Voyage Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Voyage. Here they are! All 200 of them:

β€œ
The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.
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Marcel Proust
β€œ
One glance at a book and you hear the voice of another person, perhaps someone dead for 1,000 years. To read is to voyage through time.
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Carl Sagan
β€œ
Courage, dear heart.
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C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
We are of opinion that instead of letting books grow moldy behind an iron grating, far from the vulgar gaze, it is better to let them wear out by being read.
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Jules Verne (Journey to the Center of the Earth)
β€œ
Books permit us to voyage through time, to tap the wisdom of our ancestors.
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”
Carl Sagan (Cosmos)
β€œ
There was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it.
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C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the β€œDawn Treader” (The Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
It's hard to tell the difference between sea and sky, between voyager and sea. Between reality and the workings of the heart.
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Haruki Murakami (Kafka on the Shore)
β€œ
The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of the infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.
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”
H.P. Lovecraft (The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories)
β€œ
Once you have traveled, the voyage never ends, but is played out over and over again in the quietest chambers. The mind can never break off from the journey.
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”
Pat Conroy
β€œ
It isn't Narnia, you know," sobbed Lucy. "It's you. We shan't meet you there. And how can we live, never meeting you?" "But you shall meet me, dear one," said Aslan. "Are -are you there too, Sir?" said Edmund. "I am," said Aslan. "But there I have another name. You must learn to know me by that name. This was the very reason why you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little, you may know me better there.
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”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #5))
β€œ
Make voyages. Attempt them. There's nothing else.
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Tennessee Williams (Camino Real)
β€œ
Adventures are never fun while you're having them.
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C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Never did the world make a queen of a girl who hides in houses and dreams without traveling.
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Roman Payne (The Wanderess)
β€œ
It is always sad to leave a place to which one knows one will never return. Such are the melancolies du voyage: perhaps they are one of the most rewarding things about traveling.
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Gustave Flaubert (Flaubert in Egypt: A Sensibility on Tour)
β€œ
But no one except Lucy knew that as it circled the mast it had whispered to her, "Courage, dear heart," and the voice, she felt sure, was Aslan's, and with the voice a delicious smell breathed in her face.
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C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Some beautiful paths can't be discovered without getting lost.
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”
Erol Ozan
β€œ
We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.
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H.P. Lovecraft (The Call of Cthulhu: With a Dedication by George Henry Weiss)
β€œ
It has always been forever, for me, Sassenach
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Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin.
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Charles Darwin (Voyage of the Beagle)
β€œ
I want to write a novel about Silence," he said; β€œthe things people don’t say.
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Virginia Woolf (The Voyage Out)
β€œ
In our world," said Eustace, "a star is a huge ball of flaming gas." Even in your world, my son, that is not what a star is, but only what it is made of.
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”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Borges said there are only four stories to tell: a love story between two people, a love story between three people, the struggle for power and the voyage. All of us writers rewrite these same stories ad infinitum.
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”
Paulo Coelho
β€œ
Do ye not understand?"he said, in near desparation. "I would lay the world at your feet, Claire-and I have nothing to give ye!" He honestly thought it mattered.
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Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
I feel so intensely the delights of shutting oneself up in a little world of one’s own, with pictures and music and everything beautiful.
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Virginia Woolf (The Voyage Out)
β€œ
I am [in your world].’ said Aslan. β€˜But there I have another name. You must learn to know me by that name. This was the very reason why you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little, you may know me better there.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia, #1-7))
β€œ
Books permit us to voyage through time, to tap the wisdom of our ancestors. The library connects us with the insight and knowledge, painfully extracted from Nature, of the greatest minds that ever were, with the best teachers, drawn from the entire planet and from all our history, to instruct us without tiring, and to inspire us to make our own contribution to the collective knowledge of the human species. I think the health of our civilization, the depth of our awareness about the underpinnings of our culture and our concern for the future can all be tested by how well we support our libraries.
”
”
Carl Sagan (Cosmos)
β€œ
There is a tide in the affairs of men Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune; Omitted, all the voyage of their life Is bound in shallows and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat; And we must take the current when it serves, Or lose our ventures.
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”
William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
β€œ
Now, Voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find."
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Walt Whitman
β€œ
Caminante, no hay puentes, se hace puentes al andar. (Voyager, there are no bridges, one builds them as one walks.)
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Gloria E. AnzaldΓΊa
β€œ
There is a tide in the affairs of men which, taken at the floud, leads on to fortune ommitted, all the voyage of their lives are bound in shallows and in miseries
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
β€œ
To be whole is to be part; true voyage is return.
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Ursula K. Le Guin
β€œ
But the true voyagers are only those who leave Just to be leaving; hearts light, like balloons, They never turn aside from their fatality And without knowing why they always say: "Let's go!
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Charles Baudelaire (Les Fleurs du Mal)
β€œ
A mind forever Voyaging through strange seas of Thought, alone.
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William Wordsworth
β€œ
A person does not grow from the ground like a vine or a tree, one is not part of a plot of land. Mankind has legs so it can wander.
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Roman Payne (The Wanderess)
β€œ
One of the most cowardly things ordinary people do is to shut their eyes to facts.
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C.S. Lewis (Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader)
β€œ
To know what you prefer instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive.
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Robert Louis Stevenson (An Inland Voyage)
β€œ
The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new dark age.
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H.P. Lovecraft
β€œ
She belonged to a different age, but being so entire, so complete, would always stand up on the horizon, stone-white, eminent, like a lighthouse marking some past stage on this adventurous, long, long voyage, this interminable --- this interminable life.
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Virginia Woolf (Mrs. Dalloway)
β€œ
Once you've chosen a man, don't try to change him', I wrote with more confidence. 'It can't be done. More important-don't let him try to change you.
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Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
Cities were always like people, showing their varying personalities to the traveler. Depending on the city and on the traveler, there might begin a mutual love, or dislike, friendship, or enmity. Where one city will rise a certain individual to glory, it will destroy another who is not suited to its personality. Only through travel can we know where we belong or not, where we are loved and where we are rejected.
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Roman Payne (Cities & Countries)
β€œ
I was destined to love you, and I will belong to you forever.
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Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
My dear friend, what is this our life? A boat that swims in the sea, and all one knows for certain about it is that one day it will capsize. Here we are, two good old boats that have been faithful neighbors, and above all your hand has done its best to keep me from "capsizing"! Let us then continue our voyageβ€”each for the other's sake, for a long time yet, a long time! We should miss each other so much! Tolerably calm seas and good winds and above all sunβ€”what I wish for myself, I wish for you, too, and am sorry that my gratitude can find expression only in such a wish and has no influence at all on wind or weather!
”
”
Friedrich Nietzsche
β€œ
I shook so that it was some time before I realized that he was shaking too, and for the same reason. I don't know how long we sat there on the dusty floor, crying in each others arms with the longing of twenty years spilling down our faces.
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Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
Your heart knows. Your soul remembers.
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Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
The ragamuffin who sees his life as a voyage of discovery and runs the risk of failure has a better feel for faithfulness than the timid man who hides behind the law and never finds out who he is at all.
