Rugby Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Rugby. Here they are! All 100 of them:

I have been going out with Nick Nelson since I was fourteen. He likes rugby and Formula 1, animals (especially dogs), the Marvel universe, the sound felt-tips make on paper, rain, drawing on shoes, Disneyland and minimalism. He also likes me.
Alice Oseman (Nick and Charlie)
Dearest Annie, Roses are red. Violets are blue. I’m using my hand But I’m thinking of you. - Ronan P.S. Just to clarify, I’m using my hand to write this note…get your mind out of the gutter.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
It's Thursday afternoon, and we have sports. These are the choices for the girls: watching an invitational cricket game; studying in one of the classrooms; or watching the senior rugby league. As you can imagine, I'm torn.
Melina Marchetta (Saving Francesca)
I wanted to high-five the fuck out of myself then do a victory dance. But I didn’t, because, you know, manly.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
His tiny, naked butt disappeared into the stream as he cried, "Wheeeee! Balls out!" I think that's a rugby reference," Bertie said. "But don't quote me on that.
Lisa Mantchev (Eyes Like Stars (Théâtre Illuminata, #1))
Women are born with pain built in. It's our physical destiny. Period pains, sore boobs, child birth, you know. We carry it within ourselves throughout our lives. Men don't. They have to seek it out. “Women are born with pain built in,” she says. “It’s our physical destiny: period pains, sore boobs, childbirth, you know. We carry it within ourselves throughout our lives, men don’t. They have to seek it out, they invent all these gods and demons and things just so they can feel guilty about things, which is something we do very well on our own. And then they create wars so they can feel things and touch each other and when there aren’t any wars they can play rugby. We have it all going on in here inside.
Phoebe Waller-Bridge (Fleabag: The Scriptures)
Nick is actually the human embodiment of a golden retriever puppy, as well as being Truham’s rugby captain and a genuinely lovely person.
Alice Oseman (Solitaire)
The thing about rugby is this: You can hate a guy off the pitch who will save your fucking balls on the pitch when you play on the same side. There is nothing more glorious that that.
Sam Bosma (Winger (Winger, #1))
That’s right, I’m a reclusive pervert, and I make no apologies for it. And, giving the matter some thought, a reclusive pervert is much preferable to an extroverted pervert.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Annie….” “I know; I remember. I’m supposed to dab, not rub.” I recalled his words from our first meeting. “Annie….” “Am I rubbing?” “No…but, God, I wish you would.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
He had a great laugh, a sexy laugh. My laugh was the mating call of the Yeti.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Family isn’t always the one you’re born into. Sometimes it’s about people who get into your blood, inside your heart, and under your skin all on their own.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Some of the males rose from the table then, making noise about a rugby rematch. MacRieve tensed, but didn’t join them. When a couple of the men said things in Gaelic, their tones taunting, she asked, “Are they trash-talking you?” “Oh, aye. According to them, I’m the veriest pussy. Already mate-whipped.
Kresley Cole (MacRieve (Immortals After Dark, #13))
Bollocks, bitches, and Battlestar Galactica,
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
The width of neck and shoulder suggested a rugby player, the broken nose confirmed it. Which shows just how wrong you can be as he never played the game in his life.
Spike Milligan (Puckoon)
Seriously. A man categorically devised the high heal and he did it in an attempt to make it easier for you dudes to rugby tackle us womenfolk to the ground and haul us back to your beds.
Jodi Ellen Malpas (Beneath This Man (This Man, #2))
I finally made friends with my father when I entered my twenties. We had so little in common when I was a boy, and I am certain I had been a disappointment to him. He did not ask for a child with a book, off in its own world. He wanted a son who did what he had done; swam and boxed and played rugby, and drove cars at speed with abandon and joy, but that was not what he wound up with.
Neil Gaiman (The Ocean at the End of the Lane)
You’re virtually unknown over in the States. This could be the thing that helps you crack America. I can just see it now, a picture of you reclining in a pair of tighty whiteys advertising for Calvin Klein on the side of a skyscraper.” “Fuck, man. Are you a psychic? How did you know that’s my one true dream?
