Sand County Almanac Quotes

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There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac)
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To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless waste; to others, the most valuable part.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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One of the penalties of an ecological education is that one lives alone in a world of wounds. Much of the damage inflicted on land is quite invisible to laymen. An ecologist must either harden his shell and make believe that the consequences of science are none of his business, or he must be the doctor who sees the marks of death in a community that believes itself well and does not want to be told otherwise.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac)
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Our ability to perceive quality in nature begins, as in art, with the pretty. It expands through successive stages of the beautiful to values as yet uncaptured by language.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Nonconformity is the highest evolutionary attainment of social animals.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Cease being intimidated by the argument that a right action is impossible because it does not yield maximum profits, or that a wrong action is to be condoned because it pays.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac)
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All conservation of wildness is self-defeating, for to cherish we must see and fondle, and when enough have seen and fondled, there is no wilderness left to cherish.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Civilization has so cluttered this elemental man-earth relationship with gadgets and middlemen that awareness of it is growing dim. We fancy that industry supports us, forgetting what supports industry.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Is education possibly a process of trading awareness for things of lesser worth?
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect. ~Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac
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Aldo Leopold
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The modern dogma is comfort at any cost.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac)
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A conservationist is one who is humbly aware that with each stroke [of the axe] he is writing his signature on the face of the land.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac)
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We all strive for safety, prosperity, comfort, long life, and dullness.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac)
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Education, I fear, is learning to see one thing by going blind to another.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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No matter how intently one studies the hundred little dramas of the woods and meadows, one can never learn all the salient facts about any one of them.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Man always kills the thing he loves, and so we the pioneers have killed our wilderness. Some say we had to. Be that as it may, I am glad I shall never be young without wild country to be young in. Of what avail are forty freedoms without a blank spot on the map?
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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On motionless wing they emerge from the lifting mists, sweep a final arc of sky, and settle in clangorous descending spirals to their feeding grounds. A new day has begun on the crane marsh.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac)
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To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
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We shall never achieve harmony with land, any more than we shall achieve absolute justice or liberty for people. In these higher aspirations the important thing is not to achieve, but to strive.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets, but humbler folk may circumvent this restriction if they know how. To plant a pine, for example, one need be neither god nor poet; one need only own a shovel. By virtue of this curious loophole in the rules, any clodhopper may say: Let there be a tree - and there will be one.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Tell me of what plant-birthday a man takes notice, and I shall tell you a good deal about his vocation, his hobbies, his hay fever, and the general level of his ecological education.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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The problem, then, is how to bring about a striving for harmony with land among a people many of whom have forgotten there is any such thing as land, among whom education and culture have become almost synonymous with landlessness. This is the problem of conservation education.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac)
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In our attempt to make conservation easy, we have made it trivial.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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When I call to mind my earliest impressions, I wonder whether the process ordinarily referred to as growing up is not actually a process of growing down; whether experience, so much touted among adults as the thing children lack, is not actually a progressive dilution of the essentials by the trivialities of living.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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It is part of wisdom never to revisit a wilderness, for the more golden the lily, the more certain that someone has gilded it.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Getting up too early is a vice habitual in horned owls, stars, geese, and freight trains. Some hunters acquire it from geese, and some coffee pots from hunters.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Thinking like a Mountain We reached the old wolf in time to watch a fierce green fire dying in her eyes. I realized then, and have known ever since, that there was something new to me in those eyes - something known only to her and to the mountain. I was young then, and full of trigger-itch; I thought that because fewer wolves meant more deer, that no wolves would mean hunters' paradise. But after seeing the green fire die, I sensed that neither the wolf nor the mountain agreed with such a view.…I now suspect that just as a deer herd lives in mortal fear of its wolves, so does a mountain live in mortal fear of its deer. And perhaps with better cause, for while a buck pulled down by wolves can be replaced in two or three years, a range pulled down by too many deer may fail of replacement in as many decades. So also with cows. The cowman who cleans his range of wolves does not realize that he is taking over the wolf's job of trimming the herd to fit the range. He has not learned to think like a mountain. Hence we have dustbowls, and rivers washing the future into the sea.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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...the most fun lies in seeing and studying the unknown.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: What good is it?
