Workplace Diversity Quotes

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White people raised in Western society are conditioned into a white supremacist worldview because it is the bedrock of our society and its institutions. Regardless of whether a parent told you that everyone was equal, or the poster in the hall of your white suburban school proclaimed the value of diversity, or you have traveled abroad, or you have people of color in your workplace or family, the ubiquitous socializing power of white supremacy cannot be avoided. The messages circulate 24-7 and have little or nothing to do with intentions, awareness, or agreement. Entering the conversation with this understanding is freeing because it allows us to focus on how--rather than if--our racism is manifest. When we move beyond the good/bad binary, we can become eager to identify our racist patterns because interrupting those patterns becomes more important than managing how we think we look to others. I repeat: stopping our racist patterns must be more important than working to convince others that we don't have them. We do have them, and people of color already know we have them; our efforts to prove otherwise are not convincing. An honest accounting of these patterns is no small task given the power of white fragility and white solidarity, but it is necessary.
Robin DiAngelo (White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism)
The code-of-ethics playlist: o Treat your colleagues, family, and friends with respect, dignity, fairness, and courtesy. o Pride yourself in the diversity of your experience and know that you have a lot to offer. o Commit to creating and supporting a world that is free of discrimination, harassment, and retaliation. o Have balance in your life and help others to do the same. o Invest in yourself, achieve ongoing enhancement of your skills, and continually upgrade your abilities. o Be approachable, listen carefully, and look people directly in the eyes when speaking. o Be involved, know what is expected from you, and let others know what is expected from them. o Recognize and acknowledge achievement. o Celebrate, relive, and communicate your successes on an ongoing basis.
Lorii Myers (Targeting Success, Develop the Right Business Attitude to be Successful in the Workplace (3 Off the Tee, #1))
a workplace can look as diverse as the United Nations, but if the employees are not truly respected, not truly valued, not truly involved, and not truly treated with dignity, what you have is a great photo opportunity, not real inclusion.
Lee Cockerell (Creating Magic: 10 Common Sense Leadership Strategies from a Life at Disney)
For folks who have that casual-dude energy coursing through their bloodstream, that's great. But gays should not grow up alienated just for us to alienate each other. It's too predictable, like any other cycle of abuse. Plus, the conformist, competitive notion that by "toning down" we are "growing up" ultimately blunts the radical edge of what it is to be queer; it truncates our colorful journey of identity. Said another way, it's like living in West Hollywood and working a gay job by day and working it in the gay nightlife, wearing delicate shiny shirts picked from up the gay dry cleaners, yet coquettishly left unbuttoned to reveal the pec implants purchased from a gay surgeon and shown off by prancing around the gay-owned-and-operated theater hopped up on gay health clinic steroids and wheat grass purchased from the friendly gay boy who's new to the city, and impressed by the monstrous SUV purchased from a gay car dealership with its rainbow-striped bumper sticker that says "Celebrate Diversity." Then logging on to the local Gay.com listings and describing yourself as "straight-acting." Let me make myself clear. This is not a campaign for everyone to be like me. That'd be a total yawn. Instead, this narrative is about praise for the prancy boys. Granted, there's undecided gender-fucks, dagger dykes, faux-mos, po-mos, FTMs, fisting-top daddies, and lezzie looners who also need props for broadening the sexual spectrum, but they're telling their own stories. The Cliff's Notes of me and mine are this: the only moments I feel alive are when I'm just being myself - not some stiff-necked temp masquerading as normal in the workplace, not some insecure gay boy aspiring to be an overpumped circuit queen, not some comic book version of swank WeHo living. If that's considered a political act in the homogenized world of twenty-first century homosexuals, then so be it. — excerpt of "Praise For The Prancy Boys," by Clint Catalyst appears in first edition (ISBN # 1-932360-56-5)
Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore (That's Revolting!: Queer Strategies for Resisting Assimilation)
A fast and innovative workplace is made up of what we call “stunning colleagues”—highly talented people, of diverse backgrounds and perspectives, who are exceptionally creative, accomplish significant amounts of important work, and collaborate effectively.