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
About my boss, Tyler tells me, if I'm really angry, I should go to the post office and fill out a change-of-address card and have all his mail forwarded to Rugby, North Dakota.
Chuck Palahniuk (Fight Club)
I might have been a little mesmerized for a moment as I took in the sight of her shapely backside. It was incredible. I just wanted to spank it and bite it and worship it and completely fucking defile it.
Penny Reid (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
The protector inside me was frowning while the predator soaked up her discomfort with glee.
Penny Reid (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
I feel like I could lose myself and find myself in you,
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
I like it here. I just want to walk the wind, watch you play rugby. Make kites for Agnes and do things, when I can—and come to bed with you at the end of the day. I’ve stopped running.” “You fell?” “I landed.
K.J. Charles (Jackdaw (The World of A Charm of Magpies))
I have been going out with Nick Nelson since I was fourteen. He likes rugby and Formula I, animals (especially dogs), the Marvel universe, the sound felt-tips make on paper, rain, drawing on shoes, Disneyland and minimalism. He also likes me.
Alice Oseman (Nick and Charlie)
Maybe I would get a ferret. A cat just felt too benign. My kind of crazy deserved an ambiguously cute rodent with a penchant for biting.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
OMG. WTF? BBQ!
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Beauty comes in many forms, and the strong, powerful kind is the most admirable. It's easy to be weak; you simply do nothing, but strength takes courage and effort.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
She said seals sexually assault penguins and deserved to be clubbed. That woman is nuttier than a Snickers bar.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
I’m comparing you to . . . rugby and . . . my voice breaking . . . and everything I love but don’t understand.” “To the failures in your life.” “No. I’m comparing you to all the things I love doing best and I just can’t have when I want them.
Melina Marchetta (Saving Francesca)
I was never a fan of golf. It’s too slow. Too quiet. Too bloody boring. I like my sports the way I like to fuck – wild, loud and dirty. Football is more my game. Or rugby. Full body contact. Polo is all right too. Hell, at this point, I’d settle for an energetic Quidditch match.
Emma Chase (Royally Matched (Royally, #2))
Some bruises you wear like badges of honour: when you got it playing rugby, or quad racing, or falling off something while drunk, no opportunity is lost to show off a good contusion. A bruise inflicted by someone else, however, is a whole other story: it's like a big flashing arrow marking you out as punchable, and before long there'll be boys queuing up to add bruises of their own, as if they'd just been waiting for somebody to show them it could be done.
Paul Murray
He is wearing a rugby shirt with numbers and a little man on a horse on his chest. Kent has told Elsa that this sort of shirt costs more than a thousand kronor, and Granny always used to say that those sorts of shirts were a good thing, because the horse functioned as a sort of manufacturer’s warning that the shirt was highly likely to be transporting a muppet.
Fredrik Backman (My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry)
A few weeks later, I’m in a fluorescent-lit classroom in Chelsea awaiting the start of the official Mensa test. I’m sitting next to a guy who’s doing a series of elaborate neck stretches, like we’re about to engage in a vigorous rugby match. He’s neatly laid out four types of gum on his Formica desk: Juicy Fruit, Wrigley Spearmint, Big Red, and Eclipse. I hate this guy. I hope to God he’s not a genius.
A.J. Jacobs (The Know-It-All)
@SeanCassinova Where might one procure a shoe horn in NYC? @RugbyFan101 to @SeanCassinova I’ll loan you my horn any day of the week, baby ;-) @SeanCassinova to @RugbyFan101 Who is this and where did you get my number? @RugbyFan101 to @SeanCassinova Uh, this is Twitter. @SeanCassinova to @RugbyFan101 That’s a very strange name. What were your parents thinking? @EilishCassidy @SeanCassinova Stop being an arse.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
Rugby is a beastly game played by gentlemen. Soccer is a gentleman's game played by beasts. Football is a beastly game played by beasts.
Henry Blaha
I could've been a professional rugby player... but then I saw a new Gaunt's Ghosts book come out...