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Brennan Manning (The Ragamuffin Gospel: Good News for the Bedraggled, Beat-Up, and Burnt Out)
β€œ
Into this wild Abyss/ The womb of Nature, and perhaps her grave--/ Of neither sea, nor shore, nor air, nor fire,/ But all these in their pregnant causes mixed/ Confusedly, and which thus must ever fight,/ Unless the Almighty Maker them ordain/ His dark materials to create more worlds,--/ Into this wild Abyss the wary Fiend/ Stood on the brink of Hell and looked a while,/ Pondering his voyage; for no narrow frith/ He had to cross.
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John Milton (Paradise Lost)
β€œ
The untold want, by life and land ne'er granted, Now, Voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find.
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Walt Whitman (Leaves of Grass)
β€œ
Sleeping in a tinfoil suit keeps me warmer and helps prepare me for my voyage to the moon. Would you care for some licorice?
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”
Jarod Kintz (At even one penny, this book would be overpriced. In fact, free is too expensive, because you'd still waste time by reading it.)
β€œ
For so many years, for so long, I have been so many things, so many different men. But here," he said, so softly I could barely hear him, "here in the dark, with you… I have no name.
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Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
(...)normalcy is an illusion. Each person is utterly unique. A standard of normalcy is something that most people of the world simply will never access.
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Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
You're forgetting something iadala. Love is not a consequence. Love is not a choice. Love is a thirst --- a need as vital to the soul as water is to the body.
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Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
Two years he walks the earth. No phone, no pool, no pets, no cigarettes. Ultimate freedom. An extremist. An aesthetic voyager whose home is the road. Escaped from Atlanta. Thou shalt not return, 'cause "the West is the best." And now after two rambling years comes the final and greatest adventure. The climactic battle to kill the false being within and victoriously conclude the spiritual pilgrimage. Ten days and nights of freight trains and hitchhiking bring him to the Great White North. No longer to be poisoned by civilization he flees, and walks alone upon the land to become lost in the wild. --Alexander Supertramp, May 1992
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Christopher McCandless
β€œ
Three or four times only in my youth did I glimpse the Joyous Isles, before they were lost to fogs, depressions, cold fronts, ill winds, and contrary tides... I mistook them for adulthood. Assuming they were a fixed feature in my life's voyage, I neglected to record their latitude, their longitude, their approach. Young ruddy fool. What wouldn't I give now for a never-changing map of the ever-constant ineffable? To possess, as it were, an atlas of clouds.
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David Mitchell (Cloud Atlas)
β€œ
From the first day I met her, she was the only woman to me. Every day of that voyage I loved her more, and many a time since have I kneeled down in the darkness of the night watch and kissed the deck of that ship because I knew her dear feet had trod it. She was never engaged to me. She treated me as fairly as ever a woman treated a man. I have no complaint to make. It was all love on my side, and all good comradeship and friendship on hers. When we parted she was a free woman, but I could never again be a free man.
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Arthur Conan Doyle (The Return of Sherlock Holmes (Sherlock Holmes, #5))
β€œ
Sleeping on a dragon's hoard with greedy, dragonish thoughts in his heart, he had become a dragon himself.
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C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the β€œDawn Treader” (The Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Most of us, I suppose, have a secret country but for most of us it is only an imaginary country. Edmund and Lucy were luckier than other people in that respect.
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C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
This is something you can't deny. You belong with me. You're mine.
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Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
Regrets are only felt by those who do not understand life's purpose.
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Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
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I loathe a friend whose gratitude grows old, a friend who takes his friend's prosperity but will not voyage with him in his grief
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Euripides
β€œ
Kishan shook his head. 'I'm not going to let you hurt her.' 'Hurt her? I'm not going to harm her. You, on the other hand, I'm going to destroy.
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Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
The most irritating thing about cliches, I decided, was how frequently they were true.
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Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
And she never could remember; and ever since that day what Lucy means by a good story is a story which reminds her of the forgotten story in the Magician's Book.
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C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
It wasn't a thing I had consciously missed, but having it now reminded me of the joy of it; that drowsy intimacy in which a man's body is accessible to you as your own, the strange shapes and textures of it like a sudden extension of your own limbs.
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Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
Le vΓ©ritable voyage de dΓ©couverte ne consiste pas Γ  chercher de nouveaux paysages, mais Γ  avoir de nouveaux yeux.
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Marcel Proust
β€œ
Then kiss me, Claire," he whispered, "And know that you are more to me than life, and I have no regret.
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Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
As surely as there is a voyage away, there is a journey home.
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Jack Kornfield (After the Ecstasy, the Laundry)
β€œ
But I will not tell you how long or short the way will be; only that it lies across a river. But do not fear that, for I am the great Bridge Builder.
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C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
A wise man sees the path all must walk and embraces the free will of humankind, even if to watch it unfold causes him pain.
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Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
Journal writing is a voyage to the interior.
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Christina Baldwin
β€œ
How poor are they that have no patients! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?'" "Shakespeare isn't going to save you this time, Superman. Your time's run out." He scowled. "Perhaps I should have been studying The Taming of the Shrew!
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Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
There is a need to find and sing our own song, to stretch our limbs and shake them in a dance so wild that nothing can roost there, that stirs the yearning for solitary voyage.
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Barbara Lazear Ascher
β€œ
You have so many layers, that you can peel away a few, and everyone's so shocked or impressed that you're baring your soul, while to you it's nothing, because you know you've twenty more layers to go.
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Craig Thompson (Carnet de Voyage)
β€œ
Life’s a voyage that’s homeward bound.
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Herman Melville
β€œ
He gave you to me," she said, so low I could hardly hear her. "Now I have to give you back to him, Mama.
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Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
Something came out from my heart into my throat and then into my eyes.
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Jean Rhys (Voyage in the Dark)
β€œ
The only true voyage, the only bath in the Fountain of Youth, would be not to visit strange lands but to possess other eyes, to see the universe through the eyes of another, of a hundred others, to see the hundred universes that each of them sees, that each of them is; and this we do [with great artists]; with artists like these we do really fly from star to star.
”
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Marcel Proust (The Prisoner [and] The Fugitive : In search of lost time, vol. 5)
β€œ
Um...perhaps I will go with Grandfather," Nilima said. She set down the scissors, looked at my expression, and then changed her mind and took them with her.
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Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
Was it too much to ask you to wait for me? To believe in me? Don't you know how much I love you?
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”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
Do ye want me?" he whispered. "Sassenach, will ye take me - and risk the man that I am, for the sake of the man ye knew?
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Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
Laughter and irony are at heart reminders that we are not prisoners in this world, but voyagers through it.
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Eben Alexander (Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon's Journey into the Afterlife)
β€œ
It is a great misfortune to be alone, my friends; and it must be believed that solitude can quickly destroy reason.
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Jules Verne (The Mysterious Island (Extraordinary Voyages, #12))
β€œ
For upon reaching his destination, a man with a past full of misfortunes can both taste the bitter drops of his sorrow and grin in triumph despite them. In reaching the desired end of his voyage there is an outbreak of joy. Even in a pyrrhic victory, a man of past and present tragedies experiences the sweetness of that unfamiliar emotion.
