Traveling Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Traveling. Here they are! All 200 of them:

โ€œ
A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.
โ€
โ€
Mark Twain
โ€œ
Not all those who wander are lost.
โ€
โ€
J.R.R. Tolkien (The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, #1))
โ€œ
The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.
โ€
โ€
Augustine of Hippo
โ€œ
That's the thing about books. They let you travel without moving your feet.
โ€
โ€
Jhumpa Lahiri (The Namesake)
โ€œ
I have never listened to anyone who criticized my taste in space travel, sideshows or gorillas. When this occurs, I pack up my dinosaurs and leave the room.
โ€
โ€
Ray Bradbury (Zen in the Art of Writing)
โ€œ
I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train.
โ€
โ€
Oscar Wilde (The Importance of Being Earnest)
โ€œ
Live, travel, adventure, bless, and don't be sorry.
โ€
โ€
Jack Kerouac
โ€œ
A good traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent on arriving.
โ€
โ€
Lao Tzu
โ€œ
Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it.
โ€
โ€
Terry Pratchett (Reaper Man (Discworld, #11; Death, #2))
โ€œ
I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move.
โ€
โ€
Robert Louis Stevenson (Travels with a Donkey in the Cรฉvennes)
โ€œ
The Road Not Taken Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and Iโ€” I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.
โ€
โ€
Robert Frost
โ€œ
Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.
โ€
โ€
Mark Twain (The Innocents Abroad / Roughing It)
โ€œ
Nothing travels faster than the speed of light, with the possible exception of bad news, which obeys its own special laws.
โ€
โ€
Douglas Adams (Mostly Harmless (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #5))
โ€œ
Books are the plane, and the train, and the road. They are the destination, and the journey. They are home.
โ€
โ€
Anna Quindlen (How Reading Changed My Life)
โ€œ
When I was a child, adults would tell me not to make things up, warning me of what would happen if I did. As far as I can tell so far, it seems to involve lots of foreign travel and not having to get up too early in the morning.
โ€
โ€
Neil Gaiman (Smoke and Mirrors: Short Fiction and Illusions)
โ€œ
The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.
โ€
โ€
Lao Tzu
โ€œ
I address you all tonight for who you truly are: wizards, mermaids, travelers, adventurers, and magicians. You are the true dreamers.
โ€
โ€
Brian Selznick (The Invention of Hugo Cabret)
โ€œ
Why do you go away? So that you can come back. So that you can see the place you came from with new eyes and extra colors. And the people there see you differently, too. Coming back to where you started is not the same as never leaving.
โ€
โ€
Terry Pratchett (A Hat Full of Sky (Discworld, #32; Tiffany Aching, #2))
โ€œ
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I - I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.
โ€
โ€
Robert Frost
โ€œ
Wherever you go becomes a part of you somehow.
โ€
โ€
Anita Desai
โ€œ
Don't you think it's better to be extremely happy for a short while, even if you lose it, than to be just okay for your whole life?
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
I went to collect the few personal belongings which...I held to be invaluable: my cat, my resolve to travel, and my solitude.
โ€
โ€
Colette
โ€œ
Travel changes you. As you move through this life and this world you change things slightly, you leave marks behind, however small. And in return, lifeโ€”and travelโ€”leaves marks on you.
โ€
โ€
Anthony Bourdain
โ€œ
Travel brings power and love back into your life.
โ€
โ€
Rumi
โ€œ
I stood still, vision blurring, and in that moment, I heard my heart break. It was a small, clean sound, like the snapping of a flower's stem.
โ€
โ€
Diana Gabaldon (Dragonfly in Amber (Outlander, #2))
โ€œ
We travel, some of us forever, to seek other states, other lives, other souls.
โ€
โ€
Anaรฏs Nin (The Diary of Anaรฏs Nin, Vol. 7: 1966-1974)
โ€œ
The road that is built in hope is more pleasant to the traveler than the road built in despair, even though they both lead to the same destination.
โ€
โ€
Marion Zimmer Bradley (The Fall of Atlantis (The Fall of Atlantis, #1-2))
โ€œ
Happiness is the consequence of personal effort. You fight for it, strive for it, insist upon it, and sometimes even travel around the world looking for it. You have to participate relentlessly in the manifestations of your own blessings. And once you have achieved a state of happiness, you must never become lax about maintaining it. You must make a mighty effort to keep swimming upward into that happiness forever, to stay afloat on top of it.
โ€
โ€
Elizabeth Gilbert (Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia)
โ€œ
Travel far enough, you meet yourself.
โ€
โ€
David Mitchell (Cloud Atlas)
โ€œ
We are all travelers in the wilderness of this world, and the best we can find in our travels is an honest friend.
โ€
โ€
Robert Louis Stevenson
โ€œ
The traveler sees what he sees. The tourist sees what he has come to see.
โ€
โ€
G.K. Chesterton
โ€œ
We are travelers on a cosmic journey,stardust,swirling and dancing in the eddies and whirlpools of infinity. Life is eternal. We have stopped for a moment to encounter each other, to meet, to love, to share.This is a precious moment. It is a little parenthesis in eternity.
โ€
โ€
Paulo Coelho (The Alchemist)
โ€œ
It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.
โ€
โ€
Ursula K. Le Guin (The Left Hand of Darkness (Hainish Cycle, #4))
โ€œ
The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.
โ€
โ€
Marcel Proust
โ€œ
I don't recommend shadow travel if you're scared of: a) The dark b) Cold shivers up your spine c) Strange noises d) Going so fast you feel like your face is peeling off In other words, I thought it was awesome.
โ€
โ€
Rick Riordan (The Last Olympian (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, #5))
โ€œ
We all know that light travels faster than sound. That's why certain people appear bright until you hear them speak.
โ€
โ€
Albert Einstein
โ€œ
I am awfully greedy; I want everything from life. I want to be a woman and to be a man, to have many friends and to have loneliness, to work much and write good books, to travel and enjoy myself, to be selfish and to be unselfishโ€ฆ You see, it is difficult to get all which I want. And then when I do not succeed I get mad with anger.
โ€
โ€
Simone de Beauvoir
โ€œ
I have found out that there ain't no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them.
โ€
โ€
Mark Twain (Tom Sawyer Abroad)
โ€œ
I read; I travel; I become
โ€
โ€
Derek Walcott
โ€œ
Believe in a love that is being stored up for you like an inheritance, and have faith that in this love there is a strength and a blessing so large that you can travel as far as you wish without having to step outside it.
โ€
โ€
Rainer Maria Rilke (Letters to a Young Poet)
โ€œ
Not I, nor anyone else can travel that road for you. You must travel it by yourself. It is not far. It is within reach. Perhaps you have been on it since you were born, and did not know. Perhaps it is everywhere - on water and land.
โ€
โ€
Walt Whitman (Leaves of Grass)
โ€œ
Never travel faster than your guardian angel can fly.
โ€
โ€
Mother Teresa
โ€œ
Love the world and yourself in it, move through it as though it offers no resistance, as though the world is your natural element.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us, or we find it not.