John Charles Scott
In no particular order: baked goods, Colin Farrell's eyebrows, and the thighs of rugby players everywhere. And to the city of Edinburgh, where a love story was born.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
William had played [rugby] at Eton when it first became popular, and now he only spoke of it in a reverent tone he normally saved only for women and rifles. . . . . [in contrast] Cricket had rules: one was not allowed to stamp on the head of another player and pass it off as enthusiasm.
Natasha Pulley (The Watchmaker of Filigree Street (The Watchmaker of Filigree Street, #1))
WONDERFUL, JEFFREY, JUST CUNTING WONDERFUL!!
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Why talk to a person if you had nothing in common with them? What would that accomplish, other than a painfully stunted conversation?
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
The moment you walk into a room you brighten it, Lucy Fitzpatrick, and I for one feel like the luckiest bastard in the world for having known you.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
Utu--Maori revenge. 'Do everything well, boy. Do it better than them. Be a better rugby player, better at your job. Outshine them everywhere. Tramp on their pride. Go far, and leave them sniveling in your dust.
Kris Pearson (The Boat Builder's Bed (Wicked in Wellington, #1))
I don't want to close my eyes when I could be looking at you
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
I think I've missed you all my life
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
I loved begging him, following his rules. I loved the freedom I found in complete capitulation.
Penny Reid (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Life is like a rugby ball. You never know where it bounces next.
Boniface Sagini (Thrills and Chills: Trudging Through Life)
Clean indoor studies in the dark arts, military history, and alchemy didn’t preclude messy outdoor classes in strategic combat, duelling, open-field assassination, and rugby.
Genevieve Cogman (The Invisible Library (The Invisible Library, #1))
The worst thing that happened to air travel in the past ten years was the bankruptcy of Xhibit Corp., the parent company of SkyMall. I recalled with clarity the first time I boarded a flight and it was missing from all usual nooks and crannies. It had been a dark day.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
Look at the Wikipedia entry for any famous doctor, and you’ll see: ‘He proved himself an accomplished rugby player in youth leagues. He excelled as a distance runner and in his final year at school was vice-captain of the athletics team.’ This particular description is of a certain Dr H. Shipman, so perhaps it’s not a rock-solid system.
Adam Kay (This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor)
Bollocks, bitches, and Battlestar Galactica,” I mumbled. I have a bad habit of mumbling curse words when I’m aggravated; honestly, I think I might have a mild case of Tourette’s. To soften the string of foul language and make me feel like less of a freak, I try to throw in a pop culture reference at the end. It usually works, but not today.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Something decidedly female was going on in her head, something of the mystery-to-men variety. I had no idea what she was thinking, but she looked both aggrieved and remorseful. I held very still because it seemed like the safest thing to do.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
Twitter, twatter, fudder, motherfucker, I don’t care what it’s called.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Because that’s how snobs deal with uncomfortable subjects. We belittle their importance, laugh at them, and change the subject to weather or sport.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
Never let the terms of masculinity be dictated by someone who thinks it's bound up with sexuality. If you really want to know something about what it means to be a man, just ask Gareth Thomas, who stood up in a locker room and told his teammates on the Welsh national rugby team that he was gay. I might not know much about much in this world, but I know for damn sure that no one in that locker room was more of a man at that moment than he was.
Fredrik Backman (Saker min son behöver veta om världen)
But here lies the rub: she’s all I think about. She’s the only person I want to spend time with. I’m fascinated by every little thing she does. And the fact of the matter is, I’m in love with her. Heartbreakingly, soul-wrenchingly, earth-shatteringly in love with her. It’s nothing like I’ve ever felt before. And I need her to love me back more than I need to take my next breath. I can’t imagine a greater agony than this big, pulsing, fierce love I have for her being unreciprocated. I would rather take a hundred blows to the head out on the field, suffer a thousand concussions, than not have her beside me for the rest of my life.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
I feel like I could lose myself and find myself in you, Annie” I murmured close to her ear. She swallowed. “Don’t say things like that.” “I can’t help it. Believe me, I’ve tried. You make me feel everything.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
What is 'camp'? A much misunderstood word, everyone has their own feel for it. Here is mine: Camp is not in rugby football. Camp is not in the Old Testament. Camp is not in St. Paul. Camp is not in Latin lessons, though it might be in Greek. Camp loves colour. Camp loves light. Camp takes pleasure in the surface of things. Camp loves paint as much as it loves paintings. Camp prefers style to the stylish. Camp is pale. Camp is unhealthy. Camp is not English, damn it. But … Camp is not kitsch. Camp is not drag. Camp is not nearly so superficial as it would have you believe. Camp casts out all fear. Camp is strong. Camp is healthy. And, let’s face it … Camp is queer.
