Obey Elders Quotes

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...The life of the parents is the only thing that makes good children. Parents should be very patient and ‘saintlike’ to their children. They should truly love their children. And the children will share this love! For the bad attitude of the children, says father Porphyrios, the ones who are usually responsible for it are their parents themselves. The parents don’t help their children by lecturing them and repeating to them ‘advices’, or by making them obeying strict rules in order to impose discipline. If the parents do not become ‘saints’ and truly love their children and if they don’t struggle for it, then they make a huge mistake. With their wrong and/or negative attitude the parents convey to their children their negative feelings. Then their children become reactive and insecure not only to their home, but to the society as well...
Elder Porphyrios
Similarly that is no true democracy in which the whole crowd of citizens is free to do whatever they wish or purpose, but when, in a community where it is traditional and customary to reverence the gods, to honor our parents, to respect our elders, and to obey the laws, the will of the greater number prevails, this is to be called a democracy.
Polybius (The Histories)
The sin I have committed is the sin of adoption. I have adopted a different set of beliefs from the beliefs I was raised to obey. But this definition of sin over time has become my joy. I do have other gods before me, many, and none are a white elderly man sitting on a gilded throne in heaven. Pronghorn antelope holds authority for me, like a priest.
Terry Tempest Williams (When Women Were Birds: Fifty-four Variations on Voice)
The assertion that religion is a tool for preserving social order and for organising large-scale cooperation may vex many people for whom it represents first and foremost a spiritual path. However, just as the gap between religion and science is smaller than we commonly think, so the gap between religion and spirituality is much bigger. Religion is a deal, whereas spirituality is a journey. Religion gives a complete description of the world, and offers us a well-defined contract with predetermined goals. ‘God exists. He told us to behave in certain ways. If you obey God, you’ll be admitted to heaven. If you disobey Him, you’ll burn in hell.’ The very clarity of this deal allows society to define common norms and values that regulate human behaviour. Spiritual journeys are nothing like that. They usually take people in mysterious ways towards unknown destinations. The quest usually begins with some big question, such as who am I? What is the meaning of life? What is good? Whereas many people just accept the ready-made answers provided by the powers that be, spiritual seekers are not so easily satisfied. They are determined to follow the big question wherever it leads, and not just to places you know well or wish to visit. Thus for most people, academic studies are a deal rather than a spiritual journey, because they take us to a predetermined goal approved by our elders, governments and banks.
Yuval Noah Harari (Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow)
If, like the elder brother, you believe that God ought to bless you and help you because you have worked so hard to obey him and be a good person, then Jesus may be your helper, your example, even your inspiration, but he is not your Savior. You are serving as your own Savior.
Timothy J. Keller (The Prodigal God: Recovering the Heart of the Christian Faith)
Oh, how I love your law! I meditate on it all day long. Your commands make me wiser than my enemies, for they are ever with me. I have more insight than all my teachers, for I meditate on your statutes. I have more understanding than the elders, for I obey your precepts. How sweet are your words to my taste, sweeter than honey to my mouth! Psalms 119:97-100, 103
Anonymous (The Psalms)
solemnly a knock sounded that was no tap of enquiry but a demand for admittance; the door opened and in came the blackest, the most formidable of elderly men—Mr. Barrett himself. His eye at once sought the tray. Had the meal been eaten? Had his commands been obeyed? Yes, the plates were empty. Signifying his approval of his daughter’s obedience, Mr. Barrett lowered himself heavily into the chair by her side.
Virginia Woolf (Flush)
We are reminded of the equity of eternal principles by Elder Neal A. Maxwell, "We share in a single system of salvation. We strive to walk the same strait and narrow path. We read the same scriptures. We frequent the same holy temples of God, participating in its holy ordinances. We partake of the same sacrament and share spiritual gifts. We are called to serve the kingdom of God--and released--by the same divine authority. We depend on the same Atonement for immortality, and upon obeying the same commandments for eternal life. We are to cultivate the same celestial attributes and to develop the same righteous reflexes.
Beverly Campbell (Eve and the Choice Made in Eden)
In other words, the canon is inspired; the community is illumined to understand, embrace, interpret, and obey it. Jesus taught that there is a qualitative distinction between the prophets and the tradition of the elders who were Israel’s teachers after the Old Testament canon was closed (Mt 15:2, 6). Similarly, Paul distinguishes between the foundation-laying era of the apostles and the building-erecting era of the ordinary ministers who follow after them (1Co 3:11 – 12). Although Paul could appeal to no human authority higher than his own office, he encouraged Timothy to recall the gift he received at his ordination, “when the council of elders [presbyteriou] laid their hands on you” (1Ti 4:14). None of us, today, is a Moses. None is a Paul or a Peter. We are all “Timothys,” no longer adding to the apostolic deposit, but guarding and proclaiming it (1Ti 6:20). The apostolic era has now come to an end; the office was a unique one, for a unique stage of redemptive history, a period of time used by God for the drafting of the new covenant constitution.
Michael S. Horton (Pilgrim Theology: Core Doctrines for Christian Disciples)
And they shall say  unto the elders of his city, This our son is stubborn and rebellious, he will not obey our voice; he is a glutton, and a drunkard.  And all the men of his city shall stone him with stones, that he die: so shalt thou put evil away from among you;
Brian Baker (Nonsense from the Bible)
Religion is a deal, whereas spirituality is a journey. Religion gives a complete description of the world, and offers us a well-defined contract with predetermined goals. ‘God exists. He told us to behave in certain ways. If you obey God, you’ll be admitted to heaven. If you disobey Him, you’ll burn in hell.’ The very clarity of this deal allows society to define common norms and values that regulate human behaviour. Spiritual journeys are nothing like that. They usually take people in mysterious ways towards unknown destinations. The quest usually begins with some big question, such as who am I? What is the meaning of life? What is good? Whereas most people just accept the ready-made answers provided by the powers that be, spiritual seekers are not so easily satisfied. They are determined to follow the big question wherever it leads, and not just to places they know well or wish to visit. Thus for most people, academic studies are a deal rather than a spiritual journey, because they take us to a predetermined goal approved by our elders, governments and banks.
Yuval Noah Harari (Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow)
Samuel looked at his torn hem, then back to Saul. “Yahweh has torn your kingdom from you and has given it to another.” Saul broke down weeping in pathetic tears. “I am sorry. Please restore me before the elders!” Samuel knelt down by Saul. “You have not obeyed the voice of Yahweh. He will not change his mind. But I will do what you should have done.” He grabbed Saul’s sword from his scabbard and walked over to Agag. Agag became uneasy. His mouth dried up. He angled for mercy. “Surely, glorious Seer, the bitterness of death is passed. I will gladly bow before this Yahweh and serve him as subject.” Samuel said, “Your sword has made women childless. So your mother shall be childless forever.” He raised the sword and brought it down upon Agag’s collar bone. It cut deep, severing his shoulder. Agag screamed in pain as blood spurted everywhere. Agag managed to get out one last sentence, “Damn your god and king, Seer!” “No,” replied Samuel with a hushed tone. “Damn your gods and seed.” And he swung again. The blade severed the giant’s head from his body. It fell to the floor and rolled near the feet of Saul who gasped in horror at the ghastly eyes staring into his soul. Samuel hacked and hacked at Agag’s body until it was cut to pieces and he was drenched in the blood of the dead giant.
Brian Godawa (David Ascendant (Chronicles of the Nephilim, #7))
May I inquire about how to be a person’s lord?”9 I say: Make divisions and distributions according to ritual. Be evenhanded, inclusive, and not one-sided. “May I inquire about how to be a person’s minister?” I say: Serve (85) your lord according to ritual. Be loyal, compliant, and not lazy. “May I inquire about how to be a person’s father?” I say: Be broadminded, kind, and follow the dictates of ritual. “May I inquire about how to be a person’s son?” I say: Be respectful, loving, and have utmost good form. (90) “May I inquire about how to be a person’s elder brother?” I say: Be compassionate, loving, and display friendliness. “May I inquire about how to be a person’s younger brother?” I say: Be respectful, acquiescent, and do nothing improper. “May I inquire about how to be a person’s husband?” I say: Be (95) extremely hardworking and do not stray. Be extremely watchful and follow proper distinctions. “May I inquire about the proper way to be a person’s wife?” I say: If your husband follows the dictates of ritual, then compliantly obey him and wait upon him attentively. If your husband does not (100) follow the dictates of ritual, then be apprehensive but keep yourself respectful.10 If these ways are established in a one-sided manner,11 then there will be chaos, but if they are established in a comprehensive manner, there will be order, so this matter is worth keeping watch over.12
Xun Kuang (Xunzi: The Complete Text)
For an elder must be a man whose life cannot be spoken against. He must be faithful to his wife. He must exhibit self-control, live wisely, and have a good reputation. He must enjoy having guests in his home and must be able to teach. He must not be a heavy drinker or be violent. He must be gentle, peace loving, and not one who loves money. He must manage his own family well, with children who respect and obey him. (1 Timothy 3:2-4 NLT)
Lisa Bevere (Fight Like a Girl: The Power of Being a Woman)
Respect in Latin means “to look at someone’s conduct and admire them.” When people say to kids, “Respect your elders,” they’re often really saying, “Obey your elders.” But the amazing thing is that kids inherently know the real meaning of respect, and far too often they see adults who don’t merit it—not only public figures, like hypocritical politicians and athletes, but the adults they interact with on a daily basis. This is hard to write, but for some boys it could be one of their parents.
Rosalind Wiseman (Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World)
Youngsters are increasingly excused from obeying their elders, whereas parents are blamed for anything that goes wrong in the life of their child.
Yuval Noah Harari (Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind)
Today, parental authority is in full retreat. Youngsters are increasingly excused from obeying their elders, whereas parents are blamed for anything that goes wrong in the life of their child. Mum and Dad are about as likely to be found innocent in the Freudian courtroom as were defendants in a Stalinist show trial.
Yuval Noah Harari (Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind)
When he summarizes his mission among them, Paul reminds the Ephesian elders that he went around ‘preaching the kingdom’.32 What does this expression mean? The kingdom is not a static place that you physically go into, like the United Kingdom. To enter God’s kingdom is to benefit from the rule of its King by submitting to the benevolent rule of King Jesus. Wherever the rule of Jesus goes, there is a manifestation of the kingdom. It is a dynamic, not a static, concept. If the sick are healed, the kingdom extends; as the demonized are set free, so the kingdom comes; as good news is brought to the poor, so the kingdom of God is expressed; as justice comes into situations of injustice, so the kingdom of God is growing. Wherever God is obeyed, his kingdom comes. The evidence of the kingdom on earth is his will being done here as it is in heaven.
David Devenish (Fathering Leaders Motivating Mission)
We must live by faith and not by sight. An elderly lady fell and broke her leg while attending a summer Bible conference. She said to the pastor who visited her, “I know the Lord led me to the conference. But I don’t see why this had to happen! And I don’t see any good coming from it.” Wisely, the pastor replied, “Romans 8:28 doesn’t say that we see all things working together for good. It says that we know it.” Faith means surrendering all to God and obeying His Word in spite of circumstances and consequences. Love and faith go together: When you love someone, you trust him. And faith and love together help to strengthen hope, for where you find faith and love, you will find confidence for the future. How can we grow in faith during times of testing and suffering? The same way we grow in faith when things seem to be going well: by feeding on the Word of God (Rom. 10:17). Our fellowship with Christ through His Word not only strengthens our faith, but it also deepens our love. It is a basic principle of Christian living that we spend much time in the Word when God is testing us and Satan is tempting us.
Warren W. Wiersbe (Be Hopeful (1 Peter): How to Make the Best of Times Out of Your Worst of Times (The BE Series Commentary))
When it comes to obeying your elders including parents, think once that they must be true for they have a whole lot of experience of life but think twice because they have the experience of ‘their’ life. Obey thoughtfully.
Bhavik Sarkhedi
Elder brothers obey God to get things. They don’t obey God to get God himself—in order to resemble him, love him, know him, and delight him. So
Timothy J. Keller (The Prodigal God: Recovering the Heart of the Christian Faith)
the Pharisees and the teachers of the law. Pharisees belonged to a movement scrupulous in understanding and obeying the law according to the traditions of their predecessors (the “tradition of the elders”; see 15:2; Mk 7:3, 5). Far more than the aristocratic Sadducees, Pharisees were also popular with the people and respected for their piety. They tithed meticulously, were careful about ritual purity, and at least during the dry season, they often fasted twice a week. The term for “teachers of the law” can refer even to executors of legal documents in villages, but in the Gospels it normally refers to those who were literate and formally trained in the Law of Moses, often teaching others the law. Jesus’ words are again designed to shock his hearers, since Pharisees and teachers of the law would be among the people most respected for piety. But Jesus demands a deeper form of righteousness (see vv. 21–48). 5:21 heard that
Anonymous (NIV, Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible: Bringing to Life the Ancient World of Scripture)
Liam can't be a rebellious son and expect to be a sentinel at the same time. I won't allow it. Sentinels obey orders. They have to.
Thea Harrison (Liam Takes Manhattan (Elder Races, #9.5))
...He called her, at random, Big Sister (Chị), Aunt (Cô) and Great-Aunt (Bác). No one held it against him that he came from elsewhere, from a place where personal pronouns exist so that they can remain impersonal. In the absence of those pronouns, the Vietnamese language imposes a relationship from the very first contact: the younger of the two interlocutors must respect and obey the elder, and conversely, the elder must give advice and protection to the younger. If someone were to listen to a conversation between them, he would be able to guess that, for example, the younger one is the nephew of one of his mother's older brothers. Similarly, if the conversation were taking place between two people with no family ties, it would be possible as well to determine whether the elder is younger than the parents of the other.
Kim Thúy (Mãn)
The procedure followed in this egalitarian claim troubles me more than most of the other claims that I consider in this book. When no explanations or disclaimers are made alerting readers to the uniform lack of support from scholarly specialists for such an interpretation, this wild speculation (or so it seems to me, after reading these other articles) is taken as truth by unsuspecting readers. Cindy Jacobs, for example, simply trusts Kroeger’s interpretation of this fresco as truthful, and counts it as evidence for women’s participation in high positions of governing authority in the early church.6 Thousands of readers of Jacobs’s book will also take it as true, thinking that since it has a footnote to a journal on church history, there must be scholarly support for the idea. And so something that is a figment of Catherine Kroeger’s imagination, something that no scholar in the field has ever advocated, is widely accepted as fact. The requirements of truthfulness should hold us to higher standards than this. Kroeger’s article therefore uses apparently untruthful claims based on obscure material outside the Bible in order to turn people away from being obedient to the Bible in what it says about restricting the office of pastor and elder to men. And turning people away from obeying the Bible is another step on the path toward liberalism.
Wayne Grudem (Evangelical Feminism: A New Path to Liberalism?)
And when I was not presently obeyed (my wishes being hurtful or unintelligible), then I was indignant with my elders for not submitting to me, with those owing me no service, for not serving me; and avenged myself on them by tears. Such have I learnt infants to be from observing them; and that I was myself such, they, all unconscious, have shown me better than my nurses who knew it. And,
Augustine of Hippo (Confessions (Includes Audio Links + Stunning Image Gallery Showcasing Art))
If, like the elder brother, you believe that God ought to bless you and help you because you have worked so hard to obey him and be a good person, then Jesus may be your helper, your example, even your inspiration, but he is not your Savior. You are serving as your own Savior. Underneath
Timothy J. Keller (The Prodigal God: Recovering the Heart of the Christian Faith)
If our strength in learning the arts is not turned to weakness, that is, in coming down along side to console and comfort, attending the infirm, the poor, the needy and the elderly, then we have pathetically failed with our true art, the art of humanity–of life. If this is so, all of our studies have been, like a warped, pitiless, cruel pile of cold rusty scrap metal on a gray drizzly day, in vain. If this lesson is too tough for us, we must remember that it is Jesus’ preferred way. He comes along side the sick, the feeble, the downtrodden, even the most wretched, disgusting and perverse. As He hung upon that splintˊry red cross and imparts His Spirit to all who seek Him, no, not even the fiery excelsior angels of the Highest Courts of Heaven have an excuse not to unflinchingly obey the clarion call of Him who beckons us to reach out and help lift from the mud those who cannot get up. (Martial Arts on Noah's Ark)
Douglas Laurent
Who do the lords of society think they are?!?! They assume that they can force the useless concepts of school on the youth, forcing oppressive pressure on the adults with numerous responsibilities, and ensuring that the elderly can’t do as much as they want! Why must they force us to live like this!?..Even people like us who have all of this on top of us, with our own mental/physical pain that we endure as the cherry on top, some of us resort to crime, and “criminals” as they like to define it are punished relentlessly for the things they do to survive, and we must obey their rules without question to survive...why?...
Luis Quintanilla-Jimenez
it was powerful. He had been raised to be polite and obey his elders. Even in this situation, those were hard habits to break.
Stephen King (The Institute)