Vyasa Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Vyasa. Here they are! All 200 of them:

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The happiness which comes from long practice, which leads to the end of suffering, which at first is like poison, but at last like nectar - this kind of happiness arises from the serenity of one's own mind.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Because ultimately only the witness -- and not the actors -- knows the truth (Vyasa to Draupadi)
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Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni (The Palace of Illusions)
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เค•เคพเคฒเฅ‹ เคฝเคธเฅเคฎเคฟ เคฒเฅ‹เค•เค•เฅเคทเคฏเค•เฅƒเคคเฅเคชเฅเคฐเคตเฅƒเคฆเฅเคงเฅ‹..... ( I am Time, the great destroyer of the world ~Bhagavad Gita 11.32)
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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He who experiences the unity of life sees his own Self in all beings, and all beings in his own Self, and looks on everything with an impartial eye.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Set thy heart upon thy work, but never on its reward.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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We behold what we are, and we are what we behold.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Perform all work carefully, guided by compassion.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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It is Nature that causes all movement. Deluded by the ego, the fool harbors the perception that says "I did it".
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavadgita or The Song Divine)
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Through Karna, Vyasa reiterates that our knowledge of the world is imperfect based on perceptions and false information. We are surrounded by Kuntis who hide the truth in fear. We are surrounded by Karnas, villains who are actually brothers.
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Devdutt Pattanaik (Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata)
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O Krishna, the mind is restless
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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we never really encounter the world; all we experience is our own nervous system.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Selfish action imprisons the world. Act selflessly, without any thought of personal profit.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Reshape yourself through the power of your will; never let yourself be degraded by self-will.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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It was Vyasaโ€™s genius to take the whole great Mahabharata epic and see it as metaphor for the perennial war between the forces of light and the forces of darkness in every human heart.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The wise unify their consciousness and abandon attachment to the fruits of action,
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita (Classics of Indian Spirituality))
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We are not cabin-dwellers, born to a life cramped and confined; we are meant to explore, to seek, to push the limits of our potential as human beings. The world of the senses is just a base camp: we are meant to be as much at home in consciousness as in the world of physical reality.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Lust, anger, and greed are the three doors to hell
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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To save the family, abandon a man; to save the village, abandon a family; to save the country, abandon a village; to save the soul, abandon the earth.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa
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When a person responds to the joys and sorrows of others as if they were his own, he has attained the highest state of spiritual union.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The true goal of action is knowledge of the Self.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Our mistake is in taking this for ultimate reality, like the dreamer thinking that nothing is real except his dream.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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All that we are is the result of what we have thought. We are made of our thoughts; we are molded by our thoughts.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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I am time, the destroyer of all; I have come to consume the world.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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They say that life is an accident, driven by sexual desire, that the universe has no moral order, no truth, no God. Driven by insatiable lusts, drunk on the arrogance of power, hypocritical, deluded, their actions foul with self-seeking, tormented by a vast anxiety that continues until their death, convinced that the gratification of desire is life's sole aim, bound by a hundred shackles of hope, enslaved by their greed, they squander their time dishonestly piling up mountains of wealth. "Today I got this desire, and tomorrow I will get that one; all these riches are mine, and soon I will have even more. Already I have killed these enemies, and soon I will kill the rest. I am the lord, the enjoyer, successful, happy, and strong, noble, and rich, and famous. Who on earth is my equal?
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Pleasures conceived in the world of the senses have a beginning and an end and give birth to misery, Arjuna.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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What is the greatest wonder in the world? That, every single day, people die, Yet the living think they are immortal.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (Mahabharata)
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... there is more to life than the everyday experience of our senses.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa
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Those established in Self-realization control their senses instead of letting their senses control them.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Left to itself, the mind goes on repeating the same old habitual patterns of personality. By training the mind, however, anyone can learn to step in and change old ways of thinking; that is the central principle of yoga:
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Pleasure from the senses seems like nectar at first, but it is bitter as poison in the end.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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Be aware of me always, adore me, make every act an offering to me, and you shall come to me; this I promise; for you are dear to me.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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death is no more traumatic than taking off an old coat
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The immature think that knowledge and action are different, but the wise see them as the same.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of work. You should never engage in action for the sake of reward, nor should you long for inaction. 48 Perform work in this world, Arjuna, as a man established within himself โ€“ without selfish attachments, and alike in success and defeat. For yoga is perfect evenness of mind.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Before creation I alone was, there was no other existence of the nature of cause and effect different from Me. After the creative cycle ends also, I alone exist. For, this universe is also Myself, and when everything is dissolved in its cause in Pralaya, what remains is only Myself.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa
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The very heart of the Gitaโ€™s message is to see the Lord in every creature and act accordingly,
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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the Gita is not a book of commandments but a book of choices.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Thus the Gita places human destiny entirely in human hands. Its world is not deterministic, but neither is it an expression of blind chance: we shape ourselves and our world by what we believe and think and act on, whether for good or for ill.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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We must act in a selfless spirit, Krishna says, without ego-involvement and without getting entangled in whether things work out the way we want; only then will we not fall into the terrible net of karma. We cannot hope to escape karma by refraining from our duties: even to survive in the world, we must act.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Seek refuge in the attitude of detachment and you will amass the wealth of spiritual awareness. Those who are motivated only by desire for the fruits of action are miserable, for they are constantly anxious about the results of what they do. 50 When consciousness is unified, however, all vain anxiety is left behind. There is no cause for worry, whether things go well or ill.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Each man has to follow truth as he sees it.
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K.M. Munshi
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Reshape yourself through the power of your will; never let yourself be degraded by self-will. The will is the only friend of the Self, and the will is the only enemy of the Self. (6:5) The
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Those unacquainted with any language but their own are generally very exclusive in matters of taste.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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All that we are is the result of what we have thought: it is founded on our thoughts; it is made of our thoughts.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Tat tvam asi: โ€œThou art That.โ€ Atman is Brahman: the Self in each person is not different from the Godhead.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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They live in wisdom who see themselves in all and all in them, who have renounced every selfish desire and sense craving tormenting the heart. 56
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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When everything in this world is temporary, why do you grieve for that which is lost?
