Berner Quotes

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The original idea of the web was that it should be a collaborative space where you can communicate through sharing information.
Tim Berners-Lee
Data is a precious thing and will last longer than the systems themselves.
Tim Berners-Lee (A Framework for Web Science (Foundations and Trends(r) in Web Science))
Berners-Lee was supremely lucky in the work environment he had settled into, the Swiss particle physics lab CERN. It took him ten years to nurture his slow hunch about a hypertext information platform.
Steven Johnson (Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation)
Tim Berners-Lee invented the Web in order to help him remember his colleagues at CERN. “The Web is more a social creation than a technical one,” he explains.
Andrew Keen (The Internet Is Not the Answer)
The World Wide Web is a CERN offshoot. It was invented by a CERN scientist, Tim Berners-Lee, in 1989. 2
Bill Bryson (A Short History of Nearly Everything)
And, they would still be alive today...If they hadn't died, that is
Rotraut Susanne Berner (Definitely Not for Little Ones: Some Very Grimm Fairy-tale Comics)
In an extreme view, the world can be seen as only connections, nothing else. We think of a dictionary as the repository of meaning, but it defines words only in terms of other words. I liked the idea that a piece of information is really defined only by what it's related to, and how it's related. There really is little else to meaning. The structure is everything. There are billions of neurons in our brains, but what are neurons? Just cells. The brain has no knowledge until connections are made between neurons. All that we know, all that we are, comes from the way our neurons are connected.
Tim Berners-Lee
I found myself answering the same questions asked frequently of me by different people. It would be so much easier if everyone could just read my database.
Tim Berners-Lee (Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web)
I would have to create a system with common rules that would be acceptable to everyone. That meant as close as possible to no rules at all.
Tim Berners-Lee (Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web)
E-mail allowed messages to be sent from one person to another, but did not form a space in which information could permanently exists and be referred to.
Tim Berners-Lee (Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web)
Berners-Lee built the Web on top of the Internet.
Walter Isaacson (The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution)
Berners-Lee was born in 1955, the same year as Bill Gates and Steve Jobs,
Walter Isaacson (The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution)
launched the Web in 1991, Tim Berners-Lee
Walter Isaacson (The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution)
The hanging question isn’t why Berner and Carnegie were attacked and killed, but why wolf attacks on humans on this continent, and pretty much everywhere except remote areas of south-central Asia, are as rare as they are. Wolves are opportunistic, adaptable predators. Why not choose humans—comparatively slow, small, and weak compared to most wild prey—on a regular basis? Surely, if North American wolves saw humans as potential food, thousands should have died at their fangs. Instead, just two.
Nick Jans (A Wolf Called Romeo)
What was often difficult for people to understand about the design was that there was nothing else beyond URLs, HTTP and HTML. There was no central computer "controlling" the Web, no single network on which these protocols worked, not even organisation anywhere that "ran" the Web. The Web was not a physical "thing" that existed in a certain "place". It was a "space" in which information could exist.
Tim Berners-Lee
Elisabeth Stride, who was found in Dutfield’s Yard, off Berner Street, and Catherine “Kate” Eddowes, who was killed in Mitre Square. After a brief pause in his spree, he committed his final atrocity on November 9: a complete mutilation of the body of Mary Jane Kelly as she lay in her bed at 13 Miller’s Court.
Hallie Rubenhold (The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper)
The organ played a familiar introduction. Ever since his truculent fourth form at Berners Hall, he could not bring himself to sing a hymn. However sweet the melodies or the rhythm of the lines he could not get past the embarrassment of their blatant or childish untruths. But the point was not to believe but to join in, to be part of the community.
Ian McEwan (Lessons)
Who hasn’t grown up knowing the bitchy cheerleader, a dumb jock, the computer nerd, an overbearing mother, a distant father, a misunderstood old person, or an alienated artist, writer, musician, or dancer? If everybody knows these people, are they really clichés or merely categories? Maybe the various cities, towns, neighborhoods, and blocks are really replicating microcosms? The same strands woven together to create one large tapestry of life?
Karen Wojcik Berner (Until My Soul Gets It Right (The Bibliophiles #2))
During his Oxford years, microprocessors became available. So, just as Wozniak and Jobs had done, he and his friends designed boards that they tried to sell. They were not as successful as the Steves, partly because, as Berners-Lee later said, “we didn’t have the same ripe community and cultural mix around us like there was at the Homebrew and in Silicon Valley.”7 Innovation emerges in places with the right primordial soup, which was true of the Bay Area but not of Oxfordshire in the 1970s.
