Walter Raleigh Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Walter Raleigh. Here they are! All 49 of them:

I wish I loved the human Race, I wish I loved its silly face, and when I'm introduced to one, I wish I thought "what jolly fun"!
Walter Alexander Raleigh
But Love is a durable fire in the mind ever burning Never sick, never old, never dead From itself, never turning.
Walter Raleigh
The world itself is but a large prison, out of which some are daily led to execution.
Walter Raleigh
I wish I loved the Human Race; I wish I loved its silly face; I wish I liked the way it walks; I wish I liked the way it talks; And when I’m introduced to one, I wish I thought “What Jolly Fun!
Walter Alexander Raleigh
Fain would I climb, yet fear I to fall.
Walter Raleigh
What is our life? A play of passion. Our mirth the music of division. Our mother's wombs the tyring houses be, Where we are drest for this short Comedy. Heaven the judicious sharp spectator is, That sits and marks still who doth act amiss, Our graves that hide us from the searching sun, Are like drawn curtains when the play is done. Thus march we playing to our latest rest, Only we die in earnest, that's no jest.
Walter Raleigh
Even such is Time * Even such is Time, that takes in trust Our youth, our joys, our all we have, And pays us but with earth and dust; Who in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days: But from this earth, this grave, this dust, My God shall raise me up, I trust. Sir Walter Raleigh (1554-1618) *These lines are said to have been composed by Sir Walter Raleigh on the night before his execution.
Walter Raleigh
False love, desire, and beauty frail, adieu! Dead is the root whence all these fancies grew.
Walter Raleigh
PASSIONS are likened best to floods and streams: The shallow murmur, but the deep are dumb;
Walter Raleigh
I have provided a possible explanation for Antiochus's insane foolhardiness when left in command of the Athenian Fleet, because Thucidides's bald account is so unbelievable (unless one assumes that both Antiochus and Alkibiades were mentally defective) that any explanation seems more likely than none. Alkibiades himself is an enigma. Even allowing that no man is all black and all white, few men can ever have been more wildly and magnificently piebald. Like another strange and contradictory character Sir Walter Raleigh, he casts a glamour that comes clean down the centuries, a dazzle of personal magnetism that makes it hard to see the man behind it. I have tried to see. I have tried to fit the pieces into a coherent whole; I don't know whether I have been successful or not; but I do not think that I have anywhere falsified the portrait.
Rosemary Sutcliff (The Flowers of Adonis)
The Wood is that that makes the gallows tree; The Weed is that that strings the hangman's bag; The Wag, my pretty knave, betokens thee.
Walter Raleigh
Will read a poem by Sir Walter Raleigh at his grandmother's funeral. "Pondering the joys we had, listen & keep very still. If the lowing from the hill or the tolling of the bell do not serve to break the spell, listen: you may be allowed to hear my laughter from a cloud.
Lynne Branard (The Art of Arranging Flowers)
Even such is Time, which takes in trust Our youth, our joys, and all we have, And pays us but with age and dust; Who in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days.
Walter Raleigh
When the grand twelve million jury of our sins and sinful fury, 'Gainst our souls black verdicts give, Christ pleads his death, and then we live. Be thou my speaker, taintless pleader, unblotted lawyer, true proceeder.
Walter Raleigh
Our taste must always be, more or less, the victim of our limitations, but we should beware of glorying in it, and, above all, we should beware of mistaking the aversions of timidity and sensibility for critical judgments.
Walter Raleigh
Thou mayest be sure that he that will in private tell thee of thy faults is thy friend, for he adventures thy dislike and hazards thy hatred; for there are few men that can endure it, every man for the most part delighting in self-praise, which is one of the most universal fallies that bewitcheth mankind
Walter Raleigh
A professional man of letters, especially if he is much at war with unscrupulous enenemies, is naturally jealous of his privacy... so it was, I think, with Dryden.
Walter Raleigh
Thou may be sure that he who will tell thee of thy faults is thy friend, for he ventures thy dislike and doth hazard thy hatred.
