Tokyo Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Tokyo. Here they are! All 200 of them:

Kenapa harus takut gelap kalau ada banyak hal indah yang hanya bisa dilihat sewaktu gelap? -Nishimura Kazuto
Ilana Tan (Winter in Tokyo)
If an angelic being fell from the sky and tried to live in this world of ours I think even they would commit many wrongs.
Sui Ishida
If you were to write a story with me in the lead role, it would certainly be... a tragedy
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
Fear is like a fire. If you can control it, it can cook for you. It can heat your house.If you can't control it, it will burn everything around you and destroy you. Fear is your friend and your worst enemy.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール:re 1 [Tokyo Guru:re 1] (Tokyo Ghoul:re, #1))
Human relationships are chemical reactions. If you have a reaction then you can never return back to your previous state of being.
Sui Ishida
Sometimes good people make bad choices. It doesn't mean they are bad people. It means they're human.
Sui Ishida
Dia juga tidak perlu melakukan apa-apa. Yang paling penting adalah kenyataan bahwa dia ada dan saya bisa melihatnya.” –Nishimura Kazuto–
Ilana Tan (Winter in Tokyo)
I'm not going to protect you by being your shield or armor, but I'll be the dagger hidden below your pillow.
Sui Ishida
Ada saatnya ketika rasa sakit sama sekali tidak penting. - Nishimura Kazuto
Ilana Tan (Winter in Tokyo)
It's better to be hurt than to hurt others. Nice people can be happy with just that.
Sui Ishida
We need to have a mask that we never take off.
Sui Ishida
If the love is true, then treat it the same way you would plant - feed it, protect it from the elements - you must do absolutely everything you can. But if it isn't true, then it's best to just let it wither on the vine.
Hiromi Kawakami (The Briefcase)
A calm and modest life brings more happiness than the pursuit of success combined with constant restlessness. Imperial Hotel note paper, Tokyo Japan, 1922
Albert Einstein
Rather than a person who hurts others, become the person getting hurt
Sui Ishida
In choosing both, you lose both.
Sui Ishida
You don't need to blame yourself just because you've hurt someone, just like when you're walking you can't really blame yourself to crush some ants... that's what being stronger ones means.
Sui Ishida
Trusting a human is difficult, but, if it’s by you, then it’s probably fine if I’m betrayed.
Sui Ishida
It's not because we can't take vengeance that we should feel sorry. The real reason to feel sorry... is when one is hung up on revenge and can't live their own life.
Sui Ishida
I did a lot of shopping for her in Tokyo because the colors here are very conservative. A shopaholic would have a coat in every color and lots of accessories
Sophie Kinsella (Confessions of a Shopaholic (Shopaholic, #1))
WHY DID YOU LEAVE ME ALL ALONE..! I'm lovely.. I don't want to be alone. Mom... I... I wanted you to choose me... I WANTED YOU TO LIVE FOR ME!" "Even if it meant letting your aunt die?" "EVEN IF IT MEANT LETTING HER DIE!
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 7 [Tokyo Guru 7] (Tokyo Ghoul, #7))
I can neither live with you. Nor without you.
Sui Ishida
If all you ever see is reality, you just want to die.
Durian Sukegawa (Les délices de Tokyo)
even a cracked pot has a lid that fits.
Hiromi Kawakami (The Briefcase)
What's wrong isn't me, What's wrong is the world
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
The rain that fell on the city runs down the dark gutters and empties into the sea without even soaking the ground
Haruki Murakami (Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche)
Karena sesuatu yang indah akan terlihat saat gelap. Nishimura Kazuto
Ilana Tan (Winter in Tokyo)
I wandered the earth a mercenary, daring the gods to kill me but surviving because part of me was already dead.
Barry Eisler (A Clean Kill in Tokyo (John Rain, #1))
I'm not the protagonist of a novel or anything... I'm just a normal college student who likes to read... But... If I were to write a book with me as the main character... It would be... ...A tragedy.
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
People’s lives never stay the same colour forever. There are times when the colour of life changes completely.
Durian Sukegawa (Les délices de Tokyo)
Si el mundo es un desastre, entonces este desastre es causado por todo lo existente en este mundo.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 8 [Tokyo Guru 8] (Tokyo Ghoul, #8))
I led me by the hand, as if to fill the niches in the memories in my oozing brain fluid. Without even a destination, we kept walking. Disgusting clouds were floating in the sky. I already know what will happen to me the next time I wake up.
Sui Ishida
When the farthest corner of the globe has been conquered technologically and can be exploited economically; when any incident you like, in any place you like, at any time you like, becomes accessible as fast as you like; when you can simultaneously "experience" an assassination attempt against a king in France and a symphony concert in Tokyo; when time is nothing but speed, instantaneity, and simultaneity, and time as history has vanished from all Being of all peoples; when a boxer counts as the great man of a people; when the tallies of millions at mass meetings are a triumph; then, yes then, there still looms like a specter over all this uproar the question: what for? — where to? — and what then?
Martin Heidegger (Introduction to Metaphysics)
He walked on water. Perhaps. But could he have *swum* on land? In matching knickers and dark glasses? With his Fountain in a Love-in-Tokyo? In pointy shoes and a puff? Would he have had the imagination?
Arundhati Roy (The God of Small Things)
For my 20th birthday in March, I'll buy myself a present for doing my best. A one way ticket to Tokyo. All I need is my guitar and a pack of cigarettes.
Ai Yazawa (Nana, Vol. 1)
...what makes you older is when your bones, muscles and blood wear out, when the heart sinks into oblivion and all the houses you ever lived in are gone and people are not really certain that your civilization ever existed.
Richard Brautigan (Tokyo-Montana Express)
What comes from the heart will go to the heart
Renae Lucas-Hall
This world is wrong. We have to correct it.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 3 (Tokyo Ghoul, #3))
Forcing myself to make conversation felt like standing on a cliff, peering over the edge, about to tumble down headfirst.
Hiromi Kawakami (The Briefcase)
Despite knowing we will one day be bereft, despite knowing we will one day disappear, we still strive in wretched ways. We still wish to be beautiful.
Sui Ishida
I don't have an American half and a Japanese half. I am a whole person. Nobody gets to tell me if I am Japanese enough or too American.
Emiko Jean (Tokyo Ever After (Tokyo Ever After, #1))
Only the framing material," Lucas demurely, "obvious influences, Neo-Tokyo from Akira, Ghost in the Shell, Metal Gear Solid by Hideo Kojima, or as he's known in my crib, God.
Thomas Pynchon (Bleeding Edge)
I want to take this fucked up, piece of shit world, fuck it up even more and then give it a factory reset.
Eto Yoshimura
The smallest snowstorm on record took place an hour ago in my back yard. It was approximately two flakes. I waited for more to fall, but that was it. The entire storm was two flakes.
Richard Brautigan (Tokyo-Montana Express)
He stomped away like a pint-sized Godzilla looking for Tokyo.
Julia Spencer-Fleming (I Shall Not Want (Rev. Clare Fergusson & Russ Van Alstyne Mysteries, #6))
What's tragic isn't that we can't retaliate... What's truly tragic is... ...being consumed with vengeance and not being able to live your life.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 2 (Tokyo Ghoul, #2))
Tormented by an unworldly hunger, yet not knowing how to satisfy it.
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
The deeper the pain you have, the more you hide it. I am sure I am not the only one who has suffered. The bitter truth is often covered with fake smiles.
Sōji Shimada (The Tokyo Zodiac Murders)
Mimpi tidak akan bertahan lama. Kita boleh saja hidup dalam mimpi, tetapi cepat atau lambat kenyataan akan mendesan masuk, dan ketika kenyataan mendesak masuk dan berhadapan denganmu, kau hanya bisa menerima. - Keiko Ishida
Ilana Tan (Winter in Tokyo)
I used to think the world belonged to me. But I was wrong. I belong to the world. And sometimes … I guess sometimes, our choices have to reflect that.
Emiko Jean (Tokyo Ever After (Tokyo Ever After, #1))
There was something dead in my heart. I tried to figure out what it was by the strength of the smell. I knew that it was not a lion or a sheep or a dog. Using logical deduction, I came to the conclusion that it was a mouse. I had a dead mouse in my heart.
Richard Brautigan (Tokyo-Montana Express)
The smell of death was thick in the city of Vārāṇasī. And in Tokyo as well. And yet the birds blissfully sang their songs.