Stephen Fry (Moab Is My Washpot (Memoir, #1))
There was no way I would pair up with this guy—the epitome of a privileged and entitled beefcake. He was everything I loathed rolled up into a tight, luscious, muscular, heady, and quixotically alluring package. My social phobias aside, I needed alone time with Ronan like a car needed a swim in the ocean.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
It’s not poop, it’s chocolate…just don’t try to eat it because it’s full of E. coli.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Insincerity was taxing once you’d breathed the refreshing air of artless candor.
Penny Reid (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
The man was more highly strung than Margaret Thatcher on the rag, God rest her.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Things will change more radically than you could ever imagine. Things will end up 300 miles north of your wildest predictions. Healthy people drop dead in supermarket queues. The future love of your life could be the man sitting next to you on the bus. Your secondary school math teacher and rugby coach might now go by the name of Susan. Everything will change. And it could happen any morning.
Dolly Alderton (Everything I Know About Love: A Memoir)
(Orthopaedics is basically reserved for the med school’s rugby team – it’s barely more than sawing and nailing – and I suspect they don’t ‘sign up’ for it so much as dip their hand in ink and provide a palm print.)
Adam Kay (This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor)
because I’m terrible at almost everything else in life. Take walking or talking, for instance, never mind attempting both at the same time. Or smiling. Or not being weird. Or not creeping people out. Or not being the cause of every awkward silence in a five-mile radius.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
He liked being the bigger man of the two, even though it wasn’t by much, he liked the way his solid rugby player’s build matched and countered Jonah’s athletic strength. But there was something about Jonah’s body hair, that incontrovertible evidence of his masculinity, that made Ben feel…not that he was less manly, precisely, but that Jonah was more so.
K.J. Charles (Jackdaw (The World of A Charm of Magpies))
ECassChoosesPikachu: Patrick’s new favorite joke: What do you call an alligator in a vest? An “investigator” HA! JoseyInHeels to ECassChoosesPikachu: The kid needs better jokes SeanCassinova to ECassChoosesPikachu: MY NEPHEW IS BRILLIANT!
L.H. Cosway (The Cad and the Co-Ed (Rugby, #3))
no one knows who I am…that I am she…that she is me.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
You’re too cute sometimes. I mean, seriously too cute.” “I’m not cute. I’m aloof and manly.” I lifted a disdainful eyebrow at the idea of me as cute. Ridiculous.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
What the fu— How the bloody hell had Voldemort gotten into the building?
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
Dearest Annie, Roses are red. Violets are blue. I’m using my hand But I’m thinking of you. - Ronan
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
But that’s who I was when I drank, a careless, greedy fucktard. She
L.H. Cosway (The Cad and the Co-Ed (Rugby, #3))
My love … I don’t always want you tied up. I want you free. I want you wild. I want you brave. I want you any way I can get you. I want you now, and I want you for the rest of my life.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Jordana is in the umpire's highchair. I walk under the rugby posts and on to the tennis courts, stopping a few metres in front of her, in the service box. Her legs are crossed. I wait for her to speak. 'I have two special skills,' she says. She pulls a sheaf of papers from under her bum. I recognize the font and the text boxes. It's my pamphlet. 'Blackmail,' she says. She holds up her Zippo in the other hand. I can tell that she has been practising this. 'And pyromania.' I am impressed that Jordana knows this word. 'Right,' I say. 'I'm going to blackmail you, Ol.' I feel powerless. She is in a throne. 'Okay,' I say.
