Organizational Change Management Quotes

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Instead of waiting for a leader you can believe in, try this: Become a leader you can believe in.
Stan Slap
You can’t sell it outside if you can’t sell it inside.
Stan Slap
The purpose of leadership is to change the world around you in the name of your values, so you can live those values more fully.
Stan Slap
When you’re a manager, you work for your company. When you’re a leader, your company works for you.
Stan Slap
Growing a culture requires a good storyteller. Changing a culture requires a persuasive editor.
Ryan Lilly
The first step to solving any problem is to accept one’s own accountability for creating it.
Stan Slap
Work/life balance is not about escaping work. It’s about living exactly the way you want to when you’re at work.
Stan Slap
Profitability. Growth. Quality. Exceeding customer expectations. These are not examples of values. These are examples of corporate strategies being sold to you as values.
Stan Slap
Too much attention on problems kills our faith in possibilities.
Price Pritchett (Firing Up Commitment During Organizational Change: A Handbook for Managers)
True leaders live their values everywhere, not just in the workplace.
Stan Slap
What first separates a leader from a normal human being? A leader knows who they are as a human being.
Stan Slap
Business people need to understand the psychology of risk more than the mathematics of risk.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
When rewards come from an external source instead of an internal source, they’re unreliable, which means they’re dangerous if you grow to depend on them.
Stan Slap
Values are deeply held personal beliefs that form your own priority code for living.
Stan Slap
Values are the individual biases that allow you to decide which actions are true for you alone.
Stan Slap
The first step out of the gate has to be knowing where you want to end up. What do you really want from your company?
Stan Slap
The worst thing in your own development as a leader is not to do it wrong. It’s to do it for the wrong reasons.
Stan Slap
Your values are your essence: an undistorted mirror showing you at your pure, attractive best.
Stan Slap
Careful now: even a financially rewarding, intellectually stimulating work environment isn’t the same as living your own values.
Stan Slap
Success means: I want to know the work I do means something to somebody and helps make the world, if not a Better place, not a worse one.
Stan Slap
Success for Managers means: I want to be in healthy relationships. I want a real connection with people I spend so much time with.
Stan Slap
Being relevant to your customers only when you’re trying to sell something means choosing to be irrelevant to them for the rest of the time.
Stan Slap
Leaders need to sacrifice "power-over" to get "power-to".
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
Change management is a broad term for the many ways of preparing, supporting, and helping businesses, teams, and organizations adapt to, thrive through and initiate change.
Hendrith Vanlon Smith Jr
A company can’t buy true emotional commitment from managers no matter how much it’s willing to spend; this is something too valuable to have a price tag. And yet a company can’t afford not to have it.
Stan Slap
Management controls performance in people because it impacts skills; it’s a matter of monitoring, analyzing and directing.
Stan Slap
Leadership creates performance in people because it impacts willingness; it’s a matter of modeling, inspiring, and reinforcing.
Stan Slap
Any expert will tell you that if you want emotionally committed relationships then people must be allowed to be true to who they are.
Stan Slap
When you’re not on your own agenda, you’re prey to the agenda of others.
Stan Slap
Why live my personal values at work? This is an excellent question to ask. If your attorneys are planning an insanity defense.
Stan Slap
It’s impossible for a company to get what it wants most if managers have to make a choice between their own values and company priorities.
Stan Slap
Let’s get right on top of the bottom line: You must live your personal values at work.
Stan Slap
A manager’s emotional commitment is the ultimate trigger for their discretionary effort, worth more than financial, intellectual & physical commitment combined.
Stan Slap
Try not to take this the wrong way, but your brain is smarter than you are.
Stan Slap
Human behavior is only unpredictable and dangerous if you don’t start from humanity in the first place.
Stan Slap
Imagine a world where what you say synchs up, not sinks down.
Stan Slap
The myth of management is that your personal values are irrelevant or inappropriate at work.
Stan Slap
You can stuff yourself with emotional fulfillment until it’s dribbling down your chin & your ego will quickly chomp it down and demand more.
Stan Slap
The economy is in ruins! Bottom line? Good management will defeat a bad economy.
Stan Slap
You don't have to fear your own company being perceived as human. You want it. People don't trust companies; they trust people.
Stan Slap
There will be plenty of other problems in the future. This is as good a time as any to get ahead of them.
Stan Slap
When business leaders talk about the next quarter, they ought to sometimes be talking about the next quarter century.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
Too few leaders have the emotional fortitude to take responsibility for failure.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
People who appear to be resisting change may simply be the victim of bad habits. Habit, like gravity, never takes a day off.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
Here’s what you need to know most about leadership: Lead your own life first. The only thing in this world that will dependably happen from the top down is the digging of your grave.
Stan Slap
From the systems point of view, it is evident that one of the main obstacles to organizational change is the — largely unconscious — embrace by business leaders of the mechanistic approach to management.
Fritjof Capra
The heart of a company’s performance is hardwired to the hearts of its managers.
Stan Slap
The high quality of a company’s customer experience rarely has anything to do with the high price of their product.
Stan Slap
To integrate one’s experiences around a coherent and enduring sense of self lies at the core of creating a user’s guide to life.
Stan Slap
Leaders are people who know exactly who they are. They know exactly where they want to go. They’re hell-bent on getting there.
Stan Slap
Leaders make a lot of mistakes but they admit those mistakes to themselves and change because of them.
Stan Slap
Managers know what they want most: to be allowed to achieve success by leveraging who they are, not by compromising it.
Stan Slap
Companies should be the best possible place to practice fulfillment, to live out values and to realize deep connectivity and purpose.
Stan Slap
When you don’t know what true for you, everyone else has unusual influence.
Stan Slap
Most managers have plenty of emotional commitment to give to their jobs. If they can be convinced it’s safe and sensible to give it.
Stan Slap
This is your one and only precious life. Somebody’s going to decide how it’s going to be lived and that person had better be you.
Stan Slap
Hard-core results come from igniting the massive power of emotional commitment. Are your people committed?
Stan Slap
Do you think your people struggle with being true to themselves? Do their values match up with their work?
Stan Slap
Providing the ultimate solution to work/life balance: not escaping from work but living the way you want to at work.
Stan Slap
Your dreams and the dreams of your company may be different, but they are in no way incompatible.
Stan Slap
Your company really has to work for you before you’ll really work for your company.
Stan Slap
Your company is its own competition and can deliver itself debilitating blows the competition only dreams of.
Stan Slap
Green light, STOP - if you want to see where you are taking the most risk, look where you are making the most money.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
Don't let Deepak Chopra manage your change program.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
The gap between thought and action, between belief and will, prevents us solving our most pressing individual and societal problems.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
The key to behavioral change is to pass behavioral control to the environment.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
Once individuals have the motivation to do something different, the whole world can begin to change. The
Esther Cameron (Making Sense of Change Management: A Complete Guide to the Models, Tools and Techniques of Organizational Change)
We have minds that are equipped for certainty, linearity and short-term decisions, that must instead make long-term decisions in a non-linear, probabilistic world.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
What companies want most from their managers is what they most stop their managers from giving. What managers want most from their jobs is what they most stop themselves from getting.
