Henrik Ibsen Quotes

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It is the very mark of the spirit of rebellion to crave for happiness in this life
Henrik Ibsen (Ghosts)
I don't imagine you will dispute the fact that at present the stupid people are in an absolutely overwhelming majority all the world over.
Henrik Ibsen
You see, the point is that the strongest man in the world is he who stands most alone.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
You have never loved me. You have only thought it pleasant to be in love with me.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
A thousand words leave not the same deep impression as does a single deed.
Henrik Ibsen
To live is to war with trolls.
Henrik Ibsen
You see, there are some people that one loves, and others that perhaps one would rather be with.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
I must make up my mind which is right – society or I.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
The majority is never right. Never, I tell you! That's one of these lies in society that no free and intelligent man can help rebelling against. Who are the people that make up the biggest proportion of the population -- the intelligent ones or the fools?
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
Helmer: I would gladly work night and day for you. Nora- bear sorrow and want for your sake. But no man would sacrifice his honor for the one he loves. Nora: It is a thing hundreds of thousands of women have done.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
I believe that before all else I am a reasonable human being, just as you are--or, at all events, that I must try and become one.
Henrik Ibsen (The Doll's House: A Play)
HELMER: But this is disgraceful. Is this the way you neglect your most sacred duties? NORA: What do you consider is my most sacred duty? HELMER: Do I have to tell you that? Isn't it your duty to your husband and children? NORA: I have another duty, just as sacred. HELMER: You can't have. What duty do you mean? NORA: My duty to myself.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
What is the difference in being alone with another and being alone by one's self?
Henrik Ibsen
But no man would sacrifice his honor for the one he loves." "It is a thing hundreds of thousands of women have done.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
You should never wear your best trousers when you go out to fight for freedom and truth.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
Money may be the husk of many things but not the kernel. It brings you food, but not appetite; medicine, but not health; acquaintance, but not friends; servants, but not loyalty; days of joy, but not peace or happiness.
Henrik Ibsen
NORA: I must stand on my own two feet if I'm to get to know myself and the world outside. That's why I can't stay here with you any longer.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Mrs LINDE: When you've sold yourself once for the sake of others, you don't do it second time.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
A thousand words will not leave so deep an impression as one deed.
Henrik Ibsen
It's not only what we have inherited from our father and mother that walks in us. It's all sorts of dead ideas, and lifeless old beliefs, and so forth. They have no vitality, but they cling to us all the same, and we can't get rid of them.
Henrik Ibsen (Ghosts)
Public opinion is an extremely mutable thing
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
Rob the average man of his life-illusion, and you rob him of his happiness at the same stroke.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
The most dangerous enemy of the truth and freedom amongst us is the compact majority
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
To live is to war with trolls in heart and woul. To write is to sit in judgement on oneself.
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
With me you could have been another person.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
I believe that before anything else I'm a human being -- just as much as you are... or at any rate I shall try to become one. I know quite well that most people would agree with you, Torvald, and that you have warrant for it in books; but I can't be satisfied any longer with what most people say, and with what's in books. I must think things out for myself and try to understand them.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Don't use that exotic word "ideals". We have a good enough native word: "lies".
Henrik Ibsen
It’s a release to know that in spite of everything a premeditated act of courage is still possible.
Henrik Ibsen (Hedda Gabler)
Was the majority right when they stood by while Jesus was crucified? Was the majority right when they refused to believe that the earth moved around the sun and let Galileo be driven to his knees like a dog? It takes fifty years for the majority to be right. The majority is never right until it does right.
Henrik Ibsen
Cage an eagle and it will bite at the wires, be they of iron or of gold.
Henrik Ibsen (The Vikings of Helgeland)
It's a liberation to know that an act of spontaneous courage is yet possible in this world. An act that has something of unconditional beauty.
Henrik Ibsen (Hedda Gabler)
The strongest man in the world is he who stands most alone.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
I am in revolt against the age-old lie that the majority is always right.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
A party is like a sausage machine, it grinds up all sorts of heads together into the same baloney ...
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
Oh, yes--you can shout me down, I know! But you cannot answer me. The majority has might on its side--unfortunately; but right it has not.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
There is so much falsehood both at home and at school. At home one must not speak, and at school we have to stand and tell lies to the children.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
One's life is a heavy price to pay for being born.
Henrik Ibsen
When I lost you, it was as if all the solid ground dissolved from under my feet. Look at me; I'm a half-drowned man now, hanging onto a wreck.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
I'm also like a half-drowned woman on a wreck. No one to suffer with; no one to care for.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Our home has been nothing but a playroom. I have been your doll-wife, just as at home I was papa's doll-child; and here the children have been my dolls.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Hvorfor er De ikke rasende paa en født og baaren Drit som Henrik Ibsen?
Knut Hamsun
I'll risk everything together with you.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
To live is - to war with trolls In the holds of the heart and mind
Henrik Ibsen
There are people one loves and others one likes to talk to
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Oh yes, right—right. What is the use of having right on your side if you have not got might?
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
How can I hold you close enough?
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
But a scientific man must live in a little bit of style.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
Don't tell me the moon is shining; show me light glinting on broken glass.