”
”
Asaad Almohammad (An Ishmael of Syria)
β€œ
It seems wisest to assume the worst from the beginning...and let anything better come as a surprise.
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”
Jules Verne (The Mysterious Island (Extraordinary Voyages, #12))
β€œ
Aye, well, he'll be wed a long time," he said callously. "Do him no harm to keep his breeches on for one night. And they do say that abstinence makes the heart grow firmer, no?" "Absence," I said, dodging the spoon for a moment. "AND fonder. If anything's growing firmer from abstinence, it wouldn't be his heart.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
I am the son of the road , my country is a caravan and my life is the most unexpected of voyages. i belong to earth and to the god and it is to them that I will one day soon return
”
”
Amin Maalouf
β€œ
While there is life there is hope. I beg to assert...that as long as a man's heart beats, as long as a man's flesh quivers, I do not allow that a being gifted with thought and will can allow himself to despair.
”
”
Jules Verne (Journey to the Center of the Earth)
β€œ
Only you," he said, so softly I could barely hear him. "To worship ye with my body, give ye all the service of my hands. To give ye my name, and all my heart and soul with it. Only you. Because ye will not let me lie--and yet ye love me.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
What’s all the yelling about?” Kishan asked. β€œWould you please tell your sorry excuse for a brother that I’m not talking to him anymore?” Kishan grinned. β€œNo problem. She’s not talking to you anymore.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
This was how it was with travel: one city gives you gifts, another robs you. One gives you the heart’s affections, the other destroys your soul. Cities and countries are as alive, as feeling, as fickle and uncertain as people. Their degrees of love and devotion are as varying as with any human relation. Just as one is good, another is bad.
”
”
Roman Payne (Cities & Countries)
β€œ
Ramil met Tashi's eyes with a mischievous look. "Now Wife we have a long voyage ahead of us with no interruptions, no affairs of state to sidetrack us." He brushed his fingers againist the lacings of her neck. "Isn't it time you returned that shirt to its owner?
”
”
Julia Golding (Dragonfly)
β€œ
Art hurts. Art urges voyages - and it is easier to stay at home.
”
”
Gwendolyn Brooks
β€œ
Todo te lo tragaste, como la lejania, como el mar, como el tiempo... Ese fue mi destino y en el viajo mi anhelo, y en el mi anhelo, todo en ti fue naufragio! (You swallowed everything, like distance, like the sea, like time. This was my destiny and it was the voyage of my longing, in it my longing fell, in you everything sank.)
”
”
Pablo Neruda
β€œ
Kishan is capable of a great many things, and girlfriend stealing is at the top of his list of skills.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
Two years he walks the Earth. No phone, no pool, no pets, no cigarettes. Ultimate freedom. An extremist. An aesthetic voyager whose home is the road. Escaped from Atlanta. Thou shalt not return, 'cause "the West is the best." And now after two rambling years comes the final and greatest adventure. The climactic battle to kill the false being within and victoriously conclude the spiritual revolution. Ten days and nights of freight trains and hitchhiking bring him to the great white north. No longer to be poisoned by civilization he flees, and walks alone upon the land to become lost in the wild.
”
”
Christopher McCandless
β€œ
The very first tear he made was so deep that I thought it had gone right into my heart.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Love can crystallize things. When love is in the air, distressing rain can become a wonderful avalanche of shimmering diamonds. Raindrops are transformed into a flood of sparkling crystal pearls. The power of love can convert rain into a multitude of glittering prisms. The mental seduction of love and a boundless illusion, inflamed by a profound uprising emotion, can change any ordinary incident into a radiant, luminous voyage. ( "Crystallization under an umbrella" )
”
”
Erik Pevernagie
β€œ
Beyond the East the sunrise, beyond the West the sea, And East and West the wanderlust that will not let me be; It works in me like madness, dear, to bid me say good-by! For the seas call and the stars call, and oh, the call of the sky! I know not where the white road runs, nor what the blue hills are, But man can have the sun for friend, and for his guide a star; And there's no end of voyaging when once the voice is heard, For the river calls and the road calls, and oh, the call of a bird! Yonder the long horizon lies, and there by night and day The old ships draw to home again, the young ships sail away; And come I may, but go I must, and if men ask you why, You may put the blame on the stars and the sun and the white road and the sky!
”
”
Gerald Gould
β€œ
The white tiger will always be your protector, Kelsey. Good-bye priyatama.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
…I noticed a woman whose face was a sea voyage I had not the courage to attempt.
”
”
Jeanette Winterson (Sexing the Cherry)
β€œ
Ah, you've come over the water. Powerful wet stuff, ain't it?
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the β€œDawn Treader” (The Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Like them you are tall and taciturn, and you are sad, all at once, like a voyage.
”
”
Pablo Neruda (Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair)
β€œ
Because I've died many deaths, mostly over you, and I'm still alive. Trying to have a relationship with you is like trying to rescue someone from Hades. Only a fool would keep going back to get a woman who fights him every step of the way.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
I don't need poetry, prema. I just need to get near enough to touch you.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
The battle lines are drawn, priyatama. The more formidable the foe, the sweeter the victory.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
I know why the Jews and Muslims have nine hundred names for God; one small word is not enough for love.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
Voyages are accomplished inwardly.
”
”
Henry Miller
β€œ
The old hunger for voyages fed at his heart....To go alone...into strange cities; to meet strange people and to pass again before they could know him; to wander, like his own legend, across the earth--it seemed to him there could be no better thing than that.
”
”
Thomas Wolfe
β€œ
Most of us know what we should expect to find in a dragon's lair, but, as I said before, Eustace had read only the wrong books. They had a lot to say about exports and imports and governments and drains, but they were weak on dragons.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Home is the place where they have to take you in
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
Never, never, never believe any war will be smooth and easy, or that anyone who embarks on the strange voyage can measure the tides and hurricanes he will encounter. The statesman who yields to war fever must realize that once the signal is given, he is no longer the master of policy but the slave of unforeseeable and uncontrollable events.
”
”
Winston S. Churchill
β€œ
A powerful dragon crying its eyes out under the moon in a deserted valley is a sight and a sound hardly to be imagined.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Wanting to Die Since you ask, most days I cannot remember. I walk in my clothing, unmarked by that voyage. Then the almost unnameable lust returns. Even then I have nothing against life. I know well the grass blades you mention, the furniture you have placed under the sun. But suicides have a special language. Like carpenters they want to know which tools. They never ask why build. Twice I have so simply declared myself, have possessed the enemy, eaten the enemy, have taken on his craft, his magic. In this way, heavy and thoughtful, warmer than oil or water, I have rested, drooling at the mouth-hole. I did not think of my body at needle point. Even the cornea and the leftover urine were gone. Suicides have already betrayed the body. Still-born, they don't always die, but dazzled, they can't forget a drug so sweet that even children would look on and smile. To thrust all that life under your tongue!β€” that, all by itself, becomes a passion. Death's a sad Bone; bruised, you'd say, and yet she waits for me, year after year, to so delicately undo an old wound, to empty my breath from its bad prison. Balanced there, suicides sometimes meet, raging at the fruit, a pumped-up moon, leaving the bread they mistook for a kiss, leaving the page of the book carelessly open, something unsaid, the phone off the hook and the love, whatever it was, an infection.