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (Mahabharata)
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Ramakrishna says, โ€œOne who has merely heard of fire has ajnana, ignorance. One who has seen fire has jnana. But one who has actually built a fire and cooked on it has vijnana.โ€ In
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Real teachers like Jesus, Buddha, Nanak, Rumi have much more to teach humanity, than the imaginary figure Krishna, concocted by an ancient Indian man named Vyasa.
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Abhijit Naskar (The Krishna Cancer)
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If I could offer only one key to understanding this divine dialogue, it would be to remember that it takes place in the depths of consciousness and that Krishna is not some external being, human or superhuman, but the spark of divinity that lies at the core of the human personality. This is not literary or philosophical conjecture; Krishna says as much to Arjuna over and over: โ€œI am the Self in the heart of every creature, Arjuna, and the beginning, middle, and end of their existenceโ€ (10:20).
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Reshape yourself through the power of your will; never let yourself be degraded by self-will. The will is the only friend of the Self, and the will is the only enemy of the Self. (6:5)
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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whoever remembers him at the time of death will enter madbhavam, โ€œmy being.โ€ If Arjuna can remember Krishna in the hour of death, he will be united with Krishna and enter into immortality.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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When meditation becomes very deep, breathing becomes slow, steady, and even, and the windows of the senses close to all outward sensations. Next the faculties of the mind quiet down, resting from their usually frantic activity; even the primal emotions of desire, fear, and anger subside. When all these sensory and emotional tides have ceased to flow, then the spirit is free, mukta โ€“ at least for the time being. It has entered the state called samadhi. Samadhi
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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This chapter also explores the question, "Who is the true yogi?" This word yogi may bring to mind images of amazing people who do strange contortions with their bodies.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita (Classics of Indian Spirituality))
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His judgment will be better and his vision clear if he is not emotionally entangled in the outcome of what he does.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Actions do not cling to me because I am not attached to their results. Those who understand this and practice it live in freedom.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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renunciation of selfishness in thought, word, and action
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Krishna introduces the idea that it is not enough to master all selfish desires; it is also necessary to subdue possessiveness and egocentricity.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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When a person responds to the joys and sorrows of others as if they were his own, he has attained the highest state of spiritual union. (6: 32)
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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18 The wise see that there is action in the midst of inaction and inaction in the midst of action. Their consciousness is unified, and every act is done with complete awareness.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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This does not mean, however, that the phenomenal world is an illusion or unreal. The illusion is the sense of separateness.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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But when you move amidst the world of sense, free from attachment and aversion alike, 65 there comes the peace in which all sorrows end, and you live in the wisdom of the Self. 66
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Krishna
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Seek refuge in the attitude of detachment and you will amass the wealth of spiritual awareness. Those who are motivated only by desire for the fruits of action are miserable, for they are constantly anxious about the results of what they do.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The awakened sages call a person wise when all his undertakings are free from anxiety about results; all his selfish desires have been consumed in the fire of knowledge. 20 The wise, ever satisfied, have abandoned all external supports. Their security is unaffected by the results of their action; even while acting, they really do nothing at all. 21 Free from expectations and from all sense of possession, with mind and body firmly controlled by the Self, they do not incur sin by the performance of physical action. 22 They live in freedom who have gone beyond the dualities of life. Competing with no one, they are alike in success and failure and content with whatever comes to them. 23 They are free, without selfish attachments; their minds are fixed in knowledge. They perform all work in the spirit of service, and their karma is dissolved.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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One who is free from selfish attachments, who has mastered himself and his passions, attains the supreme perfection of freedom from action. Listen and I shall explain now, Arjuna, how one who has attained perfection also attains Brahman, the supreme consummation of wisdom. (18:49โ€“50) These
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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When you keep thinking about sense objects, attachment comes. Attachment breeds desire, the lust of possession that burns to anger. Anger clouds the judgment; you can no longer learn from past mistakes. Lost is the power to choose between what is wise and what is unwise, and your life is utter waste. (2:62 โ€“63 ) Yet
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Having no knowledge of models other than what they meet with in their own tongue, the standard they have formed of purity and taste in composition must necessarily be a narrow one.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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Therefore โ€œyoga is skill in action,โ€ because this kind of detachment is required if one is to act in freedom, rather than merely react to events compelled by conditioning.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Such a person, the Upanishads stress, can actually shed the body voluntarily when the hour of death arrives, by withdrawing consciousness step by step in full awareness.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Krishna was the unborn original Personality of Godhead, appearing on earth to destroy demonic men and to establish the eternal religion, pure love of God.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (Mahabharata)
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You have the right to action, but not to the fruits of actionโ€: each of us has the obligation to act rightly, but no power to dictate what is to come of what we do.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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When your mind has overcome the confusion of duality, you will attain the state of holy indifference to things you hear and things you have heard.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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When the mind constantly runs after the wandering senses, it drives away wisdom, like the wind blowing a ship off course.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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If our eyes were sensitive to a much finer spectrum, we might see the world as a continuous field of matter and energy.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The work of a man who is unattached to the modes of material nature and who is fully situated in transcendental knowledge merges entirely into transcendence.
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Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Guna means strand, and in the Gita the gunas are described as the very fabric of existence, the veil that hides unity in a covering of diversity.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Your own duty done imperfectly is better than another man's done well.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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we never really encounter the world; all we experience is our own nervous system. When
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Earth, water, fire, air, akasha, mind, intellect, and ego โ€“ these are the eight divisions of my prakriti.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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is born of (the womb of) a she-snake that had drunk my vital fluid.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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(hatha yoga) it connotes in the West; it refers
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Mahabharata - whatever is not contained in this is not to be found anywhere
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Complete Mahabharata, Volume 1 of 4, Books 1 to 3)
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Not by refraining from action does man attain freedom from action. Not by mere renunciation does he attain supreme perfection.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Those who are motivated only by desire for the fruits of action are miserable, for they are constantly anxious about the results of what they do. 50 When consciousness is unified, however, all vain anxiety is left behind. There is no cause for worry, whether things go well or ill.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Vyasa thus shows how confrontation and conflict does not necessarily happen when one is right and the other is wrong; it can happen simply because two people follow different value systems.