Henrik Ibsen
Anyone who's sold herself for somebody else once isn't going to do it again.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Haven't you ever noticed, Hilde, how seductive, how inviting . . . the impossible is?
Henrik Ibsen (The Master Builder)
What sort of truths are they that the majority usually supports? They are truths that are of such advanced age that they are beginning to break up. And if a truth is as old as that, it is also in a fair way to become a lie, gentlemen.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
[From below comes the noise of a door slamming.]
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Happiness is worth a daring deed; we are both free if we but will it, and then the game is won.
Henrik Ibsen (The Vikings at Helgeland/The Pretenders)
You arranged everything according to your own taste, and so I got the same tastes as you - or else I pretended to. I am really not quite sure which - I think sometimes the one and sometimes the other.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Everything I touch seems destined to turn into something mean and farcical.
Henrik Ibsen
You should never wear your best trousers when you go out to fight for freedom and truth, Author
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
I am not going to let myself be beaten to the ground by the dread of what may happen. Henrik Ibsen,
Robert Galbraith (Lethal White (Cormoran Strike, #4))
A talent for building children's souls, Hilde. So building their souls that they might grow straight and fine, nobly and beautifully formed, to their full human stature. That was where Aline's talent lay.
Henrik Ibsen (The Master Builder)
Results for "It is inexcusable for scientists to torture animals; let them make their experiments on journalists and politicians
Henrik Ibsen
I am afraid, Torvald, I do not exactly know what religion is. ... When I am away from all this, and am alone, I will look into that matter too. I will see if what the clergyman said is true, or at all events if it is true for me.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
El hombre más poderoso del mundo es el que está más solo
Henrik Ibsen
The idol of Authority must be shattered in this town.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
It is the small losses in life that cut one to the heart.
Henrik Ibsen (The Master Builder)
The majority is always wrong; the minority is rarely right.
Henrik Ibsen
I am half inclined to think we are all ghosts…it is not only what we have inherited from our fathers and mothers that exists again in us, but all sorts of old dead ideas and all kinds of old dead beliefs and things of that kind. They are not actually alive in us; but there they are dormant all the same, and we can never be rid of them. Whenever I take up a newspaper and read it, I fancy I see ghosts creeping between the lines. There must be ghosts all over the world. They must be as countless as the grains of the sands, it seems to me. And we are so miserably afraid of the light, all of us.
Henrik Ibsen (Ghosts)
Nora: It's true Torvald. When I lived at home with Papa, he used to tell me his opinion about everything, and so I had the same opinion. If I thought differently, I had to hide it from him, or he wouldn't have liked it. He called me his little doll, and he used to play with me just as I played with my dolls. Then I came to live in your house - Helmer: That's no way to talk about our marriage! Nora [undisturbed]: I mean when I passed out of Papa's hands into yours. You arranged everything to suit your own tastes, and so I came to have the same tastes as yours.. or I pretended to. I'm not quite sure which.. perhaps it was a bit of both -- sometimes one and sometimes the other. Now that I come to look at it, I've lived here like a pauper -- simply from hand to mouth. I've lived by performing tricks for you, Torvald. That was how you wanted it. You and Papa have committed a grievous sin against me: it's your fault that I've made nothing of my life.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
She was an extraordinary person too! Would you believe it, she cut her hair short, and used to go about in men’s boots in bad weather
Henrik Ibsen (Pillars of Society)
Først når vi døde våkner, ser vi det uopprettelige, nemlig at vi aldri har levet.
Henrik Ibsen (When We Dead Awaken)
To think it, wish it, even want it — but do it! No, that I cannot understand.
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
Men are funny characters, they must always have something to bemuse them.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
Ghosts! […] I almost think we are all of us ghosts. It is not only what we have inherited from our father and mother that ‘walks’ in us. It is all sorts of dead ideas, and lifeless old beliefs, and so forth. They have no vitality, but they cling to us all the same, and we cannot shake them off. Whenever I take up a newspaper, I seem to see ghosts gliding between the lines. There must be ghosts all the country over, as thick as the sands of the sea. And then we are, one and all, so pitifully afraid of the light.
Henrik Ibsen
One of the qualities of liberty is that, as long as it is being striven after, it goes on expanding. Therefore, the man who stands in the midst of the struggle and says, "I have it," merely shows by doing so that he has just lost it.
Henrik Ibsen
Tar de livsløgnen fra et gjennomsnittsmenneske, så tar du lykken ifra ham med det samme
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck/John Gabriel Borkman)
I thought you understood where I'd lost what you call my heart at the time.
Henrik Ibsen (Ghosts)
You have made an empty place within me; and I must try to fill it up with something—with something that is a little like love.