”
”
Anne Sexton
β€œ
We are made of stellar ash. Our origin and evolution have been tied to distant cosmic events. The exploration of the cosmos is a voyage of self-discovery.
”
”
Carl Sagan (Cosmos)
β€œ
Ren grinned. β€œSo… you and lady tigers, eh? Is there something you want share, Kishan?” Kishan shoved a forkful of dinner into his mouth and mumbled, β€œHow about I share my fist with your face?” β€œWow. Sensitive, I’m sure your lady tiger friends were all very attractive. So am I an uncle?
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
To become imperceptible oneself, to have dismantled love in order to become capable of loving. To have dismantled one's self in order finally to be alone and meet the true double at the other end of the line. A clandestine passenger on a motionless voyage. To become like everybody else; but this, precisely, is a becoming only for one who knows how to be nobody, to no longer be anybody. To paint oneself gray on gray.
”
”
Gilles Deleuze (A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia)
β€œ
One ship drives east and another drives west With the selfsame winds that blow. Tis the set of the sails And not the gales Which tells us the way to go. Like the winds of the seas are the ways of fate, As we voyage along through the life: Tis the set of a soul That decides its goal, And not the calm or the strife.
”
”
Ella Wheeler Wilcox
β€œ
Has he come armed, then?” she asked anxiously. β€œHas he brought a pistol or a sword?” Ian shook his head, his dark hair lifting wildly in the wind. β€œOh, no, Mam!” he said. β€œIt’s worse. He’s brought a lawyer!
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
A day or two after my love pronouncement, now feral with vulnerability, I sent you the passage from Roland Barthes by Roland Barthes in which Barthes describes how the subject who utters the phrase β€œI love you” is like β€œthe Argonaut renewing his ship during its voyage without changing its name.” Just as the Argo’s parts may be replaced over time but the boat is still called the Argo, whenever the lover utters the phrase β€œI love you,” its meaning must be renewed by each use, as β€œthe very task of love and of language is to give to one and the same phrase inflections which will be forever new.
”
”
Maggie Nelson (The Argonauts)
β€œ
As we go through the flightiness of time, dazed by the inebriety of our mental time voyage, we must hit the brakes, sometimes, and not shy away from questioning ourselves, when we wade through the tanning mist of our memory that embroiders our thoughts or distorts them. ("Uber alle Gipfeln ist Ruh" )
”
”
Erik Pevernagie
β€œ
O CAPTAIN! my Captain! our fearful trip is done, The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won, The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting, While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring; But O heart! heart! heart! O the bleeding drops of red, Where on the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead. O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells; Rise up - for you the flag is flung - for you the bugle trills, For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths - for you the shores a-crowding, For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning; Here Captain! dear father! This arm beneath your head! It is some dream that on the deck, You've fallen cold and dead. My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still, My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will, The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done, From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won; Exult O shores, and ring O bells! But I with mournful tread, Walk the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead.
”
”
Walt Whitman (Leaves of Grass)
β€œ
Holy Hannah, that man is dangerous!
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
The human mind delights in grand conceptions of supernatural beings.
”
”
Jules Verne (Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea)
β€œ
I'll be fine. Maybe I should make up a magic milk bath with the Golden Fruit, huh?" I laughed. Kishan considered and grinned. "A giant bowlful of milk with you in the middle might be a little too much for us cats to resist.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
You died in your sleep? Drunk driver? Cancer,huh? World war? Well...yeah those deaths are great and all,but wait till I tell you what happened to me. Yeah...that's right...I said kraken.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
I am a sailor, you're my first mate We signed on together, we coupled our fate Hauled up our anchor, determined not to fail For the heart's treasure, together we set sail With no maps to guide us, we steered our own course Rode out the storms when the winds were gale force Sat out the doldrums in patience and hope Working together, we learned how to cope. Life is an ocean and love it a boat In troubled waters it keeps us afloat When we started the voyage there was just me and you Now gathered round us we have our own crew Together we're in this relationship We built it with care to last the whole trip Our true destination's not marked on any chart We're navigating the shores of the heart
”
”
John McDermott
β€œ
In your world, I have another name. You should know me by it.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Am I a man? To want you so badly that nothing else matters? To see you, and know I would sacrifice honor or family or life itself to lie wi' you, even though ye'd left me?
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
Later that sweltering evening, I climbed into my tiny tent and lay down on top of my bedroll, twisting the lighter blanket around me mummy-style. Ren ducked his head in to check on me and laughed. β€œDo you always do that?” β€œOnly when camping.” β€œYou know bugs can still get in there.” β€œDon’t say that. I like to live in ignorance.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
Am I to understand,' said Reepicheep to Lucy after a long stare at Eustace, 'That this singularly discourteous person is under your Majesty's protection? Because, if not--
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the β€œDawn Treader” (The Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Aures habent et non audient` - `They have ears but hear not
”
”
Jules Verne (Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea)
β€œ
Do you know,' he said again softly, addressing his hands, 'what it is to love someone, and never - never! - be able to give them peace, or joy, or happiness?' He looked up then, eyes filled with pain. 'To know that you cannot give them happiness, not through any fault of yours or theirs, but only because you were not born the right person for them?
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
My own plans are made. While I can, I sail east in the Dawn Treader. When she fails me, I paddle east in my coracle. When she sinks, I shall swim east with my four paws. And when I can swim no longer, if I have not reached Aslan’s country, or shot over the edge of the world into some vast cataract, I shall sink with my nose to the sunrise.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Kishan kept his distance, but his come-hither eyes made my face burn.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
How many things have been denied one day, only to become realities the next!
”
”
Jules Verne (From the Earth to the Moon)
β€œ
Do not look sad. We shall meet soon again." "Please, Aslan", said Lucy,"what do you call soon?" "I call all times soon" said Aslan; and instantly he was vanished away.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
No matter what the odds, a man does not pin his last hope for survival on something and then expect that it will fail.
”
”
Alfred Lansing (Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage)
β€œ
Sea-fever I must down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by, And the wheel's kick and the wind's song and the white sail's shaking, And a grey mist on the sea's face, and a grey dawn breaking. I must down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied; And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying, And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying. I must down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life, To the gull's way and the whale's way where the wind's like a whetted knife; And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick's over.
”
”
John Masefield (Sea Fever: Selected Poems)
β€œ
And I saw that all my life I had known that this was going to happen, and that I'd been afraid for a long time, I'd been afraid for a long time. There's fear, of course, with everybody. But now it had grown, it had grown gigantic; it filled me and it filled the whole world.
”
”
Jean Rhys (Voyage in the Dark)
β€œ
I am a coward, damn you! I couldna tell ye, for fear ye would leave me, and unmanly thing that I am, I thought I couldna bear that!