Joe Dunthorne (Submarine)
The night in question, I had put aside my perpetual lavatory read, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, because of all the manuscripts (inedible green tomatoes) submitted to Cavendish-Redux, my new stable of champions. I suppose it was about eleven o'clock when I heard my front door being interfered with. Skinhead munchkins mug-or-treating? Cherry knockers? The wind? Next thing I knew, the door flew in off its ruddy hinges! I was thinking al-Queda, I was thinking ball lightning, but no. Down the hallway tramped what seemed like an entire rugby team, though the intruders numbered only three. (You'll notice, I am always attacked in threes.) "Timothy," pronounced the gargoyliest, "Cavendish, I presume. Caught with your cacks down." "My business hours are eleven to two, gentlemen," Bogart would have said, "with a three-hour break for lunch. Kindly leave." All I could do was blurt, "Oy! My door! My ruddy door!
David Mitchell (Cloud Atlas)
Why are you doing this to me?” “Because you are not forgettable.” His voice deepened and sounded gruff with frustration. “I can’t have you believing that. I haven’t been able to stop thinking about you since Will’s birthday party, and trust me, I’ve tried. I have a spider plant at home that is very much alive as proof.
L.H. Cosway (The Cad and the Co-Ed (Rugby, #3))
@LucyFitz Would you rather live the rest of your life with a human head and a horse’s body, or a horse’s head and a human body? @BroderickAdams to @LucyFitzHuman head + horse body = centaur. Horse head + human body = WTF. So, the first one, obvs. @RonanFitz to @BroderickAdams @LucyFitz No more acid tabs for either of you.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
We all have issues. Human beings are flawed, and all we can hope for is to work toward making ourselves better. Not perfect, just better.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
I needed to get a handle on this girlish exhilaration. This girlish exhilaration needed a reality check. Maybe even a bitch-slap.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
Ronan’s eyes widened as though I’d just told him Santa Claus and Genghis Khan had been having a torrid love affair since the twelfth century.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
Every stray deserves a chance at love, a home and a warm bed to sleep at night.
Penny Reid (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
Stupid heart. Stop swelling. Swelling is bad for you. Stay small and protected.
L.H. Cosway (The Cad and the Co-Ed (Rugby, #3))
I finally made friends with my father when I entered my twenties. We had so little in common when I was a boy, and I am certain I had been a disappointment to him. He did not ask for a child with a book, off in its own world. He wanted a son who did what he had done: swam and boxed and played rugby, and drove cars at speed with abandon and joy, but that was not what he had wound up with. I
Neil Gaiman (The Ocean at the End of the Lane)
So yes,” Sean gave me a pointed look, “I approve of it wholeheartedly. In fact, seduce her again.” I coughed, choking on nothing, and sputtered, “What? What did you say?” “I said seduce her. And do it now. She has more unresolved feelings for you than Jennifer has for Brad.” He paused, then added, “And do a good job. Do a great job.” I stared at him for several seconds, dumbfounded. “Of course I’ll do a great job.” Sean pointed at me accusingly. “I’m serious. Look up some moves or watch some videos, do whatever it takes to make sure she enjoys herself.” Now I was offended. “Fuck you, Sean. Of course she’ll enjoy herself. She’ll like it so much she’ll beg for-” “Hey.” My teammate narrowed his eyes, slicing his hand through the air. “I don’t need or want to know the specifics. I’m just saying, take good care of her. Take excellent care of her. Give her everything she needs. And don’t be selfish.” “I won’t be.” I shook my head with the denial, staring at Sean. Staring at him because . . . Did he just tell me to seduce his cousin?
L.H. Cosway (The Cad and the Co-Ed (Rugby, #3))
Bryan turned, his gaze sweeping over the playground, and I watched his profile. I knew the exact moment his eyes found Patrick. Bryan’s expression became one of wonder. And in that moment, I believed in love at first sight, because I’d just witnessed it. I’d just witnessed a man fall head over heels in love with his own son.
L.H. Cosway (The Cad and the Co-Ed (Rugby, #3))
Ronan: I miss your taste. Come over. Her reply was almost immediate. Annie: I’m working. You’ll see me tonight. Oh, no way was she getting off that easily. I went into full-on sext mode. Ronan: I want to make you come with my mouth. Annie: Ronan! I’m at the office and Gerta is RIGHT BESIDE ME! Ronan: Gotta say, that kinda makes it hotter.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
Do you want anything from the shop?” definitely ranked as one of my top three favorite sentences of all time. It’s right up there with, “School’s been cancelled because of the weather” and “Would you like me to go down on you first?