Henrik Ibsen (Little Eyolf)
I believe two different kinds of will can exist at the same time in one person. Henrik Ibsen, Rosmersholm
Robert Galbraith (Lethal White (Cormoran Strike, #4))
76. David Hume – Treatise on Human Nature; Essays Moral and Political; An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding 77. Jean-Jacques Rousseau – On the Origin of Inequality; On the Political Economy; Emile – or, On Education, The Social Contract 78. Laurence Sterne – Tristram Shandy; A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy 79. Adam Smith – The Theory of Moral Sentiments; The Wealth of Nations 80. Immanuel Kant – Critique of Pure Reason; Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals; Critique of Practical Reason; The Science of Right; Critique of Judgment; Perpetual Peace 81. Edward Gibbon – The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; Autobiography 82. James Boswell – Journal; Life of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D. 83. Antoine Laurent Lavoisier – Traité Élémentaire de Chimie (Elements of Chemistry) 84. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison – Federalist Papers 85. Jeremy Bentham – Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation; Theory of Fictions 86. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe – Faust; Poetry and Truth 87. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier – Analytical Theory of Heat 88. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel – Phenomenology of Spirit; Philosophy of Right; Lectures on the Philosophy of History 89. William Wordsworth – Poems 90. Samuel Taylor Coleridge – Poems; Biographia Literaria 91. Jane Austen – Pride and Prejudice; Emma 92. Carl von Clausewitz – On War 93. Stendhal – The Red and the Black; The Charterhouse of Parma; On Love 94. Lord Byron – Don Juan 95. Arthur Schopenhauer – Studies in Pessimism 96. Michael Faraday – Chemical History of a Candle; Experimental Researches in Electricity 97. Charles Lyell – Principles of Geology 98. Auguste Comte – The Positive Philosophy 99. Honoré de Balzac – Père Goriot; Eugenie Grandet 100. Ralph Waldo Emerson – Representative Men; Essays; Journal 101. Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlet Letter 102. Alexis de Tocqueville – Democracy in America 103. John Stuart Mill – A System of Logic; On Liberty; Representative Government; Utilitarianism; The Subjection of Women; Autobiography 104. Charles Darwin – The Origin of Species; The Descent of Man; Autobiography 105. Charles Dickens – Pickwick Papers; David Copperfield; Hard Times 106. Claude Bernard – Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine 107. Henry David Thoreau – Civil Disobedience; Walden 108. Karl Marx – Capital; Communist Manifesto 109. George Eliot – Adam Bede; Middlemarch 110. Herman Melville – Moby-Dick; Billy Budd 111. Fyodor Dostoevsky – Crime and Punishment; The Idiot; The Brothers Karamazov 112. Gustave Flaubert – Madame Bovary; Three Stories 113. Henrik Ibsen – Plays 114. Leo Tolstoy – War and Peace; Anna Karenina; What is Art?; Twenty-Three Tales 115. Mark Twain – The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; The Mysterious Stranger 116. William James – The Principles of Psychology; The Varieties of Religious Experience; Pragmatism; Essays in Radical Empiricism 117. Henry James – The American; The Ambassadors 118. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche – Thus Spoke Zarathustra; Beyond Good and Evil; The Genealogy of Morals;The Will to Power 119. Jules Henri Poincaré – Science and Hypothesis; Science and Method 120. Sigmund Freud – The Interpretation of Dreams; Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis; Civilization and Its Discontents; New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis 121. George Bernard Shaw – Plays and Prefaces
Mortimer J. Adler (How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading)
HELMER:—To forsake your home, your husband, and your children! You don’t consider what the world will say. NORA:—I can pay no heed to that. I only know what I must do. HELMER:—It is exasperating! Can you forsake your holiest duties in this world? NORA:—What do you call my holiest duties? HELMER:—Do you ask me that? Your duties to your husband and your children. NORA:—I have other duties equally sacred. HELMER:—Impossible! What duties do you mean? NORA:—My duties towards myself. HELMER:—Before all else you are a wife and a mother. NORA:—That I no longer believe. I think that before all else I am a human being, just as much as you are—or at least I will try to become one.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Nora: Torvald, don't look at me like that! Torvald: Can't I look at my richest treasure? At all that beauty that's mine, mine alone-completely and utterly.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Good god, people don't do such things!
Henrik Ibsen (Hedda Gabler)
However wretched I may feel, I want to prolong the agony as long as possible. All my patients are like that. And so are those who are morally diseased..
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Sjel, vær trofast til det siste! Seirens seir er alt å miste. Tapets alt din vinning skapte; - evig eies kun det tapte.
Henrik Ibsen (Brand)
The right? Ah, what does it help to be in the right if you don't have any power?
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
The forests avenge themselves.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
I am not going to let myself be beaten to the ground by the dread of what may happen. Henrik Ibsen, Rosmersholm
Henrik Ibsen (Rosmersholm)
A woman cannot be herself in the society of the present day, which is an exclusively masculine society, with laws framed by men and with judicial system that judges feminine conduct from a masculine point of view.
Henrik Ibsen
Dr. Stockmann. I have already told you that what I want to speak about is the great discovery I have made lately--the discovery that all the sources of our moral life are poisoned and that the hole fabric of our civic community is founded on the pestiferous soil of falsehood.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
This longing to commit a madness stays with us throughout our lives. Who has not, when standing with someone by an abyss or high up on a tower, had a sudden impulse to push the other over? And how is it that we hurt those we love although we know that remorse will follow? Our whole being is nothing but a fight against the dark forces within ourselves. To live is to war with trolls in heart and soul. To write is to sit in judgment on oneself. —Henrik Ibsen
Robert L. Moore (Facing the Dragon: Confronting Personal and Spiritual Grandiosity)
en bruger brændevin, en anden bruger løgne; å ja! så brugte vi eventyr om prinser og trolde og allslags dyr
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
Vogt dig, barn, for tjernets strømme. Farligt, farligt der at drømme! Nøkken lader som han sover; liljer leger ovenover.