Shūsaku Endō (Deep River)
If you were to write a story with me in the lead role, it would certainly be... a tragedy.
Sui Ishida
To speak is to stumble, to hesitate, to detour and hit dead ends. To listen is straightforward. You can always just listen.
Miri Yū (Tokyo Ueno Station)
It took us five hours to reach Tokyo, but I was really happy. I kept talking about myself, and didn't hear anything about Nana. But now that I know you better; I know you wouldn't say anything.
Ai Yazawa (Nana, Vol. 1)
I just gave them a little scare. A touch of psychological terror. As Joseph Conrad once wrote, true terror is the kind that men feel towards their imagination. (from Super-frog Saves Tokyo)
Haruki Murakami (After the Quake)
If I'd been born a ghoul, I think I would've killed people. I just happened to be born a human. That's the only reason why I'm allowed to live a moral life.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 4 [Tokyo Guru 4] (Tokyo Ghoul, #4))
I have snacks." Ah, the real three words every girl longs to hear.
Emiko Jean (Tokyo Ever After (Tokyo Ever After, #1))
Good night. I'm Cinderella without her prince. Do you know where to find me in Tokyo? You won't see me again.
Osamu Dazai (Schoolgirl)
[..]Although personally, I think cyberspace means the end of our species." Yes? Why is that?" Because it means the end of innovation," Malcolm said. "This idea that the whole world is wired together is mass death. Every biologist knows that small groups in isolation evolve fastest. You put a thousand birds on an ocean island and they'll evolve very fast. You put ten thousand on a big continent, and their evolution slows down. Now, for our own species, evolution occurs mostly through our behaviour. We innovate new behaviour to adapt. And everybody on earth knows that innovation only occurs in small groups. Put three people on a committee and they may get something done. Ten people, and it gets harder. Thirty people, and nothing happens. Thirty million, it becomes impossible. That's the effect of mass media - it keeps anything from happening. Mass media swamps diversity. It makes every place the same. Bangkok or Tokyo or London: there's a McDonald's on one corner, a Benetton on another, a Gap across the street. Regional differences vanish. All differences vanish. In a mass-media world, there's less of everything except the top ten books, records, movies, ideas. People worry about losing species diversity in the rain forest. But what about intellectual diversity - our most necessary resource? That's disappearing faster than trees. But we haven't figured that out, so now we're planning to put five billion people together in cyberspace. And it'll freeze the entire species. Everything will stop dead in its tracks. Everyone will think the same thing at the same time. Global uniformity. [..]
Michael Crichton (The Lost World (Jurassic Park, #2))
For the future of the earth, We shall fight for it ~Nyan!~
Mia Ikumi (Tokyo Mew Mew, Vol. 1 (Tokyo Mew Mew, #1))
What's wrong with wanting to live...? We may be different but we were still given life. Given a chance. If we can only eat humans, then that's what we'll do. How else are we supposed to live with these bodies of ours?!
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 3 (Tokyo Ghoul, #3))
In Paris the cashiers sit rather than stand. They run your goods over a scanner, tally up the price, and then ask you for exact change. The story they give is that there aren't enough euros to go around. "The entire EU is short on coins." And I say, "Really?" because there are plenty of them in Germany. I'm never asked for exact change in Spain or Holland or Italy, so I think the real problem lies with the Parisian cashiers, who are, in a word, lazy. Here in Tokyo they're not just hard working but almost violently cheerful. Down at the Peacock, the change flows like tap water. The women behind the registers bow to you, and I don't mean that they lower their heads a little, the way you might if passing someone on the street. These cashiers press their hands together and bend from the waist. Then they say what sounds to me like "We, the people of this store, worship you as we might a god.
David Sedaris (When You Are Engulfed in Flames)
There are not too many fables about man's misuse of sunflower seeds.
Richard Brautigan (Tokyo-Montana Express)
In order to be released from that agony, it doesn't matter what it takes even if it means using your friend's life, right? And then after you've gobbled him down you'd be left alone to regret it while covered in blood and guts. That's the hunger of a 'Ghoul'.
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
If you took the city of Tokyo and turned it upside down and shook it you would be amazed at the animals that fall out: badgers, wolves, boa constrictors, crocodiles, ostriches, baboons, capybaras, wild boars, leopards, manatees, ruminants, in untold numbers. There is no doubt in my mind that that feral giraffes and feral hippos have been living in Tokyo for generations without seeing a soul.
Yann Martel (Life of Pi)
Shout out to all the girls who apologize too much.
Emiko Jean (Tokyo Ever After (Tokyo Ever After, #1))
Es el recuerdo, no el olvido, el verdadero invento del demonio
Ray Loriga (Tokyo Doesn't Love Us Anymore)
Confession is for the confessor. It makes you feel good; it ruins the lives of everyone else. It’s a selfish thing to do. Don’t confess.
Jake Adelstein (Tokyo Vice: An American Reporter on the Police Beat in Japan)
Now I understand How lonely the sun must be The unending job To rise again and again Setting fire to all it sees
Emiko Jean (Tokyo Ever After (Tokyo Ever After, #1))
Even if it's a life in shackles, if you have somebody who accepts you for what you really are, how reassuring would that be?
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 4 [Tokyo Guru 4] (Tokyo Ghoul, #4))
You? You can’t believe this? I’m the one who has to go to Artemis to save your ass. She was freaking out over Zarek, now how the hell do I explain to her that Mr. Cool-Calm-and-Collected was doing his impression of Spider Man in a bar loaded with tourists and ended up as the main feature on Tokyo news as what’s wrong with American culture? Question. How many rules did you break in less than a minute? (Acheron)
Sherrilyn Kenyon (Night Embrace (Dark-Hunter, #2))
King Norodom of Cambodia replied, “Lt. General Kawamura of the Japanese Imperial Army, It is my understanding that you Japanese are granting my people a partial freedom which is always subject to the approval of any laws we make by the Japanese Government in Tokyo!” (A Gracious Enemy & After the War Volume Two)
Michael G. Kramer
The act of taking is equally evil. We, from the moment of birth, continue to take. Food, connections, even fellow blood. Living to the utmost. Continuing to slaughter, kill, take. Life is to constantly sin. Life is evil itself. I am aware I am evil…. And so are you all. Now, come kill me and, I shall do the same.
Yoshimura
There's no place for someone who can't decide between being one or the other.
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
Your heart is burning strong with righteous indignation... That flame is scattering sparks that may set fire elsewhere. That fire of yours will one day spread to others seeking a just world. The point is whether you have a torch in your heart or not. To light a fire to others.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 2 (Tokyo Ghoul, #2))
Do you remember the time we met? The wind blew the snow about on the outside, the train moved, stopped, and then moved some more. It took us five hours to reach Tokyo, but I wasn't bored one bit. I didn't really get to hear so much about Nana. But I knew I would have loved... To hear what Nana had to say about herself. - Nana Komatsu
Ai Yazawa
As expected life isn't that sweet at all. When I came to Tokyo I thought I could achieve anything with my own two hands. It's not like that. To get something in these hands, I have to fight a horrible fight. But... there's not much time to grab the things you want with your hands. Why is that? And more importantly what is that I want?
Ai Yazawa (Nana, Vol. 2)
There are spiders living comfortably in my house while the wind howls outside. They aren't bothering anybody. If I were a fly, I'd have second thoughts, but I'm not, so I don't.
Richard Brautigan (Tokyo-Montana Express)
I am a college student who likes to read like you could find anywhere I am not a protagonist of novel or anything But If, for argument’s sake, you were to write story with me in a lead role It would certainly be A tragedy
Sui Ishida
It's as if Japanese men, all to aware that deep inside they'd like to stomp Tokyo flat, breathe fire, and do truly terrible and disgusting things to women, have built themselves the most beautiful of prisons for their rampaging ids. Instead of indulging their fantasies, they focus on food, or landscaping, or the perfect cup of tea -- or a single slab of o-toro tuna -- letting themselves go only at baseball games and office parties.
Anthony Bourdain (No Reservations: Around the World on an Empty Stomach)
Here in this ocean, in the midst of all this water, with the red flags on those distant buoys flapping in the sea breeze, I find myself unable to treat our house in Tokyo as anything but a dream.
Banana Yoshimoto (Goodbye Tsugumi)
I'm not the protagonist of a novel or anything... I'm just a normal college student who likes to read... But... If I were to write a book with me as tge main character... It would be... ...A tragedy.