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
A truly enlightened attitude to language should simply be to let six thousand or more flowers bloom. Subcultures should be allowed to thrive, not just because it is wrong to squash them, because they enrich the wider culture. Just as Black English has left its mark on standard English Culture, South Africans take pride in the marks of Afrikaans and African languages on their vocabulary and syntax. New Zealand's rugby team chants in Maori, dancing a traditional dance, before matches. French kids flirt with rebellion by using verlan, a slang that reverses words' sounds or syllables (so femmes becomes meuf). Argentines glory in lunfardo, an argot developed from the underworld a centyry ago that makes Argentine Spanish unique still today. The nonstandard greeting "Where y'at?" for "How are you?" is so common among certain whites in New Orleans that they bear their difference with pride, calling themselves Yats. And that's how it should be.
Robert Lane Greene (You Are What You Speak: Grammar Grouches, Language Laws, and the Politics of Identity)
Okay, so I'm completely undignified. As soon as school got out, I ran up to Kim, Nora and Cricket on the quad and told them the news. They were completely surprised and excited: Cricket was even jumping up an down. "Shiv! Ag!" she yelled. "He's fine," said Nora, giggling. "Have you seen him in his rugby uniform? He has some serious legs," said Kim. "How did it happen?" Cricket wanted to know. I told all. They wanted to know more. "What did it feel like?" Electricity.
E. Lockhart (The Boyfriend List: 15 Guys, 11 Shrink Appointments, 4 Ceramic Frogs and Me, Ruby Oliver (Ruby Oliver, #1))
Now you listen to me … This is happening. You and I are happening, and this is real. I like you … I love that you’re brilliant and generous and gorgeous and real. I like you.” … “You’re just going to have to trust me. And tomorrow I’m taking you out and showing you off; not just because I really fucking like how you look, but because you’re smart and good and genuine…” I rubbed myself against him, made a little wild by his commanding aggressiveness. Therefore, I was wholly disoriented when he gripped my upper arms and held me away. He glared at me until I blinked at him and was able to bring him into focus. Seemingly satisfied that he had my undivided attention, Ronan ended his suspended thought with a low growl “…and now you’re mine.
L.H. Cosway (The Hooker and the Hermit (Rugby, #1))
During dinner at the Dersinghams in "Angel Pavement"... "Do you ever watch rugger, Golspie?" Mr Dersingham demanded down the table. "What, rugby? Haven't see a match for years," replied Mr Golspie. "Prefer the other kind when I do watch one." Major Trape raised his eyebrows, "What, you a soccah man? Not this professional stuff? Don't tell me you like that." "What's the matter with it?" "Oh, come now! I mean, you can't possibly --I mean it's a dirty business, selling fellahs for money and so on, very unsporting.
J.B. Priestley (Angel Pavement)
Archie Henderson has won no awards, written no books and never played any representative sport. He was an under-11 tournament-winning tennis player as a boy, but left the game when he discovered rugby where he was one of the worst flyhalves he can remember. This did not prevent him from having opinions on most things in sport. His moment of glory came in 1970 when he predicted—correctly as it turned out—that Griquas would beat the Blue Bulls (then still the meekly named Noord-Transvaal) in the Currie Cup final. It is something for which he has never been forgiven by the powers-that-be at Loftus. Archie has played cricket in South Africa and India and gave the bowling term military medium a new and more pacifist interpretation. His greatest ambition was to score a century on Llandudno beach before the tide came in.