Walter Isaacson (The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution)
In his book Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, emphasizes the importance of the brain in the forming of connections (the italics are mine): A piece of information is really defined only by what it’s related to, and how it’s related. There really is little else to meaning. The structure is everything. There are billions of neurons in our brains, but what are neurons? Just cells. The brain has no knowledge until connections are made between neurons. All that we know, all that we are, comes from the way our neurons are connected. Berners-Lee
Richard Restak (Mozart's Brain and the Fighter Pilot: Unleashing Your Brain's Potential)
of the most momentous innovations tiptoe quietly onto history’s stage. On August 6, 1991, Berners-Lee was glancing through the Internet’s alt.hypertext newsgroup and ran across this question: “Is anyone aware of research or development efforts in . . . hypertext links enabling retrieval from multiple heterogeneous sources?” His answer, “from: timbl@info.cern.ch at 2:56 pm,” became the first public announcement of the Web. “The WorldWideWeb project aims to allow links to be made to any information anywhere,” he began. “If you’re interested in using the code, mail me.”31 With his low-key personality and even lower-key posting, Berners-Lee did not fathom what a profound idea he had unleashed. Any information anywhere.
Walter Isaacson (The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution)
I had argued that it was ridiculous for a person to have two separate interfaces, one for local information (the desktop of their own computer) and one for remote information (a browser to reach other computers). Why did we need an entire desktop for our own computer but get only a window through which to view the entire rest of the planet? Why, for that matter, should we have folders on our desktop but not on the web?
Tim Berners-Lee (Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web)
There is voluminous evidence that exclusive reliance on heuristic processing tendencies of Type I sometimes results in suboptimal responding (Baron, 2008; Evans, 2007a; Gilovich, Griffin, & Kahneman, 2002; Johnson-Laird, 2006; Kahneman & Tversky, 1973, 1996, 2000; Koehler & Harvey, 2004; Nickerson, 2004, 2008; Nisbett & Ross, 1980; Tversky & Kahneman, 1974, 1983, 1986) and that such thinking errors are not limited to the laboratory (Ariely, 2008; Åstebro, Jeffrey, & Adomdza, 2007; Baron, 1998; Baron, Bazerman, & Shonk, 2006; Belsky & Gilovich, 1999; Berner & Graber, 2008; Camerer, 2000; Chapman & Elstein, 2000; Croskerry, 2009a, 2009b; Dawes, 2001; Hilton, 2003; Kahneman & Tversky, 2000; Lichtenstein & Slovic, 2006; Lilienfeld, Ammirati, & Landfield, 2009; Myers, 2002; Prentice, 2003; Reyna et al., 2009; Stewart, 2009; Sunstein, 2002, 2005; Taleb, 2001, 2007; Tavris & Aronson, 2007; Tetlock, 2005; Thaler & Sunstein, 2008; Ubel, 2000).
Keith E. Stanovich (Rationality and the Reflective Mind)
What has been Extinction Rebellion’s magic? It boils down to values, processes, role modelling, positivity and fast learning. Most importantly for me, XR has been a loud advocate of the three core values I call for in this book. In the London protests of April 2019, you could hear the tannoys reminding supporters to respect everyone: the authorities; the government; the public; each other; the oil companies; EVERYONE. In surreal scenes on Waterloo Bridge, the police were caught visibly off balance by the tide chanting: ‘To the police, we love you. We’re doing this for your children’, as the police carried people away to their vans. Of course, as XR’s name suggests, they stand overtly for the preservation of all species. And they made a very strong call for truth. At its best, XR gave us a taste of a better world. They
Mike Berners-Lee (There Is No Planet B: A Handbook for the Make or Break Years – Updated Edition)
At Booths, over one-quarter of the transport footprint comes from the very small amount of air freight in their supply chains—typically used for expensive items that perish quickly. Conversely, most of their food miles are by ship (partly because the U.K. is an island), but because ships can carry food around the world around 100 times more efficiently than planes, they account for less than 1 percent of Booths’ total footprint. The message here is that it is OK to eat apples, oranges, bananas, or whatever you like from anywhere in the world, as long as it has not been on a plane or thousands of miles by road. Road miles are roughly as carbon intensive as air miles, but in the U.K. the distances involved tend not to be too bad, whereas in North America they can be thousands of miles. Booths is a regional supermarket with just one warehouse, so their own distribution is not a big carbon deal, and they have been working hard on further improvements.
Mike Berners-Lee (How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint of Everything)
People's realities are the result of their perceptions.