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
You know, when I was in love, I was always inventing things. A whole array of tricks, illusions and optical effects to amuse my lady friend. I think she'd had enough of my inventions by the end... I wanted to create a voyage to the moon just for her, but what I should have given her was a real journey on earth.
”
”
Mathias Malzieu (La MΓ©canique du cΕ“ur)
β€œ
Don't let's ask for the moon! We have the stars!
”
”
Olive Higgins Prouty (Now, Voyager)
β€œ
The voyage of the best ship is a zigzag line of a hundred tacks. See the line from a sufficient distance, and it straightens itself to the average tendency. Your genuine action will explain itself, and will explain your other genuine actions. Your conformity explains nothing. Act singly, and what you have already done singly will justify you now.
”
”
Ralph Waldo Emerson (Self-Reliance)
β€œ
Lunch is served!" I shouted. The brothers wasted no time. Kishan reached for the chicken, and Ren, the cookies. I smacked their hands away and handed each one a bacterial wipe. Kishan grumbled, "Kells, I ate my food raw off the ground for three hundred years. I really don't think a little dirt's going to kill me.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
I looked on, I thought, I reflected, I admired, in a state of stupefaction not altogether unmingled with fear!
”
”
Jules Verne (Journey to the Center of the Earth)
β€œ
Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things can not be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.
”
”
Mark Twain (The Innocents Abroad)
β€œ
Shall I ever be able to read that story again; the one I couldn't remember? Will you tell it to me, Aslan? Oh do,do,do." "Indeed,yes, I will tell it to you for years and years. But now, come. We must meet the master of this house.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #5))
β€œ
We're all in the dark. We try to find out, but can you imagine anything more ludicrous than one person's opinion of another person? One goes along thinking one knows; but one really doesn't know
”
”
Virginia Woolf (The Voyage Out)
β€œ
Hitch: making rules about drinking can be the sign of an alcoholic,' as Martin Amis once teasingly said to me. (Adorno would have savored that, as well.) Of course, watching the clock for the start-time is probably a bad sign, but here are some simple pieces of advice for the young. Don't drink on an empty stomach: the main point of the refreshment is the enhancement of food. Don't drink if you have the blues: it's a junk cure. Drink when you are in a good mood. Cheap booze is a false economy. It's not true that you shouldn't drink alone: these can be the happiest glasses you ever drain. Hangovers are another bad sign, and you should not expect to be believed if you take refuge in saying you can't properly remember last night. (If you really don't remember, that's an even worse sign.) Avoid all narcotics: these make you more boring rather than less and are not designedβ€”as are the grape and the grainβ€”to enliven company. Be careful about up-grading too far to single malt Scotch: when you are voyaging in rough countries it won't be easily available. Never even think about driving a car if you have taken a drop. It's much worse to see a woman drunk than a man: I don't know quite why this is true but it just is. Don't ever be responsible for it.
”
”
Christopher Hitchens (Hitch 22: A Memoir)
β€œ
It appeared that nobody ever said a thing they meant, or ever talked of a feeling they felt, but that was what music was for.
”
”
Virginia Woolf (The Voyage Out)
β€œ
I didn't want to tell the story of what makes two people come together, although that's a theme of great power and universality. I wanted to find out what it takes for two people to stay together for fifty years -- or more. I wanted to tell not the story of courtship, but the story of marriage.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (The Outlandish Companion: Companion to Outlander, Dragonfly in Amber, Voyager, and Drums of Autumn)
β€œ
To have regret is to be disappointed with yourself and your choices. Those who are wise, see their life like stepping stones across a great river. Everyone misses a stone from time to time. No one can cross the river without getting wet. Success is measured by your arrival on the other side, not on how muddy your shoes are.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
I dream with my eyes open.
”
”
Jules Verne (Journey to the Center of the Earth)
β€œ
You need mountains, long staircases don't make good hikers.
”
”
Amit Kalantri (Wealth of Words)
β€œ
Mobilis in Mobile
”
”
Jules Verne (Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea)
β€œ
Gone! And you and I quite crestfallen. It’s always like that, you can’t keep him; it’s not as if he were a tame lion.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
We had seen God in His splendors, heard the text that Nature renders. We had reached the naked soul of man.
”
”
Ernest Shackleton (Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage)
β€œ
Science, my lad, has been built upon many errors; but they are errors which it was good to fall into, for they led to the truth.
”
”
Jules Verne (Journey to the Center of the Earth)
β€œ
You’re the only person I’ve ever met who seems to have the faintest conception of what I mean when I say a thing.
”
”
Virginia Woolf (The Voyage Out)
β€œ
Mind is the lock. Knowing is the key. Unlock the mind and open your heart.
”
”
Robin Craig Clark (Voyager: The Art of Pure Awareness)
β€œ
Oh, Lord!" This must be what it's like to make love in Hell," he whispered. "With a burning she-devil.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age.
”
”
H.P. Lovecraft (The Call of Cthulhu)
β€œ
Well I am still not drunk" I straightened up against the pillows as best I could. "You told me once that if you could still stand up, you weren't drunk." You aren't standing up." he point out. You are.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
And whichsoever way thou goest, may fortune follow.
”
”
Jules Verne (Journey to the Center of the Earth)
β€œ
He was dead. However, his nose throbbed painfully, which he thought odd in the circumstances.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
And Finally I put down the last and the best advice I knew, on growing older. 'Stand up straight and try not to get fat.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
You know, when one's in love,' I said, 'and things go all wrong, one's terribly unhappy and one thinks one won't ever get over it. But you'll be astounded to learn what the sea will do.' What do you mean?' she smiled. Well, love isn't a good sailor and it languishes on a sea voyage. You'll be surprised when you have the Atlantic between you and Larry to find how slight the pang is that before you sailed seemed intolerable.
”
”
W. Somerset Maugham (The Razor's Edge)
β€œ
There are some who say that sitting at home reading is the equivalent of travel, because the experiences described in the book are more or less the same as the experiences one might have on a voyages, and there are those who say that there is no substitute for venturing out into the world. My own opinion is that it is best to travel extensively but to read the entire time, hardly glancing up to look out of the window of the airplane, train, or hired camel.
”
”
Lemony Snicket (Horseradish)
β€œ
And there we all were, as invisible as you could wish to see.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
For his mind was full of forlorn hopes, death-or-glory charges, and last stands.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
My turn now. The story of one of my insanities. For a long time I boasted that I was master of all possible landscapes-- and I thought the great figures of modern painting and poetry were laughable. What I liked were: absurd paintings, pictures over doorways, stage sets, carnival backdrops, billboards, bright-colored prints, old-fashioned literature, church Latin, erotic books full of misspellings, the kind of novels our grandmothers read, fairy tales, little children's books, old operas, silly old songs, the naive rhythms of country rimes. I dreamed of Crusades, voyages of discovery that nobody had heard of, republics without histories, religious wars stamped out, revolutions in morals, movements of races and continents; I used to believe in every kind of magic. I invented colors for the vowels! A black, E white, I red, O blue, U green. I made rules for the form and movement of every consonant, and I boasted of inventing, with rhythms from within me, a kind of poetry that all the senses, sooner or later, would recognize. And I alone would be its translator. I began it as an investigation. I turned silences and nights into words. What was unutterable, I wrote down. I made the whirling world stand still.