Archie Henderson
On either side of them the essence of honky tonk beach resort had now enclosed them: gas stations, fried clam stands, Dairy Treets, motels painted in feverish pastel colors, mini golf. Larry was drawn two painful ways by these things. Part of him clamored at their sad and blatant ugliness and at the ugliness of the minds that had turned this section of a magnificent, savage coastline into one long highway amusement park for families in station wagons. But there was a more subtle, deeper part of him that whispered of the people who had filled these places and this road during other summers. Ladies in sunhats and shorts too tight for their large behinds. College boys in red and black striped rugby shirts. Girls in beach shifts and thong sandals. Small screaming children with ice cream spread over their faces. They were American people, and there was a kind of dirty, compelling romance about them whenever they were in groups never mind if the group was in an Aspen ski lodge or performing their prosaic/ arcane rites of summer along Route 1 in Maine. And now all these Americans were gone.
Stephen King (The Stand)
I’ll wash. Looks like brute strength is required.” Matilda wasn’t about to argue. Might as well put those ridiculous muscles to good use. “I doubt I could write them into submission somehow.” “No,” Tanner agreed, heading to the sink and flicking on the taps, intent on filling the industrial size sink and agitating the water as he squirted in some detergent. “You could, however, write about how I heroically and uncomplainingly scrubbed pots for hours while being witty and charming all at the service of some of the city’s less fortunate.” “You want me to add in how woodland animals came in from the alley to befriend you?
Amy Andrews (Playing by Her Rules (Sydney Smoke Rugby, #1))
I covered my mouth to suffocate the errant sob, squeezing my eyes shut, and hoping when I opened them it would be three months ago, the night of Ronan and Annie’s wedding. The night I’d fucked up so royally that I’d apparently acquired the superpower of changing the color of HCG strips with my pee. WITH MY PEE! Which meant I had a new human inside me. Which explained all my other superpowers, like being a raging bitch all the time, and crying at nothing, and throwing up twice every day.
L.H. Cosway (The Cad and the Co-Ed (Rugby, #3))
More than six thousand people reported which sporting activities would make a member of the opposite sex more attractive. Results revealed that 57 percent of women found climbing attractive, making it the sexiest sport from a female perspective. This was closely followed by extreme sports (56 percent), soccer (52 percent), and hiking (51 percent). At the bottom of the list came aerobics and golf, with just 9 percent and 13 percent of the vote, respectively. In contrast, men were most attracted to women who did aerobics (70 percent), followed by those who took yoga (65 percent), and those who went to the gym (64 percent). At the bottom of their list came golf (18 percent), rugby (6 percent), and bodybuilding (5 percent). Women’s choices appeared to reflect the type of psychological qualities that they find attractive, such as bravery and a willingness to take on challenges, while men appeared to be looking for a woman who was physically fit without appearing muscle-bound. No one, it seemed, was attracted to golfers.
Richard Wiseman (59 Seconds: Think a Little, Change a Lot)
Don’t call your family ‘the fam’, Sean. It sounds douchey. Another two syllables won’t kill you,” I chided playfully. Sean’s smirk indicated he was enjoying my criticism, and I didn’t understand that, either. “This coming from the girl with hair like a packet of Skittles.” “My hair isn’t douchey,” I said, and flicked a few locks over my shoulder. “It brings joy to all those who gaze upon it.
L.H. Cosway (The Player and the Pixie (Rugby, #2))
The room was small, lit by two naked bulbs in wall recesses, and bare of anything except for two solid wooden posts the height of a man and four feet apart. In each post, at just below shoulder height, was set a large iron ring. There were two other men already waiting, both leathermen. Len indicated each in turn. 'Rick and Sam.' The two men regarded Mike with arms folded. Rick was in his late twenties, a tall, blond biker, his hair hanging down well past his shoulders. Under his leather waistcoat he was bare-chested, his spare, pale flesh covered with tattoos of skulls, burning angels and other biker motifs, the twining reds, blues and blacks extending along both arms as well. He was wearing black leather gloves and impenetrable black shades. Shaven-headed Sam was older, shorter and stockier, built like a rugby player. A leather harness stretched across the barrel of his chest, its steel circlet buried in wiry hair. Through his leather chaps Mike could see a sizeable pouch, heavy with its contents.