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Individual thinkers since the days of Ezekiel and Isaiah have asserted that the despoliation of land is not only inexpedient but wrong. Society, however, has not yet affirmed their belief.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Wilderness areas are first of all a series of sanctuaries for the primitive arts of wilderness travel, especially canoeing and packing. I suppose some will wish to debate whether it is important to keep these primitive arts alive. I shall not debate it. Either you know it in your bones, or you are very, very old.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets, but humbler folk may circumvent this restriction if they know how.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac with Essays on Conservation from Round River)
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The practices we now call conservation are, to a large extent, local alleviations of biotic pain. They are necessary, but they must not be confused with cures. The art of land doctoring is being practiced with vigor, but the science of land health is yet to be born.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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The outstanding scientific discovery of the twentieth century is not television, or radio, but rather the complexity of the land organism.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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It must be a poor life that achieves freedom from fear
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Essays on Conservation)
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On land ethic: A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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That the situation is hopeless should not prevent us from doing our best.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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What is a hobby anyway? Where is the line of demarcation between hobbies and ordinary normal pursuits? I have been unable to answer this question to my own satisfaction. At first blush I am tempted to conclude that a satisfactory hobby must be in large degree useless, inefficient, laborious, or irrelevant. Certainly many of our most satisfying avocations today consist of making something by hand which machines can usually make more quickly and cheaply, and sometimes better. Nevertheless I must in fairness admit that in a different age the mere fashioning of a machine might have been an excellent hobby... Today the invention of a new machine, however noteworthy to industry, would, as a hobby, be trite stuff. Perhaps we have here the real inwardness of our own question: A hobby is a defiance of the contemporary. It is an assertion of those permanent values which the momentary eddies of social evolution have contravened or overlooked. If this is true, then we may also say that every hobbyist is inherently a radical, and that his tribe is inherently a minority. This, however, is serious: Becoming serious is a grievous fault in hobbyists. It is an axiom that no hobby should either seek or need rational justification. To wish to do it is reason enough. To find reasons why it is useful or beneficial converts it at once from an avocation into an industry–lowers it at once to the ignominious category of an 'exercise' undertaken for health, power, or profit. Lifting dumbbells is not a hobby. It is a confession of subservience, not an assertion of liberty.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Some paintings become famous because, being durable, they are viewed by successive generations, in each of which are likely to be found a few appreciative eyes. I know a painting so evanescent that it is seldom viewed at all, except by some wandering deer. It is a river who wields the brush, and it is the same river who, before I can bring my friends to view his work, erases it forever from human view. After that it exists only in my mind's eye. Like other artists, my river is temperamental; there is no predicting when the mood to paint will come upon him, or how long it will last. But in midsummer, when the great white fleets cruise the sky for day after flawless day, it is worth strolling down to the sandbars just to see whether he has been at work.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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...never had there been so rare a day, or so rich a solitude top spend it in.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac; with essays on conservation from Round River)
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We reached the old wolf in time to watch a fierce green fire dying in her eyes
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Essays on Conservation)
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The evolution of a land ethic is an intellectual as well as emotional process.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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There are some who can live without wild things, and some who cannot.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Essays on Conservation)
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Out of the clouds I hear a faint bark, as of a faraway dog. It is strange how the world cocks its ear to that sound, wondering. Soon it is louder: the honk of geese, invisible, but coming on. The flock emerges from the low clouds, a tattered banner of birds, dipping and rising, blown up and blown down, blown together and blown apart, but advancing, the wind wrestling lovingly with each winnowing wing. When the flock is a blur in the far sky I hear the last honk, sounding taps for summer. It is warm behind the driftwood now, for the wind has gone with the geese. So would I--if I were the wind.
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Aldo Leopold
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But wherever the truth may lie, this much is crystal-clear: our bigger-and-better society is now like a hypochondriac, so obsessed with its own economic health as to have lost the capacity to remain healthy.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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...it is disquieting to feel that the conversion into a National Forest or Park always means the esthetic death of a piece of wild country.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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The enthusiasm of geese for high water is a subtle thing, and might be overlooked by those unfamiliar with goose gossip...
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Camp-keeping in the Delta was not all beer and skittles.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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The months of the year, from January up to June, are a geometric progression in the abundance of distractions.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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The three species of pine native to Wisconsin (white, red and jack) differ radically in their opinions about marriageable age. The precocious jackpine sometimes bloom and bears cones a year or two after leaving the nursery, and a few of my 13-year-old jacks already boast of grandchildren. My 13-year-old reds first bloomed this year, but my whites have not yet bloomed; they adhere closely to the Anglo-Saxon doctrine of free, white, and twenty-one.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Never did we plan the morrow, for we had learned that in the wilderness some new and irresistible distraction is sure to turn up each day before breakfast. Like the river, we were free to wander.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
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This sounds simple: do we not already sing our love for and obligation to the land of the free and the home of the brave? Yes, but just what and whom do we love? Certainly not the soil, which we are sending helter-skelter downriver. Certainly not the waters, which we assume have no function except to turn turbines, float barges, and carry off sewage. Certainly not the plants, of which we exterminate whole communities without batting an eye. Certainly not the animals, of which we have already extirpated many of the largest and most beautiful species.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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If education really educates, there will, in time, be more and more citizens who understand that relics of the old West add meaning and value to the new. Youth yet unborn will pole up the Missouri with Lewis and Clark, or climb the Sierras with James Capen Adams, and each generation in turn will ask: Where is the big white bear? It will be a sorry answer to say he went under while conservationists weren't looking.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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The question is, does the educated citizen know he is only a cog in an ecological mechanism? That if he will work with that mechanism his mental wealth and his material wealth can expand indefinitely? But that if he refuses to work with it, it will ultimately grind him to dust? If education does not teach us these things, then what is education for?