Reed Hastings (No Rules Rules: Netflix and the Culture of Reinvention)
Diversity training doesn’t solve the problem of women being perceived as “pushy” and unlikable if they dare to seek power; our legal system isn’t equipped to deal with the fact that Americans still prefer male bosses (and politicians). Sexual harassment is still rampant in our modern workplaces, and often HR departments are all but powerless to do anything to stop it.
Jessica Bennett (Feminist Fight Club: An Office Survival Manual for a Sexist Workplace)
If trust is the core value that allows us to meet the world in a cheerful stance, then tolerance is the equally important quality that allows us to deal with the realities of differences and conflict. Let's be honest: If people were all more or less the same — if there were no differences in race, religion, sexual orientation, political leanings — life would in some ways be easier. But, boy, would it be dull! Diversity is the spice of life. Our ability to embrace diversity makes our own lives richer. Conversely, whenever we fall victim to prejudice or unadmitted bias, we make our own lives smaller and poorer. You don't believe that women are the equal of men in the workplace? Well, your world has just shrunk by half. You have a problem with gay people? Well, you just deprived yourself of 10 percent of the population. You're not comfortable with black people? Latinos? You get my drift. Keep giving in to intolerance, and eventually your world contains no one but you and a few people who look like you and think like you; it gets to resemble a small, snooty, and deathly dull country club! Is that a world worth living in?
Peter Buffett (Life Is What You Make It: Find Your Own Path to Fulfillment)
As I have tried to show throughout this book, white people raised in Western society are conditioned into a white supremacist worldview because it is the bedrock of our society and its institutions. Regardless of whether a parent told you that everyone was equal, or the poster in the hall of your white suburban school proclaimed the value of diversity, or you have traveled abroad, or you have people of color in your workplace or family, the ubiquitous socializing power of white supremacy cannot be avoided. The messages circulate 24-7 and have little or nothing to do with intentions, awareness, or agreement. Entering the conversation with this understanding is freeing because it allows us to focus on how—rather than if—our racism is manifest. When we move beyond the good/bad binary, we can become eager to identify our racist patterns because interrupting those patterns becomes more important than managing how we think we look to others.
Robin DiAngelo (White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism)
Having a diversity program to recruit highly qualified minorities and/or women into organizations is a great initiative. However, inviting a small group of diverse individuals into a majority culture that does not see the need for change, nor desire it, the unintended consequences of not addressing the culture will result in a hostile work environment for a program intended for good-will.
Christy Rutherford (Champions Never Tell: Sisters Surviving Storms In The Workplace)
Thomas A. Kochan, a professor at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, has probably researched corporate diversity more extensively than anyone. His conclusion after a five-year study? “The diversity industry is built on sand.” Prof. Kochan initially contacted 20 major companies that have publicly committed themselves to diversity, and was astonished to find that not one had done a serious study of how diversity increased profits or improved operations. He learned that managers are afraid that race-related research could bring on lawsuits, but that another reason they do not look for results is “because people simply want to believe that diversity works.” Like other researchers, he found “the negative consequences of diversity, such as higher turnover and greater conflict in the workplace,” and concluded that even if the best managers were able to overcome these problems there was no evidence diversity leads to greater profits. “The business case rhetoric for diversity is simply naive and overdone,” he says, noting that the estimated $8 billion a year spent on diversity training did not even protect businesses from discrimination suits, much less increase profits. Common sense suggests that it is hard to get dissimilar people to work together. Indeed, a large-scale survey called the National Study of the Changing Workforce found that more than half of all workers said they preferred to work with people who were not only the same race as themselves, but had the same education and were the same sex.