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Devdutt Pattanaik (Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata)
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Health, unindebtedness, living at home, companionship with good men, certainty as regards the means of livelihood, and living without fear, these six. O king, conduce to the happiness of men.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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The image of God is found essentially and personally in all mankind. Each possesses it whole, entire and undivided, and all together not more than one alone. In this way we are all one, intimately united in our eternal image, which is the image of God and the source in us of all our life.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The battlefield is a perfect backdrop, but the Gitaโ€™s subject is the war within, the struggle for self-mastery that every human being must wage if he or she is to emerge from life victorious. THE
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The sattvic perform sacrifices with their entire mind fixed on the purpose of the sacrifice. Without thought of reward, they follow the teachings of the scriptures. 12 The rajasic perform sacrifices for the sake of show and the good it will bring them. 13 The tamasic perform sacrifices ignoring both the letter and the spirit. They omit the proper prayers, the proper offerings, the proper food, and the proper faith.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Existence and non-existence, pleasure and pain all have Time for their root. Time createth all things and Time destroyeth all creatures. It is Time that burneth creatures and it is Time that extinguisheth the fire. All states, the good and the evil, in the three worlds, are caused by Time. Time cutteth short all things and createth them anew. Time alone is awake when all things are asleep: indeed, Time is incapable of being overcome. Time passeth over all things without being retarded. Knowing, as thou dost, that all things past and future and all that exist at the present moment, are the offspring of Time, it behoveth thee not to throw away thy reason.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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Scriptural knowledge is successful when it results in humility and good conduct, wealth is successful when it is both enjoyed and given away in charity, and marriage is successful when the wife is enjoyed and bears offspring.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (Mahabharata)
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The Yaksha asked, 'What enemy is invincible? What constitutes an incurable disease for man? What sort of a man is called honest and what dishonest?' Yudhishthira answered, 'Anger is an invincible enemy. Covetousness constitutes an incurable disease. He is honest that desires the weal of all creatures, and he is dishonest who is unmerciful.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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The Yaksha asked, 'What is weightier than the earth itself? What is higher than the heavens?' What is fleeter than the wind? And what is more numerous than grass?' Yudhishthira answered, 'The mother is weightier than the earth; the father is higher than the heaven; the mind is fleeter than the wind; and our thoughts are more numerous than grass.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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The law of karma states simply that every event is both a cause and an effect. Every act has consequences of a similar kind, which in turn have further consequences and so on; and every act, every karma, is also the consequence of some previous karma.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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While seeing or hearing, touching or smelling; eating, moving about, or sleeping; breathing 9 or speaking, letting go or holding on, even opening or closing the eyes, they understand that these are only the movements of the senses among sense objects. 10
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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without ego-involvement and without getting entangled in whether things work out the way we want; only then will we not fall into the terrible net of karma. We cannot hope to escape karma by refraining from our duties: even to survive in the world, we must act. True,
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Yet there are always a few who are not content to spend their lives indoors. Simply knowing there is something unknown beyond their reach makes them acutely restless. They have to see what lies outside โ€“ if only, as George Mallory said of Everest, โ€œbecause itโ€™s there.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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If Samkhya-Yoga philosophy does not explain the reason and origin of the strange partnership between the spirit and experience, at least tries to explain the nature of their association, to define the character of their mutual relations. These are not real relationships, in the true sense of the word, such as exist for example between external objects and perceptions. The true relations imply, in effect, change and plurality, however, here we have some rules essentially opposed to the nature of spirit. โ€œStates of consciousnessโ€ are only products of prakriti and can have no kind of relation with Spirit the latter, by its very essence, being above all experience. However and for SamPhya and Yoga this is the key to the paradoxical situation the most subtle, most transparent part of mental life, that is, intelligence (buddhi) in its mode of pure luminosity (sattva), has a specific quality that of reflecting Spirit. Comprehension of the external world is possible only by virtue of this reflection of purusha in intelligence. But the Self is not corrupted by this reflection and does not lose its ontological modalities (impassibility, eternity, etc.). The Yoga-sutras (II, 20) say in substance: seeing (drashtri; i.e., purusha) is absolute consciousness (โ€œsight par excellenceโ€) and, while remaining pure, it knows cognitions (it โ€œlooks at the ideas that are presented to itโ€). Vyasa interprets: Spirit is reflected in intelligence (buddhi), but is neither like it nor different from it. It is not like intelligence because intelligence is modified by knowledge of objects, which knowledge is ever-changing whereas purusha commands uninterrupted knowledge, in some sort it is knowledge. On the other hand, purusha is not completely different from buddhi, for, although it is pure, it knows knowledge. Patanjali employs a different image to define the relationship between Spirit and intelligence: just as a flower is reflected in a crystal, intelligence reflects purusha. But only ignorance can attribute to the crystal the qualities of the flower (form, dimensions, colors). When the object (the flower) moves, its image moves in the crystal, though the latter remains motionless. It is an illusion to believe that Spirit is dynamic because mental experience is so. In reality, there is here only an illusory relation (upadhi) owing to a โ€œsympathetic correspondenceโ€ (yogyata) between the Self and intelligence.