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac; with essays on conservation from Round River)
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To build a road is so much simpler than to think of what the country really needs. A roadless marsh is seemingly as worthless to the alphabetical conservationist as an undrained one was to the empire-builders. Solitude, the one natural resource still undowered of alphabets, is so far recognized as valuable only by ornithologists and cranes. Thus always does history, whether or marsh or market place, end in paradox. The ultimate value in these marshes is wildness, and the crane is wildness incarnate. But all conservation of wildness is self-defeating, for to cherish we must see and fondle, and when enough have seen and fondled, there is no wilderness left to cherish.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac; with essays on conservation from Round River)
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Obligations have no meaning without conscience, and the problem we face is the extension of the social conscience from people to land.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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What a thousand acres of Silphiums looked like when they tickled the bellies of the buffalo is a question never again to be answered, and perhaps not even asked.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends to do otherwise.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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November is, for many reasons, the month for the axe
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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A March morning is only as drab as he who walks in it without a glance skyward.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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there are two kinds of people: those who can live without wild things & those who cannot.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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And in this annual barter of food for light, and winter warmth for summer solitude, the whole continent receives as net profit a wild poem dropped from the murky skies upon the muds of March.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Only one acorn in a thousand ever grew large enough to fight rabbits; the rest were drowned at birth in the prairie sea. It is a warming thought that this one wasn’t, and thus lived to garner eighty years of June sun. It is this sunlight that is now being released, through the intervention of my axe and saw, to warm my shack and my spirit through eighty gusts of blizzard. And with each gust a wisp of smoke from my chimney bears witness, to whomsoever it may concern, that the sun did not shine in vain.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
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We classify ourselves into vocations, each of which either wields some particular tool, or sells it, or repairs it, or sharpens it, or dispenses advice on how to do so; by such division of labors we avoid responsibility for the misuse of any tool save our own. But there is one vocation--philosophy--which knows that all men, by what they think about and wish for, in effect wield all tools. It knows that men thus determine, by their manner of thinking and wishing, whether it is worth while to wield any.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect. β€”Aldo Leopold, in his book A Sand County Almanac
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Bea Johnson (Zero Waste Home: The Ultimate Guide to Simplifying Your Life by Reducing Your Waste)
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All ethics so far evolved rest upon a single premise: that the individual is a member of a community of interdependent parts. His instincts prompt him to compete for his place in that community, but his ethics prompt him also to co-operate (perhaps in order that there may be a place to compete for). The land ethic simply enlarges the boundaries of the community to include soils, waters, plants, and animals, or collectively: the land.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
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A man may not care for golf and still be human, but the man who does not like to see, hunt, photograph, or otherwise outwit birds or animals is hardly normal. He is supercivilized, and I for one do not know how to deal with him.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Essays on Conservation)
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The only true development in American recreational resources is the development of the perceptive faculty in Americans. All of the other acts we grace by that name are, at best, attempts to retard or mask the process of dilution.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac with Essays on Conservation from Round River)
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There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace. To avoid the first danger, one should plant a garden, preferably where there is no grocer to confuse the issue. To avoid the second, he should lay a split of good oak on the andirons, preferably where there is no furnace, and let it warm his shins while a February blizzard tosses the trees outside. If one has cut, split, hauled, and piled his own good oak, and let his mind work the while, he will remember much about where the heat comes from, and with a wealth of detail denied to those who spend the week end in town astride a radiator.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
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There is value in any experience that reminds us of our dependency on the soil-plant-animal-man food chain [...] Civilization has so cluttered this elemental man-earth relation with gadgets and middlemen that awareness of it is growing dim. We fancy that industry supports us, forgetting what supports industry. Time was when education moved toward soil, not away from it.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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It is inconceivable to me that an ethical relation to land can exist without love, respect, and admiration for land, and a high regard for its value. By value, I of course mean something far broader than economic value; I mean value in the philosophical sense.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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We forest officers, who acquiesced in the extinguishment of the bear, knew a local rancher who had plowed up a dagger engraved with the name of one of CoronadoΒ΄s captains. We spoke harshly of the Spaniards, who, in their zeal for gold and converts, had needlessly extinguished the native Indians. It did not occur to us that we, too, were the captains of an invasion too sure of its righteousness.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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I sit in happy meditation on my rock, pondering, while my line dries again, upon the ways of trout and men. How like fish we are: ready, nay eager, to seize upon whatever new thing some wind of circumstance shakes down upon the river of time! And how we rue our haste, finding the gilded morsel to contain a hook.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
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One swallow does not make a summer, but one skein of geese, cleaving the murk of a March thaw, is the spring. A cardinal, whistling spring to a thaw but later finding himself mistaken, can retrieve his error by resuming his winter silence. A chipmunk, emerging for a sunbath but finding a blizzard, has only to go back to bed. But a migrating goose, staking two hundred miles of black night on the chance of finding a hole in the lake, has no easy chance for retreat. His arrival carries the conviction of a prophet who has burned his bridges. A March morning is only as drab as he who walks in it without a glance skyward, ear cocked for geese.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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I feel a deep sense of security in this single-mindedness of freight trains