”
”
Arthur Rimbaud
β€œ
It would be nice and fairly nearly true, to say that 'from that time forth, Eustace was a different boy.' To be strictly accurate, he began to be a different boy. He had relapses. There were still many days when he could be very tiresome. But most of those I shall not notice. The cure had begun.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
After a moment, he (Ren) elaborated, "By the way, I didn't say you weren't attractive. I just said you're young." "So is Nilima by your standards. You're more than three hundred years old!" "That's true." He grinned lopsidedly in an attempt to get me to smile. "Technically, you should be dating a very old lady." A tiny smile passed my lips.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
Do you mean to say," asked Caspian, "that you three come from a round world (round like a ball) and you've never told me! It's really too bad for you. Because we have fairy-tales in which there are round worlds and I have always loved them … Have you ever been to the parts where people walk about upside-down?" Edmund shook his head. "And it isn't like that," he added. "There's nothing particularly exciting about a round world when you're there.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
Are some people destined for a great fate, or to do great things? Or is it only that they're born somehow with that great passion -- and if they find themselves in the right circumstances, then things happen? It's the sort of thing you wonder...
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
Why?" I shrieked, hitting him again and again, and again, the sound of the blows thudding against his chest. "Why, why why!". Because I was afraid!" He got hold of my wrists and threw me backward so I fell across the bed. He stood over me, fists clenched, breathing hard. I am a coward, damn you! I couldna tell ye, for fear ye would leave me, and unmanly thing that I am, I thought I couldna bear that!" ~~~~~~~~~ You should have told me!" And if I had?, You'd have turned on your heel and gone without a word. And having seen ye again--I tell ye, I would ha' done far worse than lie to keep you!" Voyager
”
”
Diana Gabaldon
β€œ
I poked my stomach covertly. It still seemed pretty lean to me. Obviously, I wasn’t built like a supermodel, but all the swimming and workouts were keeping me trim enough. Kishan took my hand, squeezed it, and brushed a kiss on my fingers before setting it back onto my lap. I smiled at him in gratitude.
”
”
Colleen Houck (Tiger's Voyage (The Tiger Saga, #3))
β€œ
Our art is made in cities like New York by people who are running from other places. They feel themselves as misfits who were trapped in dead-end suburbs. They hated high school. Their parents did not understand. They are seeking a better world. And when they realize that the world is wholly a problem, that the whole problem is in them, they make television for other people who are also running, who take voyage in search of a perfect world, then rage at the price of the ticket.
”
”
Ta-Nehisi Coates
β€œ
Ithaka As you set out for Ithaka hope the voyage is a long one, full of adventure, full of discovery. Laistrygonians and Cyclops, angry Poseidonβ€”don’t be afraid of them: you’ll never find things like that on your way as long as you keep your thoughts raised high, as long as a rare excitement stirs your spirit and your body. Laistrygonians and Cyclops, wild Poseidonβ€”you won’t encounter them unless you bring them along inside your soul, unless your soul sets them up in front of you. Hope the voyage is a long one. May there be many a summer morning when, with what pleasure, what joy, you come into harbors seen for the first time; may you stop at Phoenician trading stations to buy fine things, mother of pearl and coral, amber and ebony, sensual perfume of every kindβ€” as many sensual perfumes as you can; and may you visit many Egyptian cities to gather stores of knowledge from their scholars. Keep Ithaka always in your mind. Arriving there is what you are destined for. But do not hurry the journey at all. Better if it lasts for years, so you are old by the time you reach the island, wealthy with all you have gained on the way, not expecting Ithaka to make you rich. Ithaka gave you the marvelous journey. Without her you would not have set out. She has nothing left to give you now. And if you find her poor, Ithaka won’t have fooled you. Wise as you will have become, so full of experience, you will have understood by then what these Ithakas mean.
”
”
Constantinos P. Cavafy (C. P. Cavafy: Collected Poems)
β€œ
There are books, that one has for twenty years without reading them, that one always keeps at hand, that one takes along from city to city, from country to country, carefully packed, even when there is very little room, and perhaps one leafs through them while removing them from a trunk; yet one carefully refrains from reading even a complete sentence. Then after twenty years, there comes a moment when suddenly, as though under a high compulsion, one cannot help taking in such a book from beginning to end, at one sitting: it is like a revelation. Now one knows why one made such a fuss about it. It had to be with one for a long time; it had to travel; it had to occupy space; it had to be a burden; and now it has reached the goal of its voyage, now it reveals itself, now it illuminates the twenty bygone years it mutely lived with one. It could not say so much if it had not been there mutely the whole time, and what idiot would dare to assert that the same things had always been in it.
”
”
Elias Canetti (The Human Province)
β€œ
Love is a dangerous thing. It comes in disguise to change our life... Lust is the deceiver. Lust wrenches our lives until nothing matters except the one we think we love, and under that deceptive spell we kill for them, give all for them, and then, when we have what we have wanted, we discover that it is all an illusion and nothing is there. Lust is a voyage to nowhere, to an empty land, but some men just love such voyages and never care about the destination. Love is a voyage too, a voyage with no destination except death, but a voyage of bliss.
”
”
Bernard Cornwell (Sword Song (The Saxon Stories, #4))
β€œ
They all dreamt of each other that night, as was natural, considering how thin the partitions were between them, and how strangely they had been lifted off the earth to sit next each other in mid-ocean, and see every detail of each others' faces, and hear whatever they chanced to say.
”
”
Virginia Woolf (The Voyage Out)
β€œ
I am an obscure and patient pearl-fisherman who dives into the deepest waters and comes up with empty hands and a blue face. Some fatal attraction draws me down into the abysses of thought, down into those innermost recesses which never cease to fascinate the strong. I shall spend my life gazing at the ocean of art, where others voyage or fight; and from time to time I’ll entertain myself by diving for those green and yellow shells that nobody will want. So I shall keep them for myself and cover the walls of my hut with them.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
A song of despair The memory of you emerges from the night around me. The river mingles its stubborn lament with the sea. Deserted like the dwarves at dawn. It is the hour of departure, oh deserted one! Cold flower heads are raining over my heart. Oh pit of debris, fierce cave of the shipwrecked. In you the wars and the flights accumulated. From you the wings of the song birds rose. You swallowed everything, like distance. Like the sea, like time. In you everything sank! It was the happy hour of assault and the kiss. The hour of the spell that blazed like a lighthouse. Pilot's dread, fury of blind driver, turbulent drunkenness of love, in you everything sank! In the childhood of mist my soul, winged and wounded. Lost discoverer, in you everything sank! You girdled sorrow, you clung to desire, sadness stunned you, in you everything sank! I made the wall of shadow draw back, beyond desire and act, I walked on. Oh flesh, my own flesh, woman whom I loved and lost, I summon you in the moist hour, I raise my song to you. Like a jar you housed infinite tenderness. and the infinite oblivion shattered you like a jar. There was the black solitude of the islands, and there, woman of love, your arms took me in. There was thirst and hunger, and you were the fruit. There were grief and ruins, and you were the miracle. Ah woman, I do not know how you could contain me in the earth of your soul, in the cross of your arms! How terrible and brief my desire was to you! How difficult and drunken, how tensed and avid. Cemetery of kisses, there is still fire in your tombs, still the fruited boughs burn, pecked at by birds. Oh the bitten mouth, oh the kissed limbs, oh the hungering teeth, oh the entwined bodies. Oh the mad coupling of hope and force in which we merged and despaired. And the tenderness, light as water and as flour. And the word scarcely begun on the lips. This was my destiny and in it was my voyage of my longing, and in it my longing fell, in you everything sank! Oh pit of debris, everything fell into you, what sorrow did you not express, in what sorrow are you not drowned! From billow to billow you still called and sang. Standing like a sailor in the prow of a vessel. You still flowered in songs, you still brike the currents. Oh pit of debris, open and bitter well. Pale blind diver, luckless slinger, lost discoverer, in you everything sank! It is the hour of departure, the hard cold hour which the night fastens to all the timetables. The rustling belt of the sea girdles the shore. Cold stars heave up, black birds migrate. Deserted like the wharves at dawn. Only tremulous shadow twists in my hands. Oh farther than everything. Oh farther than everything. It is the hour of departure. Oh abandoned one!
”
”
Pablo Neruda
β€œ
Writing, like life itself, is a voyage of discovery. The adventure is a metaphysical one: it is a way of approaching life indirectly, of acquiring a total rather than a partial view of the universe. The writer lives between the upper and lower worlds: he takes the path in order eventually to become that path himself. ”I began in absolute chaos and darkness, in a bog or swamp of ideas and emotions and experiences. Even now I do not consider myself a writer, in the ordinary sense of the word. I am a man telling the story of his life, a process which appears more and more inexhaustible as I go on. Like the world-evolution, it is endless. It is a turning inside out, a voyaging through X dimensions, with the result that somewhere along the way one discovers that what one has to tell is not nearly so important as the telling itself. It is this quality about all art which gives it a metaphysical hue, which lifts it out of time and space and centers or integrates it to the whole cosmic process. It is this about art which is β€˜therapeutic’: significance, purposefulness, infinitude. ”From the very beginning almost I was deeply aware that there is no goal. I never hope to embrace the whole, but merely to give in each separate fragment, each work, the feeling of the whole as I go on, because I am digging deeper and deeper into life, digging deeper and deeper into past and future. With the endless burrowing a certitude develops which is greater than faith or belief. I become more and more indifferent to my fate, as writer, and more and more certain of my destiny as a man.
”
”
Henry Miller (Henry Miller on Writing)
β€œ
He kissed my forehead gently. "Loving you has put me through hell more than once, Sassenach; I'll risk it again, if need be." "Bah," I said. "And you think loving you has been a bed of roses, do you?" This time he laughed out loud. "No," he said, "but you'll maybe keep doing it?" "Maybe I will, at that." "You're a verra stubborn woman," he said, the smile clear in his voice.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
This was how it was with travel: one city gives you gifts, another robs you. One gives you the heart’s affections, the other destroys your soul. Cities and countries are as alive and feeling, as fickle and uncertain as people. Their degrees of love and devotion are as varying as with any human relation. Just as one is good, another is bad.
”
”
Roman Payne (Cities & Countries)
β€œ
It isn't necessarily easier if you know what it is you're meant to do-- but at least you don't waste time in questioning or doubting. If you're honest--well, that isn't necessarily easier, either. Though I suppose if you're honest with yourself and know what you are, at least you're less likely to feel that you've wasted your life, doing the wrong thing.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
I love you sons of bitches. You’re all I read any more. You're the only ones who’ll talk all about the really terrific changes going on, the only ones crazy enough to know that life is a space voyage, and not a short one, either, but one that’ll last for billions of years. You’re the only ones with guts enough to really care about the future, who really notice what machines do to us, what wars do to us, what cities do to us, what big, simple ideas do to us, what tremendous misunderstanding, mistakes, accidents, catastrophes do to us. You're the only ones zany enough to agonize over time and distance without limit, over mysteries that will never die, over the fact that we are right now determining whether the space voyage for the next billion years or so is going to be Heaven or Hell.
”
”
Kurt Vonnegut Jr. (God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater)
β€œ
There is no more sagacious animal than the Icelandic horse. He is stopped by neither snow, nor storm, nor impassable roads, nor rocks, glaciers, or anything. He is courageous, sober, and surefooted. He never makes a false step, never shies. If there is a river or fjord to cross (and we shall meet with many) you will see him plunge in at once, just as if he were amphibious, and gain the opposite bank.
”
”
Jules Verne (Journey to the Center of the Earth)
β€œ
To be truly challenging, a voyage, like a life, must rest on a firm foundation of financial unrest. Otherwise, you are doomed to a routine traverse, the kind known to yachtsmen who play with their boats at sea... "cruising" it is called. Voyaging belongs to seamen, and to the wanderers of the world who cannot, or will not, fit in. If you are contemplating a voyage and you have the means, abandon the venture until your fortunes change. Only then will you know what the sea is all about. "I've always wanted to sail to the south seas, but I can't afford it." What these men can't afford is not to go. They are enmeshed in the cancerous discipline of "security." And in the worship of security we fling our lives beneath the wheels of routine - and before we know it our lives are gone. What does a man need - really need? A few pounds of food each day, heat and shelter, six feet to lie down in - and some form of working activity that will yield a sense of accomplishment. That's all - in the material sense, and we know it. But we are brainwashed by our economic system until we end up in a tomb beneath a pyramid of time payments, mortgages, preposterous gadgetry, playthings that divert our attention for the sheer idiocy of the charade. The years thunder by, The dreams of youth grow dim where they lie caked in dust on the shelves of patience. Before we know it, the tomb is sealed. Where, then, lies the answer? In choice. Which shall it be: bankruptcy of purse or bankruptcy of life?
”
”
Sterling Hayden (Wanderer)
β€œ
Why should your Majesty expect it? My own plans are made. While I can, I sail east in the Dawn Treader. When she fails me, I paddle east in my coracle. When she sinks, I shall swim east with my four paws. And when I can swim no longer, if I have not reached Aslan’s country, or shot over the edge of the world in some vast cataract, I shall sink with my nose to the sunrise and Peepiceek will be head of the talking mice in Narnia.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
But what manner of use would it be ploughing through that darkness?' asked Drinian. Use?' replied Reepicheep. 'Use, Captain?' If you mean by filling our bellies or our purses, I confess it will be no use at all. So far as I know we did not set sail to look for things useful but to seek honour and adventures. And here is as great an adventure as I have ever heard of, and here, if we turn back, no little impeachment of all our honours.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Voyage of the β€œDawn Treader” (The Chronicles of Narnia, #3))
β€œ
The media landscape of the present day is a map in search of a territory. A huge volume of sensational and often toxic imagery inundates our minds, much of it fictional in content. How do we make sense of this ceaseless flow of advertising and publicity, news and entertainment, where presidential campaigns and moon voyages are presented in terms indistinguishable from the launch of a new candy bar or deodorant? What actually happens on the level of our unconscious minds when, within minutes on the same TV screen, a prime minister is assassinated, an actress makes love, an injured child is carried from a car crash? Faced with these charged events, prepackaged emotions already in place, we can only stitch together a set of emergency scenarios, just as our sleeping minds extemporize a narrative from the unrelated memories that veer through the cortical night. In the waking dream that now constitutes everyday reality, images of a blood-spattered widow, the chromium trim of a limousine windshield, the stylised glamour of a motorcade, fuse together to provide a secondary narrative with very different meanings.