Henrik Ibsen
A normally constituted truth lives, let us say, as a rule seventeen or eighteen, or at most twenty years—seldom longer.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
Because there is surely nothing in the world that can compare with happiness of forgiveness and of lifting up a guilty sinner in the arms of love.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
first condition of a happy marriage is the absence of love, and the first condition of an enduring love is the absence of marriage.
Henrik Ibsen (Love's Comedy)
A community is like a ship; everyone ought to be prepared to take the helm.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
That's pretty amazing, the countries thing," I said. "Yeah, everybody's got a talent. I can memorize things. And you can...?" "Urn, I know a lot of people's last words." It was an indulgence, learning last words. Other people had chocolate; I had dying declarations. "Example?" "I like Henrik Ibsen's. He was a playwright." I knew a lot about Ibsen, but I'd never read any of his plays. I didn't like reading plays. I liked reading biographies. "Yeah, I know who he was," said Chip. "Right, well, he'd been sick for a while and his nurse said to him, 'You seem to be feeling better this morning/ and Ibsen looked at her and said, `On the contrary,' and then he died." Chip laughed. "That's morbid. But I like it.
John Green (Looking for Alaska)
Torvald: I would gladly work night and day for you, Nora--bear sorrow and want for your sake. But no man would sacrifice his honour for the one he loves. Nora: But hundreds of thousands of women have done!
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
But he got right to the top. And I heard harps in the air. My - my master builder!
Henrik Ibsen (The Master Builder)
No, I don't think one ought to be at everybody's beck and call. Anyway, I'm not going to be.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
I'm completely alone in the world; it frightens me to be so empty and lost.
Henrik Ibsen
Werle: "I believe there is no one in the world you detest as you do me." Gregers: "I have seen you at too close quarters.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
OSWALD: [Repeats, in a dull, toneless voice.] The sun. The sun.
Henrik Ibsen (Ghosts)
He is suffering from an acute attack of integrity.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
You are a murderer! You have committed the one mortal sin! You have killed the love-life in me. Do you understand what that means? The Bible speaks of a mysterious sin for which there is no forgiveness. I have never understood what it could be; but now I understand. The great, unpardonable sin is to murder the love-life in a human soul.
Henrik Ibsen (John Gabriel Borkman)
Jeg har aldri i mitt liv skrevet "slibrig"; men jeg kunne gi anvisning på dristigere ting i mine bøker enn hva som stod i den tyske fortelling. De er å finne f.eks. både i "Sult" og "Pan". Men når Jacob Sverdrup leser over igjen disse steder og forarges, så vil jeg også be ham lese f.eks. Ibsens "Lille Eyolf" påny. Den lille nydelige, senile råhet, champagnen som ei ble rørt, bør han virkelig nippe til. Og huske. Og bruke.
Knut Hamsun (Selected Letters 1879-1898)
When I was at home with papa, he told me his opinion about everything, and so I had the same opinions; and if I differed from him I concealed the fact, because he would not have liked it. He called me his doll-child, and he played with me just as I used to play with my dolls.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Zar nije neobično dražesna? To je bilo mišljenje i čitavog društva. Ali užasno je tvrdoglavo - to slatko malo stvorenje.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Det er just den rette oprørsånd at kræve lykken her i livet. Hvad ret har vi mennesker til lykken?
Henrik Ibsen
Dr. Stockmann: Yes, I can afford it now. Katherine tells me I earn almost as much as we spend. Peter Stockmann: Almost—yes!
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
While I think of it, Mr. Werle, junior — don't use that foreign word: ideals. We have the excellent native word: lies.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
PROFESSOR RUBEK. Well, they are trifles, perhaps; but at any rate the time passes for us in that way as well as another, Maia.
Henrik Ibsen (When We Dead Awaken)
Not in that sense. What I need is the companionship of another person who can, as it were, complete me—supply what is wanting in me—be one with me in all my striving. MAIA.
Henrik Ibsen (When We Dead Awaken)
[Gospođa Linde:]Čovek mora da živi, gospodine doktore. [Rank:]Da, uobičajeno je shvatanje da je to tako neophodno.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
What good would that ever do me if you were gone from this world, as you say? Not the slightest.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
There can be no freedom or beauty about a home life that depends on borrowing and debt.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
لن تفقدوني طويلاً، فالراحلون سرعان ما ينطوون في زوايا النسيان.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Most people are ennobled by the actual presence of death. But how long do you suppose this nobility will last in him?
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
To be oneself on a basis of gold is no better than founding one’s house on the sand. For your watch, and your ring, and the rest of your trappings the good people fawn on you, grovelling to earth; they lift their hats to your jewelled breast-pin; but your ring and your breast-pin are not your person.-
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
The majority is never right. Never, I tell you! That's one of these lies in society that no free and intelligent man can help rebelling against. Who are the people that make up the biggest proportion of the population -- the intelligent ones or the fools? I think we can agree it's the fools, no matter where you go in this world, it's the fools that form the overwhelming majority.