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
I daydream about a high school where everybody plays the harmonica: the students, the teachers, the principal, the janitor and the cook in the cafeteria.
Richard Brautigan (Tokyo-Montana Express)
I don't know if ghouls are allowed to live either. But there has to be a reason we exist.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 3 (Tokyo Ghoul, #3))
You’re always unsteady, ready to slip at any moment. That’s why everybody can’t take their eyes off you.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 11 [Tokyo Guru 11] (Tokyo Ghoul, #11))
Humans are thought to be at the top of the food chain... But there are beings who hunt them as food. These monsters who feed on the dead flesh of humans. They are called... ...Ghouls.
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
Once upon a time there was a dwarf knight who only had fifty words to live in and they were so fleeting that he only had time to put on a suit of armor and ride swiftly on a black horse into a very well-lit woods where he vanished forever.
Richard Brautigan (Tokyo-Montana Express)
Tokyo was an origami city folded over and over until something was made of virtually nothing.
Christopher Barzak (The Love We Share Without Knowing)
I believed that a life has no value if a person is not a useful member of society. I was convinced that humans are born in order to be of service to the world and to others.
Durian Sukegawa (Les délices de Tokyo)
There's only one way to satisfy a ghoul's hunger.
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
Takdir bukan berdiam diri saja, ia tengah menunggu kita memainkan ceritanya
Sefryana Khairil (Tokyo: Falling)
Aku boleh saja menangis, tapi bukan berarti aku cengeng atau lemah. Ini hanya salah satu bentuk perasaan hati. Setelah menangis, kita harus lebih berani lagi menghadapi sesuatu.
Orihara Ran (Aidoru no Sekai ni Yoroshiku!: Bunga Sakura yang Mekar di Tokyo)
What's really important isn't whether you can win fights. It's not losing against yourself.
Ken Wakui (Tokyo Revengers, Vol. 13)
Pasti akan terdengar aneh kalau seseorang yang tidak kaukenal berkata padamu bahwa kalian sudah berkencan dan kau pernah menyatakan perasaan suka pada orang itu. Kau pasti tidak akan percaya. Tidak ada orang yang akan percaya.
Ilana Tan (Winter in Tokyo)
Since I'm a novelist I'm the opposite of you - I believe that what's most important is what cannot be measured. I'm not denying your way of thinking, but the greater part of people's lives consist of things that are unmeasurable, and trying to change all these to something measurable is realistically impossible.
Haruki Murakami (Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche)
Semua rintangan pasti dapat diselesaikan! Berdoa kepada Tuhan, percaya pada diri sendiri, kalahkan, singkirkan, hancurkan, dan remukkan rintangan itu..., dan yang terakhir, tersenyumlah menuju kemenangan!
Orihara Ran (Aidoru no Sekai ni Yoroshiku!: Bunga Sakura yang Mekar di Tokyo)
being in love makes people uncertain.
Hiromi Kawakami (The Briefcase)
Cinta itu perasaan, bukan logika.
Orihara Ran (Aidoru no Sekai ni Yoroshiku!: Bunga Sakura yang Mekar di Tokyo)
Living right in the heart of Tokyo itself is quite like living in the mountains – in the midst of so many people, one hardly sees anyone.
Yūko Tsushima (Of Dogs and Walls)
To be homeless is to be ignored when people walk past while still being in full view of everyone.
Miri Yū (Tokyo Ueno Station)
No,"Ito said gently, "we will not be needing soldiers. Accountants will do nicely." Mutsuhito frowned. "How does one storm a castle with accountants ?" "One buys it, sir.
Natasha Pulley
We all have our own signals we're listening for, or trying not to hear.
Lauren Elkin (Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London)
Born a foreigner I carry two halves with me Loose skin I pull on To go places and don't fit Like apple pie and mochi
Emiko Jean (Tokyo Ever After (Tokyo Ever After, #1))
But that’s the thing about East Texas. Red dirt never quite washes out, and pine pollen is tenacious as original sin. You can leave East Texas, for Houston, for the Metroplex, for the Commonwealth, for New York, or Bonn or Tokyo or Kowloon; but you can never quite leave it behind.
Markham Shaw Pyle
It's been a year and nine month since we broke up. It's almost the second spring since then. When I turn 20 in March, I'm going to buy myself a much deserved present. A one way ticket to Tokyo. As for luggage, all I need is my guitar and my smokes. - Nana
Ai Yazawa
Please... Don't make me a murderer.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 3 (Tokyo Ghoul, #3))
Yang namanya menyukai itu nggak perlu dibuktikan oleh pujian yang keluar dari mulut, cukup melihat senyum mereka saja, kita pasti tahu kalau kita disukai. Ya, kan?
Orihara Ran (Aidoru no Sekai ni Yoroshiku!: Bunga Sakura yang Mekar di Tokyo)
Ada kalanya, apa yang kita lihat dari lensa bisa lebih jujur daripada kita melihatnya dengan mata telanjang.
Orihara Ran (Aidoru no Sekai ni Yoroshiku!: Bunga Sakura yang Mekar di Tokyo)
The wisdom that sleeps In the written word Is overcome by a despair That lurks within
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul Volume 1-11 Collection 11 Books Set)
But if I had know I had a daughter, I would have found a solution." He studies me, waiting until my eyes raise to meet his. "I would have swum across the oceans. I would have scaled mountains. I would have crossed deserts. I would have found a way.
Emiko Jean (Tokyo Ever After (Tokyo Ever After, #1))
Mass media swamps diversity. It makes every place the same. Bangkok or Tokyo or London: there’s a McDonald’s on one corner, a Benetton on another, a Gap across the street. Regional differences vanish. All differences vanish. In a mass-media world, there’s less of everything except the top ten books, records, movies, ideas.
Michael Crichton (The Lost World (Jurassic Park, #2))
Samurai are born to die. Death is not a curse to be avoided -- but the natural end of all life. Death is not eternal . . . dishonor is.
Rick Remender (Tokyo Ghost, Vol. 1: Atomic Garden)
Pain is invisible, and known only to the sufferer.
Haruki Murakami (Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche)
I'm going to gently scramble up your insides for you now, okey?~Rise,Tokyo Ghoul
Sui Ishida
If you don't fly too high, you don't have too far to fall.
Emiko Jean (Tokyo Ever After (Tokyo Ever After, #1))
This is the most beautiful place on earth. There are many such places. Every man, every woman, carries in heart and mind the image of the ideal place, the right place, the one true home, known or unknown, actual or visionary. A houseboat in Kashmir, a view down Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, a gray gothic farmhouse two stories high at the end of a red dog road in the Allegheny Mountains, a cabin on the shore of a blue lake in spruce and fir country, a greasy alley near the Hoboken waterfront, or even, possibly, for those of a less demanding sensibility, the world to be seen from a comfortable apartment high in the tender, velvety smog of Manhattan, Chicago, Paris, Tokyo, Rio, or Rome — there's no limit to the human capacity for the homing sentiment.
Edward Abbey
Most of the advice was along the lines of, “If you persevere in your efforts you will surely succeed,” which is bullshit, if you ask me. People who turn to stuff like this have probably already persevered and gotten nowhere.
Ryū Murakami (Tokyo Decadence: 15 Stories)
It’s like doing one of those dumb math problems: three people are driving at 20mph in a car carrying two gallons of gas and a horse doing yoga, when a car traveling at 30mph with two clowns drinking cola collides, what time is it in Tokyo? It doesn’t make any sense and the only answer I ever come up with is who
Jane Harvey-Berrick (Dangerous to Know & Love)
Tokyo is bigger than Kumamoto. And Japan is bigger than Tokyo. And even bigger than Japan... Even bigger than Japan is the inside of your head. Don't ever surrender yourself ― not to Japan, not to anything. You may think that what you're doing is for the sake of the nation, but let something take possession of you like that, and all you do is bring it down.
Natsume Sōseki (Sanshirō)
Loving someone is never easy. Orang bilang cinta itu sederhana. Meski seringnya cinta tak sesederhana yang kita kira.
Sefryana Khairil (Tokyo: Falling)
The 1960s: A lot of people remember hating President Lyndon Baines Johnson and loving Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison, depending on the point of view. God rest their souls.
Richard Brautigan (Tokyo-Montana Express)
That was quite a discovery for me, the fact that arbitrary kindness makes me uncomfortable, but that being treated fairly feels good.