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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...bigger-and-better society is now like a hypochondriac, so obsessed with its own economic health as to have lost the capacity to remain healthy.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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He is the prospector of the air, perpetually searching its strata for olfactory gold.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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To love what was is a new thing under the sun, unknown to most people and to all pigeons.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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When the logic of history hungers for bread and we hand out a stone, we are at pains to explain how much the stone resembles bread.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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During every week from April to September there are, on the average, ten wild plants coming into first bloom.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
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I am well content that it should remain a mystery. What a dull world if we knew all about geese.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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That wildlife is merely something to shoot at or to look at is the grossest of fallacies.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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Il Signore dΓ  e il Signore toglie, ma Egli non Γ¨ piΓΉ il solo a farlo. Quando il nostro lontano antenato inventΓ² la pala l'uomo fu in grado di dare: poteva piantare un albero; quando inventΓ² l'ascia gli fu possibile togliere: poteva tagliarlo. Chi possiede della terra ha assunto, piΓΉ o meno consapevolmente, le funzioni divine di creare e distruggere le piante.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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The Lord giveth, and the Lord taketh away. He is no longer the only one to do so. When some remote ancestor of ours invented the shovel, he became a giver: he could plant a tree. And when the axe was invented, he became a taker: he could chop it down. Whoever owns land has thus assumed, whether he knows it or not, the divine functions of creating and destroying plants.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
People who have never canoed a wild river, or who have done so only with a guide in the stern, are apt to assume that novelty, plus healthful exercise, account for the value of the trip. I thought so too, until I met the two college boys on the Flambeau. Supper dishes washed, we sat on the bank watching a buck dunking for water plants on the far shore. Soon the buck raised his head, cocked his ears upstream, and then bounded for cover. Around the bend now came the cause of his alarm: two boys in a canoe. Spying us, they edged in to pass the time of day. β€˜What time is it?’ was their first question. They explained that their watches had run down, and for the first time in their lives there was no clock, whistle, or radio to set watches by. For two days they had lived by β€˜sun-time,’ and were getting a thrill out of it. No servant brought them meals: they got their meat out of the river, or went without. No traffic cop whistled them off the hidden rock in the next rapids. No friendly roof kept them dry when they misguessed whether or not to pitch the tent. No guide showed them which camping spots offered a nightlong breeze, and which a nightlong misery of mosquitoes; which firewood made clean coals, and which only smoke. Before our young adventurers pushed off downstream, we learned that both were slated for the Army upon the conclusion of their trip. Now the motif was clear. This trip was their first and last taste of freedom, an interlude between two regimentations: the campus and the barracks. The elemental simplicities of wilderness travel were thrills not only because of their novelty, but because they represented complete freedom to make mistakes. The wilderness gave them their first taste of those rewards and penalties for wise and foolish acts which every woodsman faces daily, but against which civilization has built a thousand buffers. These boys were β€˜on their own’ in this particular sense. Perhaps every youth needs an occasional wilderness trip, in order to learn the meaning of this particular freedom.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac; with essays on conservation from Round River)
β€œ
In the narrow thread of sod between the shaved banks and the toppling fences grow the relics of what once was Illinois β€” the prairie. No one in the bus sees these relics. A worried farmer, his fertilizer bill projecting from his shirt pocket, looks blankly at the lupines, lespedezas or Baptisias that originally pumped nitrogen out of the prairie air and into his black loamy acres. He does not distinguish them from the parvenu quack-grass in which they grow. Were I to ask him the name of that white spike of pea-like flowers hugging the fence, he would shake his head. A weed, likely.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac; with essays on conservation from Round River)
β€œ
Then on a still night, when the campfire is low and the Pleiades have climbed over the rimrocks, sit quietly and listen for a wolf to howl, and think hard of everything you have seen and tried to understand. Then you may hear it- a vast pulsing harmony- its score inscribed on a thousand hills, its notes the lives and deaths of plants and animals, its rhythms spanning the seconds and the centuries.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
The drama of the sky dance is enacted nightly on hundreds of farms, the owners of which sigh for entertainment, but harbor the illusion that it is to be sought in theaters. They live on the land, but not by the land.
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Aldo Leopold (Aldo Leopold: A Sand County Almanac & Other Writings on Conservation and Ecology (LOA #238) (Library of America))
β€œ
There is an allegory for historians in the diverse functions of saw, wedge, and axe. The saw works only across the years, which it must deal with one by one, in sequence. From each year the raker teeth pull little chips of fact, which accumulate in little piles, called sawdust by woodsmen and archives by historians; both judge the character of what lies within by the character of the samples thus made visible without. It is not until the transect is complete that the tree falls, and the stump yields a collective view of the century. By its fall the tree attests the unity of the hodge-podge called history. The wedge on the other hand, works only in radial splits; such a split yields a collective view of all the years at once, or no view at all, depending on the skill with which the plane of the split is chosen[...] The axe functions only at an angle diagonal to the years, and this is only for the peripheral rings of the recent past. Its special function is to lop limbs, for which both the saw and wedge are useless. The three tools are requisite to good oak, and to good history.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
It is a century now since Darwin gave us the first glimpse of the origin of species. We know now what was unknown to all the preceding caravan of generations: that men are only fellow-voyagers with other creatures in the odyssey of evolution. This new knowledge should have given us, by this time, a sense of kinship with fellow-creatures; a wish to live and let live; a sense of wonder over the magnitude and duration of the biotic enterprise.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Recreational development is a job not of building roads into lovely country, but of building receptivity into the still unlovely human mind. Wildlife in American Culture The culture of primitive peoples is often based on wildlife.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: And Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Above all we should, in the century since Darwin, have come to know that man, while now captain of the adventuring ship, is hardly the sole object of its quest, and that his prior assumptions to this effect arose from the simple necessity of whistling in the dark.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Everything on this farm spells money in the bank. The farmstead abounds in fresh paint, steel, and concrete. A date on the barn commemorates the founding fathers. The roof bristles with lightning rods, the weathercock is proud with new gilt. Even the pigs look solvent.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
β€œ
These wild things, I admit, had little human value until mechanization assured us of a good breakfast, and until science disclosed the drama of where they come from and how they live. The whole conflict thus boils down to a question of degree. We of the minority see a law of diminishing returns in progress; our opponents do not.