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Mircea Eliade (Yoga: Immortality and Freedom)
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One of the least likable characteristics of โ€œdemonicโ€ personalities is their sense of self-importance. They like to give gifts ostentatiously and offer ritual sacrifices; this legitimizes their wealth and makes them feel respectable and esteemed. They like being generous if it will make them look good.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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the Upanishads agree on their central ideas: Brahman, the Godhead; Atman, the divine core of personality; dharma, the law that expresses and maintains the unity of creation; karma, the web of cause and effect; samsara, the cycle of birth and death; moksha, the spiritual liberation that is lifeโ€™s supreme goal. Even
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Krishna warns Arjuna that a life of work, even successful work, cannot be fulfilling without Self-knowledge. Ultimately, the true Self within him is not affected by what he does, whether good or bad. Only knowledge of the Self, which rises like the sun at dawn, can fulfill the purpose of his life and lead him beyond rebirth. This
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Those who remember me at the time of death will come to me. Do not doubt this. 6 Whatever occupies the mind at the time of death determines the destination of the dying; always they will tend toward that state of being. 7 Therefore, remember me at all times and fight on. With your heart and mind intent on me, you will surely come to me. 8
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Those who are established in wisdom (sthita-prajna) live in continuous, unbroken awareness that they are not the perishable body but the Atman. Further, they see the same Self in everyone, for the Atman is universally present in all. Such a one, Krishna says, does not identify with personal desires. These desires are on the surface of personality, and the Self is its very core. The Self-realized man or woman is not motivated by personal desires โ€“ in other words, by any desire for kama, personal satisfaction.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Two forces pervade human life, the Gita says: the upward thrust of evolution and the downward pull of our evolutionary past.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Narayana
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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makes his sun rise on the wicked and on the good, and sends rain to the righteous and to the unrighteous
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Providence controlled everything. Men were simply instruments of destiny, driven by desire and hate. The
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (Mahabharata)
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Man is the slave of money, but money is no man's slave
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (Mahabharata)
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Even one who inquires after the practice of meditation rises above those who simply perform rituals.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The world of the senses is just a base camp: we are meant to be as much at home in consciousness as in the world of physical reality. This
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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As in the great ocean one piece of wood meets another, and parts from it again such is the meeting of creatures. Mahabharata
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Vyasa (The Great Mahabharata)
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The awakened sages call a person wise when all his undertakings are free from anxiety about results; all his selfish desires have been consumed in the fire of knowledge.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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God is the ground we walk on, the food we eat, and the gratitude we express, to no one in particular, as naturally as breathing.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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My mind is so restless and unsteady that I cannot even comprehend anything about this state of
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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free of the five evils which assail men: excessive sleep, fear, anger, weakness of mind, and procrastination.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (Mahabharata)
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The whole purpose of every experience, every activity, every faculty, is to turn the human being inward and lead each of us back to our divine source.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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In the Gita, maya becomes the creative power of the Godhead, the primal creative energy that makes unity appear as the world of innumerable separate things with โ€œname and form.โ€ Later
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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These six, O king, comprise the happiness of men, viz., acquirement of wealth, uninterrupted health, a beloved and a sweet-speeched wife, an obedient son, and knowledge that is lucrative.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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The yogi who are satisfied by knowledge and discrimination, and have conquered their senses, remain undisturbed in all circumstances. They see everythingโ€”dirt, stones, and goldโ€”as the same.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa
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Vaasudeva, put all that is in you into the deed which confronts you and perform it with faith in the Great God. That is what your life is for, and that is your empire which no king can filch.
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K.M. Munshi
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The Lord said: "Time [death] I am, the destroyer of the worlds, who has come to annihilate everyone. Even without your taking part all those arrayed in the [two] opposing ranks will be slain!
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa
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Valor, strength, fortitude, skill in weaponry, resolve never to retreat from battle, large-heartedness in charity, and leadership abilities, these are the natural qualities of work for Kshatriyas.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Sattvic people enjoy food that is mild, tasty, substantial, agreeable, and nourishing, food that promotes health, strength, cheerfulness, and longevity. 9 Rajasic people like food that is salty or bitter, hot, sour, or spicy โ€“ food that promotes pain, discomfort, and disease. 10 Tamasic people like overcooked, stale, leftover, and impure food, food that has lost its taste and nutritional value.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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This work opens the eyes of the world blinded by ignorance. As the sun dispels darkness, so does Bharata by its exposition of religion, duty, action, contemplation, and so forth. As the full moon by shedding soft light helps the buds of the lotus to open, so this Purana by its exposition expands the human intellect. The lamp of history illumines the โ€˜whole mansion of the womb of Nature.โ€™ โ€”Vyasa
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R.K. Narayan (The Mahabharata: A Shortened Modern Prose Version of the Indian Epic)
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The law of karma states unequivocally that though we cannot see the connections, we can be sure that everything that happens to us, good and bad, originated once in something we did or thought. We ourselves are responsible for what happens to us, whether or not we can understand how. It follows that we can change what happens to us by changing ourselves; we can take our destiny into our own hands.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Just as a seed can grow into only one kind of tree, thoughts can produce effects only of the same nature. Kindness to others, to take just one example, favors a nervous system that is kind to itself. The
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Their findings can be summarized in three statements which Aldous Huxley, following Leibnitz, has called the Perennial Philosophy because they appear in every age and civilization: (1) there is an infinite, changeless reality beneath the world of change; (2) this same reality lies at the core of every human personality; (3) the purpose of life is to discover this reality experientially: that is, to realize God while here on earth.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Samadhi is the word used by Patanjali in his classic work, the Yoga Sutras, to describe the final stage in meditation, in which the mind is completely concentrated and a superconscious mode of knowing comes into play.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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There are many different versions or recensions of the Mahabharata. However, between 1919 and 1966, the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute (BORI) in Pune produced what has come to be known as the critical edition.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahabharata: Volume 1)