Hiromi Kawakami (Strange Weather in Tokyo)
I walk because it confers- or restores- a feeling of placeness...I walk because, somehow, it's like reading. You're privy to these lives and conversations that have nothing to do with yours, but you can eavesdrop on them. Sometimes it's overcrowded; sometimes the voices are too loud. But there is always companionship. You are not alone. You walk in the city side by side with the living and the dead.
Lauren Elkin (Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London)
Fuck 'em. Call it whatever you want. Maybe it's just two people clinging to each other to stay alive. Maybe sometimes that's all love gets to be. And, maybe, if they hold onto each other long enough . . . maybe something good finally happens.
Rick Remender (Tokyo Ghost, Vol. 1: Atomic Garden)
Bipolar disorder is about buying a dozen bottles of Heinz ketchup and all eight bottles of Windex in stock at the Food Emporium on Broadway at 4:00 a.m., flying from Zurich to the Bahamas and back to Zurich in three days to balance the hot and cold weather (my sweet and sour theory of bipolar disorder), carrying $20,000 in $100 bills in your shoes into the country on your way back from Tokyo, and picking out the person sitting six seats away at the bar to have sex with only because he or she happens to be sitting there. It's about blips and burps of madness, moments of absolute delusion, bliss, and irrational and dangerous choices made in order to heighten pleasure and excitement and to ensure a sense of control. The symptoms of bipolar disorder come in different strengths and sizes. Most days I need to be as manic as possible to come as close as I can to destruction, to get a real good high -- a $25,000 shopping spree, a four-day drug binge, or a trip around the world.
Andy Behrman (Electroboy: A Memoir of Mania)
But: all journeys were return journeys. The farther one traveled, the nakeder one got, until, towards the end, ceasing to be animated by any scene, one was most oneself, a man in a bed surrounded by empty bottles. The man who says, "I've got a wife and kids" is far from home; at home he speaks of Japan. But he does not know - how could he? - that the scenes changing in the train window from Victoria Station to Tokyo Central are nothing compared to the change in himself; and travel writing, which cannot but be droll at the outset, moves from journalism to fiction, arriving promptly as the Kodama Echo at autobiography. From there any further travel makes a beeline to confession, the embarrassed monologue in a deserted bazaar. The anonymous hotel room in a strange city...
Paul Theroux (The Great Railway Bazaar)
I broke up with Ren a year and nine months ago. Soon it will be two springs. My 20th birthday is in march. I'm working hard to buy myself a present. A one-way ticket to Tokyo. I will just carry my guitar and cigarettes.
Ai Yazawa
The earth forgets but I will always remember Karaoke bars Pharmacies and cups of tea And plates of dorayaki
Emiko Jean (Tokyo Ever After (Tokyo Ever After, #1))
We can't crush evil with morals. We are justice. We are morality.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 2 (Tokyo Ghoul, #2))
Hinami... live.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 2 (Tokyo Ghoul, #2))
In this world, the strong devour the weak. Who is the strong? I am. I am the fucking strong.
Ken Kaneki
Up until now, I thought I had enjoyed my life alone, somehow.
Hiromi Kawakami (Strange Weather in Tokyo)
I'll tell you right now, a ghoul's hunger is true hell.
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
The overriding sense of Tokyo...is that it is a city devoted to the new, sped up in a subtle but profound way: a postmodern science-fiction story set ten minutes in the future.
David Rakoff (Fraud: Essays)
Originally I wanted to get to know my father. But it's bigger than that. I came to figure out who I am, where I'm from. Finding somewhere I belong.
Emiko Jean (Tokyo Ever After (Tokyo Ever After, #1))
Mowrer and his family made it safely to Tokyo. His wife, Lillian, recalled her great sorrow at having to leave Berlin. “Nowhere have I had such lovely friends as in Germany,” she wrote. “Looking back on it all is like seeing someone you love go mad—and do horrible things.
Erik Larson (In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin)
I thought I heard an axe chop in the woods It broke the dream; and woke up dreaming on a train. It must have been a thousand years ago In some old mountain sawmill of Japan. A horde of excess poets and unwed girls And I that night prowled Tokyo like a bear Tracking the human future Of intelligence and despair.
Gary Snyder (Riprap and Cold Mountain Poems)
I used to think life was like a book: you turn the first page, and there’s the next, and as you go on turning page after page, eventually you reach the last one. But life is nothing like a story in a book. There may be words, and the pages may be numbered, but there is no plot. There may be an ending, but there is no end.
Yu Miri (Tokyo Ueno Station)
I noticed that in Tokyo people didn’t smell. It was funny. I couldn’t smell them, and they didn’t say very much: the trains were packed but it was quite silent, like being jammed into a carriage with a thousand shop-window mannequins.
Mo Hayder (Tokio)
On the plane leaving Tokyo I’m sitting alone in back twisting the knobs on Etch-A-Sketch and Roger is next to me singing “Over the Rainbow” straight into my ear, things changing, falling apart, fading, another year, a few more moves, a hard person who doesn’t give a fuck, a boredom so monumental it humbles, arrangements so fleeting made by people you don’t even know that it requires you to lose any sense of reality you might have once acquired, expectations so unreasonable you become superstitious about ever matching them. Roger offers me a joint and I take a drag and stare out the window and I relax for a moment when the lights of Tokyo, which I never realized is an island, vanish from view but this feeling only lasts a moment because Roger is telling me that other lights in other cities, in other countries, on other planets, are coming into view soon.
Bret Easton Ellis (The Informers)
Tokyo is too close up to see, sometimes. There are no distances and everything is above your head - dentists, kindergartens, dance studios. Even the roads and walkways are up on murky stilts. An evil-twin Venice with all the water drained away.
David Mitchell (Number9Dream)
Si está en San Francisco la seguiré allí. Si está en Tokyo la seguiré allí. Y si está en el infierno la seguiré allí. ¿Por qué no?. Allí es donde acabaremos de todas formas y probablemente juntos.
Stephen King (Rose Madder)
La memoria es el perro más estúpido, le lanzas un palo y te trae cualquier otra cosa.
Ray Loriga (Tokyo Doesn't Love Us Anymore)
The cold feel of the leather... Peeking at the world from my other eye... It was strangely exciting...
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 2 (Tokyo Ghoul, #2))
Those nights, I open Sensei’s briefcase and peer inside. The blank empty space unfolds, containing nothing within. It holds nothing more than an expanse of desolate absence.
Hiromi Kawakami (Strange Weather in Tokyo)
Everyone causes trouble for someone at some point in their lives.
Hiromi Kawakami
Being insulted by a smart-mouthed little punk like you.. really pisses me off!
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
Feelings are a real son of a bitch.
Emiko Jean (Tokyo Ever After (Tokyo Ever After, #1))
Adaora was beginning to see why Ayodele’s people had chosen the city of Lagos. If they’d landed in New York, Tokyo or London, the governments of these places would have quickly swooped to hide, isolate and study the aliens. Here in Lagos, there was no such order.
Nnedi Okorafor (Lagoon)
It feels like ancient history," said Naoko. But anyhow, sorry about last night. I don't know, I was a bundle of nerves. I really shouldn't have done that after you came here all the way from Tokyo." "Never mind," I said. "Both of us have a lot of feelings we need to get out in the open. So if you want to take those feelings and smash somebody with them, smash me. Then we can understand each other better." "So if you understand me better, what then?" "You don't get it, do you?" I said. "It's not a question of 'what then.' Some people get a kick out of reading railroad timetables and that's all they do all day. Some people make huge model boats out of matchsticks. So what's wrong if there happens to be one guy in the world who enjoys trying to understand you?
Haruki Murakami (Norwegian Wood)
I’m not the protagonist of a novel or anything. I’m a college student who likes to read, like you could find anywhere. But.. if, for argument’s sake, you were to write a story with me in the lead role, it would certainly be a TRAGEDY!