Henrik Ibsen
A man who has the inventive genius can't control it exactly as he wishes. Its working depends in great measure on inspiration--on a momentary suggestion--and it is almost impossible to tell beforehand at what moment it will come.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
oh, that was a terrible time for me, I can tell you. I kept the blinds drawn down over both my windows. When I peeped out, I saw the sun shining as if nothing had happened. I could not understand it. I saw people going along the street, laughing and talking about indifferent things. I could not understand it. It seemed to me that the whole of existence must be at a standstill -- as if under an eclipse.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck/John Gabriel Borkman)
Odlazak uvijek mora biti efektan.
Henrik Ibsen
O talento não é um direito, é uma obrigação
Henrik Ibsen
Hør, skulde det nu ikke være paa Tide at kaste Masken?
Henrik Ibsen (Fru Inger Til Østråt)
You see, the fact is that the strongest man upon earth is he who stands most alone.
Henrik Ibsen (Henrik Ibsen: The Man, the Plays, the Criticism)
Jeg har lest på trykk - og satsen er sann - «ingen blir profet i sitt eget land».
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
...brug ikke det udenlandske ord: Idealer, vi har jo det gode norske Løgne.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
Å, forstår du da ikke, at forvandlingen kom, - at forvandlingen måtte komme - da jeg fik vælge i frihed.
Henrik Ibsen (The Lady from the Sea)
Norge er ikke noe godt land å ha til fedreland, navnlig ikke om vinteren.
Henrik Ibsen
Live, work, act. Don’t sit here and brood.
Henrik Ibsen (Rosmersholm)
The strongest man in the world is he who stands alone.
Henrik Ibsen
Acabaram-se as meditações! Quem anda mergulhado em pensamentos profundos, tropeça com facilidade. Desse perigo posso eu rir-me à vontade, porque já estou de gatas no chão.
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
That is the only relation in life that is not subject to the law of change.
Henrik Ibsen (Little Eyolf)
MAIA. —all the glory of the world? Yes, you did. And all that glory should be mine, you said.
Henrik Ibsen (When We Dead Awaken)
To "those about to marry," Ibsen therefore says in effect, "Be sure you are not in love!" And to those who are in love he says, "Part!
Henrik Ibsen (Love's Comedy)
Nikada ne treba oblačiti svoje najbolje odelo kad čovek ide da se bori za slobodu i istinu.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
And though I have sailed my boat hard aground, O, it was so grand to be sailing!
Henrik Ibsen (Love's Comedy)
Henrik Ibsen hung a picture of August Strindberg over his desk. “He is my mortal enemy and shall hang there and watch while I write!” explained Ibsen.
Ralph Keyes (The Courage to Write: How Writers Transcend Fear)
In a family there is always something or other going awry… Henrik Ibsen, Rosmersholm
Robert Galbraith (Lethal White (Cormoran Strike, #4))
I believe you could bewitch anyone—if you set yourself to do it. Henrik Ibsen, Rosmersholm
Robert Galbraith (Lethal White (Cormoran Strike, #4))
Nicht Mord. Nicht Diebstahl, Raub oder nächtlicher Einbruch – auch Meineid nicht. Denn das alles sind ja Dinge, die man meist Leuten antut, die man haßt oder die einem gleichgültig sind und einen nichts angehen. […] Das Infamste von allem – das ist, wenn der Freund das Vertrauen des Freundes missbraucht.
Henrik Ibsen (John Gabriel Borkman)
Do think it quite incomprehensible that a young girl—when it can be done—without any one knowing—should be glad to have a peep, now and then, into a world which—which she is forbidden to know anything about?
Henrik Ibsen (Hedda Gabler)
[Suddenly letting slip the train of thought.] Do you know, the people down at the hotel think she's mad. PROFESSOR RUBEK. Indeed? And pray what do the people down at the hotel think of you and the bear-killer?
Henrik Ibsen (When We Dead Awaken)
A woman cannot be herself in modern society,” he argues, since it is “an exclusively male society, with laws made by men and with prosecutors and judges who assess feminine conduct from a masculine standpoint.
Henrik Ibsen (Complete Works of Henrik Ibsen)
Here in the north each night is a whole winter long. Yet the place is fair enough, doubt it not! Thou shalt see sights here such as thou hast not seen in the halls of the English king. We shall be together as sisters whilst thou bidest with me; we shall go down to the sea when the storm begins once more; thou shalt see the billows rushing upon the land like wild, white-maned horses—and then the whales far out in the offing! They dash one against another like steel-clad knights! Ha, what joy to be a witching-wife and ride on the whale's back—to speed before the skiff, and wake the storm, and lure men to the deeps with lovely songs of sorcery!
Henrik Ibsen (The Vikings of Helgeland)
Ja, De tvang meg inn under det som De kalte plikt og skyldighet; da De lovpriste som rett og riktig hva hele mitt sinn opprørte seg imot noe vederstyggelig. Da var det jeg begynte å se Deres lærdomme efter i sømmene. Jeg ville bare pille ved en eneste knute; men da jeg hadde fått den løst, så raknet det opp alt sammen. Og så skjønte jeg at det var maskinsøm.