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Be fearless and pure; never waver in your determination or your dedication to the spiritual life. Give freely. Be self-controlled, sincere, truthful, loving, and full of the desire to serve. Realize the truth of the scriptures; learn to be detached and to take joy in renunciation. 2 Do not get angry or harm any living creature, but be compassionate and gentle; show good will to all. 3 Cultivate vigor, patience, will, purity; avoid malice and pride.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The rajasic person is full of energy; the tamasic person is sluggish, indifferent, insensitive; the sattvic person, calm, resourceful, compassionate, and selfless. Yet all three are always present at some level of awareness, and their proportions change: their interplay is the dynamics of personality. The same individual will have times when he is bursting with energy and times when inertia descends and paralyzes his will, times when he is thoughtful and other times when he is moving so fast that he never notices those around him. The person is the same; he is simply experiencing the play of the gunas. As long as he identifies with his body and mind, he is at the mercy of this play.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Gold is tested by fire; a well-born person, by his deportment; an honest man, by his conduct. A brave man is tested during a season of panic; he that is self-controlled, in times of poverty; and friends and foes, in times of calamity and danger.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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... Krishna, the great Lord of Yoga, revealed to Arjuna his majestic, transcendent, limitless form. With innumerable mouths and eyes, faces too marvelous to stare at, dazzling ornaments, innumerable weapons uplifted, flamingโ€” crowned with fire, wrapped in pure light, with celestial fragrance, he stood forth as the infinite God, composed of all wonders. If a thousand suns were to rise and stand in the noon sky, blazing, such brilliance would be like the fierce brilliance of that mighty Self.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The word dharma means many things, but its underlying sense is โ€œthat which supports,โ€ from the root dhri, to support, hold up, or bear. Generally, dharma implies support from within: the essence of a thing, its virtue, that which makes it what it is.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Weapons, such as arrows, bullets, and bearded darts, can be easily extracted from the body, but a wordy dagger plunged deep into the heart is incapable of being taken out. Wordy arrows are shot from the mouth; smitten by them one grieveth day and night.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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(1) there is an infinite, changeless reality beneath the world of change; (2) this same reality lies at the core of every human personality; (3) the purpose of life is to discover this reality experientially: that is, to realize God while here on earth.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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without being able to arrive at its end, then, O Sanjaya, I had no hope of success. When I heard that Yudhishthira, beaten by Saubala at the game of dice and deprived of his kingdom as a consequence thereof, had still been attended upon by his brothers of
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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The law of karma states simply that every event is both a cause and an effect. Every act has consequences of a similar kind, which in turn have further consequences and so on; and every act, every karma, is also the consequence of some previous karma. This
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Strive constantly to serve the welfare of the world; by devotion to selfless work one attains the supreme goal of life. 20 Do your work with the welfare of others always in mind. It was by such work that Janaka attained perfection; others too have followed this path. 21 What the outstanding person does, others will try to do. The standards such people create will be followed by the whole world. 22 There is nothing in the three worlds for me to gain, Arjuna, nor is there anything I do not have; I continue to act, but I am not driven by any need of my own. 23 If I ever refrained from continuous work, everyone would immediately follow my example. 24 If I stopped working I would be the cause of cosmic chaos, and finally of the destruction of this world and these people. 25 The ignorant work for their own profit, Arjuna; the wise work for the welfare of the world, without thought for themselves. 26 By abstaining from work you will confuse the ignorant, who are engrossed in their actions. Perform all work carefully, guided by compassion.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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I have described the discovery of Atman and Brahman โ€“ God immanent and God transcendent โ€“ as separate, but there is no real distinction. In the climax of meditation, the sages discovered unity: the same indivisible reality without and within. It was advaita, โ€œnot two.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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As for those who seek the transcendental Reality, without name, without form, contemplating the Unmanifested, beyond the reach of thought and of feeling, 4 with their senses subdued and mind serene and striving for the good of all beings, they too will verily come unto me.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The man or woman who realizes God has everything and lacks nothing: having this, โ€œthey desire nothing else, and cannot be shaken by the heaviest burden of sorrowโ€ (6:22). Life cannot threaten such a person; all it holds is the opportunity to love, to serve, and to give. Dharma,
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Now listen, Arjuna: there are also three kinds of happiness. By sustained effort, one comes to the end of sorrow. 37 That which seems like poison at first, but tastes like nectar in the end โ€“ this is the joy of sattva, born of a mind at peace with itself. 38 Pleasure from the senses seems like nectar at first, but it is bitter as poison in the end. This is the kind of happiness that comes to the rajasic. 39 Those who are tamasic draw their pleasures from sleep, indolence, and intoxication. Both in the beginning and in the end, this happiness is a delusion.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Everything we do produces karma in the mind. In fact, it is in the mind rather than the world that karmaโ€™s seeds are planted. Aptly, Indian philosophy compares a thought to a seed: very tiny, but it can grow into a huge, deep-rooted, wide-spreading tree. I have seen places where a seed in a crack of a pavement grew into a tree that tore up the sidewalk. It is difficult to remove such a tree, and terribly difficult to undo the effects of a lifetime of negative thinking, which can extend into many other peopleโ€™s lives. But it can be done, and the purpose of the Gita is to show how.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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When the senses contact sense objects, a person experiences cold or heat, pleasure or pain. These experiences are fleeting; they come and go. Bear them patiently, Arjuna. Those who are not affected by these changes, who are the same in pleasure and pain, are truly wise and fit for immortality
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Then Krishna also decided to return home. As he was departing he spoke affectionately to Yudhisthira. "O King, cherish all your subjects with ceaseless vigilance and patience. As the cloud is to all creatures, or the large tree to the birds, so should you become the refuge to your dependants.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (Mahabharata)
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Krishna assures Arjuna that his basic nature is not subject to time and death; yet he reminds him that he cannot realize this truth if he cannot see beyond the dualities of life: pleasure and pain, success and failure, even heat and cold. The Gita does not teach a spirituality aimed at an enjoyable life in the hereafter, nor does it teach a way to enhance power in this life or the next. It teaches a basic detachment from pleasure and pain, as this chapter says more than once. Only in this way can an individual rise above the conditioning of lifeโ€™s dualities and identify with the Atman, the immortal Self. Also,
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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46 Meditation is superior to severe asceticism and the path of knowledge. It is also superior to selfless service. May you attain the goal of meditation, Arjuna! 47 Even among those who meditate, that man or woman who worships me with perfect faith, completely absorbed in me, is the most firmly established in yoga.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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The Yaksha asked, 'Who is the guest of all creatures? What is the eternal duty? What, O foremost of kings, is Amrita? And what is this entire Universe?' Yudhishthira answered, Agni is the guest of all creatures: the milk of kine is amrita: Homa (therewith) is the eternal duty: and this Universe consists of air alone.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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Over-attachment for oneโ€™s close relatives is simply born of ignorance. Every creature in the world is born alone and dies alone. He experiences the results of his own good and evil deeds and in the end leaves the present body to accept another. The belief that one person is the relation of another is nothing more than illusion.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (Mahabharata)
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When the senses contact sense objects, a person experiences cold or heat, pleasure or pain. These experiences are fleeting; they come and go. Bear them patiently, Arjuna. 15 Those who are unaffected by these changes, who are the same in pleasure and pain, are truly wise and fit for immortality. Assert your strength and realize this!