Karen Wojcik Berner (Until My Soul Gets It Right (The Bibliophiles #2))
Dr Syngmann: Gott ist der Gott der Juden, sage ich! Deswegen sollst du ihn in Ruhe lassen, John. Was du gestohlen hast, wird niemals deins. Die Juden könne diese Gottesliebe verklagen und sie ins Zuchthaus bringen nach der Berner Konvention, die für Diebstahl von Patenten und Ideen schwere Strafen androht.
Halldór Laxness
Dairy has all the same problems of ruminant meat production, so there is little point in switching from beef to cheese. A kilo (2.2 pounds) of cheese comes in at around 13 kg CO2e, compared with around 17 kg for beef. Milk comes in at around 1.3 kg per liter or quart.
Mike Berners-Lee (How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint of Everything)
Most of systems still depended on some central node to which everything had to be connected [...]. I wanted the act of adding a link to be trivial. If i was, then a web of links could spread evenly across the globe.
Tim Berners-Lee (Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web)
in general, class distinction was presumed to be dictated by Providence and fixed to eternity. The fifteenth-century Lady Juliana Berners, author of a treatise on hunting, records the common conviction that Seth and Abel, sons of Adam and Eve, were gentlemen, but Cain a churl and ancestor of the churls of the world. Christ, she says, was a gentleman on his mother’s side.
Morris Bishop (The Middle Ages)
Queridos artríticos y médicos, no hay remedios que curen esta enfermedad salvo un cambio de vida, tanto en la parte física como psíquica y espiritual.
Claudette Berner (Como me sané de artritis reumatoide)
naturista
Claudette Berner (Como me sané de artritis reumatoide)
Vida Natural del profesor Rafael Lezaeta
Claudette Berner (Como me sané de artritis reumatoide)
Plastic is environmentally nasty as either landfill or litter because it hangs around for so long. However, it is typically not quite as energy intensive to produce as card packaging and has the advantage, from a purely carbon perspective, that when you put it in landfill, you are just sending those hydrocarbons back into the ground where they came from for long-term storage. In
Mike Berners-Lee (How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint of Everything)
Whereas CO2 is the dominant greenhouse gas overall, it accounts for only 11 percent of agricultural emissions.2 The rest is nitrous oxide (53 percent) and methane (36 percent). Nitrous oxide is 296 times more potent per pound than CO2 as a climate-change gas, and on farms it results mainly from the use of fertilizer but also from cattle pee, especially if there is excessive protein in their diet, and from the burning of biomass and fuel.3 Methane, which is 25 times more potent than CO2, is mainly emitted by cows and sheep when they belch. Some is also emitted from silage. The CO2 comes from machinery but also from the heating of greenhouses to grow crops out of season or in countries that just don’t have the right climate.
Mike Berners-Lee (How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint of Everything)
> Glass is energy intensive to make (or recycle), and its weight adds to the transport footprint. Cans of beer are better than bottles, as are cartons or boxes of wine. Incidentally, bottles are absolutely no better for storing wine than the more climate-friendly alternatives. > Steel and aluminum are carbon-intensive stuff, but you don’t need a great weight of them, and they’re easy to recycle. It takes only about one-tenth of the energy to recycle aluminum compared with extracting it from ore in the ground.
Mike Berners-Lee (How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint of Everything)
Nitrogen fertilizer is a significant contributor to the world’s carbon footprint. Its production is energy intensive because the chemical process involved requires both heat and pressure. Depending on the efficiency of the factory, making 1 ton of fertilizer creates between 1 and 4 tons CO2e. When the fertilizer is actually applied, between 1 and 5 percent of the nitrogen it contains is released as nitrous oxide, which is around 300 times more potent than CO2. This adds between 1.7 and 8.3 tons CO2e to the total footprint,11 depending on a variety of factors.12 Here’s how the science of it goes. All plants contain nitrogen, so if you’re growing a crop, it has to be replaced into the soil somehow or it will eventually run out. Nitrogen fertilizer is one way of doing this. Manure is another. Up to a point there can be big benefits. For some crops in some situations, the amount of produce can even be proportional to the amount of nitrogen that is used. However, there is a cut-off point after which applying more does nothing at all to the yield, or even decreases it. Timing matters, too. It is inefficient to apply fertilizer before a seed has had a chance to develop into a rapidly growing plant. Currently these messages are frequently not understood by small farmers in rural China, especially, where fertilizer is as cheap as chips and the farmers believe that the more they put on the bigger and better the crop will be. Many have a visceral understanding of the needs for high yields, having experienced hunger in their own lifetime, so it is easy to understand the instinct to spread a bit more fertilizer. After all, China has 22 percent of the world’s population to feed from 9 percent of the world’s arable land. There are other countries in which the same issues apply, although typically the developed world is more careful. Meanwhile in parts of Africa there is a scarcity of nitrogen in the soil and there would be real benefits in applying a bit more fertilizer to increase the yield and get people properly fed. One-third of all nitrogen fertilizer is applied to fields in China—about 26 million tons per year. The Chinese government believes there is scope for a 30 to 60 percent reduction without any decrease in yields. In other words, emissions savings on the order of 100 million tons are possible just by cutting out stuff that does nothing whatsoever to help the yield. There are other benefits, too. It’s much better for the environment generally, and it’s cheaper and easier for the farmers. It boils down to an education exercise... and perhaps dealing with the interests of a fertilizer industry.