Henrik Ibsen (Ghosts)
As soon as your fear was over--and it was not fear for what threatened me, but for what might happen to you--when the whole thing was past, as far as you were concerned it was exactly as if nothing at all had happened. Exactly as before, I was your little skylark, your doll, which you would in future treat with doubly gentle care, because it was so brittle and fragile.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
He last, late guest To the gate we followed; Goodbye – and the rest The night-wind swallowed. House, garden, street, Lay tenfold gloomy, Where accents sweet Had made music to me. It was but a feast With the dark coming on; She was but a guest – And now, she is gone.
Henrik Ibsen
Both agree in repudiating "marriage for love"; but the idealist repudiates it in the name of love, the critic in the name of marriage. Love, for the idealist Ibsen, is a passion which loses its virtue when it reaches its goal, which inspires only while it aspires, and flags bewildered when it attains. Marriage, for the critic Ibsen, is an institution beset with pitfalls into which those are surest to step who enter it blinded with love.
Henrik Ibsen (Love's Comedy)
Think, Dagny, what it is to sit by the window in the eventide and hear the kelpie wailing in the boat-house; to sit waiting and listening for the dead men's ride to Valhal; for their way lies past us here in the north. They are the brave men that fell in fight, the strong women that did not drag out their lives tamely, like thee and me; they sweep through the storm-night on their black horses, with jangling bells! Ha, Dagny! think of riding the last ride on so rare a steed!
Henrik Ibsen
Helmer: Nem voltál boldog? Nóra: Nem; csak vidám.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
At digte, – det er at holde
 dommedag over sig selv.
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
A man's moral character may be completely sapped; that is the dreadful part of it.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
You possibly believe I keep the glue Of lies for Happiness's in a broken jar?
Henrik Ibsen (Love's Comedy)
Let others emulate the eagle's flight, Life in the lowly plains may be as bright.
Henrik Ibsen (Love's Comedy)
About the white and shining milky way? Man may not there the milk of fortune skim, Nor is the butter of it meant for him.
Henrik Ibsen (Love's Comedy)
it was a tremendous pleasure to sit there working and earning money. It was like being a man.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Budi to što jesi, samo budi potpuno.
Henrik Ibsen
Ja Mandeviljens QUANTUM SATIS står bogført som din Rigdoms Rad Men Prest, din CONTO CARITATIS er Bogens hvide Jomfrublad.
Henrik Ibsen (Brand)
velsignet Mand, tænk hvilke Lig der vil drive i Land!
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
Men kjære betenk, De har Fordel af Sagen Jeg skal faa Dem aabnet og lagt for Dagen Hvad jeg navnlig vil søge er Sædet for Drømmene og forresten gå Dem kritisk efter i Sømmene
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
the strongest man is he who stands most alone
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People: With Linked Table of Contents)
Anitra! Evas naturlige datter! Magnetiskt jeg drages; ti jeg er mann og, som det står hos en aktet forfatter das ewige weibliche zieht uns an!
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
    (A thrill of dread runs through the whole group; ASGARDSREIEN—the       ride of the fallen heroes to Valhal—hurtles through the air.)
Henrik Ibsen (The Vikings of Helgeland The Prose Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen, Vol. III.)
SIGURD. Man's will can do this and that; but fate rules in the deeds that shape our lives—so has it gone with us twain.
Henrik Ibsen (The Vikings of Helgeland The Prose Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen, Vol. III.)
  HIORDIS. Cage an eagle and it will bite at the wires, be they of iron or of gold.
Henrik Ibsen (The Vikings of Helgeland The Prose Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen, Vol. III.)
HIORDIS. Better no child, than one born in shame. DAGNY. In shame?
Henrik Ibsen (The Vikings of Helgeland The Prose Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen, Vol. III.)
The White God is coming northward; him will I not meet; the old gods are strong no longer;—they sleep, they sit half shadow- high;—with them will we strive!
Henrik Ibsen (The Vikings of Helgeland The Prose Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen, Vol. III.)
ALLMERS. No. For it is here, in the life of earth, that we living beings are at home.
Henrik Ibsen (Little Eyolf)
Oh, we are all of us run over, sometime or other in life. The thing is to jump up again, and let no one see you are hurt.
Henrik Ibsen (John Gabriel Borkman)
Ne upotrebljavajte stranu reč: ideali. Pa mi imamo dobru našu reč: laži.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
RELING: Ako dopuštate, - kakva je vaša sudbina? GREGERS: Da budem za stolom trinaesti.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
أنا ارى الناس صنفين .. صنف تعشقه المرأة، وصنف تحب أن تتجاذب معه أطراف الحديث.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
A community is like a ship; every one ought to be prepared to take the helm.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
Gina. I wish to goodness that detestable thing had never set his foot inside our doors!
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
OSWALD: For I'm not so afraid of death--though I should like to live as long as I can. MRS. ALVING: Yes, yes, Oswald, you must! OSWALD: But this is so unutterably loathsome.