Sui Ishida (Tokyo Ghoul, Tome 1 (Tokyo Ghoul, #1))
Once upon a time, there lived a boy and a girl. The boy was eighteen and the girl sixteen. He was not unusually handsome, and she was not especially beautiful. They were just an ordinary lonely boy and an ordinary lonely girl, like all the others. But they believed with their whole hearts that somewhere in the world there lived the 100% perfect boy and the 100% perfect girl for them. Yes, they believed in a miracle. And that miracle actually happened. One day the two came upon each other on the corner of a street. “This is amazing,” he said. “I’ve been looking for you all my life. You may not believe this, but you’re the 100% perfect girl for me.” “And you,” she said to him, “are the 100% perfect boy for me, exactly as I’d pictured you in every detail. It’s like a dream.” They sat on a park bench, held hands, and told each other their stories hour after hour. They were not lonely anymore. They had found and been found by their 100% perfect other. What a wonderful thing it is to find and be found by your 100% perfect other. It’s a miracle, a cosmic miracle. As they sat and talked, however, a tiny, tiny sliver of doubt took root in their hearts: Was it really all right for one’s dreams to come true so easily? And so, when there came a momentary lull in their conversation, the boy said to the girl, “Let’s test ourselves - just once. If we really are each other’s 100% perfect lovers, then sometime, somewhere, we will meet again without fail. And when that happens, and we know that we are the 100% perfect ones, we’ll marry then and there. What do you think?” “Yes,” she said, “that is exactly what we should do.” And so they parted, she to the east, and he to the west. The test they had agreed upon, however, was utterly unnecessary. They should never have undertaken it, because they really and truly were each other’s 100% perfect lovers, and it was a miracle that they had ever met. But it was impossible for them to know this, young as they were. The cold, indifferent waves of fate proceeded to toss them unmercifully. One winter, both the boy and the girl came down with the season’s terrible inluenza, and after drifting for weeks between life and death they lost all memory of their earlier years. When they awoke, their heads were as empty as the young D. H. Lawrence’s piggy bank. They were two bright, determined young people, however, and through their unremitting efforts they were able to acquire once again the knowledge and feeling that qualified them to return as full-fledged members of society. Heaven be praised, they became truly upstanding citizens who knew how to transfer from one subway line to another, who were fully capable of sending a special-delivery letter at the post office. Indeed, they even experienced love again, sometimes as much as 75% or even 85% love. Time passed with shocking swiftness, and soon the boy was thirty-two, the girl thirty. One beautiful April morning, in search of a cup of coffee to start the day, the boy was walking from west to east, while the girl, intending to send a special-delivery letter, was walking from east to west, but along the same narrow street in the Harajuku neighborhood of Tokyo. They passed each other in the very center of the street. The faintest gleam of their lost memories glimmered for the briefest moment in their hearts. Each felt a rumbling in their chest. And they knew: She is the 100% perfect girl for me. He is the 100% perfect boy for me. But the glow of their memories was far too weak, and their thoughts no longer had the clarity of fouteen years earlier. Without a word, they passed each other, disappearing into the crowd. Forever. A sad story, don’t you think?
Haruki Murakami (The Elephant Vanishes)
As Halloran parachuted over Tokyo, the Zero that had shot him down sped toward him, and Halloran was certain that he was going to be strafed, as so many falling airmen were. But instead of firing, the pilot saluted him. After the war, Halloran and that pilot, Isamu Kashiide, became dear friends.
Laura Hillenbrand (Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption)
The leaders of Nippon were stupid. They took all of the gold out of Tokyo and buried it in holes in the ground in the Philippines! Because they thought that The General would march into Tokyo and steal it. But The General didn’t care about the gold. He understood that the real gold is here—" he points to his head "—in the intelligence of the people, and here—" he holds out his hands "—in the work that they do. Getting rid of our gold was the best thing that ever happened to Nippon. It made us rich. Receiving that gold was the worst thing that happened to the Philippines. It made them poor.
Neal Stephenson (Cryptonomicon)
The world hasn’t changed. It’s just as cruel as it always was.
Durian Sukegawa (Les délices de Tokyo)
Even now I occasionally get a long letter from Kimiko, who’s still in and out of mental hospitals. I’ve never written a reply. The Last Picture Show Iwas eighteen.
Ryū Murakami (Tokyo Decadence: 15 Stories)
You develop a kind of admiration for criminal genius and ruthless efficiency, and you forget that the criminal empire is built on human pain and suffering.
Jake Adelstein (Tokyo Vice: An American Reporter on the Police Beat in Japan)
Something this rare... Nobody can have him but me...
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール 4 [Tokyo Guru 4] (Tokyo Ghoul, #4))
Sometimes good people make bad choices, it doesn’t mean they are bad people. It means they are human.
Kishou Arima
Why is it that the beautiful things are more intertwined in death more that life?
Kaneki Ken
Walk around Tokyo and all you see are people trying to sell you something. Tell them okay and before you know you have bought something. Make the mistake of telling your address and now you're on a mailing list. Some old guy pats you on the shoulder and before you know what hit you you're in a hotel room. Stalkers' victims, the ones they kill, are always women.
Natsuo Kirino (Real World)
If you lose your ego, you lose the thread of that narrative you call your Self. Humans, however, can't live very long without some sense of a continuing story. Such stories go beyond the limited rational system (or the systematic rationality) with which you surround yourself; they are crucial keys to sharing time-experience with others. Now a narrative is a story, not a logic, nor ethics, nor philosophy. It is a dream you keep having, whether you realize it or not. Just as surely as you breathe, you go on ceaselessly dreaming your story. And in these stories you wear two faces. You are simultaneously subject and object. You are a whole and you are a part. You are real and you are shadow. "Storyteller" and at the same time "character". It is through such multilayering of roles in our stories that we heal the loneliness of being an isolated individual in the world. Yet without a proper ego nobody can create a personal narrative, any more than you can drive a car without an engine, or cast a shadow without a real physical object. But once you've consigned your ego to someone else, where on earth do you go from there? At this point you receive a new narrative from the person to whom you have entrusted your ego. You've handed over the real thing, so what comes back is a shadow. And once your ego has merged with another ego, your narrative will necessarily take on the narrative created by that ego. Just what kind of narrative? It needn't be anything particularly fancy, nothing complicated or refined. You don't need to have literary ambitions. In fact, the sketchier and simpler the better. Junk, a leftover rehash will do. Anyway, most people are tired of complex, multilayered scenarios-they are a potential letdown. It's precisely because people can't find any fixed point within their own multilayered schemes that they're tossing aside their own self-identity.
Haruki Murakami (Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche)
13. A Buddha In Tokyo in th Meiji era there lived two prominent teachers of opposite characteristics. One, Unsho, an instructor in Shingon, kept Buddha's precepts scrupulously. He never drank intoxicants, nor did he eat after eleven o'clock in the morning. The other teacher, Tanzan, a professor of philosophy at the Imperial University, never observed the precepts. When he felt like eating he ate, and when he felt like sleeping in the daytime he slept. One da Unsho visited Tanzan, who was drinking wine at the time, not even a drop of which is supposed to touch the tongue of a Buddhist. "Hello, brother," Tanzan greeted him. "Won't you have a drink?" "I never drink!" exclaimed Unsho solemnly. "One who never drinks is not even human," said Tanzan. "Do you mean to call me inhuman just because I do not indulge in intoxicating liquids!" exclaimed Unsho in anger. "Then if I am not human, wht am I?" "A Buddha," answered Tanzan.
Nyogen Senzaki
Takizawa: something that was left in my care. give it back to Amon for me. see you, Goat's King. Kaneki: I'm not taking It. Takizawa: Its just a small chain and yet It feels so heavy to me... fine whatever. Kaneki: Takizawa, Its because you'r completely empty inside that if we don't tie you down with a chain you'll go off and die.
Sui Ishida (東京喰種トーキョーグール:re 11 [Tokyo Guru:re 11] (Tokyo Ghoul:re, #11))
Walking is mapping with your feet. It helps you piece a city together, connecting up neighborhoods that might otherwise have remained discrete entities, different planets bound to each other, sustained yet remote. I like seeing how in fact they blend into one another, I like noticing the boundaries between them. Walking helps me feel at home.