Jared Taylor (White Identity: Racial Consciousness in the 21st Century)
What are the advantages of diversity that not only compensate for agonizing conflicts but justify considering it America’s “greatest strength?” If readers cannot immediately think of any besides ethnic restaurants, they are not alone. A 2007 study by the University of Minnesota found that Americans claim to be positive and even optimistic about the word “diversity” but are unable to explain its value or give examples of its benefits. The researchers found that even people who work in the field of race relations stumble when asked to list its benefits. In 2009, a San Francisco radio host named Marty Nemko agreed to host an on-air debate on workplace diversity in which the author of this book was to argue that it was a weakness, not a strength. Mr. Nemko contacted a Georgia-based diversity consultant whose slogan was “Stronger Performance Through Diversity,” fully expecting that he would be happy to argue the other side. The consultant declined, admitting that he did not think diversity was a strength, only that it can be made to work better with “diversity management” of the kind he offers.
Jared Taylor (White Identity: Racial Consciousness in the 21st Century)
The US government sponsors a publication called Managing Diversity, which is supposed to help federal employees work better in an increasingly mixed-race workplace. One of its 1997 issues published a front-page story called “What are the Values of White People?” The author, Harris Sussman, explained that merely to speak of whites is “to invoke [a] history and experience of injustice and cruelty. When we say ‘white people,’ we mean the people of greed who value things over people, who value money over people.” Noel Ignatiev, formerly of Harvard, endorsed such sentiments in a publication called Race Traitor, which promoted the slogan, “Treason to whiteness is loyalty to humanity.” The lead article of the first issue of Race Traitor was called “Abolish the White Race—by any Means Necessary.” By this Prof. Ignatiev did not mean that whites should be physically eliminated, only that they should “dissolve the club” of white privilege whose alleged purpose is to exploit non-whites. Christine Sleeter, President of the National Association for Multicultural Education, explains what whiteness means: “ravenous materialism, competitive individualism, and a way of living characterized by putting acquisition of possessions above humanity.” In 2000, there were bomb threats and anti-black e-mail at the University of Iowa that turned out to be a fake hate crime staged by a black woman. Ann Rhodes, a white woman who was vice president for university relations was surprised: “I figured it was going to be a white guy between 25 and 55 because they’re the root of most evil.
Jared Taylor (White Identity: Racial Consciousness in the 21st Century)
Companies are ultimately looking for increased creativity, better ideas, and multiple perspectives, so they will in fact benefit from diversity. However, we will see that achieving this takes much more effort than merely assembling a workplace that looks like Noah’s ark.
Laura A. Liswood (The Loudest Duck: Moving Beyond Diversity while Embracing Differences to Achieve Success at Work)
Whites enact racism while maintaining a positive self-image in many ways: • Rationalizing racial segregation as unfortunate but necessary to access “good schools” • Rationalizing that our workplaces are virtually all white because people of color just don’t apply • Avoiding direct racial language and using racially coded terms such as urban, underprivileged, diverse, sketchy, and good neighborhoods • Denying that we have few cross-racial relationships by proclaiming how diverse our community or workplace is • Attributing inequality between whites and people of color to causes other than racism
Robin DiAngelo (White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism)
I have gone through Let’s Talk, Mukta Mahajani’s book on negotiations and communications at the workplace, with curiosity. Although the book essentially aims at equipping young executives with techniques and skills to deal with difficult workplace situations, it is an interesting and useful read for public servants like me, who have been groomed in an era when negotiation and communication skills were considered an art and one either had the skills or did not have them. We never believed that these skills could be acquired and then honed with right training. Of course, I firmly believe that negotiations have to be built on the foundation of trust and ethics. They should not lead to lose–lose or win– lose situations but should culminate in win–win situations. The modern-day workplace is a highly complex, multidimensional and multi-layered system manned by a diverse workforce. Human behaviour is the most important factor that makes the workplace complex and dynamic. Hundreds of Ankitas, Ketans, Rams and Vidyas struggle to achieve their desired goals at the workplace. I am certain that Mukta’s book will be of great value to them. Congratulations Mukta! Mr Sharad Pawar
Mukta Mahajani (Let's Talk)
Just as we have created a society in which it would be unthinkable to light up a cigarette in the Kennedy Center lobby, we can create a society where it is unthinkable that a child suffers abuse, fails in school, becomes delinquent, or faces teasing and bullying. We could have a society in which diverse people and organizations work together to ensure that families, schools, workplaces, and neighborhoods are nurturing and that our capitalistic system functions to benefit everyone.