โ€
โ€
Ralph Waldo Emerson (Emerson's Essays)
โ€œ
I won't ever leave you, even though you're always leaving me.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
I think you travel to search and you come back home to find yourself there.
โ€
โ€
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
โ€œ
Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.
โ€
โ€
Gustave Flaubert
โ€œ
The three saddest things are the ill wanting to be well, the poor wanting to be rich, and the constant traveler saying 'anywhere but here'.
โ€
โ€
E.E. Cummings
โ€œ
It's hard being left behind. (...) It's hard to be the one who stays.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
In books I have traveled, not only to other worlds, but into my own.
โ€
โ€
Anna Quindlen (How Reading Changed My Life)
โ€œ
Every traveler has a home of his own, and he learns to appreciate it the more from his wandering.
โ€
โ€
Charles Dickens
โ€œ
What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.
โ€
โ€
John Steinbeck (Travels with Charley: In Search of America)
โ€œ
Sometimes the road less traveled is less traveled for a reason
โ€
โ€
Jerry Seinfeld
โ€œ
No matter how far you travel, you can never get away from yourself.
โ€
โ€
Haruki Murakami (After the Quake)
โ€œ
What is that feeling when you're driving away from people and they recede on the plain till you see their specks dispersing? - it's the too-huge world vaulting us, and it's good-bye. But we lean forward to the next crazy venture beneath the skies.
โ€
โ€
Jack Kerouac (On the Road)
โ€œ
Now more than ever do I realize that I will never be content with a sedentary life, that I will always be haunted by thoughts of a sun-drenched elsewhere.
โ€
โ€
Isabelle Eberhardt (The Nomad: Diaries of Isabelle Eberhardt)
โ€œ
To travel is to live.
โ€
โ€
Hans Christian Andersen (The Fairy Tale of My Life: An Autobiography)
โ€œ
How to stop time: kiss. How to travel in time: read. How to escape time: music. How to feel time: write. How to release time: breathe.
โ€
โ€
Matt Haig (Reasons to Stay Alive)
โ€œ
People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but *actually* from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint - it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly... time-y wimey... stuff.
โ€
โ€
Steven Moffat
โ€œ
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the road less traveled by and they CANCELLED MY FRIKKIN' SHOW. I totally shoulda took the road that had all those people on it. Damn.
โ€
โ€
Joss Whedon
โ€œ
Maybe the truth is, there's a little bit of loser in all of us. Being happy isn't having everything in your life be perfect. Maybe it's about stringing together all the little things.
โ€
โ€
Ann Brashares (The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (Sisterhood, #1))
โ€œ
I was born lost and take no pleasure in being found.
โ€
โ€
John Steinbeck (Travels with Charley: In Search of America)
โ€œ
To move, to breathe, to fly, to float, To gain all while you give, To roam the roads of lands remote, To travel is to live.
โ€
โ€
Hans Christian Andersen (The Fairy Tale of My Life: An Autobiography)
โ€œ
Though [Abraham Lincoln] never would travel to Europe, he went with Shakespeareโ€™s kings to Merry England; he went with Lord Byron poetry to Spain and Portugal. Literature allowed him to transcend his surroundings.
โ€
โ€
Doris Kearns Goodwin
โ€œ
Itโ€™s dark now and I am very tired. I love you, always. Time is nothing.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
You're on Earth. There's no cure for that.
โ€
โ€
Samuel Beckett
โ€œ
The books transported her into new worlds and introduced her to amazing people who lived exciting lives. She went on olden-day sailing ships with Joseph Conrad. She went to Africa with Ernest Hemingway and to India with Rudyard Kipling. She travelled all over the world while sitting in her little room in an English village.
โ€
โ€
Roald Dahl (Matilda)
โ€œ
All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost.
โ€
โ€
J.R.R. Tolkien (The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, #1))
โ€œ
We leave something of ourselves behind when we leave a place, we stay there, even though we go away. And there are things in us that we can find again only by going back there.
โ€
โ€
Pascal Mercier (Night Train to Lisbon)
โ€œ
Good humor may be said to be one of the very best articles of dress one can wear in society.
โ€
โ€
William Makepeace Thackeray (Sketches and Travels, Etc.)
โ€œ
Like some wines our love could neither mature nor travel.
โ€
โ€
Graham Greene (The Comedians)
โ€œ
Augustus," I said. "Really. You don't have to do this." "Sure I do," he said. "I found my Wish." "God, you're the best," I told him. "I bet you say that to all the boys who finance your international travel," he answered.
โ€
โ€
John Green (The Fault in Our Stars)
โ€œ
Never did the world make a queen of a girl who hides in houses and dreams without traveling.
โ€
โ€
Roman Payne (The Wanderess)
โ€œ
Youโ€™ll learn, as you get older, that rules are made to be broken. Be bold enough to live life on your terms, and never, ever apologize for it. Go against the grain, refuse to conform, take the road less traveled instead of the well-beaten path. Laugh in the face of adversity, and leap before you look. Dance as though EVERYBODY is watching. March to the beat of your own drummer. And stubbornly refuse to fit in.
โ€
โ€
Mandy Hale (The Single Woman: Life, Love, and a Dash of Sass)
โ€œ
to travel is worth any cost or sacrifice.
โ€
โ€
Elizabeth Gilbert (Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia)
โ€œ
We should not judge people by their peak of excellence; but by the distance they have traveled from the point where they started.
โ€
โ€
Henry Ward Beecher
โ€œ
A man of my acquaintance once wrote a poem called "The Road Less Traveled", describing a journey he took through the woods along a path most travelers never used. The poet found that the road less traveled was peaceful but quite lonely, and he was probably a bit nervous as he went along, because if anything happened on the road less traveled, the other travelers would be on the road more frequently traveled and so couldn't hear him as he cried for help. Sure enough, that poet is dead.
โ€
โ€
Lemony Snicket (The Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events, #10))
โ€œ
Every dreamer knows that it is entirely possible to be homesick for a place you've never been to, perhaps more homesick than for familiar ground.
โ€
โ€
Judith Thurman
โ€œ
Own only what you can always carry with you: know languages, know countries, know people. Let your memory be your travel bag.
โ€
โ€
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (The Gulag Archipelago 1918โ€“1956 (Abridged))
โ€œ
Nothing was ever in tune. People just blindly grabbed at whatever there was: communism, health foods, zen, surfing, ballet, hypnotism, group encounters, orgies, biking, herbs, Catholicism, weight-lifting, travel, withdrawal, vegetarianism, India, painting, writing, sculpting, composing, conducting, backpacking, yoga, copulating, gambling, drinking, hanging around, frozen yogurt, Beethoven, Back, Buddha, Christ, TM, H, carrot juice, suicide, handmade suits, jet travel, New York City, and then it all evaporated and fell apart. People had to find things to do while waiting to die. I guess it was nice to have a choice.
