Uhtred Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Uhtred. Here they are! All 54 of them:

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What happens to you, Uhtred, is what you make happen. You will grow, you will learn the sword, you will learn the way of the shield wall, you will learn the oar, you will give honor to the gods, and then you will use what you have learned to make your life good or bad.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Stories, #1))
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All those separate people were a part of my life, strings strung on the frame of Uhtred, and though they were separate they affected one another and together they would make the music of my life.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Stories, #1))
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I had the arrogant confidence of a man born to battle. I am Uhtred, son of Uhtred, son of another Uhtred, and we had not held Bebbanburg and its lands by whimpering at altars. We are warriors.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Stories, #1))
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You're a bastard," I said. "Uhtred," he began, but could find nothing more to say. "You're a piece of weasel-shit," I said, "you're an earsling." "I'm a king," he said, trying to regain his dignity. "So you're a royal piece of weasel-shit. An earsling on a throne.
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Bernard Cornwell (Lords of the North (The Saxon Stories, #3))
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I hated Alfred. He was a miserable, pious, tight-fisted king who distrusted me because I was no Christian, because I was a northerner, and because I had given him his kingdom back at Ethandun. And as reward he had given me Fifhaden. Bastard.
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Bernard Cornwell (Lords of the North (The Saxon Stories, #3))
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- Senhor Uhtred! - Como sempre, Willibald reagiu Γ  minha provocação. - Esse peixe - ele apontou o dedo trΓͺmulo na direção dos ossos - foi um dos dois que Nosso Senhor usou para alimentar 5 mil pessoas! - O outro devia ser um peixe incrivelmente grande - respondi. - O que era? Uma baleia?
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Bernard Cornwell (Death of Kings (The Saxon Stories, #6))
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I'm in pain all the time,' I said, 'and if I gave into it then I'd do nothing.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Empty Throne (The Saxon Stories, #8))
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There’s war between the gods, Uhtred, war between the Christian god and our gods, and when there is war in Asgard the gods make us fight for them on earth.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Stories, #1))
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I could imagine Cnut sitting there and thinking that I must join him soon, and we would raise a horn of ale together. There is no pain in Valhalla, no sadness, no tears, no broken oaths.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Empty Throne (The Saxon Stories, #8))
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- Senhor Uhtred! - O padre Willibald veio correndo na minha direção. - O que estΓ‘ acontecendo? O que estΓ‘ acontecendo? - Decidi comeΓ§ar uma guerra, padre - respondi cheio de animação. - Γ‰ muito mais interessante que a paz.
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Bernard Cornwell (Death of Kings (The Saxon Stories, #6))
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I am Uhtred, son of Uhtred, and this is the tale of a blood feud. It is a tale of how I will take from my enemy what the law says is mine. And it is the tale of a woman and of her father, a king. He was my king and all that I have I owe to him. The food that I eat, the hall where I live, and the swords of my men, all came from Alfred, my king, who hated me.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Stories, #1))
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The Lord Uhtred sought to annoy you, bishop," the king said, "and it is best not to give him the satisfaction of showing that he has succeeded.
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Bernard Cornwell (Sword Song (The Saxon Stories, #4))
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You should always plan your battles form the enemy's point of view.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Flame Bearer (The Saxon Stories, #10))
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I think only one man in three is a warrior, and sometimes not even that many, but in our army, Uhtred, every man is a fighter. If you do not want to be a warrior you stay home in Denmark. You till the soil, herd sheep, fish the sea, but you do not take to the ships and become a fighter. But here in England? Every man is forced to the fight, yet only one in three or maybe only one in four has the belly for it. The rest are farmers who just want to run. We are wolves fighting sheep.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Stories, #1))
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My name is Uhtred. I am the son of Uhtred, who was the son of Uhtred and his father was also called Uhtred.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Stories, #1))
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There is a greater war, Uhtred. Not the fight between Saxon and Dane, but between God and the devil, between good and evil! We are part of it!
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Bernard Cornwell (The Pale Horseman (The Saxon Stories, #2))
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Tell Ragnall,” I told him, β€œthat the Saxons of Mercia are coming. Tell him that his dead will number in the thousands. Tell him that his own death is just days away. Tell him that promise comes from Uhtred of Bebbanburg.
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Bernard Cornwell (Warriors of the Storm (The Saxon Stories, #9))
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Nothing finishes an evening in an alehouse so well as a fight.
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Uhtred of Bebbanburg
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Men do not relish the shield wall. They do not rush to death's embrace. You look ahead and see the overlapping shields, the helmets, the glint of axes and spears and swords, and you know you must go into the reach of those blades, into the place of death, and it takes time to summon the courage, to heat the blood, to let the madness overtake caution.