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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a man who cooketh in his own house, on the fifth or the sixth part of the day, with scanty vegetables, but who is not in debt and who stirreth not from home, is truly happy. Day after day countless creatures are going to the abode of Yama, yet those that remain behind believe themselves to be immortal. What can be more wonderful than this?
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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Kunti asked Yudhishthira to perform the rituals for Karna as well. When Yudhishthira expressed his surprise, she confessed to the real lineage of Karna. Everyone was shocked at this startling revelation. Yudhishthira could not believe that he had been instrumental in murdering his own brother for the throne of Hastinapura. He fell into a deep swoon and after coming out of it he refused to be the King of Hastinapura and prepared to leave for the forest. It required lot of effort for days together on the part of Maharishi Vyasa, Narada and Shri Krishna to finally persuade him to desist from doing so. But in sheer agony, Yudhishthira cursed all women that thenceforth they would not be able to keep any secret for long.
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Umesh Kotru (Karna The Unsung Hero of the Mahabharata)
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In sleep a person passes in and out of two stages, dreaming and dreamless sleep. In the first, consciousness is withdrawn from the body and senses but still engaged in the mind. In dreamless sleep, however, consciousness is withdrawn from the mind as well. Then the thinking process โ€“ even the sense of โ€œIโ€ โ€“ is temporarily suspended, and consciousness is said to rest in the Self. In this state a person ceases to be a separate creature, a separate personality. In dreamless sleep, the Upanishads say, a king is not a king nor a pauper poor; no one is old or young, male or female, educated or ignorant. When consciousness returns to the mind, however, the thinking process starts up again, and personality returns to the body.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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These six forget those who have bestowed obligations on them, viz., educated disciples, their preceptors; married persons, their mothers; persons whose desires have been gratified, women; they who have achieved success, they who had rendered aid; they who have crossed a river, the boat (that carried them over); and patients that have been cured, their physicians.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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The Yaksha asked, 'What hath been said to be the sign of asceticism? And what is true restraint? What constitutes forgiveness. And what is shame?' Yudhishthira answered, 'Staying in one's own religion is asceticism: the restraint of the mind is of all restraints the true one: forgiveness consists in enduring enmity; and shame, in withdrawing from all unworthy acts.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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In profound meditation, they found, when consciousness is so acutely focused that it is utterly withdrawn from the body and mind, it enters a kind of singularity in which the sense of a separate ego disappears. In this state, the supreme climax of meditation, the seers discovered a core of consciousness beyond time and change. They called it simply Atman, the Self.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Renounce and enjoy.โ€ Those who are compulsively attached to the results of action cannot really enjoy what they do; they get downcast when things do not work out and cling more desperately when they do. So the Gita classifies the karma of attachment as pleasant at first, but โ€œbitter as poison in the endโ€ (18:38), because of the painful bondage of conditioning. Again,
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Guna means strand, and in the Gita the gunas are described as the very fabric of existence, the veil that hides unity in a covering of diversity. Tamas is mayaโ€™s power of concealment, the darkness or ignorance that hides unitive reality; rajas distracts and scatters awareness, turning it away from reality toward the diversity of the outside world. Thus the gunas are essentially born of the mind. When the mindโ€™s activity is stilled, we see life as it is.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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In this state we realize that we are not a physical creature but the Atman, the Self, and thus not separate from God. We see the world not as pieces but whole, and we see that whole as a manifestation of God. Once identified with the Self, we know that although the body will die, we will not die; our awareness of this identity is not ruptured by the death of the physical body. Thus we have realized the essential immortality which is the birthright of every human being. To such a person, the Gita says, death is no more traumatic than taking off an old coat (2:22).