โ€
โ€
Charles Bukowski (Women)
โ€œ
Why is love intensified by absence?
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
The world must be all fucked up," he said then, "when men travel first class and literature goes as freight.
โ€
โ€
Gabriel Garcรญa Mรกrquez
โ€œ
Time is priceless, but itโ€™s Free. You can't own it, you can use it. You can spend it. But you can't keep it. Once you've lost it you can never get it back.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
As Athera. To grow. As Pyrata. To burn. As Illumae. To light. As Orense. To open. As Anase. To dispel. As Hasari. To heal. As Travars. To Travel.
โ€
โ€
V.E. Schwab (A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1))
โ€œ
Luckily, I always travel with a book, just in case I have to wait on line for Santa, or some such inconvenience.
โ€
โ€
David Levithan (Dash & Lily's Book of Dares (Dash & Lily, #1))
โ€œ
Still, there are times I am bewildered by each mile I have traveled, each meal I have eaten, each person I have known, each room in which I have slept. As ordinary as it all appears, there are times when it is beyond my imagination.
โ€
โ€
Jhumpa Lahiri (Interpreter of Maladies)
โ€œ
Sleep is my lover now, my forgetting, my opiate, my oblivion.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
There are no foreign lands. It is the traveler only who is foreign.
โ€
โ€
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Silverado Squatters)
โ€œ
Therefore, dear Sir, love your solitude and try to sing out with the pain it causes you. For those who are near you are far away... and this shows that the space around you is beginning to grow vast.... be happy about your growth, in which of course you can't take anyone with you, and be gentle with those who stay behind; be confident and calm in front of them and don't torment them with your doubts and don't frighten them with your faith or joy, which they wouldn't be able to comprehend. Seek out some simple and true feeling of what you have in common with them, which doesn't necessarily have to alter when you yourself change again and again; when you see them, love life in a form that is not your own and be indulgent toward those who are growing old, who are afraid of the aloneness that you trust.... and don't expect any understanding; but believe in a love that is being stored up for you like an inheritance, and have faith that in this love there is a strength and a blessing so large that you can travel as far as you wish without having to step outside it.
โ€
โ€
Rainer Maria Rilke (Letters to a Young Poet)
โ€œ
Truthfully, Professor Hawking? Why would we allow tourists from the future muck up the past when your contemporaries had the task well in Hand?" Brigadier General Patrick E Buckwalder 2241C.E.
โ€
โ€
Gabriel F.W. Koch (Paradox Effect: Time Travel and Purified DNA Merge to Halt the Collapse of Human Existence)
โ€œ
And so, does the destination matter? Or is it the path we take? I declare that no accomplishment has substance nearly as great as the road used to achieve it. We are not creatures of destinations. It is the journey that shapes us. Our callused feet, our backs strong from carrying the weight of our travels, our eyes open with the fresh delight of experiences lived.
โ€
โ€
Brandon Sanderson (The Way of Kings (The Stormlight Archive, #1))
โ€œ
A man who has been through bitter experiences and travelled far enjoys even his sufferings after a time
โ€
โ€
Homer (The Odyssey)
โ€œ
We laugh and laugh, and nothing can ever be sad, no one can be lost, or dead, or far away: right now we are here, and nothing can mar our perfection, or steal the joy of this perfect moment.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
because he had no place he could stay in without getting tired of it and because there was nowhere to go but everywhere, keep rolling under the stars...
โ€
โ€
Jack Kerouac (On the Road)
โ€œ
And it came to me then. That we were wonderful traveling companions but in the end no more than lonely lumps of metal in their own separate orbits. From far off they look like beautiful shooting stars, but in reality they're nothing more than prisons, where each of us is locked up alone, going nowhere. When the orbits of these two satellites of ours happened to cross paths, we could be together. Maybe even open our hearts to each other. But that was only for the briefest moment. In the next instant we'd be in absolute solitude. Until we burned up and became nothing.
โ€
โ€
Haruki Murakami (Sputnik Sweetheart)
โ€œ
Stars, too, were time travelers. How many of those ancient points of light were the last echoes of suns now dead? How many had been born but their light not yet come this far? If all the suns but ours collapsed tonight, how many lifetimes would it take us to realize we were alone? I had always known the sky was full of mysteriesโ€”but not until now had I realized how full of them the earth was.
โ€
โ€
Ransom Riggs (Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine's Peculiar Children, #1))
โ€œ
Arriving at each new city, the traveler finds again a past of his that he did not know he had: the foreignness of what you no longer are or no longer possess lies in wait for you in foreign, unpossessed places.
โ€
โ€
Italo Calvino (Invisible Cities)
โ€œ
Maybe I'm dreaming you. Maybe you're dreaming me; maybe we only exist in each other's dreams and every morning when we wake up we forget all about each other.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
The steward just asked me if I was not afraid to travel alone, and I said, "Why, it is life.
โ€
โ€
Emily Hahn (Congo Solo; Misadventures Two Degrees North)
โ€œ
To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep; No more; and by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause: there's the respect That makes calamity of so long life; For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all; And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pith and moment With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action.--Soft you now! The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons Be all my sins remember'd!
โ€
โ€
William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
โ€œ
To travel is to discover that everyone is wrong about other countries.
โ€
โ€
Aldous Huxley
โ€œ
may came home with a smooth round stone as small as a world and as large as alone.
โ€
โ€
E.E. Cummings
โ€œ
Once you have traveled, the voyage never ends, but is played out over and over again in the quietest chambers. The mind can never break off from the journey.
โ€
โ€
Pat Conroy
โ€œ
A weird time in which we are alive. We can travel anywhere we want, even to other planets. And for what? To sit day after day, declining in morale and hope.
โ€
โ€
Philip K. Dick (The Man in the High Castle)
โ€œ
One's destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things.
โ€
โ€
Henry Miller
โ€œ
Until you value yourself, you won't value your time. Until you value your time, you will not do anything with it.
โ€
โ€
M. Scott Peck (The Road Less Traveled: A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth)
โ€œ
A sad soul can kill you quicker, far quicker, than a germ.
โ€
โ€
John Steinbeck (Travels with Charley: In Search of America)
โ€œ
Maybe, sometimes, it's easier to be mad at the people you trust because you know they'll always love you, no matter what.
โ€
โ€
Ann Brashares (The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (Sisterhood, #1))
โ€œ
It can hardly be a coincidence that no language on earth has ever produced the expression, 'As pretty as an airport.
โ€
โ€
Douglas Adams (The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul (Dirk Gently, #2))
โ€œ
I am not the same having seen the moon shine on the other side of the world.
โ€
โ€
Mary Anne Radmacher
โ€œ
The ache for home lives in all of us. The safe place where we can go as we are and not be questioned.
โ€
โ€
Maya Angelou (All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes)
โ€œ
People travel to wonder at the height of the mountains, at the huge waves of the seas, at the long course of the rivers, at the vast compass of the ocean, at the circular motion of the stars, and yet they pass by themselves without wondering.