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Bernard Cornwell (Death of Kings (The Saxon Stories, #6))
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Wyrd bið ful āræd.
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Bernard Cornwell (War of the Wolf (The Saxon Stories, #11))
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You bastard!' he shouted. He was quick. No warrior stays alive by being slow.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Empty Throne (The Saxon Stories, #8))
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The gods are not kind to us, any more than children are kind to their toys. We are here to amuse the gods, and at times it amuses them to be unkind.
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Bernard Cornwell (War of the Wolf (The Saxon Stories, #11))
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I look at those parchments, which are deeds saying that Uhtred, son of Uhtred, is the lawful and sole owner of the lands that are carefully marked by stones and by dykes, by oaks and by ash, by marsh and by sea, and I dream of those lands, wavebeaten and wild beneath the winddriven sky. I dream, and know that one day I will take back the land from those who stole it from me.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Stories, #1))
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I was Uhtred, Lord of Bebbanburg, in my war-glory. The arm rings of fallen enemies glinted on my forearms, my shield was newly painted with the snarling wolf’s head of my house, while another wolf, this one of silver, crouched on the crest of my polished helmet. My mail was tight, polished with sand, my sword belt and scabbard and bridle and saddle were studded with silver, there was a gold chain at my neck, my boots were panelled with silver, my drawn sword was grey with the whorls of its making running from the hilt to its hungry tip. I was the lord of war mounted on a great black horse, and together we would make panic.
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Bernard Cornwell (Warriors of the Storm (The Saxon Stories, #9))
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It was the year 878, I was twenty-one years old and believed my swords could win me the whole world. I was Uhtred of Bebbanburg, the man who had killed Ubba Lothbrokson beside the sea and who had spilled Svein of the White Horse from his saddle at Ethandun. I was the man who had given Alfred his kingdom back and I hated him. So I would leave him. My path was the sword-path, and it would take me home. I would go north.
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Bernard Cornwell (Lords of the North (The Saxon Stories, #3))
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Win your war, Lord Uhtred," he said, "then take her away from us priests and give her lots of children. She'll be happy, and one day she'll be truly wise. That's the women's real gift, to be wise, and not many men have it.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Pale Horseman (The Saxon Stories, #2))
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Earsling,' a harsh voice challenged me from beside the Wheatsheaf's heart. 'What rancid demon brought you here to spoil my day?' I stared. And stared. Because the last person I had ever expected to see in AEthelred's stronghold of Gleawecestre was staring at me. 'Well, earsling?' he demanded, 'what are you doing here?' It was my father.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Empty Throne (The Saxon Stories, #8))
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Alfred has trapped you, Uhtred.” β€œNo,” I said, β€œthe spinners did that.” Ur r, Ver andi, and Skuld, the three women who spin our threads at the foot of Yggdrasil, had decided my fate. Destiny is all. β€œI shall go to my woman,” I said.
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Bernard Cornwell
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Cnut Longsword had near killed me with his blade Ice-Spite and it was small consolation that Serpent-Breath had sliced his throat in the same heartbeat that his sword had broken a rib and pierced my lung.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Empty Throne (The Saxon Stories, #8))
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I have often suspected that Loki, the trickster god, invented Christianity because it has his wicked stench all over it. I can imagine the gods sitting in Asgard one night, all of them bored and probably drunk, and Loki amuses them with a typical piece of his nonsense, "Let’s invent a carpenter," he suggests, "and tell the fools that he was the son of the only god, that he died and came back to life, that he cured blindness with lumps of clay, and that he walked on water!" Who would believe that nonsense? But the trouble with Loki is that he always takes his jests too far.
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Bernard Cornwell
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You will tell him that Uhtred of Bebbanburg is in a mood to kill.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Pagan Lord (The Saxon Stories, #7))
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then went to the small room where Uhtred lay. Except he was no longer Uhtred. He called himself Father Oswald now and I found him propped up in his bed with color in his cheeks.
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Bernard Cornwell (Warriors of the Storm (The Saxon Stories #9))
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With Stiorra too,” I said, and felt a pang of guilt. I have been a careless father. My eldest son was an outlaw to me because of his damned religion, Uhtred had turned out well, but none of that was my doing, while Stiorra was a mystery to me.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Empty Throne (The Saxon Stories #8))
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The church, we're to meet in the church. Do try to wipe that blood off your mail, Uhtred. We're an embassy!
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Bernard Cornwell (Lords of the North (The Saxon Stories, #3))
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We are going to soak this rock with blood! I am Uhtred! I am the lord here. This is my rock!