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Aldo Leopold (Aldo Leopold: A Sand County Almanac & Other Writings on Conservation and Ecology (LOA #238) (Library of America))
β€œ
The fallacy the economic determinists have tied around our collective neck, and which we now need to cast off, is the belief that economics determines all land-use. This is simply not true. An innumerable host of actions and attitudes, comprising perhaps the bulk of all land relations, is determined by the land-users’ tastes and predilections, rather than by his purse.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
I have read many definitions of what is a conservationist, and written not a few myself, but I suspect that the best one is written not with a pen, but with an axe. It is a matter of what a man thinks about while chopping, or while deciding what to chop. A conservationist is one who is humbly aware that with each stroke he is writing his signature on the face of his land.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
β€œ
Land, then, is not merely soil; it is a fountain of energy flowing through a circuit of soils, plants, and animals. … When a change occurs in one part of the circuit, many other parts must adjust themselves to it. …Evolutionary changes, however, are usually slow and local. Man’s invention of tools has enabled him to make changes of unprecedented violence, rapidity and scope.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Our grandfathers were less well-housed, well-fed, well-clothed than we are. The strivings by which they bettered their lot are also those which deprived us of pigeons. Perhaps we now grieve because we are not sure, in our hearts, that we have gained by the exchange. The gadgets of industry bring us more comforts than the pigeons did, but do they add as much to the glory of the spring?
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
β€œ
Our lumber pile, recruited entirely from the river, is thus not only a collection of personalities, but an anthology of human strivings in upriver farms and forests. The autobiography of an old board is a kind of literature not yet taught on campuses, but any riverbank farm is a library where he who hammers or saws may read at will. Come high water, there is always an accession of new books.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
There are degrees and kinds of solitude. An island in a lake has one kind; but lakes have boats, and there is always the chance that one might land to pay you a visit. A peak in the clouds has another kind; but most peaks have trails, and trails have tourists. I know of no solitude so secure as one guarded by a spring flood; nor do the geese, who have seen more kinds and degrees of aloneness than I have.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Essays on Conservation)
β€œ
By this international commerce of geese, the waste corn of Illinois is carried through the clouds to the Arctic tundras, there to combine with the waste sunlight of a nightless June to grow goslings for all the lands between. And in this annual barter of food for light, and winter warmth for summer solitude, the whole continent receives as net profit a wild poem dropped from the murky skies upon the muds of March.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
β€œ
Becoming serious is a grievous fault in hobbyists. It is an axiom that no hobby should either seek or need rational justification. To wish to do it is reason enough. To find reasons why it is useful or beneficial converts it at once from an avocation into an industry - lowers it at once to the ignominious category of an 'exercise' undertaken for health, power, or profit. Lifting dumbbells is not a hobby. It is a confession of subservience, not an assertion of liberty.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac with Essays on Conservation from Round River)
β€œ
I sit in happy mediation on my rock, pondering, while my line dries again, upon the ways of trout and men. How like fish we are: ready, nay eager, to seize upon whatever new thing some wind of circumstance shakes down upon the river of time! And how we rue our haste, finding the gilded morsel to contain a hook. Even so, I think there is some virtue to eagerness, whether its object prove true or false. How utterly dull would be a wholly prudent man, or trout, or world!
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
There will always be pigeons in books and in museums, but these are effigies and images, dead to all hardships and to all delights. Book-pigeons cannot dive out of a cloud to make the deer run for cover, or clap their wings in thunderous applause of mast-laden woods. Book-pigeons cannot breakfast on new-mown wheat in Minnesota, and dine on blueberries in Canada. They know no urge of seasons; they feel no kiss of sun, no lash of wind and weather. They live forever by not living at all.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
By mid-August they had read through A Sand County Almanac, and although she couldn’t read every word, she got most of it. Aldo Leopold taught her that floodplains are living extensions of the rivers, which will claim them back any time they choose. Anyone living on a floodplain is just waiting in the river’s wings. She learned where the geese go in winter, and the meaning of their music. His soft words, sounding almost like poetry, taught her that soil is packed with life and one of the most precious riches on Earth; that draining wetlands dries the land for miles beyond, killing plants and animals along with the water. Some of the seeds lie dormant in the desiccated earth for decades, waiting, and when the water finally comes home again, they burst through the soil, unfolding their faces. Wonders and real-life knowledge she would’ve never learned in school. Truths everyone should know, yet somehow, even though they lay exposed all around, seemed to lie in secret like the seeds.
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Delia Owens (Where the Crawdads Sing)
β€œ
FOR THE REST of the summer Kya and Tate did the reading lessons at the tumbledown cabin. By mid-August they had read through A Sand County Almanac, and although she couldn’t read every word, she got most of it. Aldo Leopold taught her that floodplains are living extensions of the rivers, which will claim them back any time they choose. Anyone living on a floodplain is just waiting in the river’s wings. She learned where the geese go in winter, and the meaning of their music. His soft words, sounding almost like poetry, taught her that soil is packed with life and one of the most precious riches on Earth; that draining wetlands dries the land for miles beyond, killing plants and animals along with the water. Some of the seeds lie dormant in the desiccated earth for decades, waiting, and when the water finally comes home again, they burst through the soil, unfolding their faces. Wonders and real-life knowledge she would’ve never learned in school. Truths everyone should know, yet somehow, even though they lay exposed all around, seemed to lie in secret like the seeds.