โ€
โ€
Augustine of Hippo
โ€œ
A man travels the world over in search of what he needs and returns home to find it.
โ€
โ€
George Moore (The Brook Kerith)
โ€œ
Wherever you go, you take yourself with you.
โ€
โ€
Neil Gaiman (The Graveyard Book)
โ€œ
Do you know what hurts so very much? It's love. Love is the strongest force in the world, and when it is blocked that means pain. There are two things we can do when this happens. We can kill that love so that it stops hurting. But then of course part of us dies, too. Or we can ask God to open up another route for that love to travel.
โ€
โ€
Corrie ten Boom (The Hiding Place: The Triumphant True Story of Corrie Ten Boom)
โ€œ
Travel is never a matter of money but of courage
โ€
โ€
Paulo Coelho (Aleph)
โ€œ
When religion and politics travel in the same cart, the riders believe nothing can stand in their way. Their movements become headlong - faster and faster and faster. They put aside all thoughts of obstacles and forget the precipice does not show itself to the man in a blind rush until it's too late.
โ€
โ€
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune #1))
โ€œ
Travelling's not something you're good at. It's something you do. Like breathing. You can't work too much at it, or it feels like work. You have to surrender yourself to the chaos. To the accidents.
โ€
โ€
Gayle Forman (Just One Day (Just One Day, #1))
โ€œ
Everything I was I carry with me, everything I will be lies waiting on the road ahead.
โ€
โ€
Ma Jian (Red Dust: A Path Through China)
โ€œ
Not forgiving is like drinking rat poison and then waiting for the rat to die.
โ€
โ€
Anne Lamott (Traveling Mercies: Some Thoughts on Faith)
โ€œ
Yes, my consuming desire is to mingle with road crews, sailors and soldiers, barroom regularsโ€”to be a part of a scene, anonymous, listening, recordingโ€”all this is spoiled by the fact that I am a girl, a female always supposedly in danger of assault and battery. My consuming interest in men and their lives is often misconstrued as a desire to seduce them, or as an invitation to intimacy. Yes, God, I want to talk to everybody as deeply as I can. I want to be able to sleep in an open field, to travel west, to walk freely at night...
โ€
โ€
Sylvia Plath (The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath)
โ€œ
I never understood why Clark Kent was so hell bent on keeping Lois Lane in the dark.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
Our battered suitcases were piled on the sidewalk again; we had longer ways to go. But no matter, the road is life
โ€
โ€
Jack Kerouac (On the Road)
โ€œ
Every friendship travels at sometime through the black valley of despair. This tests every aspect of your affection. You lose the attraction and the magic. Your sense of each other darkens and your presence is sore. If you can come through this time, it can purify with your love, and falsity and need will fall away. It will bring you onto new ground where affection can grow again.
โ€
โ€
John O'Donohue (Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom)
โ€œ
I have always lived violently, drunk hugely, eaten too much or not at all, slept around the clock or missed two nights of sleeping, worked too hard and too long in glory, or slobbed for a time in utter laziness. I've lifted, pulled, chopped, climbed, made love with joy and taken my hangovers as a consequence, not as a punishment.
โ€
โ€
John Steinbeck (Travels with Charley: In Search of America)
โ€œ
Come with me," she said. "Stay with me. Be with me. See everything with me. I have traveled the world and seen so much, but there is so much more, and no one I would rather see it with than you. I would go everywhere and anywhere with you, Jem Carstairs.
โ€
โ€
Cassandra Clare (Clockwork Princess (The Infernal Devices, #3))
โ€œ
I'm sorry. I didn't know you were coming or I'd have cleaned up a little more. My life, I mean, not just the apartment.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
But that's the glory of foreign travel, as far as I am concerned. I don't want to know what people are talking about. I can't think of anything that excites a greater sense of childlike wonder than to be in a country where you are ignorant of almost everything. Suddenly you are five years old again. You can't read anything, you have only the most rudimentary sense of how things work, you can't even reliably cross a street without endangering your life. Your whole existence becomes a series of interesting guesses.
โ€
โ€
Bill Bryson (Neither Here nor There: Travels in Europe)
โ€œ
Freedom is a heavy load, a great and strange burden for the spirit to undertake. It is not easy. It is not a gift given, but a choice made, and the choice may be a hard one. The road goes upward towards the light; but the laden traveler may never reach the end of it.
โ€
โ€
Ursula K. Le Guin (The Tombs of Atuan (Earthsea Cycle, #2))
โ€œ
Anger is like flowing water; there's nothing wrong with it as long as you let it flow. Hate is like stagnant water; anger that you denied yourself the freedom to feel, the freedom to flow; water that you gathered in one place and left to forget. Stagnant water becomes dirty, stinky, disease-ridden, poisonous, deadly; that is your hate. On flowing water travels little paper boats; paper boats of forgiveness. Allow yourself to feel anger, allow your waters to flow, along with all the paper boats of forgiveness. Be human.
โ€
โ€
C. JoyBell C.
โ€œ
I woke up as the sun was reddening; and that was the one distinct time in my life, the strangest moment of all, when I didn't know who I was - I was far away from home, haunted and tired with travel, in a cheap hotel room I'd never seen, hearing the hiss of steam outside, and the creak of the old wood of the hotel, and footsteps upstairs, and all the sad sounds, and I looked at the cracked high ceiling and really didn't know who I was for about fifteen strange seconds. I wasn't scared; I was just somebody else, some stranger, and my whole life was a haunted life, the life of a ghost.
โ€
โ€
Jack Kerouac (On the Road)
โ€œ
Some beautiful paths can't be discovered without getting lost.
โ€
โ€
Erol Ozan
โ€œ
We wanderers, ever seeking the lonelier way, begin no day where we have ended another day; and no sunrise finds us where sunset left us. Even while the earth sleeps we travel. We are the seeds of the tenacious plant, and it is in our ripeness and our fullness of heart that we are given to the wind and are scattered.
โ€
โ€
Kahlil Gibran (The Prophet)
โ€œ
I wanted someone to love who would stay: stay and be there, always.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
I wandered everywhere, through cities and countries wide. And everywhere I went, the world was on my side.
โ€
โ€
Roman Payne (Rooftop Soliloquy)
โ€œ
...there ain't no journey what don't change you some.
โ€
โ€
David Mitchell (Cloud Atlas)
โ€œ
you are a horse running alone and he tries to tame you compares you to an impossible highway to a burning house says you are blinding him that he could never leave you forget you want anything but you you dizzy him, you are unbearable every woman before or after you is doused in your name you fill his mouth his teeth ache with memory of taste his body just a long shadow seeking yours but you are always too intense frightening in the way you want him unashamed and sacrificial he tells you that no man can live up to the one who lives in your head and you tried to change didn't you? closed your mouth more tried to be softer prettier less volatile, less awake but even when sleeping you could feel him travelling away from you in his dreams so what did you want to do love split his head open? you can't make homes out of human beings someone should have already told you that and if he wants to leave then let him leave you are terrifying and strange and beautiful something not everyone knows how to love.