Stan Slap
The principles of classical management theory have become so deeply ingrained in the ways managers think about organizations that for most of them the design of formal structures, linked by clear lines of communication, coordination, and control, has become almost second nature. This largely unconscious embrace of the mechanistic approach to management has now become one of the main obstacles to organizational change.
Fritjof Capra (The Systems View of Life: A Unifying Vision)
Every organizational system has its own natural “immune system” whose task it is to resist unfamiliar, and so unrecognizable, signals. That is not necessarily bad.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
Ensure that value is created for all stakeholders – customers, employees, partners, society, and investors – simultaneously
Justin Lokitz (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Emotional commitment is a personal choice. Managers understand this even if their companies don’t.
Stan Slap
A manager’s emotional commitment is worth more than their financial, intellectual and physical commitment combined.
Stan Slap
What managers want most from companies they stop themselves from getting. What companies want most from managers they stop them from giving.
Stan Slap
Emotional commitment means unchecked, unvarnished devotion to the company and its success; any legendary organizational performance is the result of emotionally committed managers.
Stan Slap
The company may have captured their minds, their bodies and their pockets, but that doesn’t mean it’s captured their hearts.
Stan Slap
There was nothing scientific about Scientific Management (Taylorism), and neither was it good management.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
Creating change-agile businesses will eliminate the need for what we today call change management.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
We need leadership books that offer information as well as inspiration. Pop leadership is one of the most destructive forces today.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
The change "grief cycle", for some people, may be excitement, enthusiasm, engagement, effort, and excellence.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
Most change strategy models are not very strategic – change strategy is an important lynchpin between business strategy and change tactics.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
The psychological theories that inform day-to-day business practices are comprised mostly of folk-psychology, fads, and myths.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
The notion of "business as usual" is a harmful myth.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
Most businesses would profit greatly from just applying Change Management 101 well.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
It is time to euthanize change management.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
Sometimes the conflicts we have in organizational life are actually clashes of the roles involved, but we mistake them for clashes between the people filling those roles.
Brian J. Robertson (Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World)
Why is it that we reward programmers who work all night to remove the errors they put into their programs, or managers who make drastic organizational changes to resolve the crises their poor management has created? Why not reward the programmers who design so well that they don’t have dramatic errors, and managers whose organizations stay out of crisis mode? Organizing
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
The purpose of management, leadership, parenting, or governing - any form of organizational leadership - is to solve today’s problems and get ready to deal with tomorrow’s problems. And that means managing change.
Ichak Kalderon Adizes (The Ideal Executive)
The sustainable success of digital transformation comes from a carefully planned organisational change management process that meets two key objectives, one being the company culture, and the other one is empowering its employees
Enamul Haque
term Lean was coined by John Krafcik in a 1988 article based on his master’s thesis at MIT Sloan School of Management1 and then popularized in The Machine that Changed the World and Lean Thinking. Lean Thinking summarized Womack and Jones’s findings from studying how Toyota operates, an approach that was spearheaded by Taiichi Ohno, codified by Shigeo Shingo, and strongly influenced by the work of W. Edwards Deming, Joseph Juran, Henry Ford, and U.S. grocery stores. Lean Thinking framed Toyota’s
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
I frequently detect a hint of satisfaction in the accounts that manage to excavate moral and individual responsibility from the historical debris. Perhaps it is because of the unspoken belief that changing the people will change the outcome. 'No Hitler, no Holocaust.' If only a few individuals had resolved that it was unconscionable to be a bystander, then perhaps thousands would have been saved. I suppose there is some solace in recovering a history in which altering an isolated event transforms all that follows. But personalizing the story in this way can obscure how these were not isolated individuals operating on their own but rather were people situated in an organizational and historical context that profoundly shaped how they looked upon the world, what they believed they could do, and what they wanted to do. The UN staff and diplomats in New York, in the main, were highly decent, hard-working, and honorable individuals who believed that they were acting properly when they decided not to try to put an end to genocide. It is this history that stays with me.
Michael Barnett
As the idea of culture has migrated from anthropology to organizational theory, so it has become highly instrumentalized and reified. It is another example of the hubris of managerialism, which claims to be able to analyse, predict and control the intangible, and with the result that it can bring about the opposite of what it intends. In other words, with the intention of ensuring that employees are more committed to their work and are more productive, repeated culture change programmes can have the effect of inducing cynicism or resistance in staff (McKinlay and Taylor, 1996). With an insistence that staff align their values with those of the organization, what may result is gaming strategies on the part of staff to cover over what they really think and feel (Jackall, 2009).
Chris Mowles (Managing in Uncertainty: Complexity and the paradoxes of everyday organizational life)
you’re a leader with no power over business strategy and no ability to allocate people to important tasks, you’re at best at the mercy of your influence with other executives and managers, and at worst a figurehead. You can’t give up the responsibility of management without giving up the power that comes with it. The CTO who doesn’t also have the authority of management must be able to get things done purely by influencing the organization. If the managers won’t actually give people and time to work on the areas that the CTO believes are important, he is rendered effectively powerless. If you give up management, you’re giving up the most important power you ever had over the business strategy, and you effectively have nothing but your organizational goodwill and your own two hands. My advice for aspiring CTOs is to remember that it’s a business strategy job first and foremost. It’s also a management job.