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Delia Owens (Where the Crawdads Sing)
β€œ
ONE SWALLOW does not make a summer, but one skein of geese, cleaving the murk of a March thaw, is the spring. A cardinal, whistling spring to a thaw but later finding himself mistaken, can retrieve his error by resuming his winter silence. A chipmunk, emerging for a sunbath but finding a blizzard, has only to go back to bed. But a migrating goose, staking two hundred miles of black night on the chance of finding a hole in the lake, has no easy chance for retreat. His arrival carries the conviction of a prophet who has burned his bridges.
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Aldo Leopold (Aldo Leopold: A Sand County Almanac & Other Writings on Conservation and Ecology (LOA #238) (Library of America))
β€œ
Now the motif was clear. This trip was their first and last taste of freedom, an interlude between two regimentations: the campus and the barracks. The elemental simplicities of wilderness travel were thrills not only because of their novelty, but because they represented complete freedom to make mistakes. The wilderness gave them their first taste of those rewards and penalties for wise and foolish acts which every woodsman faces daily, but against which civilization has built a thousand buffers. These boys were β€˜on their own’ in this particular sense.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
β€œ
These haymeadow days were the Arcadian age for marsh dwellers. Man and beast, plant and soil lived on and with each other in mutual toleration, to the mutual benefit of all. The marsh might have kept on producing hay and prairie chickens, deer and muskrat, crane-music and cranberries forever. The new overlords did not understand this. They did not include soil, plants, or birds in their ideas of mutuality. The dividends of such a balanced economy were too modest. They envisaged farms not only around, but in the marsh. An epidemic of ditch-digging and land-booming set in. The marsh was gridironed with drainage canals, speckled with new fields and farmsteads.
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Aldo Leopold (Aldo Leopold: A Sand County Almanac & Other Writings on Conservation and Ecology (LOA #238) (Library of America))
β€œ
L'opinione corrente a proposito di queste malattie della terra si riflette nel fatto che le nostre cure sono ancora prevalentemente locali. PerciΓ² quando il terreno perde fertilitΓ  usiamo un fertilizzante o, nel migliore dei casi, ne alteriamo la flora e la fauna, senza considerare che le sue specie selvatiche, poichΓ© hanno formato quel particolare terreno, possono essere molto importanti per la sua salvaguardia. Si Γ¨ scoperto di recente per esempio che un buon raccolto di tabacco dipende per qualche motivo sconosciuto dalla preparazione del terreno fatta dalle piante di senecio selvatico. Non ci rendiamo conto che simili legami di dipendenza possono essere estremamente comuni in natura.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Recreational development is a job not of building roads into lovely country, but of building receptivity into the still unlovely human mind.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Draba plucks no heartstrings. Its perfume, if there is any, is lost in the gusty winds. Its color is plain white. Its leaves wear a sensible woolly coat. Nothing eats it; it is too small. No poets sing of it. Some botanist once gave it a Latin name, and then forgot it. Altogether, it is of no importance – just a small creature that does a small job quickly and well.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
It might be wise to prohibit at once all teaching of real botany and real history, lest some future citizen suffer qualms about the floristic price of his good life.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Solitude, the one natural resource still undowered of alphabets, is so far recognized as valuable only by ornithologists and cranes.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
But all conservation of wildness is self-defeating, for to cherish we must see and fondle, and when enough have seen and fondled, there is no wilderness left to cherish.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
our bigger-and-better society is now like a hypochondriac, so obsessed with its own economic health as to have lost the capacity to remain healthy. The whole world is so greedy for more bathtubs that it has lost the stability necessary to build them, or even to turn off the tap.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: And Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
It seems timely, therefore, to segregate the components, and to examine the distinctive characteristics or properties of each.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: And Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
There is a peculiar virtue in the music of elusive birds.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
β€œ
An oak is no respecter of persons.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Thus always does history, whether or marsh or market place, end in paradox. The ultimate value in these marshes is wildness, and the crane is wildness incarnate. But all conservation of wildness is self-defeating, for to cherish we must see and fondle, and when enough have seen and fondled, there is no wilderness left to cherish.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Essays on Conservation)
β€œ
A cardinal, whistling spring to a thaw but later finding himself mistaken, can retrieve his error by resuming his winter silence. A chipmunk, emerging for a sunbath but finding a blizzard, has only to go back to bed. But a migrating goose, staking two hundred miles of black night on the chance of finding a hole in the lake, has no easy chance for retreat. His arrival carries the conviction of a prophet who has burned his bridges.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
β€œ
We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect. There is no other way for land to survive the impact of mechanized man, nor for us to reap from it the esthetic harvest it is capable, under science, of contributing to culture.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
If one has cut, split, hauled, and piled his own good oak, and let his mind work the while, he will remember much about where the heat comes from...