โ€
โ€
Warsan Shire
โ€œ
As my father always used to tell me, 'You see, son, there's always someone in the world worse off than you.' And I always used to think, 'So?
โ€
โ€
Bill Bryson (The Lost Continent: Travels in Small Town America)
โ€œ
People do not die for us immediately, but remain bathed in a sort of aura of life which bears no relation to true immortality but through which they continue to occupy our thoughts in the same way as when they were alive. It is as though they were traveling abroad.
โ€
โ€
Marcel Proust
โ€œ
Death and Famine and War and Pollution continued biking towards Tadfield. And Grievous Bodily Harm, Cruelty To Animals, Things Not Working Properly Even After You've Given Them A Good Thumping but secretly No Alcohol Lager, and Really Cool People travelled with them.
โ€
โ€
Neil Gaiman (Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch)
โ€œ
By hook or by crook, I hope that you will possess yourselves of money enough to travel and to idle, to contemplate the future or the past of the world, to dream over books and loiter at street corners and let the line of thought dip deep into the stream
โ€
โ€
Virginia Woolf
โ€œ
Being a mother is an attitude, not a biological relation.
โ€
โ€
Robert A. Heinlein (Have Space Suitโ€”Will Travel)
โ€œ
Girls aren't beautiful, they're pretty. Beautiful is too heavy a word to assign to a girl. Women are beautiful because their faces show that they know they have lost something and picked up something else.
โ€
โ€
Henry Rollins (Smile, You're Traveling: Black Coffee Blues Part 3)
โ€œ
Today is the tomorrow we worried about yesterday.
โ€
โ€
Ann Brashares (The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (Sisterhood, #1))
โ€œ
I go to sleep alone, and wake up alone. I take walks. I work until I'm tired. I watch the wind play with the trash that's been under the snow all winter. Everything seems simple until you think about it. Why is love intensified by abscence?
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
All men have stars, but they are not the same things for different people. For some, who are travelers, the stars are guides. For others they are no more than little lights in the sky. For others, who are scholars, they are problems... But all these stars are silent. You-You alone will have stars as no one else has them... In one of the stars I shall be living. In one of them I shall be laughing. And so it will be as if all the stars will be laughing when you look at the sky at night..You, only you, will have stars that can laugh! And when your sorrow is comforted (time soothes all sorrows) you will be content that you have known me... You will always be my friend. You will want to laugh with me. And you will sometimes open your window, so, for that pleasure... It will be as if, in place of the stars, I had given you a great number of little bells that knew how to laugh
โ€
โ€
Antoine de Saint-Exupรฉry (The Little Prince)
โ€œ
It is a long way to Ireland, Janet, and I am sorry to send my little friend on such weary travels: but if I can't do better, how is it to be helped? Are you anything akin to me, do you think, Jane?" I could risk no sort of answer by this time: my heart was still. "Because, he said, "I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you - especially when you are near me, as now: it is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame. And if that boisterous channel, and two hundred miles or so of land some broad between us, I am afraid that cord of communion will be snapt; and then I've a nervous notion I should take to bleeding inwardly. As for you, - you'd forget me.
โ€
โ€
Charlotte Brontรซ (Jane Eyre)
โ€œ
Think for a minute, darling: in fairy tales it's always the children who have the fine adventures. The mothers have to stay at home and wait for the children to fly in the window.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
When she awoke, the world was on fire.
โ€
โ€
Scott Westerfeld (Uglies (Uglies, #1))
โ€œ
People tend to think that happiness is a stroke of luck, something that will descend like fine weather if you're fortunate. But happiness is the result of personal effort. You fight for it, strive for it, insist upon it, and sometimes even travel around the world looking for it. You have to participate relentlessly.
โ€
โ€
Elizabeth Gilbert
โ€œ
Thereโ€™s something about arriving in new cities, wandering empty streets with no destination. I will never lose the love for the arriving, but I'm born to leave.
โ€
โ€
Charlotte Eriksson (Empty Roads & Broken Bottles: in search for The Great Perhaps)
โ€œ
Know that love is truly timeless.
โ€
โ€
Mary M. Ricksen
โ€œ
You tried to change didnโ€™t you? closed your mouth more tried to be softer prettier less volatile, less awake but even when sleeping you could feel him travelling away from you in his dreams so what did you want to do love split his head open? you canโ€™t make homes out of human beings someone should have already told you that and if he wants to leave then let him leave you are terrifying and strange and beautiful something not everyone knows how to love.
โ€
โ€
Warsan Shire
โ€œ
ุชุจุณู…ูƒ ููŠ ูˆุฌู‡ ุฃุฎูŠูƒ ุตุฏู‚ุฉุŒ ูˆุฃู…ุฑูƒ ุจุงู„ู…ุนุฑูˆู ุตุฏู‚ุฉ ูˆู†ู‡ูŠูƒ ุนู† ุงู„ู…ู†ูƒุฑ ุตุฏู‚ุฉุŒ ูˆุฅุฑุดุงุฏูƒ ุงู„ุฑุฌู„ ููŠ ุฃุฑุถ ุงู„ุถู„ุงู„ ู„ูƒ ุตุฏู‚ุฉุŒ ูˆู†ุตุฑูƒ ุงู„ุฑุฌู„ ุงู„ุฑุฏูŠุก ุงู„ุจุตุฑ ู„ูƒ ุตุฏู‚ุฉุŒ ูˆุฅู…ุงุทุชูƒ ุงู„ุญุฌุฑ ูˆุงู„ุดูˆูƒ ุงู„ุนุธู… ุนู† ุงู„ุทุฑูŠู‚ ู„ูƒ ุตุฏู‚ุฉ Smiling in your brotherโ€™s face is an act of charity. So is enjoining good and forbidding evil, giving directions to the lost traveller, aiding the blind and removing obstacles from the path. (Graded authentic by Ibn Hajar and al-Albani: Hidaayat-ur-Ruwaah, 2/293)
โ€
โ€
Anonymous
โ€œ
If you really want to escape the things that harass you, what youโ€™re needing is not to be in a different place but to be a different person.
โ€
โ€
Seneca (Letters from a Stoic)
โ€œ
Whatever you choose, however many roads you travel, I hope that you choose not to be a lady. I hope you will find some way to break the rules and make a little trouble out there. And I also hope that you will choose to make some of that trouble on behalf of women." [Commencement Address, Wellesley College, 1996]
โ€
โ€
Nora Ephron
โ€œ
Problem is (follow me closely here, the science is pretty complicated), if I cut a hole in the Hab, the air won't stay inside anymore.
โ€
โ€
Andy Weir (The Martian)
โ€œ
If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion, and avoid the people, you might better stay home.
โ€
โ€
James A. Michener
โ€œ
See the world. It's more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories. Ask for no guarantees, ask for no security.
