in a society: those who have, and those who have not. But according to the egalitarian principles of any communist society, those 'haves' should share with the 'have nots.' And because there is not much to share anyway, in the end that egalitarianism boils down to the equal distribution of poverty.
Slavenka Drakulić (Cafe Europa: Life After Communism)
The individual citizen had no chance to voice his protest or his opinion, not even his fear. He could only leave the country - and so people did. Those who used 'I' instead of 'we' in their language had to escape. It was this fatal difference in grammar that divided them from the rest of their compatriots. As a consequence of this 'us', no civic society developed. The little there was, in the form of small, isolated, and marginalised groups, was soon swallowed up by the national homogenisation that did not permit any differences, any individualism. As under communism, individualism was punished - individuals speaking out against the war, or against nationalism, were singled out as 'traitors'. How does a person who is a product of a totalitarian society learn responsibility, individuality, initiative? by saying 'no'. But this begins with saying 'I', thinking 'I' and doing 'I' - in public as well as in private. Individuality, the first-person singular, always existed under communism, it was just exiled from public and political life and exercised in private. Thus the terrible hypocrisy with which we learned to live in order to survive is having its backlash now: it is very difficult to connect the private and public 'I'; to start believing that an individual opinion, initiative, or vote could make a difference. There is still too big a danger that the citizen will withdraw into an anonymous, safe 'us'.
Slavenka Drakulić (Cafe Europa: Life After Communism)
America’s professional and managerial elites have little interest in the broad middle class of our society and have weak ties to nation and place.
Ray Oldenburg (The Great Good Place: Cafes, Coffee Shops, Bookstores, Bars, Hair Salons, and Other Hangouts at the Heart of a Community)
The poor live on society's scraps--a few dollars in government assistance or charity, donated food, thrift-store clothes. They can afford neither transport to venture out of their communities nor simple luxuries such as movies or a cup of coffee with friends in a cafe. They cannot afford to vary the routines of their daily lives. Embarrassed by their poverty, worried about being judged failures in life, humiliated by that judgement, many told me they have essentially withdrawn from all but the most necessary, unavoidable social interactions,
Sasha Abramsky
But most of all," she said, "I like to watch people. Sometimes I ride the subway all day and look at them and listen to them. I just want to figure out who they are and what they want and where they're going. Sometimes I even go to the Fun Parks and ride in the jet cars when they race on the edge of town at midnight and the police don't care as long as they're insured. As long as everyone has ten thousand insurance everyone's happy. Sometimes I sneak around and listen in subways. Or I listen at soda fountains, and do you know what?" "What?" "People don't talk about anything." "Oh, they must!" "No, not anything. They name a lot of cars or clothes or swimming-pools mostly and say how swell! But they all say the same things and nobody says anything different from anyone else. And most of the time in the cafes they have the jokeboxes on and the same jokes most of the time, or the musical wall lit and all the coloured patterns running up and down, but it's only colour and all abstract. And at the museums, have you ever been? All abstract. That's all there is now.
Ray Bradbury
So society says it's great to be big. But being big can take away from the specialness... The growth thing, it's like a cafe. You open up a really cool little organic vegetarian cafe, and there's a certain type of people that come to it and you really bond with them. And then it gets popular and you wonder if you should make it bigger or open up another one. It's a question of knowing when to stop, knowing when you lose what you had originally.
Damien Rice
A few hours later I realize the quarterly meeting is still dull, but it’s moving in the right direction. It’s only been three months since the last meeting, but Gabe’s already implemented a few changes to make it more useful for everyone. We don’t have any surveys to fill out today—thank goodness—so I’m taking my usual notes and following along. Even Preston is awake and paying attention. Sort of. “I have to pee, Sandy. I’m not gonna make it till the lunch break,” Preston whispers. He’s been fidgeting for ten minutes. I wish he’d just go already. “So go,” I say in a low whisper. “We’re not captives.” “You know I hate doing the walk of shame during a meeting,” he whispers disdainfully. I shake my head. “For the hundredth time, that is not what ‘walk of shame’ means.” “No one should be ashamed of getting it on with a hot stranger, Sandy. That is not shameworthy.” He shakes his head in disgust. “People should high-five in the morning and go home with their heads held high.” “What do you suggest it be called then? If we as a society should be proud of our one-night stands we need to have a term for it.” “I’m trying to get ‘walk of satisfaction’ to catch on, but it’s hard to make something go viral.” “Uh-huh
Jana Aston (Fling (Cafe, #2.5))
São vários os orfãos dos cafés. Quem os frequentou e perdeu abrigo, mas, sobretudo, quem busca em vão um domicílio para a sua relação com a cidade.
Marina Tavares Dias (Os Cafés de Lisboa)
the one with the lower rate. A few unique things to see in Stockholm include the Nobelmuseet, the Nobel Museum, which tells of the creation of the Nobel Prize and the creativity of its laureates, and the Spiritmuseet, where you can learn about the nation’s complicated relationship with alcohol. Sweden is associated with design (and not just Ikea) and many shops sell Swedish‐only design. Oudoor activities in summer include hiking trails through the islands and archipelago. Winter activities stretch to cross‐country skiing, ice skating and snow hiking. Nightlife is expensive, cover charges to bars can be high and, bizarrely, the minimum age for drinking varies in an arbitrary fashion as it is up to each establishment to make its own decision – it can be anything from 17 to 27. So take identification with you. There are two airports serving Stockholm. Arlanda is 40 kms north of the city and serves main airlines. Skavsta, 100 kms to the south, serves the budget airlines. Both airports have coaches to take visitors directly to the city centre. Downside: Many independently owned restaurants and cafes close for holidays between July and August which can limit the range of places to eat. To read: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson. This trilogy of a financial journalist and the tattooed genius with a motive to fight the dark right‐wing forces of Swedish society romped through the bestseller lists.
Dee Maldon (The Solo Travel Guide: Just Do It)