Lauren Elkin (Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London)
Guess what? The Nazis didn't lose the war after all. They won it and flourished. They took over the world and wiped out every last Jew, every last Gypsy, black, East Indian, and American Indian. Then, when they were finished with that, they wiped out the Russians and the Poles and the Bohemians and the Moravians and the Bulgarians and the Serbians and the Croatians--all the Slavs. Then they started in on the Polynesians and the Koreans and the Chinese and the Japanese--all the peoples of Asia. This took a long, long time, but when it was all over, everyone in the world was one hundred percent Aryan, and they were all very, very happy. Naturally the textbooks used in the schools no longer mentioned any race but the Aryan or any language but German or any religion but Hitlerism or any political system but National Socialism. There would have been no point. After a few generations of that, no one could have put anything different into the textbooks even if they'd wanted to, because they didn't know anything different. But one day, two young students were conversing at the University of New Heidelberg in Tokyo. Both were handsome in the usual Aryan way, but one of them looked vaguely worried and unhappy. That was Kurt. His friend said, "What's wrong, Kurt? Why are you always moping around like this?" Kurt said, "I'll tell you, Hans. There is something that's troubling me--and troubling me deeply." His friend asked what it was. "It's this," Kurt said. "I cannot shake the crazy feeling that there is some small thing that we're being lied to about." And that's how the paper ended.' Ishmael nodded thoughtfully. 'And what did your teacher think of that?' 'He wanted to know if I had the same crazy feeling as Kurt. When I said I did, he wanted to know what I thought we were being lied to about. I said, 'How could I know? I'm no better off than Kurt.
Daniel Quinn (Ishmael: An Adventure of the Mind and Spirit (Ishmael, #1))
Rosette disappeared onto the dance floor. Wells sat in silence for a minute, watching the dancers. The worldwide cult of fast money spent stupidly. The worldwide cult of trying too hard. Moscow, Rio, Los Angeles, Tokyo, New York, London, Shanghai--the story was the same everywhere. The same overloud music, the same overpromoted brand names, the same fake tits, about as erotic as helium balloons. Everywhere an orgy of empty consumption and bad sex. Las Vegas was the cult's world headquarters, Donald Trump its patron saint. Wells had spent ten years in the barren mountains of Afghanistan and Pakistan. He never wanted to live there again. But if he had to choose between an eternity there or in the supposed luxury of this club, he'd go back without a second thought.
Alex Berenson (The Silent Man (John Wells, #3))
Men know how to read printed books; they do not know how to read the unprinted ones. They can play on a stringed harp, but not on a stringless one. Applying themselves to the superficial instead of the profound, how should they understand music or poetry?From the Saikontan, by Kojisei (circa 1600) cited in Haiku by Robert Blyth, circa 1947 Tokyo, p. 73.
Kojisei
that you don’t suffer because of someone else. There’s never anyone but
Ryū Murakami (Tokyo Decadence: 15 Stories)
My enemy is, among other things, the me inside me. Inside me is the un-me
Haruki Murakami (Ranocchio salva Tokyo)
You'll be going back to Tokyo before much longer," Midorikawa quietly stated. "And you'll return to real life. You need to live life to the fullest. No matter how shallow and dull things might get, this life is worth living. I guarantee it. And I'm not being either ironic or paradoxical. It's just that, for me, what's worthwhile in life has become a burden, something I can't shoulder anymore. Maybe I'm just not cut out for it. So, like a dying cat, I've crawled into a quiet, dark place, silently waiting for my time to come. It's not so bad. But you're different. You should be able to handle what life sends your way. You need to use the thread of logic, as best as you can, to skillfully sew onto yourself everything that's worth living for.
Haruki Murakami (Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage)
We're all struggling so hard, heading in the wrong direction. All our efforts are in vain, Kazumi. They come to nothing! Our pleasure, our sorrow, our anger—it all comes and goes like a typhoon or a squall or cherry blossoms. We are all being pushed by our petty feelings and carried away to the same place. None of us can resist it. Do whatever you think is idealistic? But it's not! It's just petty! We only end up knowing that our efforts were in vain!
Sōji Shimada (The Tokyo Zodiac Murders)
I haven’t had any adventures. Things have happened to me, events, incidents, anything you like. But not adventures. It isn’t a matter of words; I am beginning to understand. There is something I longed for more than all the rest - without realizing it properly. It wasn’t love, heaven forbid, nor glory, nor wealth. It was…anyway, I had imagined that at certain moments my life could take on a rare and precious quality. There was no need for extraordinary circumstances: all I asked for was a little order. There is nothing very splendid about my life at present: but now and then, for example when they played music in the cafés, I would l look back and say to myself: in the old days, in London, Meknés, Tokyo, I have known wonderful moments, I have had adventures. It is that which has been taken away from me now. I have just learnt, all of a sudden, for no apparent reason, that I have been lying to myself for ten years. Adventures are in books. And naturally, everything they tell you about in books can happen in real life, but not in the same way. It was to this way of happening that I attached so much importance.
Jean-Paul Sartre (Nausea)
It was just that, no matter where I found myself, I felt like there was a hole inside me, with the wind rushing through. I never felt satisfied. From the outside you wouldn’t imagine I had any troubles.
Haruki Murakami (Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche)
When he heard that Sanshiro was going to school forty hours a week, his eyes popped. "You idiot! Do you think it would 'satisfy' you to eat what they serve at your rooming house ten times a day?" "What should I do?" Sanshiro pleaded. "Ride the streetcar," Yojiro said. Sanshiro tried to find Yojiro's hidden meaning, without success. "You mean a real streetcar?" he asked. Yojiro laughed uncontrollably. "Get on the streetcar and ride around Tokyo ten or fifteen times. After a while it will just happen by itself- you will become satisfied. "Why?" "Why? Well, look at it this way. Your head is alive, but if you seal it up inside dead classes, you're lost. Take it outside and get the wind into it. Riding the streetcar is not the only way to get satisfaction, of course, but it's the first step, and the easiest.
Natsume Sōseki (Sanshirō)
The best fact I know is that kindred souls collect like dew to morning thistle. So if any of this gets out of hand, or collapses to pillars of bromide and dust, or our solitary struggle is cheapened and dashed, I'll die knowing we were all stupid in stupid togetherness, and the allure, lustre, good in that phrase consoles my wanting spirit, that we made it all too messy, but kicked out the jams in the process.
Kirk Marshall (A Solution to Economic Depression in Little Tokyo, 1953)
I’M LOSING FAITH IN MY FAVORITE COUNTRY Throughout my life, the United States has been my favorite country, save and except for Canada, where I was born, raised, educated, and still live for six months each year. As a child growing up in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, I aggressively bought and saved baseball cards of American and National League players, spent hours watching snowy images of American baseball and football games on black and white television and longed for the day when I could travel to that great country. Every Saturday afternoon, me and the boys would pay twelve cents to go the show and watch U.S. made movies, and particularly, the Superman serial. Then I got my chance. My father, who worked for B.F. Goodrich, took my brother and me to watch the Cleveland Indians play baseball in the Mistake on the Lake in Cleveland. At last I had made it to the big time. I thought it was an amazing stadium and it was certainly not a mistake. Amazingly, the Americans thought we were Americans. I loved the United States, and everything about the country: its people, its movies, its comic books, its sports, and a great deal more. The country was alive and growing. No, exploding. It was the golden age of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. The American dream was alive and well, but demanded hard work, honesty, and frugality. Everyone understood that. Even the politicians. Then everything changed. Partly because of its proximity to the United States and a shared heritage, Canadians also aspired to what was commonly referred to as the American dream. I fall neatly into that category. For as long as I can remember I wanted a better life, but because I was born with a cardboard spoon in my mouth, and wasn’t a member of the golden gene club, I knew I would have to make it the old fashioned way: work hard and save. After university graduation I spent the first half of my career working for the two largest oil companies in the world: Exxon and Royal Dutch Shell. The second half was spent with one of the smallest oil companies in the world: my own. Then I sold my company and retired into obscurity. In my case obscurity was spending summers in our cottage on Lake Rosseau in Muskoka, Ontario, and winters in our home in Port St. Lucie, Florida. My wife, Ann, and I, (and our three sons when they can find the time), have been enjoying that “obscurity” for a long time. During that long time we have been fortunate to meet and befriend a large number of Americans, many from Tom Brokaw’s “Greatest Generation.” One was a military policeman in Tokyo in 1945. After a very successful business carer in the U.S. he’s retired and living the dream. Another American friend, also a member of the “Greatest Generation”, survived The Battle of the Bulge and lived to drink Hitler’s booze at Berchtesgaden in 1945. He too is happily retired and living the dream. Both of these individuals got to where they are by working hard, saving, and living within their means. Both also remember when their Federal Government did the same thing. One of my younger American friends recently sent me a You Tube video, featuring an impassioned speech by Marco Rubio, Republican senator from Florida. In the speech, Rubio blasts the spending habits of his Federal Government and deeply laments his country’s future. He is outraged that the U.S. Government spends three hundred billion dollars, each and every month. He is even more outraged that one hundred and twenty billion of that three hundred billion dollars is borrowed. In other words, Rubio states that for every dollar the U.S. Government spends, forty cents is borrowed. I don’t blame him for being upset. If I had run my business using that arithmetic, I would be in the soup kitchens. If individual American families had applied that arithmetic to their finances, none of them would be in a position to pay a thin dime of taxes.