โ€
โ€
Ray Bradbury (Fahrenheit 451)
โ€œ
Chaos is more freedom; in fact, total freedom. But no meaning. I want to be free to act, and I also want my actions to mean something.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
Reading changes your life. Reading unlocks worlds unknown or forgotten, taking travelers around the world and through time. Reading helps you escape the confines of school and pursue your own education. Through characters โ€“ the saints and the sinners, real or imagined โ€“ reading shows you how to be a better human being.
โ€
โ€
Donalyn Miller (The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child)
โ€œ
The journey itself is my home.
โ€
โ€
Matsuo Bashล
โ€œ
We may sit in our library and yet be in all quarters of the earth.
โ€
โ€
John Lubbock (The Pleasures of Life)
โ€œ
But is it such a bad thing to live like this for just a little while? Just for a few months of one's life, is it so awful to travel through time with no greater ambition than to find the next lovely meal? Or to learn how to speak a language for no higher purpose than that it pleases your ear to hear it? Or to nap in a garden, in a patch of sunlight, in the middle of the day, right next to your favourite fountain? And then to do it again the next day?
โ€
โ€
Elizabeth Gilbert (Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia)
โ€œ
But you make me happy. It's living up to being happy that's the difficult part.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
Cities were always like people, showing their varying personalities to the traveler. Depending on the city and on the traveler, there might begin a mutual love, or dislike, friendship, or enmity. Where one city will rise a certain individual to glory, it will destroy another who is not suited to its personality. Only through travel can we know where we belong or not, where we are loved and where we are rejected.
โ€
โ€
Roman Payne (Cities & Countries)
โ€œ
ร”, Sunlight! The most precious gold to be found on Earth.
โ€
โ€
Roman Payne
โ€œ
somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond any experience, your eyes have their silence: in your most frail gesture are things which enclose me, or which i cannot touch because they are too near your slightest look easily will unclose me though i have closed myself as fingers, you open always petal by petal myself as Spring opens (touching skilfully, mysteriously) her first rose or if your wish be to close me, i and my life will shut very beautifully, suddenly, as when the heart of this flower imagines the snow carefully everywhere descending; nothing which we are to perceive in this world equals the power of your intense fragility: whose texture compels me with the colour of its countries, rendering death and forever with each breathing (i do not know what it is about you that closes and opens; only something in me understands the voice of your eyes is deeper than all roses) nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands
โ€
โ€
E.E. Cummings (Selected Poems)
โ€œ
The real hero is always a hero by mistake; he dreams of being an honest coward like everybody else.
โ€
โ€
Umberto Eco (Travels in Hyperreality)
โ€œ
You may not remember the time you let me go first. Or the time you dropped back to tell me it wasn't that far to go. Or the time you waited at the crossroads for me to catch up. You may not remember any of those, but I do and this is what I have to say to you: Today, no matter what it takes, we ride home together.
โ€
โ€
Brian Andreas (Traveling Light: Stories & Drawings for a Quiet Mind)
โ€œ
Does this mean youโ€™re going to make love to me tonight, Christian?โ€ Holy shit. Did I just say that? His mouth drops open slightly, but he recovers quickly. โ€œNo, Anastasia it doesnโ€™t. Firstly, I donโ€™t make love. I fuckโ€ฆ hard. Secondly, thereโ€™s a lot more paperwork to do, and thirdly, you donโ€™t yet know what youโ€™re in for. You could still run for the hills. Come, I want to show you my playroom.โ€ My mouth drops open. Fuck hard! Holy shit, that sounds soโ€ฆ hot. But why are we looking at a playroom? I am mystified. โ€œYou want to play on your Xbox?โ€ I ask. He laughs, loudly. โ€œNo, Anastasia, no Xbox, no Playstation. Come.โ€โ€ฆ Producing a key from his pocket, he unlocks yet another door and takes a deep breath. โ€œYou can leave anytime. The helicopter is on stand-by to take you whenever you want to go, you can stay the night and go home in the morning. Itโ€™s fine whatever you decide.โ€ โ€œJust open the damn door, Christian.โ€ He opens the door and stands back to let me in. I gaze at him once more. I so want to know whatโ€™s in here. Taking a deep breath I walk in. And it feels like Iโ€™ve time-traveled back to the sixteenth century and the Spanish Inquisition. Holy fuck.
โ€
โ€
E.L. James (Fifty Shades of Grey (Fifty Shades, #1))
โ€œ
Do we really want to travel in hermetically sealed popemobiles through the rural provinces of France, Mexico and the Far East, eating only in Hard Rock Cafes and McDonalds? Or do we want to eat without fear, tearing into the local stew, the humble taqueria's mystery meat, the sincerely offered gift of a lightly grilled fish head? I know what I want. I want it all. I want to try everything once.
โ€
โ€
Anthony Bourdain (Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly)
โ€œ
I am suddenly comsumed by nostalgia for the little girl who was me, who loved the fields and believed in God, who spent winter days home sick from school reading Nancy Drew and sucking menthol cough drops, who could keep a secret.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
We travel, initially, to lose ourselves; and we travel, next to find ourselves. We travel to open our hearts and eyes and learn more about the world than our newspapers will accommodate. We travel to bring what little we can, in our ignorance and knowledge, to those parts of the globe whose riches are differently dispersed. And we travel, in essence, to become young fools again- to slow time down and get taken in, and fall in love once more.
โ€
โ€
Pico Iyer
โ€œ
Iz," Alec said tiredly. "It's not like it's one big bad thing. It's a lot of little invisible things. When Magnus and I were traveling, and I'd call from the road, Dad never asked how he was. When I get up to talk in Clave meetings, no one listens, and I don't know if that's because I'm young or if it's because of something else. I saw Mom talking to a friend about her grandchildren and the second I walked into the room they shut up. Irina Cartwright told me it was a pity no one would ever inherit my blue eyes now." He shrugged and looked toward Magnus, who took a hand off the wheel for a moment to place it on Alec's. "It's not like a stab wound you can protect me from. It's a million little paper cuts every day.
โ€
โ€
Cassandra Clare (City of Lost Souls (The Mortal Instruments, #5))
โ€œ
It was the pure Language of the World. It required no explanation, just as the universe needs none as it travels through endless time. What the boy felt at that moment was that he was in the presence of the only woman in his life, and that, with no need for words, she recognized the same thing. He was more certain of it than of anything in the world. He had been told by his parents and grandparents that he must fall in love and really know a person before becoming committed. But maybe people who felt that way had never learned the universal language. Because, when you know that language, it's easy to understand that someone in the world awaits you, whether it's in the middle of the desert or in some great city. And when two such people encounter each other, and their eyes meet, the past and the future become unimportant. There is only that moment, and the incredible certainty that everything under the sun has been written by one hand only. It is the hand that evokes love, and creates a twin soul for every person in the world. Without such love, one's dreams would have no meaning.
โ€
โ€
Paulo Coelho (The Alchemist)
โ€œ
You are still young, free.. Do yourself a favor. Before it's too late, without thinking too much about it first, pack a pillow and a blanket and see as much of the world as you can. You will not regret it. One day it will be too late.