Jack Stevens (Fellowship of Iron)
It was good to be gay on Top of the Pops years before it was good to be gay in Parliament, or gay in church, or gay on the rugby pitch. And it’s not just gay progress that happens in this way: 24 had a black president before America did. Jane Eyre was a feminist before Germaine Greer was born. A Trip to the Moon put humans on the Moon in 1902. This is why recent debates about the importance of the arts contain, at core, an unhappy error of judgment. In both the arts cuts—29 percent of the Arts Council’s funding has now gone—and the presumption that the new, “slimmed down” National Curriculum will “squeeze out” art, drama and music, there lies a subconscious belief that the arts are some kind of . . . social luxury: the national equivalent of buying some overpriced throw pillows and big candle from John Lewis. Policing and defense, of course, remain very much “essentials”—the fridge and duvets in our country’s putative semi-detached house. But art—painting, poetry, film, TV, music, books, magazines—is a world that runs constant and parallel to ours, where we imagine different futures—millions of them—and try them out for size. Fantasy characters can kiss, and we, as a nation, can all work out how we feel about it, without having to involve real shy teenage lesbians in awful sweaters, to the benefit of everyone’s notion of civility.
Caitlin Moran (Moranthology)
Here we’ll describe four signs that you have to disengage from your autonomous efforts and seek connection. Each of these emotions is a different form of hunger for connection—that is, they’re all different ways of feeling lonely: When you have been gaslit. When you’re asking yourself, “Am I crazy, or is there something completely unacceptable happening right now?” turn to someone who can relate; let them give you the reality check that yes, the gaslights are flickering. When you feel “not enough.” No individual can meet all the needs of the world. Humans are not built to do big things alone. We are built to do them together. When you experience the empty-handed feeling that you are just one person, unable to meet all the demands the world makes on you, helpless in the face of the endless, yawning need you see around you, recognize that emotion for what it is: a form of loneliness. ... When you’re sad. In the animated film Inside Out, the emotions in the head of a tween girl, Riley, struggle to cope with the exigencies of growing up.... When you are boiling with rage. Rage has a special place in women’s lives and a special role in the Bubble of Love. More, even, than sadness, many of us have been taught to swallow our rage, hide it even from ourselves. We have been taught to fear rage—our own, as well as others’—because its power can be used as a weapon. Can be. A chef’s knife can be used as a weapon. And it can help you prepare a feast. It’s all in how you use it. We don’t want to hurt anyone, and rage is indeed very, very powerful. Bring your rage into the Bubble with your loved ones’ permission, and complete the stress response cycle with them. If your Bubble is a rugby team, you can leverage your rage in a match or practice. If your Bubble is a knitting circle, you might need to get creative. Use your body. Jump up and down, get noisy, release all that energy, share it with others. “Yes!” say the people in your Bubble. “That was some bullshit you dealt with!” Rage gives you strength and energy and the urge to fight, and sharing that energy in the Bubble changes it from something potentially dangerous to something safe and potentially transformative.
Emily Nagoski (Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle)
I arched a brow. “Something funny?” Her mouth formed a tight line. “Nope.” I approached her. “You sure?” Her gaze flicked to mine, then away. “Uh-huh.” “Okay, then.” I turned and headed over to grab the last of our things. “It’s just . . .” Eilish began and then trailed off. “Yes?” She shook her head and finally let her giggles flow free. I couldn’t help smiling, too, even though I wasn’t entirely sure an inconvenient hard-on warranted so much laughter. It was infectious all the same. She gestured to the retreating group of tourists. “I studied German at school, so I can pick out certain words. One of the women commented about you to her friend.” I smirked. “Oh yeah? What did she say?” She dabbed the wetness from the corners of her eyes. “Something along the lines of a bratwurst big enough to feed an army.” My smirk died. “I wish I hadn’t asked.” “Really? I thought men enjoyed compliments about that . . . particular area.” “They do. But armies are generally made up of a bunch of blokes.” I arched a brow meaningfully. A loud burst of laughter escaped her, and she clamped her hand over mouth. God, she was too fucking adorable. She sucked in a breath, finally calming down from her fit of giggles. “You’re too much, Bryan Leech.” “That’s what the German ladies think anyway,” I deadpanned, my smirk returning. Eilish burst into laughter all over again.
L.H. Cosway (The Cad and the Co-Ed (Rugby, #3))