Henrik Ibsen (Ghosts)
You must not think, Mrs. Borkman, that I haven't said the same to him. I have laid my whole life before him. Again and again I have reminded him that I am seven years older than he——
Henrik Ibsen (John Gabriel Borkman)
The individual ought undoubtedly to acquiesce in subordinating himself to the community—or, to speak more accurately, to the authorities who have the care of the community’s welfare.
Henrik Ibsen (An Enemy of the People)
Borkman: Dann haben wir uns gegenseitig etwas vorgemacht. Und uns selber haben wir vielleicht auch etwas vorgemacht – beide. Foldal: Ja, John Gabriel, aber ist das denn nicht im Grunde das Wesen der Freundschaft? Borkman (lächelt bitter): Doch, doch, lügen und betrügen – das ist Freundschaft. Da hast du recht. Diese Erfahrung habe ich schon einmal in meinem Leben gemacht.
Henrik Ibsen (John Gabriel Borkman)
Helmer: To desert your home, your husband and your children! And you don‘t consider what people will say! Nora: I cannot consider that at all. I only know that it is necessary for me. Helmer: It‘s shocking. This is how you would neglect your most sacred duties. Nora: What do you consider my most sacred duties? Helmer: Do I need to tell you that? Are they not your duties to your husband and your children? Nora: I have other duties just as sacred. Helmer: That you have not. What duties could those be? Nora: Duties to myself. Helmer: Before all else, you are a wife and mother. Nora: I don‘t believe that any longer. I believe that before all else I am a reasonable human being, just as you are — or, at all events, that I must try and become one. I know quite well, Torvald, that most people would think you right, and that views of that kind are to be found in books; but I can no longer content myself with what most people say, or with what is found in books. I must think over things for myself and get to understand them.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Det ved jeg, at til ægteskabet hører barnet også, og barnet skal I lade i fred. Hedvig får I værs'go holde udenfor. Hende skal I fare varsomt med, siger jeg, for ellers kan I komme til at gøre en ulykke på hende.
Henrik Ibsen (The Wild Duck)
[Touching his own breast.] In here, you see—in here I have a little bramah-locked casket. And in that casket all my sculptor's visions are stored up. But when she disappeared and left no trace, the lock of the casket snapped to. And she had the key—and she took it away with her.—You, little Maia, you had no key; so all that the casket contains must lie unused. And the years pass! And I have no means of getting at the treasure.
Henrik Ibsen (When We Dead Awaken)
But if you are to die, live first! Come forth With me into the glory of God's earth! Soon, soon the gilded cage will claim its prize. The Lady thrives there, but the Woman dies, And I love nothing but the Woman in you.
Henrik Ibsen (Love's Comedy)
Være seg selv på grunnlag av gull, det er som å bygge sitt hus på sandet. For ur og for ring og alt det annet logrer de godtfolk og kryper i muld; de løfter på hatten for brystnål-kronen; men ring eller nål er jo ikke personen.
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
Så usigelig fattig kan en sjel da gå tilbake til intet i det tåkete grå. Du deilige jord, vær ikke vred at jeg trampet ditt gress til ingen nytte. Du deilige sol, du har sløset med dine lysende stenk i en folketom hytte. Der satt ingen der inne å varme og stemme; - eieren, sier de, var aldri hjemme. Deilige sol og deilige jord, I var dumme at I bar og lyste for min mor. Ånden er karrig og naturen ødsel. Det er dyrt å bøte med livet for sin fødsel. - Jeg vil oppad, høyt, på den bratteste tinde; jeg vil ennu engang se solen rinne, stirre meg trett på det lovede land, se å få snedyngen over meg kavet; de kan skrive derover «her er ingen begravet»; og bakefter - siden - ! La det gå som det kan.
Henrik Ibsen (Peer Gynt)
Nóra: Más feladat az, amit előbb meg kell oldanom. Magamat kell megnevelnem. S te nem vagy az a férfi, aki segíthetsz ebben. Ezt egyedül kell megcsinálnom. (…) Ha meg akarom érteni magamat, s az egész környezetemet, egészen egyedül kell állnom.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
Die Flügel gespannt! Die Segel heraus Dem Aar gleich des Lebens Meer ich durchsaus - Lass hinten der Möwen Scharen.. Über Bord mit Vernunft, dem schweren Ballast! Vielleicht wird mein Schiff vom Strudel erfasst Doch es ist so herrlich zu fahren
Henrik Ibsen
Frida. So after all, it is not for nothing that I was born a poet. For now she is going forth into the great wide world, that I once yearned so passionately to see. Little Frida sets out in a splendid covered sledge with silver bells on the harness——
Henrik Ibsen (John Gabriel Borkman)
Time was when I was young, like you, and played Like you, the unconquerable Titan's part; Year after year I toiled and moiled for bread, Which hardens a man's hand, but not his heart. For northern fells my lonely home surrounded, And by my parish bounds my world was bounded.
Henrik Ibsen (Love's Comedy)
The truth is that there are two men in Ibsen—an idealist, exalted to the verge of sentimentality, and a critic, hard, inexorable, remorseless, to the verge of cynicism. What we call his "social philosophy" is a modus vivendi arrived at between them. Both agree in repudiating "marriage for love";
Henrik Ibsen (Love's Comedy)
HIORDIS. Better no child, than one born in shame. DAGNY. In shame? HIORDIS. Dost thou forgot thy father's saying? Egil is the son of a leman; that was his word. DAGNY. A word spoken in wrath—why wilt thou heed it? HIORDIS. Nay, nay, Ornulf was right; Egil is weak; one can see he is no freeborn child.