Anthony Biglan (The Nurture Effect: How the Science of Human Behavior Can Improve Our Lives and Our World)
After the massacre, the worst domestic terrorist attack since 9/11, General George Casey, army chief of staff, bleated that a “greater tragedy” than the mass murder and maiming would be “if our diversity becomes a casualty.” The administration fraudulently labeled the killings of U.S. troops who were about to deploy to a war zone as “workplace violence,” not international terrorism—a finding that denied Purple Hearts to the soldiers killed and wounded in the attack.
Andrew McCarthy (Faithless Execution: Building the Political Case for Obama’s Impeachment)
I would like to express how I regard salespeople in general. I consider they embody a unified and diverse aggregate of the most able individuals in society and its workplace. In any economy, they are among the most valuable to its continued existence. They alone move the economy of a nation.
Michael Delaware (The Art of Sales Management: Lessons Learned on the Fly)
Core ideology provides the glue that holds an organization together as it grows, decentralizes, diversifies, expands globally, and develops workplace diversity. Think of it as analogous to the principles of Judaism that held the Jewish people together for centuries without a homeland, even as they spread throughout the Diaspora.
James C. Collins (HBR's 10 Must Reads on Strategy (including featured article “What Is Strategy?” by Michael E. Porter))
As the world contends with slowing economic growth driven by constraints on labor market supply, engaging women could be a key driver of global economic growth,
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
Will having more women on your team result in greater profitability? Actually, yes.
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
Women are less inclined to respond to listings containing words like “determined” and “assertive,” as these words are connected with male stereotypes, according to research from the Technische Universität München on how leaders are selected and assessed.
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
Asking women to take responsibility for closing the pay gap with their ace negotiating skills is sort of like teaching women self-defense as a way of addressing sexual assault.
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
Vodafone shares a five-step action plan for organizations on how to approach flexible work arrangements.
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
ROWE is not about work-life integration; for us it’s about revolutionizing the work environment from the industrial to the knowledge age. The idea that management is about watching people physically working is outmoded,
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
As such, women often face a double bind when they speak up at work. If they do speak up, they’re often interrupted or considered too aggressive. When they opt to stay quiet, they’re seen as having fewer leadership qualities or even incompetent.
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
Catalyst also provides a handy, free-of-charge quiz that managers could benefit from taking. The quiz can help leaders understand whether their organizations are inclusive and what areas need to be improved.
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
1. Get male leaders to attend women’s conferences. One technique is to encourage male senior leaders to attend women’s leadership conferences.
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
To counteract the gender bias, men shouldn’t take over the note-taking from women, everyone should be taking notes!” How
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
Women face a persistent double bind when it comes to their leadership capabilities—she has a higher chance of being liked if she behaves in a “feminine” way, but she’s probably not respected or seen as a leader. If she operates in a “masculine” way, however, she’s more likely to be called names like “bossy” (or worse) and disliked. What’s alarming is that if a company already has one female executive leader, another woman’s chances of landing one of the organization’s five highest-paid executive positions falls by 51%, research finds.
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
For a sponsorship program to truly work, Catalyst’s Beninger says the program must be driven from the top down, with tangible involvement from the organization’s most senior leaders.
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
This rule refers to how 70% of a manager’s learning and professional development should be honed through on-the-job stretch assignments. Just 20% should come from mentoring and 10% from taking classes.