โ€
โ€
Jhumpa Lahiri (The Namesake)
โ€œ
Sections in the bookstore - Books You Haven't Read - Books You Needn't Read - Books Made for Purposes Other Than Reading - Books Read Even Before You Open Them Since They Belong to the Category of Books Read Before Being Written - Books That If You Had More Than One Life You Would Certainly Also Read But Unfortunately Your Days Are Numbered - Books You Mean to Read But There Are Others You Must Read First - Books Too Expensive Now and You'll Wait 'Til They're Remaindered - Books ditto When They Come Out in Paperback - Books You Can Borrow from Somebody - Books That Everybody's Read So It's As If You Had Read Them, Too - Books You've Been Planning to Read for Ages - Books You've Been Hunting for Years Without Success - Books Dealing with Something You're Working on at the Moment - Books You Want to Own So They'll Be Handy Just in Case - Books You Could Put Aside Maybe to Read This Summer - Books You Need to Go with Other Books on Your Shelves - Books That Fill You with Sudden, Inexplicable Curiosity, Not Easily Justified - Books Read Long Ago Which It's Now Time to Re-read - Books You've Always Pretended to Have Read and Now It's Time to Sit Down and Really Read Them
โ€
โ€
Italo Calvino (If on a Winter's Night a Traveler)
โ€œ
I wish for a moment that time would lift me out of this day, and into some more benign one. But then I feel guilty for wanting to avoid the sadness; dead people need us to remember them, even if it eats us, even if all we can do is say "I'm sorry" until it is as meaningless air.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
I'm living under water. Everything seems slow and far away. I know there's a world up there, a sunlit quick world where time runs like dry sand through an hourglass, but down here, where I am, air and sound and time and feeling are thick and dense.
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
The Hero Path We have not even to risk the adventure alone for the heroes of all time have gone before us. The labyrinth is thoroughly known ... we have only to follow the thread of the hero path. And where we had thought to find an abomination we shall find a God. And where we had thought to slay another we shall slay ourselves. Where we had thought to travel outwards we shall come to the center of our own existence. And where we had thought to be alone we shall be with all the world.
โ€
โ€
Joseph Campbell
โ€œ
Ten little Indian boys went out to dine; One choked his little self and then there were nine. Nine little Indian boys sat up very late; One overslept himself and then there were eight. Eight little Indian boys travelling in Devon; One said he'd stay there and then there were seven. Seven little Indian boys chopping up sticks; One chopped himself in halves and then there were six. Six little Indian boys playing with a hive; A bumblebee stung one and then there were five. Five little Indian boys going in for law; One got in Chancery and then there were four. Four little Indian boys going out to sea; A red herring swallowed one and then there were three. Three little Indian boys walking in the Zoo; A big bear hugged one and then there were two. Two little Indian boys sitting in the sun; One got frizzled up and then there was one. One little Indian boy left all alone; He went and hanged himself and then there were none.
โ€
โ€
Agatha Christie (And Then There Were None)
โ€œ
If one wanted to depict the whole thing graphically, every episode, with its climax, would require a three-dimensional, or, rather, no model: every experience is unrepeatable. What makes lovemaking and reading resemble each other most is that within both of them times and spaces open, different from measurable time and space.
โ€
โ€
Italo Calvino (If on a Winter's Night a Traveler)
โ€œ
Long ago, men went to sea, and women waited for them, standing on the edge of the water, scanning the horizon for the tiny ship. Now I wait for Henry. He vanishes unwillingly, without warning. I wait for him. Each moment that I wait feels like a year, an eternity. Each moment is as slow and transparent as glass. Through each moment I can see infinite moments lined up, waiting. Why has he gone where I cannot follow?
โ€
โ€
Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler's Wife)
โ€œ
When the two people who thus discover that they are on the same secret road are of different sexes, the friendship which arises between them will very easily pass โ€“ may pass in the first half hour โ€“ into erotic love. Indeed, unless they are physically repulsive to each other or unless one or both already loves elsewhere, it is almost certain to do so sooner or later. And conversely, erotic love may lead to Friendship between the lovers. But this, so far from obliterating the distinction between the two loves, puts it in a clearer light. If one who was first, in the deep and full sense, your Friend, is then gradually or suddenly revealed as also your lover you will certainly not want to share the Belovedโ€™s erotic love with any third. But you will have no jealousy at all about sharing the Friendship. Nothing so enriches an erotic love as the discovery that the Beloved can deeply, truly and spontaneously enter into Friendship with the Friends you already had; to feel that not only are we two united by erotic love but we three or four or five are all travelers on the same quest, have all a common vision.
โ€
โ€
C.S. Lewis (The Four Loves)
โ€œ
Life is difficult. This is a great truth, one of the greatest truths. It is a great truth because once we truly see this truth, we transcend it. Once we truly know that life is difficult-once we truly understand and accept it-then life is no longer difficult. Because once it is accepted, the fact that life is difficult no longer matters.
โ€
โ€
M. Scott Peck (The Road Less Traveled: A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth)
โ€œ
It is a curious thing, but as one travels the world getting older and older, it appears that happiness is easier to get used to than despair. The second time you have a root beer float, for instance, your happiness at sipping the delicious concoction may not be quite as enormous as when you first had a root beer float, and the twelfth time your happiness may be still less enormous, until root beer floats begin to offer you very little happiness at all, because you have become used to the taste of vanilla ice cream and root beer mixed together. However, the second time you find a thumbtack in your root beer float, your despair is much greater than the first time, when you dismissed the thumbtack as a freak accident rather than part of the scheme of a soda jerk, a phrase which here means "ice cream shop employee who is trying to injure your tongue," and by the twelfth time you find a thumbtack, your despair is even greater still, until you can hardly utter the phrase "root beer float" without bursting into tears. It is almost as if happiness is an acquired taste, like coconut cordial or ceviche, to which you can eventually become accustomed, but despair is something surprising each time you encounter it.
โ€
โ€
Lemony Snicket (The End (A Series of Unfortunate Events, #13))
โ€œ
And so seated next to my father in the train compartment, I suddenly asked, "Father, what is sexsin?" He turned to look at me, as he always did when answering a question, but to my surprise he said nothing. At last he stood up, lifted his traveling case off the floor and set it on the floor. Will you carry it off the train, Corrie?" he said. I stood up and tugged at it. It was crammed with the watches and spare parts he had purchased that morning. It's too heavy," I said. Yes," he said, "and it would be a pretty poor father who would ask his little girl to carry such a load. It's the same way, Corrie, with knowledge. Some knowledge is too heavy for children. When you are older and stronger, you can bear it. For now you must trust me to carry it for you.
โ€
โ€
Corrie ten Boom (The Hiding Place: The Triumphant True Story of Corrie Ten Boom)
โ€œ
It's funny: I always imagined when I was a kid that adults had some kind of inner toolbox full of shiny tools: the saw of discernment, the hammer of wisdom, the sandpaper of patience. But then when I grew up I found that life handed you these rusty bent old tools - friendships, prayer, conscience, honesty - and said 'do the best you can with these, they will have to do'. And mostly, against all odds, they do.