Stephen Douglass
Saya mungkin berbeda dari orang lain, tetapi itulah yang menjadikan saya seorang seniman. Seni bukanlah meniru hasil karya orang lain; seni sejati hanya ada dalam perbedaan. Meskipun akan lebih mudah, saya tidak pernah mau mengikuti jejak orang lain.
Sōji Shimada (The Tokyo Zodiac Murders)
I feel very strongly that all Japanese at that time had the idea drilled into them of 1999 being the end of the world. Aum renunciates have already accepted, inside themselves, the end of the world, because when they become a renunciate, they discard themselves totally, thereby abandoning the world. In other words, Aum is a collection of people who have accepted the end. People who continue to hold out hope for the near future still have an attachment to the world. If you have attachments, you will not discard your Self, but for Renunciates it's as if they've leaped right off the cliff. And taking a giant leap like that feels good. They lose something - but gain something in return.
Haruki Murakami (Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche)
I want a gang that's all for one, and one for all.
Ken Wakui (Tokyo Revengers, Vol. 8)
Hakkai... Fighting on... Isn't painful. What hurts more than anything... Is loneliness.
Ken Wakui (Tokyo Revengers, Vol. 12)
If everything that looks like love really were love, my God, this would be a different and better world and even the darkest nightmares would be followed by unbearably happy days.
Ray Loriga (Tokyo Doesn't Love Us Anymore)
Psychologically speaking (I’ll only wheel out the amateur psychology just this once, so bear with me), encounters that call up strong physical disgust or revulsion are often in fact projections of our own faults and weaknesses.
Haruki Murakami (Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche)
Haven’t you offered up some part of your Self to someone (or something), and taken on a “narrative” in return? Haven’t we entrusted some part of our personality to some greater System or Order? And if so, has not that System at some stage demanded of us some kind of “insanity”? Is the narrative you now possess really and truly your own? Are your dreams really your own dreams? Might not they be someone else’s visions that could sooner or later turn into nightmares?
Haruki Murakami (Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche)
She had come out tonight because she believed there had to be a present tense, somewhere, and she'd followed Gav and Barnesy because she'd hoped they knew where it was. Is. And they'd dragged her to yet another haunted house. Where was the now? In bloody America, probably, apart from the bit that Tucker lived in, or in bloody Tokyo. In any case, it was somewhere else. How could people who didn't live in bloody America or bloody Tokyo stand it, all that swimming around in the past imperfect?
Nick Hornby (Juliet, Naked)
On his youth, Yoshiro had prided himself of always having an answer ready when someone asked who his favorite composer or designer was, or what kind of wine he preferred. Confident in his good taste, he had poured time and money into surrounding himself with things that would show it off. Now he no longer felt any need to use taste as the bricks and mortar fora structure called «individuality».
Yōko Tawada (The Last Children of Tokyo)
I had an overwhelming sense of the lonliness of this city - a trillion souls in their bedrooms, high in the cliffs of windows. I thought of what was underneath it all - I thought of the electricty cables, steam, water, fire, subway trains and lava in the city's guts, the subterranean rumbling of trains and earthquakes. I thought of the dead souls from the war, concreted over.
Mo Hayder (The Devil of Nanking)
Johnny Battistini had gone to Japan once as a replacement drummer for a metal band past its prime ... a one-shot gig that he had talked about for years afterward. At the time, Theo had been frustrated by Johnny’s inability to describe Tokyo and why it had made such an impression on him. Although he spoke about it frequently ... he could never explain his fascination more clearly than: ‘It was just ... weird. It’s like a regular city, but then it’s all different and shit. But to them it’s not different. And that’s the really weird part!
Tad Williams (The War of the Flowers)
weren't we all the same as children?" eiko asked. "all of us, destined to become beautiful brides in fluffy white dresses!" she giggled to herself. "where did we go wrong?" isn't that what keeps life interesting?" i replied. "and who knows? next year you could be somebody's wife. no one knows what will happen." sometimes i think it would be wonderful just to stay the way i am forever, just kick back and space out during the afternoon thinking about all the exciting things that the night will bring, all the naughty things i might take part in." she snickered again. well," i said, "aren't you the happy one." she squinted her tiny nose and laughed. dawn was breaking as we said good-bye. i saw her off by watching her small body disappear into the background, her high heels clapping along, echoing in the early morning city. my drunkenness, the sunrise, the bright sky, and a friend who was leaving. if i had died in my fall i would have missed that morning - that splendid sunrise over tokyo.
Banana Yoshimoto
I've wanted to find out as much about China as I could. But that China is only my China. Not any China I can read about. It's the China that sends messages just to me. It's not the big yellow expanse on the globe, it's another China. Another hypothesis, another supposition. In a sense, it's a part of myself that's been cut off by the word China. I wander though China. Without ever having boarded a plane. My travels take place here in the Tokyo subways, in the backseat of a taxi... all of a sudden this city will start to go. In a flash, the buildings will crumble. Over the Tokyo streets will fall my China, like ash, leaching into everything it touches. Slowly, gradually, until nothing remains.
Haruki Murakami (The Elephant Vanishes)
Along the way I stopped into a coffee shop. All around me normal, everyday city types were going about their normal, everyday affairs. Lovers were whispering to each other, businessmen were poring over spread sheets, college kids were planning their next ski trip and discussing the new Police album. We could have been in any city in Japan. Transplant this coffee shop scene to Yokohama or Fukuoka and nothing would seem out of place. In spite of which -- or, rather, all the more because -- here I was, sitting in this coffee shop, drinking my coffee, feeling a desperate loneliness. I alone was the outsider. I had no place here. Of course, by the same token, I couldn't really say I belonged to Tokyo and its coffee shops. But I had never felt this loneliness there. I could drink my coffee, read my book, pass the time of day without any special thought, all because I was part of the regular scenery. Here I had no ties to anyone. Fact is, I'd come to reclaim myself.
Haruki Murakami (Dance Dance Dance (The Rat, #4))
From the corner of the divan of Persian saddle-bags on which he was lying, smoking, as was his custom, innumerable cigarettes, Lord Henry Wotton could just catch the gleam of the honey-sweet and honey-coloured blossoms of a laburnum, whose tremulous branches seemed hardly able to bear the burden of a beauty so flamelike as theirs; and now and then the fantastic shadows of birds in flight flitted across the long tussore-silk curtains that were stretched in front of the huge window, producing a kind of momentary Japanese effect, and making him think of those pallid, jade-faced painters of Tokyo who, through the medium of an art that is necessarily immobile, seek to convey the sense of swiftness and motion. The sullen murmur of the bees shouldering their way through the long unmown grass, or circling with monotonous insistence round the dusty gilt horns of the straggling woodbine, seemed to make the stillness more oppressive. The dim roar of London was like the bourdon note of a distant organ.
Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
These are lines from my asteroid-impact novel, Regolith: Just because there are no laws against stupidity doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be punished. I haven’t faced rejection this brutal since I was single. He smelled trouble like a fart in the shower. If this was a kiss of gratitude, then she must have been very grateful. Not since Bush and Cheney have so few spent so much so fast for so long for so little. As a nympho for mind-fucks, Lisa took to politics like a pig to mud. She began paying men compliments as if she expected a receipt. Like the Aerosmith song, his get-up-and-go just got-up-and-went. “You couldn’t beat the crap out of a dirty diaper!” He embraced his only daughter as if she was deploying to Iraq. She was hotter than a Class 4 solar flare! If sex was a weapon, then Monique possessed WMD I haven’t felt this alive since I lost my virginity. He once read that 95% of women fake organism, and the rest are gay. Beauty may be in the eyes of the beholder, but ugly is universal. Why do wives fart, but not girlfriends? Adultery is sex that is wrong, but not necessarily bad. The dinosaurs stayed drugged out, drooling like Jonas Brothers fans. Silence filled the room like tear gas. The told him a fraction of the truth and hoped it would take just a fraction of the time. Happiness is the best cosmetic, He was a whale of a catch, and there were a lot of fish in the sea eager to nibble on his bait. Cheap hookers are less buck for the bang, Men cannot fall in love with women they don’t find attractive, and women cannot fall in love with men they do not respect. During sex, men want feedback while women expect mind-reading. Cooper looked like a cow about to be tipped over. His father warned him to never do anything he couldn’t justify on Oprah. The poor are not free -- they’re just not enslaved. Only those with money are free. Sperm wasn’t something he would choose on a menu, but it still tasted better than asparagus. The crater looked alive, like Godzilla was about to leap out and mess up Tokyo. Bush follows the Bible until it gets to Jesus. When Bush talks to God, it’s prayer; when God talks to Bush, it’s policy. Cheney called the new Miss America a traitor – apparently she wished for world peace. Cheney was so unpopular that Bush almost replaced him when running for re-election, changing his campaign slogan to, ‘Ain’t Got Dick.’ Bush fought a war on poverty – and the poor lost. Bush thinks we should strengthen the dollar by making it two-ply. Hurricane Katrina got rid of so many Democratic voters that Republicans have started calling her Kathleen Harris. America and Iraq fought a war and Iran won. Bush hasn’t choked this much since his last pretzel. Some wars are unpopular; the rest are victorious. So many conservatives hate the GOP that they are thinking of changing their name to the Dixie Chicks. If Saddam had any WMD, he would have used them when we invaded. If Bush had any brains, he would have used them when we invaded. It’s hard for Bush to win hearts and minds since he has neither. In Iraq, you are a coward if you leave and a fool if you stay. Bush believes it’s not a sin to kill Muslims since they are going to Hell anyway. And, with Bush’s help, soon. In Iraq, those who make their constitution subservient to their religion are called Muslims. In America they’re called Republicans. With great power comes great responsibility – unless you’re Republican.
Brent Reilly
I thought you'd be halfway to Tokyo by now,” she said, stalling. “Not without you.” Oh, man, she was so screwed. He was bad enough when he was giving her shit. Right now he was looking at her as if she was the most precious thing on earth, and she knew what she looked and smelled like. The world had turned upside down. “I don't suppose you love me,” she said. “Even a little bit?” “Don't be an idiot, Ji-chan. Why else would I be here? Now, do you want to stay here or do you want to prove you're really crazy and come with me?” “Will you grow your hair again?” “If you want me to.” “Then tell me.” “You're not going to make this easy, are you? Su-chan warned me about you.” “She warned me, too. Tell me.” He let out a long-suffering sigh. “Aishiteru,” he muttered. “In English.” “I love you.
Anne Stuart (Fire and Ice (Ice, #5))
Twenty million people live and work in Tokyo. It’s so big that nobody really knows where it stops. It’s long since filled up the plain, and now it’s creeping up the mountains to the west and reclaiming land from the bay in the east. The city never stops rewriting itself. In the time one street guide is produced, it’s already become out of date. It’s a tall city, and a deep one, as well as a spread-out one. Things are always moving below you, and above your head. All these people, flyovers, cars, walkways, subways, offices, tower blocks, power cables, pipes, apartments, it all adds up to a lot of weight. You have to do something to stop yourself caving in, or you just become a piece of flotsam or an ant in a tunnel. In smaller cities people can use the space around them to insulate themselves, to remind themselves of who they are. Not in Tokyo. You just don’t have the space, not unless you’re a company president, a gangster, a politician or the Emperor. You’re pressed against people body to body in the trains, several hands gripping each strap on the metro trains. Apartment windows have no view but other apartment windows.
David Mitchell (Ghostwritten)
Dr. Y. Hiraiwa, professor of Hiroshima University of Literature and Science, and one of my church members, was buried by the bomb under the two storied house with his son, a student of Tokyo University. Both of them could not move an inch under tremendously heavy pressure. And the house already caught fire. His son said, ‘Father, we can do nothing except make our mind up to consecrate our lives for the country. Let us give Banzai to our Emperor.’ Then the father followed after his son, ‘Tenno-heika, Banzai, Banzai, Banzai!’ . . . In thinking of their experience of that time Dr. Hiraiwa repeated, ‘What a fortunate that we are Japanese! It was my first time I ever tasted such a beautiful spirit when I decided to die for our Emperor.
John Hersey (Hiroshima)
What will be lost, and what saved, of our civilization probably lies beyond our powers to decide. No human group has ever figured out how to design its future. That future may be germinating today not in a boardroom in London or an office in Washington or a bank in Tokyo, but in some antic outpost or other -- a kindly British orphanage in the grim foothills of Peru, a house for the dying in a back street of Calcutta run by a fiercely single-minded Albanian nun, an easy-going French medical team at the starving edge of the Sahel, a mission to Somalia by Irish social workers who remember their own Great Hunger, a nursery program to assist convict-mothers at a New York Prison -- in some unheralded corner where a great-hearted human being is committed to loving o9utcasts in an extraordinary way.
Thomas Cahill (How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland's Heroic Role from the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe)
And everybody on earth knows that innovation only occurs in small groups. Put three people on a committee and they may get something done. Ten people, and it gets harder. Thirty people, and nothing happens. Thirty million, it becomes impossible. That’s the effect of mass media—it keeps anything from happening. Mass media swamps diversity. It makes every place the same. Bangkok or Tokyo or London: there’s a McDonald’s on one corner, a Benetton on another, a Gap across the street. Regional differences vanish. All differences vanish. In a mass-media world, there’s less of everything except the top ten books, records, movies, ideas. People worry about losing species diversity in the rain forest. But what about intellectual diversity—our most necessary resource? That’s disappearing faster than trees.
Michael Crichton (The Lost World (Jurassic Park, #2))
DEAR MISS MANNERS: Should you tell your mother something if it is important when she is talking to company? I am six. GENTLE READER: Yes, you should (after saying "Excuse me"). Here are some of the things that are important to tell your mother, even though she is talking to company: "Mommy, the kitchen is full of smoke." "Daddy's calling from Tokyo." "Kristen fell out of her crib and I can't put her back." "There's a policeman at the door and he says he wants to talk to you." "I was just reaching for my ball, and the goldfish bowl fell over." Now, here are some things that are not important, so they can wait until your mother's company has gone home: "Mommy, I'm tired of playing blocks. What do I do now?" "The ice-cream truck is coming down the street." "Can I give Kristen the rest of my applesauce?" "I can't find my crayons." "When are we going to have lunch? I'm hungry.
Judith Martin
Because complex animals can evolve their behavior rapidly. Changes can occur very quickly. Human beings are transforming the planet, and nobody knows whether it’s a dangerous development or not. So these behavioral processes can happen faster than we usually think evolution occurs. In ten thousand years human beings have gone from hunting to farming to cities to cyberspace. Behavior is screaming forward, and it might be nonadaptive. Nobody knows. Although personally, I think cyberspace means the end of our species.” “Yes? Why is that?” “Because it means the end of innovation,” Malcolm said. “This idea that the whole world is wired together is mass death. Every biologist knows that small groups in isolation evolve fastest. You put a thousand birds on an ocean island and they’ll evolve very fast. You put ten thousand on a big continent, and their evolution slows down. Now, for our own species, evolution occurs mostly through our behavior. We innovate new behavior to adapt. And everybody on earth knows that innovation only occurs in small groups. Put three people on a committee and they may get something done. Ten people, and it gets harder. Thirty people, and nothing happens. Thirty million, it becomes impossible. That’s the effect of mass media—it keeps anything from happening. Mass media swamps diversity. It makes every place the same. Bangkok or Tokyo or London: there’s a McDonald’s on one corner, a Benetton on another, a Gap across the street. Regional differences vanish. All differences vanish. In a mass-media world, there’s less of everything except the top ten books, records, movies, ideas. People worry about losing species diversity in the rain forest. But what about intellectual diversity—our most necessary resource? That’s disappearing faster than trees. But we haven’t figured that out, so now we’re planning to put five billion people together in cyberspace. And it’ll freeze the entire species. Everything will stop dead in its tracks. Everyone will think the same thing at the same time. Global uniformity. Oh, that hurts. Are you done?” “Almost,” Harding said. “Hang on.” “And believe me, it’ll be fast. If you map complex systems on a fitness landscape, you find the behavior can move so fast that fitness can drop precipitously. It doesn’t require asteroids or diseases or anything else. It’s just behavior that suddenly emerges, and turns out to be fatal to the creatures that do it. My idea was that dinosaurs—being complex creatures—might have undergone some of these behavioral changes. And that led to their extinction.
Michael Crichton (The Lost World (Jurassic Park, #2))