Walter Raleigh
Sir Walter Raleigh, said to have written on a window with a diamond to Queen Elizabeth: "Fain would I climb, but yet fear I to fall." Queen Elizabeth: "If thy heart fail thee, then climb not at all.
Elizabeth I
Shakespeare was not even able to perform a function that we consider today as perfectly normal and ordinary a function as reading itself. He could not, as the saying goes, “look something up.” Indeed the very phrase—when it is used in the sense of “searching for something in a dictionary or encyclopedia or other book of reference”—simply did not exist. It does not appear in the English language, in fact, until as late as 1692, when an Oxford historian named Anthony Wood used it. Since there was no such phrase until the late seventeenth century, it follows that there was essentially no such concept either, certainly not at the time when Shakespeare was writing—a time when writers were writing furiously, and thinkers thinking as they rarely had before. Despite all the intellectual activity of the time there was in print no guide to the tongue, no linguistic vade mecum, no single book that Shakespeare or Martin Frobisher, Francis Drake, Walter Raleigh, Francis Bacon, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Nash, John Donne, Ben Jonson, Izaak Walton, or any of their other learned contemporaries could consult.
Simon Winchester (The Professor & the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity & the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary)
...Raleigh was later to write, after a duel the hangman was the one who bestowed the garland on the victor.
Raleigh Trevelyan (Sir Walter Raleigh: Being a True and Vivid Account of the Life and Times of the Explorer, Soldier, Scholar, Poet, and Courtier--The Controversial Hero of the Elizabethan Age)
The Engine Is The Heart Of An Airplane But The Pilot Is Its Soul.
Walter Alexander Raleigh
I wish I loved the Human Race; I wish I loved its silly face; I wish I liked the way it walks; I wish I liked the way it talks: And when I’m introduced to one I wish I thought What Jolly Fun! —Sir Walter A. Raleigh
M.C. Beaton (Death of a Nurse (Hamish Macbeth, #31))
He that doth not as other men do, but endeavoureth that which ought to be done, shall thereby rather incur peril than preservation; for whoso laboureth to be sincerely perfect and good shall necessarily perish, living among men that are generally evil.
Walter Raleigh
All, or the greatest part of men that have aspired to riches or power, have attained thereunto either by force or fraud, and what they have by craft or cruelty gained, to cover the foulness of their fact, they call purchase, as a name more honest. Howsoever, he that for want of will or wit useth not those means, must rest in servitude and poverty.
Walter Raleigh
SHAKESPEARE What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more (Hamlet) There is no one kind of Shakespearean hero, although in many ways Hamlet is the epitome of the Renaissance tragic hero, who reaches his perfection only to die. In Shakespeare's early plays, his heroes are mainly historical figures, kings of England, as he traces some of the historical background to the nation's glory. But character and motive are more vital to his work than praise for the dynasty, and Shakespeare's range expands considerably during the 1590s, as he and his company became the stars of London theatre. Although he never went to university, as Marlowe and Kyd had done, Shakespeare had a wider range of reference and allusion, theme and content than any of his contemporaries. His plays, written for performance rather than publication, were not only highly successful as entertainment, they were also at the cutting edge of the debate on a great many of the moral and philosophical issues of the time. Shakespeare's earliest concern was with kingship and history, with how 'this sceptr'd isle' came to its present glory. As his career progressed, the horizons of the world widened, and his explorations encompassed the geography of the human soul, just as the voyages of such travellers as Richard Hakluyt, Sir Walter Raleigh, and Sir Francis Drake expanded the horizons of the real world.