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Bernard Cornwell (The Flame Bearer (The Saxon Stories, #10))
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We were three ships in a summer's dawn, and we were going to battle.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Flame Bearer (The Saxon Stories, #10))
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It never occurred to me that they might not accept it, yet looking back I am astonished that the battle of Cynuit was fought according to the idea of a twenty-year-old who had never stood in a slaughter wall. Yet I was tall, I was a lord, I had grown up among warriors, and I had the arrogant confidence of a man born to battle. I am Uhtred, son of Uhtred, son of another Uhtred, and we had not held Bebbanburg and its lands by whimpering at altars. We are warriors.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Stories, #1))
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Osferth, at time we are all afraid. Courage is finding the will to overcome your fear, nothing more.
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Uhtred of Bebbanburg
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Idle men make mischief, especially idle men supplied with ale, whores, and weapons.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Flame Bearer (The Saxon Stories, #10))
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All you need to know, boy," Finan growled, "is that Lord Uhtred's side is the one that wins.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Flame Bearer (The Saxon Stories, #10))
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Choose your battles,’ I snarled at Γ†thelstan. β€˜That space between your ears was given so that you can think! If you just charge whenever you see an enemy you’ll earn yourself an early grave.’ Lord Uhtred of Bebbanburg
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Bernard Cornwell (Warriors of the Storm (The Saxon Stories, #9))
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And you, Uhtred of Bebbanburg, Uhtred of Nothing, will die last and die slowest because you have betrayed the gods. You are cursed. You are all cursed!" She cackled then, a mad sound, before pointing the blade at me again. "The gods hate you, Uhtred! You were their son, you were their favourite, you were loved by them, but you chose to use your gifts for the false god, for the filthy Christian god, and now the real gods hate you and curse you! I speak to the gods, they listen to me, they will give you to me and I will kill you so slowly that your death will last till Ragnarok!
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Bernard Cornwell (Warriors of the Storm (The Saxon Stories, #9))
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Serpent-Breath was famous...Wasp-Sting, short and lethal.
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Bernard Cornwell (Death of Kings (The Saxon Stories, #6))
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I’m not his man, Father. I’m Uhtred of Bebbanburg, and the lords of Bebbanburg don’t marry pious maggotfaced bitches of low birth.
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Bernard Cornwell
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He thinks with his heart, Uhtred,’ Alfred said, β€˜not his head. You can change a man’s heart, but not his head.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Last Kingdom (The Last Kingdom, #1))
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It had happened to me once, long ago. I had been named Osbert by my father, who was called Uhtred, but when my elder brother, also Uhtred, was slaughtered by the Danes my father had renamed me. It is always thus in our family. The eldest son carries on the name. My stepmother, a foolish woman, even had me baptized a second time because, she said, the angels who guard the gates of heaven would not know me by my new name, and so I was dipped in the water barrel, but Christianity washed off me, thank Christ, and I discovered the old gods and have worshiped them ever since.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Pagan Lord (The Saxon Stories, #7))
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The other held a hand toward the wretched boy in the dung-heap. β€œFather Uhtred,” he said. β€œHis name is not Uhtred,” I snarled, β€œand if he dares call himself Uhtred,” I looked at him as I spoke, β€œthen I will find him and I will cut his belly to the bone and I will feed his lily-livered guts to my swine. He is not my son. He’s not worthy to be my son.” The man who was not worthy to be my son clambered wetly from the dung-heap, dripping filth. He looked up at me. β€œThen what am I called?” he asked. β€œJudas,” I said mockingly.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Pagan Lord (The Saxon Stories, #7))
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Uhtred of Steapa - He might be dumb as a parsnip but he knows how to fight.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Burning Land (The Saxon Stories, #5))
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(Erkanwald) β€œThat is what you do, Lord Uhtred! You beat a child into obedience! A child learns by suffering pain, by being beaten, and that pregnant child must learn her duty. God wills it! Praise God!” I heard only last week that they want to make Erkenwald into a saint. Priests come to my home beside the northern sea where they find an old man, and they tell me I am just a few paces from the fires of hell. I only need repent, they say, and I will go to heaven and live for evermore in the blessed company of the saints. And I would rather burn till time itself burns out.
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Bernard Cornwell (Sword Song (The Saxon Stories, #4))
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Many folk are clever, lord Uhtred, but very few are wise.
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Bernard Cornwell (Death of Kings (The Saxon Stories, #6))
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You road, Uhtred, is like a bright blade across a dark moor. I see it clearly.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Pale Horseman (The Saxon Stories, #2))
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Your road, Uhtred, is like a bright blade across a dark moor. I see it clearly.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Pale Horseman (The Saxon Stories, #2))
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What happens to you, Uhtred, is what you make happen.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Stories, #1))
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The
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H.A. Culley (Uhtred the Bold: Earls of Northumbria Book 1)