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
Financial performance alone may not be the only way to assess the positive impact of a diverse team. A new body of research shows the next frontier of innovation is about diversity of thought and it is essential for a company to retain its competitive advantage. Diversity
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
The company ends up losing out, since the time and effort spent on promoting workplace diversity isn’t producing something beneficial, or achieving the cognitive diversity of perspective, experience, and learning.
Laura A. Liswood (The Loudest Duck: Moving Beyond Diversity while Embracing Differences to Achieve Success at Work)
Respect for diversity doesn’t just make a happier workplace, it improves productivity and is good for the business
Jeanette Purkis (The Wonderful World of Work: A Workbook for Asperteens)
All theories of violence have a piece in the picture. To see the whole picture, however, we need to consider all theories simultaneously. We cannot separate one issue or approach from another. For example, while working on nationality factors that contribute to violence, we must remember economics. While working on economics, we must remember race and gender. While working on sexism we have to remember health issues. While working on health issues we have to remember sexual orientation. While working on sexual orientation we have to remember racism. We need multileveled awareness. While considering social issues, we must remember biology and genetics, the warrior instinct, and appreciate the diversity in religious viewpoints as well.
Arnold Mindell (The Deep Democracy of Open Forums: Practical Steps to Conflict Prevention and Resolution for the Family, Workplace, and World)
Whites enact racism while maintaining a positive self-image in many ways: • Rationalizing racial segregation as unfortunate but necessary to access “good schools” • Rationalizing that our workplaces are virtually all white because people of color just don’t apply • Avoiding direct racial language and using racially coded terms such as urban, underprivileged, diverse, sketchy, and good neighborhoods • Denying that we have few cross-racial relationships by proclaiming how diverse our community or workplace is • Attributing inequality between whites and people of color to causes other than racism
Robin DiAngelo (White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism)
It has become fashionable for modern workplaces to relax what are often seen as outmoded relics of a less egalitarian age: out with stuffy hierarchies, in with flat organisational structures. But the problem with the absence of a formal hierarchy is that it doesn’t actually result in an absence of a hierarchy altogether. It just means that the unspoken, implicit, profoundly non-egalitarian structure reasserts itself, with white men at the top and the rest of us fighting for a piece of the small space left for everyone else. Group-discussion approaches like brainstorming, explains female leadership trainer Gayna Williams, are ‘well known to be loaded with challenges for diverse representation’, because already-dominant voices dominate.
Caroline Criado Pérez (Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men)
A fast and innovative workplace is made up of what we call “stunning colleagues”—highly talented people, of diverse backgrounds and perspectives, who are exceptionally creative, accomplish significant amounts of important work, and collaborate effectively. What’s more, none of the other principles can work unless you have ensured this first dot is in place.
Reed Hastings (No Rules Rules: Netflix and the Culture of Reinvention)
It is important to dedicate some space to discuss what one might call the hoax of diversity in the American workplaces, which entails putting ‘diverse’ faces of often low-paid employees at the forefront of most businesses to project the false impression that workplaces are diverse. It is pure tokenism.
Louis Yako
In brief, if we do not seriously problematize diversity as practiced currently in our society, we all lose. The diverse people should take this more seriously than anyone else, because putting them at the forefront of the battlefield with low-paid jobs while making them look like they are 'stealing' someone else’s job opportunities is not worth the paychecks they are getting in the long run. It is no secret that this hoax of diversity has turned countless poor and marginalized White Americans into the biggest enemies of diversity in America. This negatively affects all diverse people who truly love and make important contributions to the American society.
Louis Yako
Diversity training is any program designed to facilitate positive intergroup interaction, reduce prejudice and discrimination, and generally teach individuals who are different from others how to work together effectively. "From the broad corporate perspective, diversity training is defined as raising personal awareness about individual differences in the workplace and how those differences inhibit or enhance the way people work together and get work done. In the narrowest sense, it is education about compliance – affirmative action (AA), equal employment opportunity (EEO), and sexual harassment." A competency based definition refers to diversity training as any solution designed to increase cultural diversity awareness, attitude, knowledge, and skills. Diversity training is thought to be more needed because of the growing ethnic and racial diversity in the workplace.