Camille Fournier (The Manager's Path: A Guide for Tech Leaders Navigating Growth and Change)
coat!” the manager repeated. “Then you won’t have to pay the tax.” “But I have to sign a form,” my father exclaimed. “I have to declare the things I’ve bought and am bringing into the country.” “Don’t declare it; just wear it,” the manager said once again. “Don’t worry about the tax.” My father was silent for a moment, and then he said, “Look, frankly I’m not as worried about having to pay the tax as I am about this new salesman you’re training. He’s watching you. He’s learning from you. What is he going to think when you sign his commission? What kind of trust is he going to have in you in managing his career?” Can you see why employees don’t trust their managers? Most of the time, it’s not the huge, visible withdrawals like major ethics violations that wipe out organizational trust. It’s the little things—a day at a time, a weak or dishonest act at a time—that gradually weaken and corrode credibility. Whoever
Stephen M.R. Covey (The SPEED of Trust: The One Thing that Changes Everything)
Self-Management If you can read just one book on motivation—yours and others: Dan Pink, Drive If you can read just one book on building new habits: Charles Duhigg, The Power of Habit If you can read just one book on harnessing neuroscience for personal change: Dan Siegel, Mindsight If you can read just one book on deep personal change: Lisa Lahey and Bob Kegan, Immunity to Change If you can read just one book on resilience: Seth Godin, The Dip Organizational Change If you can read just one book on how organizational change really works: Chip and Dan Heath, Switch If you can read just two books on understanding that change is a complex system: Frederic Laloux, Reinventing Organizations Dan Pontefract, Flat Army Hear interviews with FREDERIC LALOUX, DAN PONTEFRACT, and JERRY STERNIN at the Great Work Podcast. If you can read just one book on using structure to change behaviours: Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto If you can read just one book on how to amplify the good: Richard Pascale, Jerry Sternin and Monique Sternin, The Power of Positive Deviance If you can read just one book on increasing your impact within organizations: Peter Block, Flawless Consulting Other Cool Stuff If you can read just one book on being strategic: Roger Martin and A.G. Lafley, Playing to Win If you can read just one book on scaling up your impact: Bob Sutton and Huggy Rao, Scaling Up Excellence If you can read just one book on being more helpful: Edgar Schein, Helping Hear interviews with ROGER MARTIN, BOB SUTTON, and WARREN BERGER at the Great Work Podcast. If you can read just two books on the great questions: Warren Berger, A More Beautiful Question Dorothy Strachan, Making Questions Work If you can read just one book on creating learning that sticks: Peter Brown, Henry Roediger and Mark McDaniel, Make It Stick If you can read just one book on why you should appreciate and marvel at every day, every moment: Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything If you can read just one book that saves lives while increasing impact: Michael Bungay Stanier, ed., End Malaria (All money goes to Malaria No More; about $400,000 has been raised so far.) IF THERE ARE NO STUPID QUESTIONS, THEN WHAT KIND OF QUESTIONS DO STUPID PEOPLE ASK?
Michael Bungay Stanier (The Coaching Habit: Say Less, Ask More & Change the Way You Lead Forever)
Where to stash your organizational risk? Lately, I’m increasingly hearing folks reference the idea of organizational debt. This is the organizational sibling of technical debt, and it represents things like biased interview processes and inequitable compensation mechanisms. These are systemic problems that are preventing your organization from reaching its potential. Like technical debt, these risks linger because they are never the most pressing problem. Until that one fateful moment when they are. Within organizational debt, there is a volatile subset most likely to come abruptly due, and I call that subset organizational risk. Some good examples might be a toxic team culture, a toilsome fire drill, or a struggling leader. These problems bubble up from your peers, skip-level one-on-ones,16 and organizational health surveys. If you care and are listening, these are hard to miss. But they are slow to fix. And, oh, do they accumulate! The larger and older your organization is, the more you’ll find perched on your capable shoulders. How you respond to this is, in my opinion, the core challenge of leading a large organization. How do you continue to remain emotionally engaged with the challenges faced by individuals you’re responsible to help, when their problem is low in your problems queue? In that moment, do you shrug off the responsibility, either by changing roles or picking powerlessness? Hide in indifference? Become so hard on yourself that you collapse inward? I’ve tried all of these! They weren’t very satisfying. What I’ve found most successful is to identify a few areas to improve, ensure you’re making progress on those, and give yourself permission to do the rest poorly. Work with your manager to write this up as an explicit plan and agree on what reasonable progress looks like. These issues are still stored with your other bags of risk and responsibility, but you’ve agreed on expectations. Now you have a set of organizational risks that you’re pretty confident will get fixed, and then you have all the others: known problems, likely to go sideways, that you don’t believe you’re able to address quickly. What do you do about those? I like to keep them close. Typically, my organizational philosophy is to stabilize team-by-team and organization-by-organization. Ensuring any given area is well on the path to health before moving my focus. I try not to push risks onto teams that are functioning well. You do need to delegate some risks, but generally I think it’s best to only delegate solvable risk. If something simply isn’t likely to go well, I think it’s best to hold the bag yourself. You may be the best suited to manage the risk, but you’re almost certainly the best positioned to take responsibility. As an organizational leader, you’ll always have a portfolio of risk, and you’ll always be doing very badly at some things that are important to you. That’s not only okay, it’s unavoidable.
Will Larson (An Elegant Puzzle: Systems of Engineering Management)
Is it time to dump the change management approach and work on the evolution attitude?
Sukant Ratnakar
With this in mind, here are the basic steps to organizational design: 1. Figure out what needs to be communicated. Start by listing the most important knowledge and who needs to have it. For example, knowledge of the product architecture must be understood by engineering, QA, product management, marketing, and sales. 2. Figure out what needs to be decided. Consider the types of decisions that must get made on a frequent basis: feature selection, architectural decisions, how to resolve support issues. How can you design the organization to put the maximum number of decisions under the domain of a designated manager? 3. Prioritize the most important communication and decision paths. Is it more important for product managers to understand the product architecture or the market? Is it more important for engineers to understand the customer or the architecture? Keep in mind that these priorities will be based on today’s situation. If the situation changes, then you can reorganize. 4. Decide who’s going to run each group. Notice that this is the fourth step, not the first. You want to optimize the organization for the people—for the people doing the work—not for the managers. Most large mistakes in organizational design come from putting the individual ambitions of the people at the top of the organization ahead of the communication paths for the people at the bottom of the organization. Making this step four will upset your managers, but they will get over it. 5. Identify the paths that you did not optimize. As important as picking the communication paths that you will optimize is identifying the ones that you will not. Just because you deprioritized them doesn’t mean they are unimportant. If you ignore them entirely, they will surely come back to bite you. 6. Build a plan for mitigating the issues identified in step five. Once you’ve identified the likely issues, you will know the processes you will need to build to patch the impending cross-organizational challenges.
Ben Horowitz (The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers)
Provide opportunities for others to step back and take stock, both organizationally and individually: schedule offsites, process reviews, surveys, and open conversations; offer people the chance to review their careers and refocus their efforts in areas of growing interest to them.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
This belief in the good of the firm seems to contribute to the commitment to hard work and outperformance, which has benefited the firm, but it has slowly and incrementally changed to also be used as a rationalization for behavior that may not be consistent with the original meaning of the firm’s principles. The sense of higher purpose explains why Goldman brushes off cases of bad behavior as “one-offs” or “exceptions,” why its employees should get swine flu vaccinations ahead of others, and why the firm believes that while its peers may not be able to handle situations where conflicts need to be managed through ethical behavior, Goldman can.