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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said, 'While the (Kuru) host was shaken by the grandson of Sini in these places (through which he proceeded), the son of Bharadwaja covered him with a dense shower of arrows. The encounter that then took place between Drona and Satwata in the very sight of all the troops was extremely fierce, like that between Vali and Vasava (in days of old). Then Drona pierced the grandson of Sini on the forehead with three beautiful arrows made entirely of iron and resembling' snakes of virulent poison. Thus pierced on the forehead with those straight shafts, Yuyudhana, O king, looked beautiful like a mountain with three summits. The son of Bharadwaja always on the alert for an opportunity, then sped in that battle many other arrows of Satyaki which resembled the roar of Indra's thunder. Then he of Dasarha's race, acquainted with the highest weapons, cut off all those arrows shot from Drona's bow, with two beautifully winged arrows of his. Beholding that lightness of hand (in Satyaki), Drona, O king, smiling the while, suddenly pierced that bull among the Sinis with thirty arrows. Surpassing by his own lightness the lightness of Yuyudhana, Drona, once more, pierced
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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The Self is one, the same in every creature. This is not some peculiar tenet of the Hindu scriptures; it is the testimony of everyone who has undergone these experiments in the depths of consciousness and followed them through to the end. Here is Ruysbroeck, a great mystic of medieval Europe; every word is most carefully chosen: The image of God is found essentially and personally in all mankind. Each possesses it whole, entire and undivided, and all together not more than one alone. In this way we are all one, intimately united in our eternal image, which is the image of God and the source in us of all our life. Maya In the unitive experience, every trace of separateness disappears; life is a seamless whole. But the body cannot remain in this state for long. After a while, awareness of mind and body returns, and then the conventional world of multiplicity rushes in again with such vigor and vividness that the memory of unity, though stamped with reality, seems as distant as a dream. The unitive state has to be entered over and over until a person is established in it. But once established, even in the midst of ordinary life, one sees the One underlying the many, the Eternal beneath the ephemeral.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Vaishampayana said, โ€œI shall recount the entire history, that which was composed by the great-souled maharshi Vyasa, whose powers are infinite and who is worshipped in all the worlds. This contains 100,000 sacred shlokas, composed by Satyavatiโ€™s son, Vyasa, of infinite powers. The learned man who recites it to others and also those who hear its recital attain the world of Brahma and become the equals of the gods. This is equal to the Vedas. It is sacred and supreme. It is the best of all that can be heard. It is a purana worshipped by the rishis. It contains all the useful instructions on artha and kama. This immensely sacred history makes the mind desire to attain salvation. The learned man who recites Krishnaโ€™s33 Veda to those who are noble, generous, truthful and faithful, will attain great fortune. Even sins like the killing of embryos in wombs are destroyed. On hearing it, the most evil is freed from the most evil of sins. This history, called jaya, should be heard by those who wish to attain victory. On hearing it, a king can bring the entire world under his subjugation and defeat all his enemies. This is the best way to obtain a son and the great path to ensure welfare. It should be heard several times by heirs apparent and their wives.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahabharata: Volume 1)
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Yet there are always a few who are not content to spend their lives indoors. Simply knowing there is something unknown beyond their reach makes them acutely restless. They have to see what lies outside โ€“ if only, as George Mallory said of Everest, โ€œbecause itโ€™s there.โ€ This is true of adventurers of every kind, but especially of those who seek to explore not mountains or jungles but consciousness itself: whose real drive, we might say, is not so much to know the unknown as to know the knower. Such men and women can be found in every age and every culture. While the rest of us stay put, they quietly slip out to see what lies beyond.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Indians like to classify, and the eighteen chapters of the Gita are said to break into three six-chapter parts. The first third, according to this, deals with karma yoga, the second with jnana yoga, and the last with bhakti yoga: that is, the Gita begins with the way of selfless action, passes into the way of Self-knowledge, and ends with the way of love. This scheme is not tight, and non-Hindu readers may find it difficult to discover in the text. But the themes are there, and Krishna clearly shifts his emphasis as he goes on using this one word yoga. Here he focuses on transcendental knowledge, there on selfless action, here on meditation, there on
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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What is here is found elsewhere. What is not here is found nowhere.
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Vyasa (The Mahabharata)
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Virtues of a rich man donating whole estate and a poor person donating a yard of land are equal.
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Ved Vyasa (NARADA PURANA)
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For those who establish abhorrent connection with their mother, sister or daughter, self-immolation is the only way to expiate.
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Ved Vyasa (NARADA PURANA)
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Abidance to morality is the best way to train the religion. Religion without morality is equally painful.
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Ved Vyasa (NARADA PURANA)
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Seeing Lord Vishnu in each living and non-living things is impartial view. To be in peace and harmony in all circumstances with each and everyone is peace.
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Ved Vyasa (NARADA PURANA)
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Desist, brother. Great men never care for the harsh words uttered by inferior men. Even if able to retaliate, they do not take seriously acts of hostility, preferring instead to remember even a little good that their enemies may have done them.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (Mahabharata)
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The Mahabharata is literature at its greatest โ€“ in fact, it has been called a literature in itself, comparable in its breadth and depth and characterization to the whole of Greek literature or Shakespeare. But what makes it unique is that embedded in this literary masterpiece is one of the finest mystical documents the world has seen: the Bhagavad Gita.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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If I could offer only one key to understanding this divine dialogue, it would be to remember that it takes place in the depths of consciousness and that Krishna is not some external being, human or superhuman, but the spark of divinity that lies at the core of the human personality. This is not literary or philosophical conjecture; Krishna says as much to Arjuna over and over: โ€œI am the Self in the heart of every creature, Arjuna, and the beginning, middle, and end of their existence
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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I am time, the destroyer of all; I have come to consume the world.
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Vyasa
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To keep me chaste and foster harmony in the Pandava household, Vyasa designed a special code of marital conduct for us. I would be wife to each brother for a year at a time, from oldest to youngest, consecutively. During that year, the other brothers were to keep their eyes lowered when speaking to me. (Better if they didnโ€™t speak at all.) They were not to touch me, not even the tips of my fingers. If they intruded upon our privacy when my husband and I were together, they were to be banished for a year from the household. In a postscript he added that he would give me a boon to balance the one that had landed me with five spouses. Each time I went to a new brother, Iโ€™d be a virgin again.
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Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni (The Palace of Illusions)
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O guide of the Ganas! be thou the writer of the Bharata which I have formed in my imagination, and which I am about to repeat.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa - Complete)
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What is described is the conflict within the human body between opposing moral tendencies, which are imagined as distinct figures. A seer such as Vyasa would never concern himself with a description of mere physical fighting. It is the human body that is described as Kurukshetra, as dharmakshetra9 . The epithet may also mean that for a Kshatriya a battlefield is always a fi eld of dharma. Surely a fi eld on which the Pandavas too were present could not be altogether a place of sin.
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Mahatma Gandhi (Bhagavad Gita According to Gandhi)
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Through the story of Ram, Vyasa is trying to explain that while we believe our problems are the greatest and our misfortunes the worst, there is always someone out there who has suffered more. And just as they survived and triumphed over their suffering, we must too.
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Devdutt Pattanaik (Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata)
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By associating Arjuna and Krishna to Nara and Narayana, Vyasa makes them creatures of destiny. Their birth is not random; they are born for a reason.