Mike Berners-Lee (How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint of Everything)
Go seasonal, avoiding hothouses and air freight. Local, seasonal produce is best of all, but shipping is fine. As a guide, if something has a short shelf life and isn’t in season where you live, it will probably have had to go in a hothouse or on a plane. In the U.K., Canada, and more northern parts of the U.S., in January, examples are lettuce, asparagus, tomatoes, strawberries, and most cut flowers. Apples, oranges, and bananas, by contrast, almost always go on boats. Adopting this tip religiously can probably deliver a 10 percent savings on a typical diet.
Mike Berners-Lee (How Bad Are Bananas?: The Carbon Footprint of Everything)
What would the world be like today if Tim Berners-Lee had never developed the World Wide Web? Or Alexander Fleming had never discovered penicillin and Frank Colton had not developed the oral contraceptive pill?
Ian Mortimer (Why Running Matters: Lessons in Life, Pain and Exhilaration – From 5K to the Marathon)
We could do with spending less time charging around earning as much as we can to buy things we don’t really need. We would do well to become better at enjoying what we’ve got – and to disentangle our self-esteems from our pay packets.
Mike Berners-Lee (How Bad Are Bananas?: The carbon footprint of everything)
Auch hat sich deine Berner Polizei ja nun wirklich ungeschickt benommen, man erschießt nun einmal keinen Hund, wenn Bach gespielt wird.
Friedrich Dürrenmatt (Der Richter und sein Henker)
As Tim Berners-Lee has written, “The web that many connected to years ago is not what new users will find today. What was once a rich selection of blogs and websites has been compressed under the powerful weight of a few dominant platforms. This concentration of power creates a new set of gatekeepers, allowing a handful of platforms to control which ideas and opinions are seen and shared . . . What’s more, the fact that power is concentrated among so few companies has made it possible to [weaponize] the web at scale.
P.W. Singer (Likewar: The Weaponization of Social Media)
Una tecnología implica una ideología, ya que afecta a la forma en que pensamos y actuamos y nos obliga a escoger varias formas de proceder. Nuevos artefactos generan su propia dinámica con consecuencias difíciles de predecir. Los inventores del automóvil no se imaginaban las consecuencias, y tampoco el inventor del World Wide Web podía imaginar la transformación social y cultural que está causando.
Daniel R. Altschuler
How can I help to create the conditions under which the world that I want to see becomes possible?
Mike Berners-Lee (There Is No Planet B: A Handbook for the Make or Break Years – Updated Edition)
Do we need protest? After decades of asking politely and getting nowhere, we have a full-scale emergency on our hands. We have to have change. And it must be now. If the right kind of protest is what it takes, then that’s what we must have. I do not write this as someone who feels instinctive joy at the thought of taking to the streets, but these are serious times. There is compelling evidence that the right kind of protest clearly works. When, in 2019, the UK tightened its carbon targets to ‘net zero by 2050’, it wasn’t far enough, but it was a big step in the right direction. And it looks pretty clear that the political space to make that possible was opened up in no small part by protesters; by Greta Thunberg, by armies of school kids, and by Extinction Rebellion (XR). My work with tech giants, investment bankers, energy companies, an airline and many other corporations tells me that these straight-talking, non-violent direct actions made possible conversations in boardrooms that seemed unthinkable just 18 months before.
Mike Berners-Lee (There Is No Planet B: A Handbook for the Make or Break Years – Updated Edition)
The inventor of the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee, describes the DNS system as the “one centralized Achilles’ heel by which {the Web} can all be brought down or controlled.