Steven G. Mandis (What Happened to Goldman Sachs: An Insider's Story of Organizational Drift and Its Unintended Consequences)
The ability to make rational decisions is limited, or bounded, by the extent of people’s information. To broaden employees’ understanding, a firm should promote a tradition of teamwork and interdependence and develop future leaders by rotating them among work assignments in different departments and geographic locations. In order to reduce structural secrecy, there may be short-term opportunity costs, but the long-term benefits are significant.12 Firms must think about long-term greed and what it means. Through actions and training, leaders must explain the pressures on short-term thinking and how the firm resolves the conflicts of short- and long-term goals. Potentially conflicting or confusing organizational goals, such as putting clients first while also having a duty to shareholders, require strong signals from leadership as to what is acceptable and unacceptable behavior. These nuances cannot be left to statements of principles; they must be modeled by leaders’ actions each day. Leaders must understand that external influences can shape the culture. For example, there are competitive, technological, and regulatory pressures. Responses to them can have unintended consequences, including drifting from principles. This can increase the probability of an organizational failure. An organization needs to understand to what extent models impact behavior, decisions made by business leaders, and organizational culture. For example, boards of directors of public companies should ask questions if earnings per share (EPS) estimates are too consistent with analysts’ estimates. They should ask whether the firm is managing to models or to what is in the best long-term interests of the firm. Leaders get too much credit and too much blame. Leaders need to uphold the firm’s shared values—and that is a key component to leadership.13 But too little emphasis is given to the organizational elements that shape behavior or provide an environment for leadership or change. An organization’s structure, incentives, and values last longer and have more impact than those of individual leaders. Usually when there is a change or loss or failure there is a tendency to blame one thing or one person, when typically there are complex organizational cultural reasons. It is the duty of leaders and board members to examine what is responsible, not who is responsible.
Steven G. Mandis (What Happened to Goldman Sachs: An Insider's Story of Organizational Drift and Its Unintended Consequences)
Think about this. What would it take for you (or your staff) to move on from your current organization? Would you leave to feel valued, empowered, and largely left to your skills without being micromanaged but with the occasional “Hey, thanks for doing a great job!” from your manager? Organizational leaders: are you doing the little things to retain people? Are these attributes inherent and apparent in your organizational culture? If you are not asking yourselves these questions, you’d be wise to start doing so immediately. We should never underestimate how important it is for people to feel they are valued, respected, and heard. They want to know their voices matter and be met with a high level of responsiveness. All these needs rely on effective communication as the glue to bind them together.
Albert Collu (Catapulting Change: Mindful Leadership To Launch Organizations and People)
Hiring and onboarding approaches, sales and marketing processes, budgeting practices, incentive structures, performance evaluation and management systems, and every other organizational system, structure, and process can be conceived and deployed in inward-mindset or outward-mindset ways. Organizations that are serious about operating with an outward mindset turn these systems and processes outward to invite and reinforce outward-mindset working.
The Arbinger Institute (The Outward Mindset: How to Change Lives and Transform Organizations)
Selling problems is, in fact, the investment that pays long-term dividends by making people more ready for particular organizational transitions—and for a world of continuous change in general.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
When one person does something wrong, it's his mistake. If more than one person makes the same mistake, there is something wrong with the organizational culture.
Sukant Ratnakar (Quantraz)
Managers manage by using the authority the factory gives them. You listen to your manager or you lose your job. A manager can’t make change because that’s not his job. His job is to complete tasks assigned to him by someone else in the factory. Leaders, on the other hand, don’t care very much for organizational structure or the official blessing of whatever factory they work for. They use passion and ideas to lead people, as opposed to using threats and bureaucracy to manage them. Leaders must become aware of how the organization works, because this awareness allows them to change it.
Seth Godin (Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us)
The ultimate purpose of a company is to create amazing value for customers and all of its stakeholders. With so much value created, a company is way more profitable in the long term
Justin Lokitz (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Whether the grand challenge you plan to address is global in nature or affects only your industry, what’s clear is this: if you don’t address it, someone else will
Justin Lokitz (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
What connection can you facilitate around moments in the lives of consumers?
Roland Wijnen (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
And when you do have the authority to act but worry that doing so may cause tension for others, it’s much safer and more comfortable to just take action when you know any tensions that result will be transformed into organizational learning in the next governance meeting—and when your team had a voice in giving you that authority in the first place.
Brian J. Robertson (Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World)
To succeed, you must adopt a mindset that is open to exploration and continually searches for (unmet) customer needs and contextual changes in the business, technology, regulatory, and competitive landscape
Justin Lokitz (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value for Customers)
Shifts start as small moves inside an existing business model that evolve into entirely new ways of creating value and relevance
Justin Lokitz (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Create new ways to reach your customers
Justin Lokitz (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Customers first, always
Justin Lokitz (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Understanding that the change we’re experiencing is accelerating is half the battle
Roland Wijnen (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Execute your own shift and create a future with more value for your customers and stakeholders.
Roland Wijnen (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
How can you think differently about your production system or supply chain, and shrink its footprint?
Patrick van der Pijl (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
What needs to change in order for your products to stay in use forever?
Patrick van der Pijl (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Where can you be extraordinary? What commitment can you make to solve a huge problem for the masses?
Justin Lokitz (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
After all, business model innovation is about finding new combinations from existing business model elements, enhanced elements, and completely new elements.
Patrick van der Pijl (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Successfully shifting business models is tough and requires guts and perseverance.
Patrick van der Pijl (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Innovating is hard work and the journey to success is a long and rocky road
Patrick van der Pijl (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
After all, shifting business models is about customers
Patrick van der Pijl (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Access, not ownership
Patrick van der Pijl (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Whatever you’re producing, at the end of the day, your customers only care about getting a job done
Patrick van der Pijl (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Companies die because they’ve become fixated on fighting for their current business model rather than shifting to a more relevant one
Patrick van der Pijl (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
The journey towards a successful business model shift is often littered with uncertainty and failures
Roland Wijnen (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
A clear vision must be developed in order to inspire, motivate, and activate people to move the business forward together
Roland Wijnen
Innovation requires the right talent and mindset from both leadership and innovators themselves
Roland Wijnen (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Enable your organization to delight customers in the long term
Roland Wijnen (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
What can you gamify to make it more fun, addictive, and effective?
Justin Lokitz (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
What needs to change in your company to maximize value for all stakeholders, making your shares rock-solid for the next decades?
Roland Wijnen (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
The more things change, the more they remain the same.
Patrick van der Pijl (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value for Customers)
Overnight success does not exist.
Patrick van der Pijl (Business Model Shifts: Six Ways to Create New Value For Customers)
Green Projects Consulting provides a variety of services such as project portfolio management trainings, project portfolio management strategy and project portfolio management implementation services. Furthermore we have extensive experience in building value driven PMOs, organizational transformation, change management and advanced project management applying critical chain project management and TOC principles to achieve exceptional growth for our clients.
Green Projects Consulting
the speed of change has been accelerating. While the telephone took seventy-five years to reach 50 million users, TV took thirteen years, and the internet took only four years.13 As environments change fast and faster, and innovations are copied more and more quickly, employer-imposed scripted and repetitive behaviors are no longer a way for leaders to gain a competitive advantage. Organizational survival today comes from employees being proactive—using creativity and ingenuity to solve problems without waiting for instruction. The most valuable employees think like owners and develop new approaches to solving problems, instead of waiting until management works out a full-blown solution and teaches them the new procedures.
Daniel M. Cable (Alive at Work: The Neuroscience of Helping Your People Love What They Do)
Were organizational inertia the whole story, a well-adapted corporation would remain healthy and efficient as long as the outside world remained unchanged. But, another force, entropy, is also at work. In science, entropy measures a physical system’s degree of disorder, and the second law of thermodynamics states that entropy always increases in an isolated physical system. Similarly, weakly managed organizations tend to become less organized and focused. Entropy makes it necessary for leaders to constantly work on maintaining an organization’s purpose, form, and methods even if there are no changes in strategy or competition.
Richard P. Rumelt (Good Strategy Bad Strategy: The Difference and Why It Matters)
During the past thirty years there has been a so-called hidden revolution in the introduction and development of new organizational structures. Management has come to realize that organizations must be dynamic in nature; that is, they must be capable of rapid restructuring should environmental conditions so dictate. These environmental factors evolved from the increasing competitiveness of the market, changes in technology, and a requirement for better control of resources for multiproduct firms. More than forty years ago, Wallace identified four major factors that caused the onset of the organizational revolution
Harold R. Kerzner (Project Management: A Systems Approach To Planning, Scheduling, And Controlling)
LEADERSHIP ABILITIES Some competencies are relevant (though not sufficient) when evaluating senior manager candidates. While each job and organization is different, the best leaders have, in some measure, eight abilities. 1 STRATEGIC ORIENTATION The capacity to engage in broad, complex analytical and conceptual thinking 2 MARKET INSIGHT A strong understanding of the market and how it affects the business 3 RESULTS ORIENTATION A commitment to demonstrably improving key business metrics 4 CUSTOMER IMPACT A passion for serving the customer 5 COLLABORATION AND INFLUENCE An ability to work effectively with peers or partners, including those not in the line of command 6 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT A drive to improve the company by attracting and developing top talent 7 TEAM LEADERSHIP Success in focusing, aligning, and building effective groups 8 CHANGE LEADERSHIP The capacity to transform and align an organization around a new goal You should assess these abilities through interviews and reference checks, in the same way you would evaluate potential, aiming to confirm that the candidate has displayed them in the past, under similar circumstances.
Anonymous
Process helps make sense of change, but blindly following a process is a recipe for disaster
Jason Little (Lean Change Management: Innovative practices for managing organizational change)
Goldratt taught us that in most plants, there are a very small number of resources, whether it’s men, machines, or materials, that dictates the output of the entire system. We call this the constraint—or bottleneck. Either term works. Whatever you call it, until you create a trusted system to manage the flow of work to the constraint, the constraint is constantly wasted, which means that the constraint is likely being drastically underutilized. “That means you’re not delivering to the business the full capacity available to you. It also likely means that you’re not paying down technical debt, so your problems and amount of unplanned work continues to increase over time,” he says. He continues, “You’ve identified this Brent person as a constraint to restore service. Trust me, you’ll find that he constrains many other important flows of work, as well.” I try to interrupt to ask a question, but he continues headlong, “There are five focusing steps which Goldratt describes in The Goal: Step 1 is to identify the constraint. You’ve done that, so congratulations. Keep challenging yourself to really make sure that’s your organizational constraint, because if you’re wrong, nothing you do will matter. Remember, any improvement not made at the constraint is just an illusion, yes? “Step 2 is to exploit the constraint,” he continues. “In other words, make sure that the constraint is not allowed to waste any time. Ever. It should never be waiting on any other resource for anything, and it should always be working on the highest priority commitment the IT Operations organization has made to the rest of the enterprise. Always.” I hear him say encouragingly, “You’ve done a good job exploiting the constraint on several fronts. You’ve reduced reliance on Brent for unplanned work and outages. You’ve even started to figure out how to exploit Brent better for the three other types of work: business and IT projects and changes. Remember, unplanned work kills your ability to do planned work, so you must always do whatever it takes to eradicate it.
Gene Kim (The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win)
Although science is not easy in complex human systems, we cannot afford to throw our hands in the air and give up. It may take decades, but it is a game worth playing and winning.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
VersionOne indicated that the top three reasons for agile project failure are: Inadequate experience with agile methods Little understanding of broader organizational change required Company philosophy or culture at odds with agile values
Gloria J. Miller (Going Agile Project Management Practices)
The QMO, worked closely with the PMO throughout the Kanban transformation, but we never tried to change them. Our stance was to help them understand what was different about how projects were governed with the new Agile practices so they could decide what to change.
Jason Little (Lean Change Management: Innovative practices for managing organizational change)
DevOps and its resulting technical, architectural, and cultural practices represent a convergence of many philosophical and management movements (including): Lean, Theory of Constraints, Toyota production system, resilience engineering, learning organizations, safety culture, Human factors, high-trust management cultures, servant leadership, organizational change management, and Agile methods.
Gene Kim (The DevOps Handbook: How to Create World-Class Agility, Reliability, and Security in Technology Organizations)
lack drama. Why is it that we reward programmers who work all night to remove the errors they put into their programs, or managers who make drastic organizational changes to resolve the crises their poor management has created? Why not reward the programmers who design so well that they don’t have dramatic errors, and managers whose organizations stay out of crisis mode? Organizing
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
No matter how narrow our perceptions become in the daily obsessions of the organization, there is no such thing as a life lived only within an organization. There are other necessities calling us to a much greater participation than any corporation can offer. The most efficiently run, streamlined organization, the best-groomed, most-organized executive is interwoven with the ragged vagaries of creation, and despite our best attempts to anchor ourselves in the concrete foundations of profitability and permanence, we remain forever at the whim, mercy, and pleasure of the wind-blown world. Ironically, we bring more vitality into our organizations when we refuse to make their goals the measure of our success and start to ask about the greater goals they might serve, and when we stop looking to them as parents who will supply necessities we can only obtain when we wrestle directly with our own destiny. In a sense, we place the same burdens on our organizational life as we place on the rest of our existence. We feel there is something wrong at the center of it all, and we have to put it right. We are forever looking for a cure for our ills. We do this by placing ourselves in the position of manager, of thus managing change. Unless it is managed, something is wrong. But our real unconscious and underlying wish is to find a cure for the impermanence of life, and for that there is no remedy. Most of the difficulties we confront at work are no different from those human beings have been dealing with for millenia. Life is full of loneliness, failure, grief, and loss to an extent that terrifies us, and we will do anything to will ourselves another existence.
David Whyte (The Heart Aroused: Poetry and the Preservation of the Soul in Corporate America)
Behind Closed Doors 1, a fantastic book about management from Esther Derby and Johanna Rothman.
Jason Little (Lean Change Management: Innovative practices for managing organizational change)
The more people are involved in alignment deliberations, the more likely the effort will result in substantial organizational and behavioral change, and thus improvements to the bottom line. Organization alignment discussions are where change management begins, not several days or weeks later when a beautifully packaged presentation is pitched to the enterprise. It is best to broaden alignment participation as much as you can, and then work to replicate the experience for other enterprise members in a cascade down through the organization.
Reed Deshler (Mastering the Cube: Overcoming Stumbling Blocks and Building an Organization that Works)
The single biggest reason organizational changes fail is because no one has thought about endings or planned to manage their impact on people. Naturally concerned about the future, planners and implementers all too often forget that people have to let go of the present first. They forget that while the first task of change management is to understand the desired outcome and how to get there, the first task of transition management is to convince people to leave home.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
Transitions are the dynamic interludes between one of the seven stages of organizational life and the next. Their function is to close out one phase, reorient and renew people in that time we are calling the neutral zone, and carry people into the new way of doing and being that is the beginning of the next stage.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
the First Law of Organizational Development is evident: those who were most at home with the necessary activities and arrangements of one phase are the ones who are the most likely to experience the subsequent phase as a severe personal setback. They will talk about it as a “strategic mistake,” as “dumb,” “unnecessary,” and “too expensive.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
And remaining steadfast to the cause requires committed, executive leadership, motivation, organizational change management and above all, perseverance and resolve.
Jim Maholic (IT Strategy: A 3-Dimensional Framework to Plan Your Digital Transformation and Deliver Value to Your Enterprise)
Being “exciting” means the company is continuously learning, improving, innovating, changing. Being part of this is challenging and exciting to everyone. Companies focused on doing this always create new opportunities for individual as well as organizational growth.
David Brock (Sales Manager Survival Guide: Lessons from Sales' Front Lines)
This picture in people’s heads is the reality they live in, and one of the losses that takes place during the ending phase of a transition is that the old picture—the mental image of how and why things are the way they are—falls apart. Much of the pain of the neutral zone comes from the fact that it is a time without a viable organizational picture.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
Second Law of Organizational Development: the successful outcome of any phase of organizational development triggers its demise by creating challenges that it is not equipped to handle.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
Third Law of Organizational Development: in any significant transition, the thing that the organization needs to let go of is the very thing that got it this far. Discovering that law is painful, especially when you feel that you owe everything to the people, the culture, the style of management, or the strategy that “got you this far.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
Such conflicts are reminders of the Fourth Law of Organizational Development: whenever there is a painful, troubled time in the organization, a developmental transition is probably going on.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
The first thing you’re going to need in order to handle nonstop organizational change is an overall design within which the various and separate changes are integrated as component elements. In periods of major strategic change, such a design may have been announced to the organization by its leadership. When that happens, you’re fortunate. Even if you don’t entirely agree with the logic of the larger change, you benefit from the coherence it gives to the component changes.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
Renewal must begin with Redreaming the Dream on which the organization is based. The new Dream might be the idea of becoming a service business (IBM) or reinventing the idea of leadership (the U.S. Army). It might involve getting into entirely new business areas or simply redefining the organization’s approach to existing ones. But in some significant way, organizational renewal always involves getting a new central idea around which to build the organization’s activities and structures.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
It is important for leaders to comprehend the implications of what they are trying to achieve and not to let their understanding that renewal is essential blind them to the painful transitions that will be necessary to make things turn out as intended. It is also important for the HR and OD specialists who advise the leaders to recognize that transition management must be built into the very fabric of organizational renewal efforts.
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
The impatient leader is likely to want to Redream the Dream and Recapture the Venture Spirit and get the renewal-generating organizational infrastructure in place and working tomorrow!
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
Organizational culture is simply the response of an organization to its political influences, both internal and external.
Larrie D. Ferreiro
...You can’t expect niceness to fix the issue. We must understand that the act of caring doesn’t actually solve issues as complex as discrimination and lack of inclusiveness, and that we must use metrics and actually push the envelope to create change. In order to create institutional changes that actually last, library leaders must facilitate the creation of organizational programs that ensure that diversity, inclusion and social justice goals are met. Library managers have to make sure social justice and diversity workshops and trainings are built into professional development budgets, and that our staff have the opportunity to work on not only their technical skills but on being a better, more compassionate workforce.
Yago S. Cura (Librarians with Spines: Information Agitators in an Age of Stagnation, Vol. 1)
Disruptive innovation is good. Disruption for the sake of disruption is not." Culture
Jason Little (Lean Change Management: Innovative practices for managing organizational change)
Lean Change Management moves the slider for managing change from using plan-driven aproaches to feedback-driven aproaches
Jason Little (Lean Change Management: Innovative practices for managing organizational change)
In a linear world of equilibrium and predictability, the sparse research into an evidence base for management prescriptions and the confused findings it produces would be a sign of incompetence; it would not make much sense. Nevertheless, if organizations are actually patterns of nonlinear interaction between people; if small changes could produce widespread major consequences; if local interaction produces emergent global pattern; then it will not be possible to provide a reliable evidence base. In such a world, it makes no sense to conduct studies looking for simple causal relationships between an action and an outcome. I suggest that the story of the last few years strongly indicates that human action is nonlinear, that time and place matter a great deal, and that since this precludes simple evidence bases we do need to rethink the nature of organizations and the roles of managers and leaders in them.
Ralph D. Stacey (Complexity and Organizational Reality)
If you truly want to understand something, try to change it" - Kurt Lewin -
Jason Little (Lean Change Management: Innovative practices for managing organizational change)
Top-down change without honest feedback from those affected by the change simply will not work.
Jason Little (Lean Change Management: Innovative practices for managing organizational change)
The Hack is the action you take to expose, jam, complicate, disrupt, or otherwise point out the crack to the organization.