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Devdutt Pattanaik (Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata)
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Who are the Eight Immortals?โ€™ asked Adhyapika. โ€˜One of them is Ashwatthama, the son of guru Drona. He was given immortality not as a boon but as a curse for his misdeeds. Then thereโ€™s Vyasa, the sage who narrated the Mahabharata. He was born in Tretayug, lived through Dwaparyug and Kalyug. Also there is the Asura King Bali whose pious deeds on earth provided him with the boon of being able to visit his subjects once a year during Onam.โ€™ โ€˜Thatโ€™s only three,โ€™ said Adhyapika. โ€˜Well, the fourth is Vibhishana, Ravanaโ€™s brother. He was made immortal in order to maintain morality and righteousness in Lanka. Fifth, thereโ€™s Kripa, the kulguru of the Kurus. His impartiality towards all of his students was the reason for his immortality. And sixth, Parshurama, the master of astras, shastras and celestial weapons. He is waiting for Kalki, the final avatar of Vishnu, to appear so that he may train him in warfare. Seventh is Markendeya, a devotee of Shiva who was granted immortality by him when Shiva and Yama fought each other. Finally, thereโ€™s me, the eighth.โ€™ โ€˜But why were all of you in Ashokaโ€™s
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Ashwin Sanghi (The Sialkot Saga)
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May no woman give birth to one who would mutely suffer insults, who is devoid of vigour and manly prowess and one who would bring joy to the enemies. -Mahabharata
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Vyasa
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He counsels Arjuna to be compassionate to friend and enemy alike, to see himself in every person, to suffer othersโ€™ sorrows as his own.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Without beginning and without end, the wheel of existence rolls on eternally in this world, causing creation and destruction, without beginning and without end.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahabharata: Volume 1)
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I am become Death, the shatterer of worlds
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Veda Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gitaโ€”The Song of God)
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I am time, the destroyer of all; I have come to consume the world.
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Veda Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gitaโ€”The Song of God)
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Good people come to worship me for different reasons. Some come to the spiritual life because of suffering, some in order to understand life; some come through a desire to achieve lifeโ€™s purpose, and some come who are men and women of wisdom. 17 Unwavering in devotion, always united with me, the man or woman of wisdom surpasses all the others. To them I am the dearest beloved, and they are very dear to me. 18 All those who follow the spiritual path are blessed. But the wise who are always established in union, for whom there is no higher goal than me, may be regarded as my very Self.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Out of the corruption of women proceeds the confusion of castes; out of the confusion of castes, the loss of memory; out of the loss of memory, the lack of understanding; and out of this, all evils.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Real renunciation was something internal, not external. One who did his duty in a mood of detachment was the true renunciant, not the man who gave up his duty.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (Mahabharata)
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there are many remarkable parallels between the (revised) metaphysical vision of Plotinus and that of the Bhagavad Gita. These parallels arise from the fact that both Vyasa and Plotinus had directly experienced these truths in their visionary revelations, as have innumerable other souls. We must not forget, however, that Plotinus must certainly have had some introduction to the Indian metaphysics through his guru, Ammonius, who was said to be conversant with both the Persian and Indian metaphysics.
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Swami Abhayananda (Body and Soul: An Integral Perspective)
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Bhagavad Gita, โ€œThe Song Of God.โ€ It is a philosophical dialogue, written by some illumined sage of the time (and attributed to the legendary sage, Vyasa), which offers the most comprehensive and definitive expression of the Samkhya philosophy ever written.
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Swami Abhayananda (History of Mysticism: The Unchanging Testament)
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Some declare that action should be shunned and that salvation is attainable by knowledge. The Brahmanas say that though one may have a knowledge of eatable things, yet his hunger will not be appeased unless he actually eats. Those branches of knowledge that help the doing of work, bear fruit, but not other kinds, for the fruit of work is of ocular demonstration. A thirsty person drinks water, and by that act his thirst is allayed. This result proceeds, no doubt, from work. Therein lies the efficacy of work. If anyone thinks that something else is better than work, I deem, his work and his words are meaningless.
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Kisari Mohan Ganguli (The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 Books 4, 5, 6 and 7)
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El amor, dice, es ciego, pero no es exactamente asรญ: el amor es un ojo extra con el que se ve tan sรณlo lo que hay de bueno en el ser amado, permaneciendo ciego a todas sus faltas. - Mahabharata (Tomo 1)
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa
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we have control over our work and actions, but we have no command of the results.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Bhagavad Gita)
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Those kinds of food that increase life's period, energy, strength, health, well-being, and joy, which are savoury, oleaginous, nutritive, and agreeable, are liked by God.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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The Yaksha asked, 'What is that which, if renounced, maketh one agreeable? What is that which, if renounced, leadeth to no regret? What is that which, if renounced, maketh one wealthy? And what is that which if renounced, maketh one happy?' Yudhishthira answered, 'Pride, if renounced, maketh one agreeable; wrath, if renounced leadeth to no regret: desire, if renounced, maketh one wealthy: and avarice, if renounced, maketh one happy.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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The Yaksha asked, 'By what, O king, birth, behaviour, study, or learning doth a person become a Brahmana? Tell us with certitude!' Yudhishthira answered,-'Listen, O Yaksha! It is neither birth, nor study, nor learning, that is the cause of Brahmanahood, without doubt, it is behaviour that constitutes it. One's behaviour should always be well-guarded, especially by a Brahmana. He who maintaineth his conduct unimpaired, is never impaired himself. Professors and pupils, in fact, all who study the scriptures, if addicted to wicked habits, are to be regarded as illiterate wretches. He only is learned who performeth his religious duties. He even that hath studied the four Vedas is to be regarded as a wicked wretch scarcely distinguishable from a Sudra (if his conduct be not correct).
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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Thinking of the objects of sense, a person's attachment is begotten towards them. From attachment springeth wrath; from wrath ariseth want of discrimination; from want of discrimination, loss of memory; from loss of memory, loss of understanding; and from loss of understanding (he) is utterly ruined.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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He who is not self-restrained hath no contemplation (of self). He who hath no contemplation hath no peace (of mind).[148] Whence can there be happiness for him who hath no peace (of mind)?
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)
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Wisdom, good lineage, self-control, acquaintance with the scriptures, prowess, absence of garrulity, gift to the extent of one's power, and gratefulness, these eight qualities shed a lustre upon their possessor.
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Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa (The Mahฤbhฤrata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa)