Hg Wells Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Hg Wells. Here they are! All 35 of them:

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We all have our time machines, don't we. Those that take us back are memories...And those that carry us forward, are dreams.
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H.G. Wells
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Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo.
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H.G. Wells (The Wife of Sir Isaac Harman)
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The major problemβ€”one of the major problems, for there are severalβ€”one of the many major problems with governing people is that of whom you get to do it; or rather of who manages to get people to let them do it to them. To summarize: it is a well-known fact that those people who must want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it. To summarize the summary: anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job.
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Douglas Adams (The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #2))
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If you fell down yesterday, stand up today.
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H.G. Wells
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The forceps of our minds are clumsy forceps, and crush the truth a little in taking hold of it.
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H.G. Wells
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Advertising is legitimised lying.
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H.G. Wells
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Sometimes, you have to step outside of the person you've been and remember the person you were meant to be. The person you want to be. The person you are.
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H.G. Wells
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Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no need of change.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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If we don't end war, war will end us.
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H.G. Wells
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It sounds plausible enough tonight, but wait until tomorrow. Wait for the common sense of the morning.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.
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H.G. Wells
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We should strive to welcome change and challenges, because they are what help us grow. With out them we grow weak like the Eloi in comfort and security. We need to constantly be challenging ourselves in order to strengthen our character and increase our intelligence.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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All men, however highly educated, retain some superstitious inklings.
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H.G. Wells (The Invisible Man)
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An animal may be ferocious and cunning enough, but it takes a real man to tell a lie.
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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Be a man!... What good is religion if it collapses under calamity? Think of what earthquakes and floods, wars and volcanoes, have done before to men! Did you think that God had exempted [us]? He is not an insurance agent.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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We are always getting away from the present moment. Our mental existence, which are immaterial and have no dimensions, are passing along the Time-Dimension with a uniform velocity from the cradle to the grave.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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I grieved to think how brief the dream of the human intellect had been. It had committed suicide.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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Things that would have made fame of a less clever man seemed tricks in his hands. It is a mistake to do things too easily.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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Looking at these stars suddenly dwarfed my own troubles and all the gravities of terrestrial life. I thought of their unfathomable distance, and the slow inevitable drift of their movements out of the unknown past into the unknown future.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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We must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its own inferior races. The Tasmanians . . . were entirely swept out of existence in a war of extermination waged by European immigrants, in the space if fifty years. Are we such apostles of mercy as to complain if the Martians warred in the same spirit?
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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I saw huge buildings rise up faint and fair, and pass like dreams.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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My days I devote to reading and experiments in chemistry, and I spend many of the clear nights in the study of astronomy. There is, though I do not know how there is or why there is, a sense of infinite peace and protection in the glittering hosts of heaven. There it must be, I think, in the vast and eternal laws of matter, and not in the daily cares and sins and troubles of men, that whatever is more than animal within us must find its solace and its hope.
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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The sea was silent, the sky was silent; I was alone with the night and silence.
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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In the next place, wonderful as it seems in a sexual world, the Martians were absolutely without sex, and therefore without any of the tumultuous emotions that arise...
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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There is no way out or round or through.
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H.G. Wells (Mind at the end of its tether)
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Where there is no derision the people perish," said Chiffan. "Now who said that?" asked Steenhold, always anxious to check his quotations. "It sounds familiar." "I said it," said Chiffan. "Get on with your suggestions.
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H.G. Wells (The Holy Terror)
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A few minutes before, there had only been three real things before me--the immensity of the night and space and nature, my own feebleness and anguish, and the near approach of death.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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For that moment I touched an emotion beyond the common range of men, yet one the poor brutes we dominate know only too well. I felt as a rabbit might feel returning to his burrow, and suddenly confronted by the work of a dozen busy navvies digging the foundations of a house. I felt the first inkling of a thing that presently grew quite clear in my mind, that oppressed me for many days, a sense of dethronement, a persuasion that I was no longer master, but an animal among animals; under the Martian heel.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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The brown and charred rags that hung from the sides of it, I presently recognized as the decaying vestiges of books. They had long since dropped to pieces, and every semblance of print had left them. But here and there were warped boards and cracked metallic clasps that told the tale well enough. Had I been a literary man I might, perhaps, have moralized upon the futility of all ambition. But as it was, the thing that struck me with keenest force was the enormous waste of labour to which this sombre wilderness of rotting paper testified.
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H.G. Wells
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The stranger came early in February, one wintry day, through a biting wind and a driving snow, the last snowfall of the year, over the down, walking from Bramblehurst railway station, and carrying a little black portmanteau in his thickly gloved hand. He was wrapped up from head to foot, and the brim of his soft felt hat hid every inch of his face but the shiny tip of his nose; the snow had piled itself against his shoulders and chest, and added a white crest to the burden he carried. He staggered into the β€œCoach and Horses” more dead than alive, and flung his portmanteau down. β€œA fire,” he cried, β€œin the name of human charity! A room and a fire!” He stamped and shook the snow from off himself in the bar, and followed Mrs.Β Hall into her guest parlour to strike his bargain. And with that much introduction, that and a couple of sovereigns flung upon the table, he took up his quarters in the inn.
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H.G. Wells (The Invisible Man)
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What good is religion if it collapses under calamity? Think of what earthquakes and floods, wars and volcanoes, have done before to men! Did you think God had exempted Weybridge? He is not an insurance agent.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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I feel as though the animal was surging up through them; that presently the degradation of the Islanders will be played over again on a larger scale.
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H.G. Wells (The Complete Novels of H. G. Wells: Over 55 Works: The Time Machine, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds, The History of Mr. Polly, The War in the Air and many more)
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We inherit their sinsβ€”not their knowledge.
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H.G. Wells
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He felt himself a little figure, very small and ineffectual, pitifully conspicuous. And all about him, the world wasβ€”strange.
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H.G. Wells (When the Sleeper Wakes)
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H.G. Wells, who recognized in the policies of Lenin and even Stalin something familiar and sympathetic: social engineering from above by those who know best.
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Tony Judt (Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945)