Jason Little (Lean Change Management: Innovative practices for managing organizational change)
Knowing that an asteroid is going to hit the earth is not really useful if you are not planning to launch missiles to knock it out of the sky. You have to work massively overtime on the belief that innovation or massive change is going to happen.' — Tom Martin, former VP of marketing
Heather Simmons
Managing the Neutral Zone: A Checklist Yes No   ___ ___ Have I done my best to normalize the neutral zone by explaining it as an uncomfortable time that (with careful attention) can be turned to everyone’s advantage? ___ ___ Have I redefined the neutral zone by choosing a new and more affirmative metaphor with which to describe it? ___ ___ Have I reinforced that metaphor with training programs, policy changes, and financial rewards for people to keep doing their jobs during the neutral zone? ___ ___ Am I protecting people adequately from inessential further changes? ___ ___ If I can’t protect them, am I clustering those changes meaningfully? ___ ___ Have I created the temporary policies and procedures that we need to get us through the neutral zone? ___ ___ Have I created the temporary roles, reporting relationships, and organizational groupings that we need to get us through the neutral zone? ___ ___ Have I set short-range goals and checkpoints? ___ ___ Have I set realistic output objectives? ___ ___ Have I found the special training programs we need to deal successfully with the neutral zone? ___ ___ Have I found ways to keep people feeling that they still belong to the organization and are valued by our part of it? And have I taken care that perks and other forms of “privilege” are not undermining the solidarity of the group? ___ ___ Have I set up one or more Transition Monitoring Teams to keep realistic feedback flowing upward during the time in the neutral zone? ___ ___ Are my people willing to experiment and take risks in intelligently conceived ventures—or are we punishing all failures? ___ ___ Have I stepped back and taken stock of how things are being done in my part of the organization? (This is worth doing both for its own sake and as a visible model for others’ similar efforts.) ___ ___ Have I provided others with opportunities to do the same thing? Have I provided them with the resources—facilitators, survey instruments, and so on—that will help them do that? ___ ___ Have I seen to it that people build their skills in creative thinking and innovation? ___ ___ Have I encouraged experimentation and seen to it that people are not punished for failing in intelligent efforts that do not pan out? ___ ___ Have I worked to transform the losses of our organization into opportunities to try doing things a new way? ___ ___ Have I set an example by brainstorming many answers to old problems—the ones that people say we just have to live with? Am I encouraging others to do the same? ___ ___ Am I regularly checking to see that I am not pushing for certainty and closure when it would be more conducive to creativity to live a little longer with uncertainty and questions? ___ ___ Am I using my time in the neutral zone as an opportunity to replace bucket brigades with integrated systems throughout the organization?
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
It is socially unsafe if you risk being mocked, laughed at, joked about, scaffolded, castigated. In such a disrespectful interaction, people are losing face. The safety issue sometimes irritates managers (in my practice). They argue that no heads are being chopped off. So why would you not be safe? They feel that people should say what they mean anyway. But in a position where you can be ridiculed or punished for expressing ideas, people will hide and hoard information to protect themselves.
Marcella Bremer (Organizational Culture Change: Unleashing your Organization's Potential in Circles of 10)
This isn’t just a book about organizational change—it’s also about
Daryl R. Conner (Managing At the Speed of Change)
Organizations naturally decline, so for optimum results, actively experiment and continuously tweak.
Chris Hutchinson (Ripple: A Field Manual for Leadership that Works)
These undesirable outcomes and behaviors exist because there is a mission-killing divergence between what we say our church believes and what our church actually believes. When the theological statements and catchy slogans don’t match the theological convictions actually held by the people of the local church, the God-honoring hopes of that church will never become a reality. It is for this reason that many churches who want to engage in leadership development can’t seem to get the church to fall in line. The strategy of “program cut-and-paste” will not serve our local churches in creating the actual change needed. All three layers of culture must be continually considered. In order to become churches that embrace the call to produce leaders, we have to take a hard and thoughtful look at our church culture. Diagnosing Actual Beliefs Managing church culture is ultimately a pastoral function. This is not a tool for pragmatists or a skill set borrowed from business. Engaging in the fight for healthy church culture is fighting for faith for God’s people. Serving to cultivate healthy church culture in a local church is the regular work of uncovering disbelief or wrong belief among God’s people and working to commend true faith to God’s people. Church disbelief must be transformed. Is there such a thing as organizational or church disbelief? Can a whole group disbelieve? Yes! In the same way that some societies are riddled by disbelief in the gospel because of an intertwining of some false religion and the worldview of a people group, so also churches can have systemic false beliefs. In modern-day Turkey, for example, many converts to Christ will remark on the difficulty of believing the gospel as a Turk, largely because of the false belief that to be a Turk is to be a Muslim. For Turks, being a follower of Christ is inconsistent with the worldview of being a Turk. There are whole societies in the world, including churches, that have distinct errors in their thinking that are held by a majority of the people. The leaders of God’s Church must approach church culture as a doctor caring for the patient but wanting to remove the sickness from the body. God’s leaders must diagnose the widespread errors in belief that are harming the body from inside our church cultures. It is these widespread errors in worldview that often account for unhealthy culture in the local church. Leading culture in the local church is leading a whole church to purity in doctrine and in deed.
Eric Geiger (Designed to Lead: The Church and Leadership Development)
Change needs to be cultivated as a business habit and differentiated organizational competency.
Pearl Zhu (100 IT Charms: Running Versatile IT to get Digital Ready)
Executives alone cannot bring about organizational change, especially of the magnitude that AI can potentially make across an enterprise and industry. Some of your most important stakeholders are your front-line employees and middle managers who will be integrating, using, and overseeing AI tools every day.
Mariya Yao (Applied Artificial Intelligence: A Handbook For Business Leaders)
Managers today must change from being supervisors of internal performance to being ‘curators of contribution’ from a distributed talent system.
Gyan Nagpal (The Future Ready Organization: How Dynamic Capability Management Is Reshaping the Modern Workplace)
As we begin the new century, we know that our success will depend on how well we change and manage the firm’s rapid growth. That requires a willingness to abandon old practices and discover new and innovative ways of conducting business. Everything is subject to change—everything but the values we live by and stand for: teamwork, putting clients’ interests first, integrity, entrepreneurship and excellence.
Steven G. Mandis (What Happened to Goldman Sachs: An Insider's Story of Organizational Drift and Its Unintended Consequences)
When the spark of sarcasm ignites the fire of cynicism, you might find yourself on the harlequin-pyre before even noticing it.
Andreas Steiner
Wall Street was historically more balanced between trading business and client business. I ran investment banking and oversaw investment management. But as the trading business got bigger and bigger, the client side made up less of the firm’s overall work. This was going on at every single firm, not just at Goldman Sachs. I began to believe I could add more value in the world by doing something else. It was a difficult decision. However, I realized I had lost some passion for what we were doing, and that’s when I talked to the CEO, Hank Paulson, about leaving. It was traumatic, but I felt like I had to make a change.45
Steven G. Mandis (What Happened to Goldman Sachs: An Insider's Story of Organizational Drift and Its Unintended Consequences)
here are the basic steps to organizational design: 1. Figure out what needs to be communicated. Start by listing the most important knowledge and who needs to have it. For example, knowledge of the product architecture must be understood by engineering, QA, product management, marketing, and sales. 2. Figure out what needs to be decided. Consider the types of decisions that must get made on a frequent basis: feature selection, architectural decisions, how to resolve support issues. How can you design the organization to put the maximum number of decisions under the domain of a designated manager? 3. Prioritize the most important communication and decision paths. Is it more important for product managers to understand the product architecture or the market? Is it more important for engineers to understand the customer or the architecture? Keep in mind that these priorities will be based on today’s situation. If the situation changes, then you can reorganize. 4. Decide who’s going to run each group. Notice that this is the fourth step, not the first. You want to optimize the organization for the people—for the people doing the work—not for the managers. Most large mistakes in organizational design come from putting the individual ambitions of the people at the top of the organization ahead of the communication paths for the people at the bottom of the organization. Making this step four will upset your managers, but they will get over it. 5. Identify the paths that you did not optimize. As important as picking the communication paths that you will optimize is identifying the ones that you will not. Just because you deprioritized them doesn’t mean they are unimportant. If you ignore them entirely, they will surely come back to bite you. 6. Build a plan for mitigating the issues identified in step five. Once you’ve identified the likely issues, you will know the processes you will need to build to patch the impending cross-organizational challenges.