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
We listen and take our truthsβ€”all of usβ€”from people we trust, who know us and have our interests at heart. This is a built-in bias of the human psyche, and the crux of the fix we’re in as we stand as nations divided against themselves. As long as we live in entirely separate worlds, without comprehension of the others language or daily grind, the door between us is sealed. Not a word will pass from one side to the other. Barbara Kingsolverβ€”Introduction to A Sand County Almanac
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Black and white buffalo pass in and out of red barns, offering free rides to itinerant atoms.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Other Essays on Conservation from Round River (Galaxy Books))
β€œ
July I watch eagerly a certain country graveyard that I pass in driving to and from my farm. It is time for a prairie birthday, and in one corner of this graveyard lives a surviving celebrant of that once important event. It is an ordinary graveyard, bordered by the usual spruces, and studded with the usual pink granite or white marble headstones, each with the usual Sunday bouquet of red or pink geraniums. It is extraordinary only in being triangular instead of square, and in harboring, within the sharp angle of its fence, a pin-point remnant of the native prairie on which the graveyard was established in the 1840’s. Heretofore unreachable by scythe or mower, this yard-square relic of original Wisconsin gives birth, each July, to a man-high stalk of compass plant or cutleaf Silphium, spangled with saucer-sized yellow blooms resembling sunflowers. It is the sole remnant of this plant along this highway, and perhaps the sole remnant in the western half of our county. What a thousand acres of Silphiums looked like when they tickled the bellies of the buffalo is a question never again to be answered, and perhaps not even asked. This year I found the Silphium in first bloom on 24 July, a week later than usual; during the last six years the average date was 15 July. When I passed the graveyard again on 3 August, the fence had been removed by a road crew, and the Silphium cut. It is easy now to predict the future; for a few years my Silphium will try in vain to rise above the mowing machine, and then it will die. With it will die the prairie epoch. The Highway Department says that 100,000 cars pass yearly over this route during the three summer months when the Silphium is in bloom. In them must ride at least 100,000 people who have β€˜taken’ what is called history, and perhaps 25,000 who have β€˜taken’ what is called botany. Yet I doubt whether a dozen have seen the Silphium, and of these hardly one will notice its demise. If I were to tell a preacher of the adjoining church that the road crew has been burning history books in his cemetery, under the guise of mowing weeds, he would be amazed and uncomprehending. How could a weed be a book? This is one little episode in the funeral of the native flora, which in turn is one episode in the funeral of the floras of the world. Mechanized man, oblivious of floras, is proud of his progress in cleaning up the landscape on which, willy-nilly, he must live out his days. It might be wise to prohibit at once all teaching of real botany and real history, lest some future citizen suffer qualms about the floristic price of his good life. * * *
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Aldo Leopold (Aldo Leopold: A Sand County Almanac & Other Writings on Conservation and Ecology (LOA #238) (Library of America))
β€œ
L'atto di creare Γ¨ generalmente riservato agli dei e ai poeti, ma anche la gente piΓΉ umile puΓ² superare questa restrizione se sa come farlo. Per piantare un pino, per esempio, non Γ¨ necessario essere un dio nΓ© un poeta, basta possedere una pala.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
La nostra società, sempre più grande e bella, a questo punto è come un ipocondriaco, talmente ossessionato dalla sua salute finanziaria da aver perso la capacità di rimanere sano. Il mondo è così incessantemente avido di vasche da bagno che ha perduto l'equilibrio necessario per costruirle e persino per chiudere i rubinetti.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
La capacitΓ  di percepire il valore culturale della natura allo stato selvaggio si riduce, in ultima analisi, a una questione di umiltΓ  intellettuale. La superficialitΓ  degli uomini d'oggi, che hanno perso le proprie radici terrene, fa loro credere di aver giΓ  scoperto ciΓ² che conta; questi sono coloro che cianciano di imperi politici ed economici destinati a durare secoli. Solo lo studioso riconosce che la storia consiste di successivi percorsi da un unico punto di partenza, a cui l'uomo ritorna continuamente per organizzare sempre nuovi viaggi, alla ricerca di una scala di valori costante. Solo lo studioso comprende perchΓ© l'autentica natura selvaggia determina e dΓ  significato alle vicende umane.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Un'etica terrestre, modifica il ruolo dell'Homo Sapiens da conquistatore della terra a semplice membro e cittadino della sua comunitΓ . Implica rispetto per altri membri e per la stessa comunitΓ .