Henrik Ibsen (The Vikings of Helgeland The Prose Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen, Vol. III.)
Nora. I know nothing but what the clergyman said, when I went to be confirmed. He told us that religion was this, and that, and the other. When I am away from all this, and am alone, I will look into that matter too. I will see if what the clergyman said is true, or at all events if it is true for me.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
OSWALD: Is it very late, mother? MRS. ALVING: It is early morning. [She looks out through the conservatory.] The day is dawning over the mountains. And the weather is clearing, Oswald. In a little while you shall see the sun. OSWALD: I'm glad of that. Oh, I may still have much to rejoice in and live for--
Henrik Ibsen (Ghosts)
I have skulked up there and wasted eight precious years of my life! The very day I was set free, I should have gone forth into the world—out into the steel-hard, dreamless world of reality! I should have begun at the bottom and swung myself up to the heights anew—higher than ever before—in spite of all that lay between.
Henrik Ibsen (John Gabriel Borkman)
A onda kad polazimo, i kad stavljam šal oko tvojih nježnih, mladenačkih ramena - na taj divni zatiljak - onda zamišljam da si ti moja mlada nevjesta i da upravo dolazimo iz crkve, da te po prvi put vodim u svoj stan, da sam po prvi put nasamo s tobom - sasvim sam s tobom, ti mlada, ustreptala ljepotice! Čitavo ovo veče bila si moja čežnja.
Henrik Ibsen
Nóra: ...Azt hiszem, hogy legelsősorban ember vagyok, éppen úgy, mint te - vagy mindenesetre meg kell kísérelnem, hogy az legyek. Jól tudom, hogy a legtöbben neked adnak igazat, Torvald; valami olyasmi van a könyvekben is. De én nem törődhetek vele tovább, hogy a többség mit mond, s mi van a könyvekben. Magamnak kell a dolgokat átgondolnom, s tisztába jönnöm velük.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
NORA: No; only merry. And you were always so friendly and kind to me. But our house has been nothing but a nursery. Here I have been your doll-wife, just as at home I used to be papa's doll-child. And my children were, in their turn, my dolls. I was exceedingly delighted when you played with me, just as children were whenever I played with them. That has been our marriage, Torvald.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
FALK. I feel myself like God's lost prodigal; I left Him for the world's delusive charms. With mild reproof He wooed me to His arms; And when I come, He lights the vaulted hall, Prepares a banquet for the son restored, And makes His noblest creature my reward. From this time forth I'll never leave that Light,— But stand its armed defender in the fight; Nothing shall part us, and our life shall prove A song of glory to triumphant love!
Henrik Ibsen (Love's Comedy)
(The feast-room in GUNNAR'S house. The entrance-door is in the back; smaller doors in the side-walls. In front, on the left, the greater high-seat; opposite it on the right, the lesser. In the middle of the floor, a wood fire is burning on a built-up hearth. In the background, on both sides of the door, are daises for the women of the household. From each of the high-seats, a long table, with benches, stretches backwards, parallel with the wall. It is dark outside; the fire lights the room.)
Henrik Ibsen (The Vikings of Helgeland The Prose Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen, Vol. III.)
Úgy értem, hogy papa kezéből a tiédbe kerültem. Itt te mindent a magad ízlése szerint rendeztél be, s így nekem ugyanaz lett az ízlésem, ami neked, vagy legalább úgy tettem, nem is tudom igazán… úgy gondolom, mindkettő igaz; hol az egyik, hol a másik. De ahogy most nézem, mintha úgy éltem volna itt, mint egy szegény ember, aki csak a betevő falatját keresi meg. Abból éltem, hogy mókáztam neked, Torvald. De hát te így akartad. Te és a papa nagy bűnt követtetek el ellenem. Ti vagytok a hibásak benne, hogy semmi sem lett belőlem.
Henrik Ibsen (A Doll's House)
JOHN GABRIEL BORKMAN stands with his hands behind his back, beside the piano, listening to FRIDA FOLDAL, who is playing the last bars of the "Danse Macabre. BORKMAN. Can you guess where I first heard tones like these? FRIDA. [Looking up at him.] No, Mr. Borkman. BORKMAN. It was down in the mines. FRIDA. [Not understanding.] Indeed? Down in the mines? BORKMAN. I am a miner's son, you know. Or perhaps you did not know? FRIDA. No, Mr. Borkman. BORKMAN. A miner's son. And my father used sometimes to take me with him into the mines. The metal sings down there. FRIDA. Really? Sings? BORKMAN. [Nodding.] When it is loosened. The hammer-strokes that loosen it are the midnight bell clanging to set it free; and that is why the metal sings--in its own way--for gladness. FRIDA. Why does it do that, Mr. Borkman? BORKMAN. It wants to come up into the light of day and serve mankind.
Henrik Ibsen (John Gabriel Borkman)