Ben Horowitz (The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers)
Organizational Excellence' would reflect the organization's ability to make sufficient commitment to clinch and apply progressive changes in the system through updating information with applied decision making, overhauling structural responsibilities from time to time, strengthen people’s management, learning/training systems, and periodical improvisation of work process ( work flow links). With the strapping leadership of the top management, strategical partnerships are resourcefully tapped and managed which in turn reverberate impressing a positive impact on their people, customers/clientele, clientele’s business, organization's business and in turn end up contributing to the infrastructure of the nation they serve with a broader impact made on the society at large.
Henrietta Newton Martin-Legal Advisor & Author
Leaders have to understand the principles and practices of change leadership and organizational change management. They must become curators, caretakers, and defenders of the new way of working.
Richard Knaster (SAFe 5.0 Distilled)
One lesson from the occurrence of crises in the last century is that they are here to stay. The other aspect brought to light by the novel corona virus 2019 (COVID-19) is that personal or organizational experience cannot be a form of inoculation from future events that may present more crises.
Victor Manan Nyambala
one might make the case that managers have been coopted into the project of globalization and radical competition, which is supposedly brought about through constant change and innovation, as well as tighter and tighter scrutiny of the performance of staff measured against highly reductive metrics. This has affected both how managers are educated to do their jobs, their sense of professionalism and identity and what they find themselves involved in doing as managers. One of their principle roles is thought to be to champion innovation, by designing, implementing and supervising the necessary transformational changes that will guarantee competitive advantage.
Chris Mowles (Managing in Uncertainty: Complexity and the paradoxes of everyday organizational life)
Of course, as experience shows, managers are in charge but not necessarily in control. They will inevitably be called upon to make changes in organizations since, as MacIntyre observes, longer-term shared projects to make the future less unpredictable are an inevitable part of being human. However, as he advises us, because of fate and contingency, because of the interweaving of intentions as we try to discover things about others that we strive equally hard to conceal from them as we try to anticipate the anticipations of others, because generalization takes a different form in the social sciences than in the natural sciences, we may only succeed ‘characteristically, and for the most part’. The claim to be able to guarantee positive change for the good of the firm is either, according to MacIntyre, good acting, or the road to tyranny where we impose our conceptions of the good, irrespective of the resistance we are likely to meet.
Chris Mowles (Managing in Uncertainty: Complexity and the paradoxes of everyday organizational life)
This can be a little uncomfortable at first. Shereef Bishay, the founder of the educational company Dev Bootcamp, put it succinctly: “The explicitness that Holacracy creates is uncivilized.” Bishay was pointing to how accustomed we can get, in “civilized” society, to being vague and indirect. When things get really clear and concrete, it can feel awkward at first. But as clarity grows, trust is often a natural outcome. Over time, the organizational culture becomes more and more free of people using politics as a means of influence, simply because generating clarity through governance is more effective.
Brian J. Robertson (Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World)
I have come round to the opposite point of view than that recommended by what we might term the dominant discourse on managing conflict. Instead of assuming managers can adopt an objective position, deciding what type of conflict they have on their hands and so which tool or technique they might choose to resolve it for the optimum working of the organization, I am assuming that there is no objective position to be found. Rather, what managers might do instead is to immerse themselves as fully as possible in the complex responsive processes of relating which take place in all social life, noticing their own reactions to and perspectives on the situation as important data in deciding what to do about it. They are caught up in complex social relationships which are forming them, and which they are forming, and these contribute to the regular irregularity of organizational life. Managers would be naïve to anticipate that emotions are absent from everyday organizational life; indeed, it is most likely to provoke strong emotions as people endure the flux and change in the emerging balance of forces.
Chris Mowles (Managing in Uncertainty: Complexity and the paradoxes of everyday organizational life)
Research by Neilson, Martin, and Powers shows that execution exemplars focus their efforts on two levers far more powerful than structural change: • Clarifying decision rights—for instance, specifying who “owns” each decision and who must provide input • Ensuring information flows where it’s needed—such as promoting managers laterally so they build networks needed for the cross-unit collaboration critical to a new strategy Tackle decision rights and information flows first, and only then alter organizational structures and realign incentives to support those moves. Armed
Gary L. Neilson (HBR's 10 Must Reads on Strategy (including featured article “What Is Strategy?” by Michael E. Porter))
Managers and leaders cause most of the organizational confusion and frustration by not doing their jobs — their real jobs.
Liz Weber (Something Needs to Change Around Here)
Although external changes can be the problem, the greater threat to strategy often comes from within. A sound strategy is undermined by a misguided view of competition, by organizational failures, and, especially, by the desire to grow. Managers
Michael E. Porter (HBR's 10 Must Reads on Strategy (including featured article “What Is Strategy?” by Michael E. Porter))
Value Stream Management Do policies need to be changed to enable improved performance? Are there organization departmental reporting structures that can be changed to reduce conflicting goals or align resources? Do existing performance metrics (if any) encourage desired behaviors and discourage dysfunctional behavior? What key performance indicators (KPIs) will we use to monitor value stream performance? Who will monitor the KPIs? How frequently? Who else will results be communicated to? What visual systems can be created to aid in managing and monitoring the value stream? Are the key processes within the value stream clearly defined with their own KPIs, standardized appropriately, and measured and improved regularly?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Managing conflict is one of the greatest challenges a leader of organizational change faces. The conflict may involve resistance to change, or it may involve clashing viewpoints about how the change should be carried out. Often, it will be latent rather than palpable. That’s because most organizations are allergic to conflict, seeing it primarily as a source of danger, which it certainly can be. But conflict is a necessary part of the change process and, if handled properly, can serve as the engine of progress.
Harvard Business School Press (HBR's 10 Must Reads on Change Management (including featured article "Leading Change," by John P. Kotter))
Use of analytics is accelerating, and that means more data-driven decision making and fewer hunches. Evidence-based management complements analytics by adding validated cause-and-effect relationships between policies and effects.
Paul Gibbons (The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture)
IT should cross-examine business opportunities and risks, and IT must contribute to or facilitate and accelerate organizational performance.
Pearl Zhu (The Change Agent CIO)