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Forse il pericolo che minaccia piΓΉ gravemente l'evoluzione di un'etica della terra Γ¨ il fatto che i nostri sistemi educativi ed economici vanno nella direzione opposta a quella che li condurrebbe verso lo sviluppo di un'intensa consapevolezza della terra. L'uomo moderno Γ¨ separato dalla terra da troppi intermediari e arnesi; non ha un rapporto vitale con essa e per lui "terra" significa solo lo spazio fra una cittΓ  e l'altra, dove si producono i raccolti. Se lo si lascia libero un giorno in campagna, in un luogo che non sia un campo da golf o un belvedere, si annoierΓ  a morte. Se i raccolti fossero prodotti con l'idroponica e non con l'agricoltura gli andrebbe benissimo e inoltre preferisce i sostituti sintetici del legno, pelle, lana e di altri prodotti naturali della terra. In poche parole, la terra ormai gli va stretta.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
Noi ci classifichiamo secondo le nostre vocazioni, ciascuna delle quali ci porta a maneggiare un particolare attrezzo, a venderlo, a ripararlo, ad affilarlo o a dare istruzioni su come fare tutto ciΓ²: attraverso questa suddivisione delle attivitΓ  evitiamo di assumerci responsabilitΓ  per il cattivo uso di qualsiasi attrezzo, salvo il nostro. Ma esiste una vocazione, quella per la filosofia, la quale riconosce che tutti gli uomini attraverso ciΓ² che pensano o desiderano, di fatto maneggiano tutti gli strumenti e quindi, attraverso il loro modo di pensare e di desiderare, stabiliscono se valga la pena di usarne qualcuno.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
What the youth needs to be told is that a ship is a-building in his own mental dry dock, a ship with freedom of the seas.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
In general, the trend of the evidence indicates that in land, just as in the human body, the symptoms may lie in one organ and the cause in another. The practices we now call conservation are, to a large extent, local alleviations of biotic pain. They are necessary, but they must not be confused with cures. The art of land doctoring is being practiced with vigor, but the science of land health is yet to be born.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
There is, as yet, no sense of pride in the husbandry of wild plants and animals, no sense of shame in the proprietorship of a sick landscape.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: With Essays on Conservation)
β€œ
According to Leopold [in A Sand County Almanac] (1966), All ethics so far evolved rest upon a single premise: that the individual is a member of a community of individual parts. His instincts prompt him to compete for his place in the community, but his ethics prompt him also to cooperate. The land ethic simply enlarges the boundaries of the community to include soils, water, plants and animals, or collectively: the land. We can be ethical only in relation to something we can see, feel, understand, love and otherwise have faith in. A land ethic, then, reflects the existence of an ecological conscience, and this in turn reflects a conviction of individual responsibility for the health of the land.
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Bill Reed (The Integrative Design Guide to Green Building: Redefining the Practice of Sustainability (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design Book 1))
β€œ
Last semester, when I asked my class, as I do each quarter, how many of them had ever spent a night sleeping in the wilderness the answer was zero, and I realized for the first time in my teaching life I might be standing in front of a room full of students for whom the words β€œelk” or β€œgranite” or β€œbristlecone pine” conjured exactly nothing. I thought about the books that had shaped my sensibility as a young writer: Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, Silent Spring, A Sand County Almanac, Refuge, A River Runs Through It, In Patagonia and Desert Solitaire. Now, amid the most sweeping legislative attack on our environment in history, a colleague wondered aloud to me whether it was feasible, or even sane anymore, to teach books that celebrate nature unironically. This planet hadn’t even been mapped properly a couple of hundred years ago, and now none of it, above or below ground, remains unsullied by our need for extraction. As we hurtle toward the cliff, foot heavy on the throttle, to write a poem about the loveliness of a newly leafed out aspen grove or a hot August wind sweeping across prairie grass or the smell of the air after a three-day rain in the maple forest might be at best so unconscionably naΓ―ve, and at worst so much part of the problem, we might as well drive a Hummer and start voting Republican.
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Pam Houston (Deep Creek: Finding Hope in the High Country)
β€œ
In human history, we have learned (I hope) that the conqueror role is eventually self-defeating. Why? Because it is implicit in such a role that the conqueror knows, ex cathedra, just what makes the community clock tick, and just what and who is valuable, and what and who is worthless, in community life. It always turns out that he knows neither, and this is why conquests eventually defeat themselves.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
That man is, in fact, only a member of a biotic team is shown by an ecological interpretation of history. Many historical events, hitherto explained solely in . terms of human enterprise, were actually biotic interactions between people and land.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
β€œ
a library shaped by the aspirations and concerns of people who came of age in the late sixties [the collected works of Thoreau, Lopez, Abbey, Ginsberg, Snyder, Kerouac, the entirety of the Foxfire series as well as The Gulag Archipelago, The Tropic of Cancer, a smattering of Gogol, Tolstoy, and Dostoyevsky, The Rubaiyat, The Sand County Almanac, Them] ["The Basement,” The Awl, Feb 5, 2015].
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Ariana Kelly
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Um dos castigos impostos por uma educação ecolΓ³gica Γ© viver solitariamente em um mundo ferido. Para um leigo, muitos dos danos causados Γ  Terra sΓ£o invisΓ­veis. Um ecologista deve se embrutecer e fazer de conta que nΓ£o tem nada a ver com as consequΓͺncias da ciΓͺncia, ou deve ser como um mΓ©dico que vΓͺ marcas da morte em uma comunidade que acredita estar saudΓ‘vel e nΓ£o quer ser convencida do contrΓ‘rio.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac)
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The real jewel of my disease-ridden woodlot is the prothonotary warbler. He nests in an old woodpecker hole, or other small cavity, in a dead snag overhanging water. The flash of his gold-and-blue plumage amid the dank decay of the June woods is in itself proof that dead trees are transmuted into living animals, and vice versa. When you doubt the wisdom of this arrangement, take a look at the prothonotary.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac)
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Land, then, is not merely soil; it is a fountain of energy flowing through a circuit of soils, plants, and animals.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: And Sketches Here and There)
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By this international commerce of geese, the waste corn of Illinois is carried through the clouds to the Arctic tundras, there to combine with the waste sunlight of a nightless June to grow goslings fro all the lands between. And in this annual barter of food for light, and winter warmth for summer solitude, the whole continent receives as a net profit a wild poem dropped from the murky skies upon the muds of March.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There)
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November is, for many reasons, the month for the axe. It is warm enough to grind an axe without freezing, but cold enough to fell a tree in comfort.
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Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac: And Sketches Here and There)