Alexander R. Galloway (Protocol: How Control Exists after Decentralization (Leonardo))
Is cycling a carbon-friendly thing to do? Emphatically yes! Powered by biscuits, bananas or breakfast cereal, the bike is nearly 10 times more carbon efficient than the most efficient of petrol cars. Cycling also keeps you healthy, provided you don’t end up under a bus. (Strictly speaking, dying could be classed as a carbon-friendly thing to do but needing an operation couldn’t: see
Mike Berners-Lee (How Bad Are Bananas?: The carbon footprint of everything)
HTML originated from a prototype of a language created by Tim Berners-Lee in 1992. Berners-Lee felt that there was a possibility of linking documents together using hypertext, and the concept of HTML evolved from this. A breakthrough in this field of development
Aravind Shenoy (Thinking in CSS)
Half-formed ideas, they float around. They come from different places, and the mind has got this wonderful way of somehow just shoveling them around until one day they fit. They may fit not so well, and then we go for a bike ride or something, and it’s better.
Tim Berners-Lee
We can’t blame the technology when we make mistakes. —TIM BERNERS-LEE
Graham Moore (The Last Days of Night)
for Berners-Lee today there is some regret as he looks back at the birth of the Web. The Web was built to decentralize power and create open access, yet, he noted, “popular and successful services (search, social networking, email) have achieved near-monopoly status. Although industry leaders often spur positive change, we must remain wary of concentrations of power.” Notice the tentative voice: he doesn’t mention Google and Facebook by name. Tim Berners-Lee never got rich on his invention. He gave it to the world for free, so he remains dependent on research funding from giant corporations.
Jonathan Taplin (Move Fast and Break Things: How Facebook, Google, and Amazon Cornered Culture and Undermined Democracy)
Reading the news has become an exercise in sorrow.
David W. Berner (Walks With Sam: A Man, a Dog, and a Season of Awakening)
«El proyecto World Wide Web aspira a crear enlaces a cualquier información desde cualquier lugar. Si estás interesado en usar el código envíame un correo». Dos décadas más tarde, Berners-Lee afirmaría que en aquel momento una de sus principales preocupaciones era que cualquiera, en cualquier parte del mundo, pudiera subir cualquier cosa a la red. «No tenía ni idea de que la gente lo pondría literalmente todo.»
Ramón González Férriz (La trampa del optimismo. Cómo los años noventa explican el mundo actual)
Berners-Lee’s hypertext browsing, users would finally begin to get it about the Internet.
M. Mitchell Waldrop (The Dream Machine)
The spirit there was very decentralized. The individual was incredibly empowered. It was all based on there being no central authority that you had to go to to ask permission,” he said. “That feeling of individual control, that empowerment, is something we’ve lost.
Tim Berners-Lee
The spirit there was very decentralized. The individual was incredibly empowered. It was all based on there being no central authority that you had to go to to ask permission. That feeling of individual control, that empowerment, is something we’ve lost.
Tim Berners-Lee
Mientras trabajaba en Suiza en el CERN (la organización europea de investigación nuclear), el físico británico Tim Berners-Lee inventó el World Wide Web en 1989.
John E. Mackey (Capitalismo consciente: Libera el espíritu heroico de los negocios (Spanish Edition))
A common myth is that huge four-wheel-drive guzzlers are safer for their occupants. This is generally not true. They are, however, more dangerous for everyone else on the road.
Mike Berners-Lee (How Bad Are Bananas?: The carbon footprint of everything)
one small team at DIA was in charge of creating a Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications System, and I tried to give them as much support as I could. Their charter was signed in 1990, the same year Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web.
James R. Clapper (Facts and Fears: Hard Truths from a Life in Intelligence)
we are, faced
Leila Gal Berner (Listening to the Heart of Genesis: A Contemplative Path)
Nichts davon schien Dulles zu stören, der in einem zerknitterten Regenmantel und einem sorglos in den Nacken geschobenen Fedora auf dem Kopf offen durch die Berner Straßen spazierte.
David Talbot (Das Schachbrett des Teufels: Die CIA, Allen Dulles und der Aufstieg Amerikas heimlicher Regierung (German Edition))
Semantic search, as a concept, has been around since Tim Berners-Lee, the man who is frequently called the father of the Internet, wrote an article about it in 2001 in Scientific American. There he explained that the essence of semantic search is the use of mathematics to get rid of the guesswork and approximation used in search today and introduce a clear understanding of what words mean and how they connect with what we are actually looking for in the search engine box.
David Amerland (Google Semantic Search: Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Techniques That Get Your Company More Traffic)