Wikipedia: Diversity Training
Of course I knew that. My old boss Iain had been equal parts jealous and pleased that my interview (and skin color) had painted his workplace to be capable, diverse.
Sonya Lalli (Serena Singh Flips the Script)
It is imperative to think of the task of decolonizing knowledge production as inseparable from every other aspect of our lives. It must be applied to the smallest and most hidden details of life, including but not limited to decolonizing romantic relationships (stop seeing beauty only in whiteness, blue eyes, and blond hair); decolonizing social connections (stop believing that there is more value in socially connecting and networking with powerful people who often happen to be Westerners); decolonizing the workplace (stop believing that expertise, management and power are embodied in Western individuals); decolonize our hobbies and activities (don’t do things or enjoy activities promoted and imposed on us by the West such as going to the beach or wasting one’s life watching TV or Netflix); decolonize travel destinations (shatter the illusion that nowhere is more worth seeing that Europe, or that traveling around Europe equals ‘seeing’ the world). We need to seek and discover new destinations, peoples, and cultures to travel to and learn about and from.
Louis Yako
But first, for the straight people reading this book, in case you are worried, reading about LGBTQ issues and trying to make your organization diverse will not make you LGBTQ. It doesn't happen that way, darlings. If you are straight, you will remain straight. Chill!
Parmesh Shahani (Queeristan: LGBTQ Inclusion in the Indian Workplace)
The purpose-oriented among us are the first to jump ship.
Jennifer Brown (Inclusion: Diversity, The New Workplace & The Will To Change)
Denouncing white supremacy means that I will no longer be supreme. Fostering diversity in my workplace means I will talk less as the dominant power in the room. Being pro-LGBTQ doesn’t entitle me to explain to my lesbian colleague that her relationships are “easier.” A
Koa Beck (White Feminism: From the Suffragettes to Influencers and Who They Leave Behind)
As I have tried to show throughout this book, white people raised in Western society are conditioned into a white supremacist worldview because it is the bedrock of our society and its institutions. Regardless of whether a parent told you that everyone was equal, or the poster in the hall of your white suburban school proclaimed the value of diversity, or you have traveled abroad, or you have people of color in your workplace or family, the ubiquitous socializing power of white supremacy cannot be avoided. The messages circulate 24-7 and have little or nothing to do with intentions, awareness, or agreement. Entering the conversation with this understanding is freeing because it allows us to focus on how—rather than if—our racism is manifest
Robin DiAngelo (White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism)
Those with the least social capital and power shouldn’t be asked to instigate the most change.
Rohit Bhargava (Beyond Diversity)
Discrimination is hate, and there is no place for it in the workplace. Strive to be a person or organization who promotes diversity and commits to sustaining an inclusive culture.
Germany Kent
To build a more inclusive world, we must move toward building more accommodations into our modern workplaces for all types of families, and more acceptance into our social fabric for neighbors and colleagues who live in family structures different than our own.
Jennifer Brown (Beyond Diversity)
This approach is flawed on multiple levels. First, when institutions conflate racial and gender diversity metrics with diversity of thought in their organizations, they implicitly reinforce the incorrect assumption that genetic characteristics predict something important about the way that a person thinks—the most fundamental assumption underlying racism itself. Second, this approach empowers entrenched managers to create the visible appearance of diversity in their organizations while avoiding the need to engage with true diversity of thought, including challenges to their incumbency. Third, when a narrow conception of diversity is implemented through affirmative action or other quota-based systems, that fuels racism and sexism by fostering tokenism in the workplace and animus among communities that fail to benefit from these programs.
Vivek Ramaswamy (Woke, Inc.: Inside Corporate America's Social Justice Scam)