Ronald Carter (The Routledge History of Literature in English: Britain and Ireland)
Fran had from an unsuitably early age been attracted by the heroic death, the famous last words, the tragic farewell. Her parents had on their shelves a copy of Brewer's 'Dictionary of Phase and fable', a book which, as a teenager, she would morbidly browse for hours. One of her favourite sections was 'Dying Sayings', with its fine mix of the pious, the complacent, the apocryphal, the bathetic and the defiant. Artists had fared well: Beethoven was alleged to have said 'I shall hear in heaven'; the erotic painter Etty had declared 'Wonderful! Wonderful this death!'; and Keats had died bravely, generously comforting his poor friend Severn. Those about to be executed had clearly had time to prepare a fine last thought, and of these she favoured the romantic Walter Raleigh's, 'It matters little how the head lies, so the heart be right'. Harriet Martineau, who had suffered so much as a child from religion, as Fran had later discovered, had stoically remarked, 'I see no reason why the existence of Harriet Martineau should be perpetuated', an admirably composed sentiment which had caught the child Fran's attention long before she knew who Harriet Martineau was. But most of all she had liked the parting of Siward the Dane who had commended his men: 'Lift me up that I may die standing, not lying down like a cow'.
Margaret Drabble (The Dark Flood Rises)
Sir Walter Raleigh introduced potatoes to England. His was the face that launched 1,000 chips.
Martin H. Samuel
First colonized by Sir Humphrey Gilbert, half-brother of Sir Walter Raleigh, in 1583, St John’s has ever since been an important outpost of the Americas. Home port of the vast Grand Banks cod fishing fleet, it was here, on Signal Hill, that Marconi received the first transatlantic wireless message in 1901, and from here Alcock and Brown took off to make the first non-stop transatlantic flight in 1919.
Bernard Edwards (The Twilight of the U-Boats)
Potatoes came to Europe from the New World in the early sixteenth century. Sir Francis Drake is thought to have introduced the potato to England, and shortly afterward Sir Walter Raleigh tried planting them on his Irish estates. When
Ryan Hackney (The Myths, Legends, and Lore of Ireland)
Sir Walter Raleigh is more safely enshrined in the memory of mankind because he set his cloak for the Virgin Queen to walk on than because he carried the english name to undiscovered countries.
W. Somerset Maugham
Despite all the intellectual activity of the time there was in print no guide to the tongue, no linguistic vade mecum, no single book that Shakespeare or Martin Frobisher, Francis Drake, Walter Raleigh, Francis Bacon, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Nash, John Donne, Ben Jonson, Izaak Walton, or any of their other learned contemporaries could consult.
Simon Winchester (The Professor & the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity & the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary)
The King’s instructions included that “all persons should kindly treat the savages and heathen people in these parts, and use all proper means to draw them to the true service and knowledge of God.”21 As early as 1588, Sir Walter Raleigh had given 100 pounds for the “propagation of Christianity in Virginia.”22
Peter A. Lillback (George Washington's Sacred Fire)
A man must first govern himself ere he be fit to govern a family. —SIR WALTER RALEIGH
Robyn Carr (The Family Gathering (Sullivan's Crossing #3))
Wealth comes from Middle English roots meaning “well-being” or “wellness,” a condition of happiness and good fortune closely aligned with health. It was not until the late Middle Ages that it took on its definite sense of financial or material riches. Common derives from French origins meaning “shared by all.” Because it is egalitarian, it has often been on the receiving end of aristocratic scorn: “common” is also low, unrefined, undistinguished, earthy. So Walter Raleigh, the courtier and double-fisted colonizer who planted migrants in Ulster and Virginia, defined commonwealth scornfully as a “depravation … the Government of the whole Multitude of the base and poorer Sort, without respect of the other Orders.” John Locke, by contrast, defined it as “any independent Community,” a self-governing polity that might be a monarchy, a democracy, or anything else. But there is an older sense of commonwealth that means “the general good” or the well-being of the whole community—the flourishing that is shared and open to all.
Jedediah Purdy (This Land Is Our Land: The Struggle for a New Commonwealth)
Sir Walter Raleigh was one of the most brilliant men at the court of Queen Elizabeth of England. He had skills as a scientist, wrote poetry still recognized as among the most beautiful writing of the time, was a proven leader of men, an enterprising entrepreneur, a great sea captain, and on top of all this was a handsome, dashing courtier who charmed his way into becoming one of the queen's favorites.... In the end, the reason he was executed was treason, but envy will use any cover it finds to mask its destructiveness.