”
”
J.G. Ballard (The Atrocity Exhibition)
β€œ
I say no wealth is worth my life! Not all they claim was stored in the depths of Troy, that city built on riches, in the old days of peace before the sons of Achaea came- not all the gold held fast in the Archer's rocky vaults, in Phoebus Apollo's house on Pytho's sheer cliffs! Cattle and fat sheep can all be had for the raiding, tripods all for the trading, and tawny-headed stallions. But a man's life breath cannot come back again- no raiders in force, no trading brings it back, once it slips through a man's clenched teeth. Mother tells me, the immortal goddess Thetis with her glistening feet, that two fates bear me on to the day of death. If I hold out here and I lay siege to Troy, my journey home is gone, but my glory never dies. If I voyage back to the fatherland I love, my pride, my glory dies... true, but the life that's left me will be long, the stroke of death will not come on me quickly.
”
”
Homer (The Iliad)
β€œ
How did you keep this by you?" Grey demanded abruptly. "You were searched to the skin when you were brought back." The wide mouth curved slightly in the first genuine smile Grey had seen. "I swallowed it," Fraser said. Grey's hand closed convulsively on the sapphire. He opened his hand and rather gingerly set the gleaming blue thing on the table by the chess piece. "I see," he said. "I'm sure you do, Major," said Fraser, with a gravity that merely made the glint of amusement in his eyes more pronounced. "A diet of rough parritch has its advantages, now and again.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
I've seen ye so many times," he said, his voice whispering warm in my ear. "You've come to me so often. When I dreamed sometimes.When I lay in fever. When I was so afraid and so lonely I knew I must die. When I needed you, I would always see ye, smiling, with your hair curling up about your face. But ye never spoke. And ye never touched me." "I can touch you now." I reached up and drew my hand gently down his temple, his ear, the cheek and jaw that I could see. My hand went to the nape of his neck, under the clubbed bronze hair, and he raised his head at last, and cupped his face between my hands, love glowing strong in the dark blue eyes. "Dinna be afraid," he said softly, "There's the two of us now.
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
β€œ
The sea is everything. It covers seven-tenths of the terrestrial globe. Its breath is pure and life-giving. It is an immense desert place where man is never lonely, for he senses the weaving of Creation on every hand. It is the physical embodiment of a supernatural existence... For the sea is itself nothing but love and emotion. It is the Living Infinite, as one of your poets has said. Nature manifests herself in it, with her three kingdoms: mineral, vegetable, and animal. The ocean is the vast reservoir of Nature.
”
”
Jules Verne (Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea)
β€œ
The Voyager We are all lonely voyagers sailing on life's ebb tide, To a far off place were all stripling warriors have died, Sometime at eve when the tide is low, The voices call us back to the rippling water's flow, Even though our boat sailed with love in our hearts, Neither our dreams or plans would keep heaven far apart, We drift through the hush of God's twilight pale, With no response to our friendly hail, We raise our sails and search for majestic light, While finding company on this journey to the brighten our night, Then suddenly he pulls us through the reef's cutting sea, Back to the place that he asked us to be, Friendly barges that were anchored so sweetly near, In silent sorrow they drop their salted tears, Shall our soul be a feast of kelp and brine, The wasted tales of wishful time, Are we a fish on a line lured with bait, Is life the grind, a heartless fate, Suddenly, "HUSH", said the wind from afar, Have you not looked to the heavens and seen the new star, It danced on the abyss of the evening sky, The sparkle of heaven shining on high, Its whisper echoed on the ocean's spray, From the bow to the mast they heard him say, "Hope is above, not found in the deep, I am alive in your memories and dreams when you sleep, I will greet you at sunset and with the moon's evening smile, I will light your path home.. every last lonely mile, My friends, have no fear, my work was done well, In this life I broke the waves and rode the swell, I found faith in those that I called my crew, My love will be the compass that will see you through, So don't look for me on the ocean's floor to find, I've never left the weathered docks of your loving mind, For I am in the moon, the wind and the whale's evening song, I am the sailor of eternity whose voyage is not gone.
”
”
Shannon L. Alder
β€œ
Depression, somehow, is much more in line with society's notions of what women are all about: passive, sensitive, hopeless, helpless, stricken, dependent, confused, rather tiresome, and with limited aspirations. Manic states, on the other hand, seem to be more the provenance of men: restless, fiery, aggressive, volatile, energetic, risk taking, grandiose and visionary, and impatient with the status quo. Anger or irritability in men, under such circumstances, is more tolerated and understandable; leaders or takers of voyages are permitted a wider latitude for being temperamental. Journalists and other writers, quite understandably, have tended to focus on women and depression, rather than women and mania. This is not surprising: depression is twice as common in women as men. But manic-depressive illness occurs equally often in women and men, and, being a relatively common condition, mania ends up affecting a large number of women. They, in turn, often are misdiagnosed, receive poor, if any, psychiatric treatment, and are at high risk for suicide, alcoholism, drug abuse, and violence. But they, like men who have manic-depressive illness, also often contribute a great deal of energy, fire, enthusiasm, and imagination to the people and world around them.
”
”
Kay Redfield Jamison (An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness)
β€œ
When I was small, I never wanted to step in puddles. Not because of any fear of drowned worms or wet stockings; I was by and large a grubby child, with a blissful disregard for filth of any kind. It was because I couldn't bring myself believe that that perfect smooth expanse was no more than I thin film of water over solid earth. I believed it was an opening into some fathomless space. Sometimes, seeing the tiny ripples caused by my approach, I thought the puddle impossibly deep, a bottomless sea in which the lazy coil of a tentacle and gleam of scale lay hidden, with the threat of huge bodies and sharp teeth adrift and silent in the far-down depths. And then, looking down into reflection, I would see my own round face and frizzled hair against a featureless blue sweep, and think instead that the puddle was the entrance to another sky. If I stepped in there, I would drop at once, and keep on falling, on and on, into blue space. The only time I would dare walk though a puddle was at twilight, when the evening stars came out. If I looked in the water and saw one lighted pinprick there, I could slash through unafraid--for if I should fall into the puddle and on into space, I could grab hold of the star as I passed, and be safe. Even now, when I see a puddle in my path, my mind half-halts--though my feet do not--then hurries on, with only the echo of the though left behind. What if, this time, you fall?
”
”
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))