Robert Greene
The envy elicited by Sir Walter Raleigh is the worst kind: It was inspired by his natural talent and grace, which he felt was best displayed in its full flower.
Robert Greene (The 48 Laws of Power)
Nothing’s so partial as the laws of fate, Erecting blockheads to suppress the great. Sir Francis Drake the Spanish plate-fleet won; He had been a pirate if he had got none. Sir Walter Raleigh strove, but missed the plate, And therefore died a traitor to the State. Endeavour bears a value more or less, Just as ’tis recommended by success: The lucky coxcomb ev’ry man will prize, And prosp’rous actions always pass for wise.
Daniel Defoe (An Essay upon Projects)
Sir Walter Raleigh once remarked, “the art of magic is the art of worshipping God.
Jason Louv (The Angelic Reformation: John Dee, Enochian Magick & the Occult Roots of Empire)
ORIGIN OF AMERICA In Cuba, according to Christopher Columbus, there were mermaids with men’s faces and roosters’ feathers. In Guyana, according to Sir Walter Raleigh, there were people with eyes on their shoulders and mouths in their chests.
Eduardo Galeano (Mirrors: Stories of Almost Everyone)
Even such is Time, that takes in trust Our youth, our joys, our all we have, And pays us but with earth and dust; Who, in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days. But from this earth, this grave this dust, My God shall raise me up, I trust. - "Even such is Time" from "Petition to Anne of Denmark
Walter Raleigh
There are many modern biographies and histories, full of carefully authenticated fact, which afflict the reader with a weight of indigestion. The author has no right to his facts, no ownership in them. They have flitted through his mind on a calm five minutes' passage from the notebook to the immortality of the printed page. But no man can hope to make much impression on a reader with facts which he has not thought it worth his own while to remember. Every considerable book, in literature or science, is an engine whereby, mind operates on mind. It is an ignorant worship of Science which treats it as residing in books, and reduces the mind to a mechanism of transfer. The measure of an author's power would be best found in the book which he should sit down to write the day after his library was burnt to the ground.
Walter Alexander Raleigh (Six Essays On Johnson)
O eloquent, just and mighty Death! Whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded; what none hath dared, thou hast done; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised; thou hast drawn together all the far-stretched greatness, all the pride, cruelty and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words; Hic Jacet! (Here lies)
Walter Raleigh
An epitaph, said to have been written by Sir Walter Raleigh, was much quoted: “Here lies the noble Warrior that never blunted sword; Here lies the noble Courtier that never kept his word; Here lies his Excellency that govern’d all the State; Here lies the Lord of Leicester that all the world did hate.
Abigail Archer (Elizabeth I)
God’s justice in the one, and his goodness in the other, is exercised for evermore, as the everlasting subjects of his reward and punishment.
Sir Walter Raleigh.
Francis Drake but also Sir Walter Raleigh, John Hawkins, Richard Grenville, and the Gilberts, whose climb in rank did not suffer from their pirate leanings. As Sir Henry Mainwaring, pirate turned admiral of the navy under King James I,
Henry Freeman (Pirates: The Golden Age of Piracy: A History From Beginning to End (Buccaneer, Blackbeard, Grace o Malley, Henry Morgan))
Mankind is incorrigible. Sir Walter Raleigh brought from the new world that potato and that weed, the one a killer of pestilence by absorption, the other a poisoner of the ear, eye, heart, memory, will, understanding, all. That is to say, he brought the poison a hundred years before another person whose name I forget brought the food. Suicide. Lies. All our habits. Why, look at our public
James Joyce (James Joyce: The Complete Collection)
Use thy youth so that thou mayest have comfort to remember it when it hath forsaken thee, and not sigh and grieve at the account thereof. Use it as the spring-time which soon departeth, and wherein thou oughtest to plant and sow all provisions for a long and happy life.
Walter Raleigh
This place may indeed be haunted,” he thought, “perhaps by the delighted soul of Sir Walter Raleigh, patron of the weed, but seemingly not by the proprietors.
Christopher Morley (The Haunted Bookshop)