โ€
โ€
Anne Lamott (Traveling Mercies: Some Thoughts on Faith)
โ€œ
He who becomes the slave of habit, who follows the same routes every day, who never changes pace, who does not risk and change the color of his clothes, who does not speak and does not experience, dies slowly. He or she who shuns passion, who prefers black on white, dotting ones "itโ€™s" rather than a bundle of emotions, the kind that make your eyes glimmer, that turn a yawn into a smile, that make the heart pound in the face of mistakes and feelings, dies slowly. He or she who does not turn things topsy-turvy, who is unhappy at work, who does not risk certainty for uncertainty, to thus follow a dream, those who do not forego sound advice at least once in their lives, die slowly. He who does not travel, who does not read, who does not listen to music, who does not find grace in himself, she who does not find grace in herself, dies slowly. He who slowly destroys his own self-esteem, who does not allow himself to be helped, who spends days on end complaining about his own bad luck, about the rain that never stops, dies slowly. He or she who abandon a project before starting it, who fail to ask questions on subjects he doesn't know, he or she who don't reply when they are asked something they do know, die slowly. Let's try and avoid death in small doses, reminding oneself that being alive requires an effort far greater than the simple fact of breathing. Only a burning patience will lead to the attainment of a splendid happiness.
โ€
โ€
Martha Medeiros
โ€œ
The art of losing isn't hard to master; so many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that their loss is no disaster. Lose something every day. Accept the fluster of lost door keys, the hour badly spent. The art of losing isn't hard to master. Then practice losing farther, losing faster: places, and names, and where it was you meant to travel. None of these will bring disaster. I lost my mother's watch. And look! my last, or next-to-last, of three loved houses went. The art of losing isn't hard to master. I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster, some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent. I miss them, but it wasn't a disaster. ---Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture I love) I shan't have lied. It's evident the art of losing's not too hard to master though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.
โ€
โ€
Elizabeth Bishop (One Art)
โ€œ
I placed my face so close to his that his features became indistict, and I began to lose myself in them. I stroked his hair, his skin, his brow, with my fingertips, tears sliding unchecked down my cheeks, my nose against his, and all the time he watched me silently, studying me intently as if he were storing each molecule of me away. He was already retreating withdrawing to somewhere I couldn't reach him. I kissed him, trying to bring him back. I kissed him and let my lips rest against his so that our breath mingled and the tears from my eyes became salt on his skin, and I told myself that, somewhere, tiny particles of him would become tiny particles of me, ingested, swallowed, alive perpetual. I wanted to press every bit of me against him. I wanted to will something into him. I wanted to give him every bit of life I felt and force him to life. I held him, Will Traynor ex-City whiz kid, ex-stunt diver, sportsman, traveller, lover. I held him close and said nothing, all the while telling him silently that he was loved. Oh, but he was loved.
โ€
โ€
Jojo Moyes (Me Before You (Me Before You, #1))
โ€œ
Kindness Before you know what kindness really is you must lose things, feel the future dissolve in a moment like salt in a weakened broth. What you held in your hand, what you counted and carefully saved, all this must go so you know how desolate the landscape can be between the regions of kindness. How you ride and ride thinking the bus will never stop, the passengers eating maize and chicken will stare out the window forever. Before you learn the tender gravity of kindness, you must travel where the Indian in a white poncho lies dead by the side of the road. You must see how this could be you, how he too was someone who journeyed through the night with plans and the simple breath that kept him alive. Before you know kindness as the deepest thing inside, you must know sorrow as the other deepest thing. You must wake up with sorrow. You must speak to it till your voice catches the thread of all sorrows and you see the size of the cloth. Then it is only kindness that makes sense anymore, only kindness that ties your shoes and sends you out into the day to mail letters and purchase bread, only kindness that raises its head from the crowd of the world to say It is I you have been looking for, and then goes with you everywhere like a shadow or a friend.
โ€
โ€
Naomi Shihab Nye (Words Under the Words: Selected Poems)
โ€œ
Ladies and gentlemen of the class of '97: Wear sunscreen. If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it. The long-term benefits of sunscreen have been proved by scientists, whereas the rest of my advice has no basis more reliable than my own meandering experience. I will dispense this advice now. Enjoy the power and beauty of your youth. Oh, never mind. You will not understand the power and beauty of your youth until they've faded. But trust me, in 20 years, you'll look back at photos of yourself and recall in a way you can't grasp now how much possibility lay before you and how fabulous you really looked. You are not as fat as you imagine. Don't worry about the future. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum. The real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, the kind that blindside you at 4 pm on some idle Tuesday. Do one thing everyday that scares you. Sing. Don't be reckless with other people's hearts. Don't put up with people who are reckless with yours. Floss. Don't waste your time on jealousy. Sometimes you're ahead, sometimes you're behind. The race is long and, in the end, it's only with yourself. Remember compliments you receive. Forget the insults. If you succeed in doing this, tell me how. Keep your old love letters. Throw away your old bank statements. Stretch. Don't feel guilty if you don't know what you want to do with your life. The most interesting people I know didn't know at 22 what they wanted to do with their lives. Some of the most interesting 40-year-olds I know still don't. Get plenty of calcium. Be kind to your knees. You'll miss them when they're gone. Maybe you'll marry, maybe you won't. Maybe you'll have children, maybe you won't. Maybe you'll divorce at 40, maybe you'll dance the funky chicken on your 75th wedding anniversary. Whatever you do, don't congratulate yourself too much, or berate yourself either. Your choices are half chance. So are everybody else's. Enjoy your body. Use it every way you can. Don't be afraid of it or of what other people think of it. It's the greatest instrument you'll ever own. Dance, even if you have nowhere to do it but your living room. Read the directions, even if you don't follow them. Do not read beauty magazines. They will only make you feel ugly. Get to know your parents. You never know when they'll be gone for good. Be nice to your siblings. They're your best link to your past and the people most likely to stick with you in the future. Understand that friends come and go, but with a precious few you should hold on. Work hard to bridge the gaps in geography and lifestyle, because the older you get, the more you need the people who knew you when you were young. Live in New York City once, but leave before it makes you hard. Live in Northern California once, but leave before it makes you soft. Travel. Accept certain inalienable truths: Prices will rise. Politicians will philander. You, too, will get old. And when you do, you'll fantasize that when you were young, prices were reasonable, politicians were noble, and children respected their elders. Respect your elders. Don't expect anyone else to support you. Maybe you have a trust fund. Maybe you'll have a wealthy spouse. But you never know when either one might run out. Don't mess too much with your hair or by the time you're 40 it will look 85. Be careful whose advice you buy, but be patient with those who supply it. Advice is a form of nostalgia. Dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the disposal, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it's worth. But trust me on the sunscreen.
โ€
โ€
Mary Schmich (Wear Sunscreen: A Primer for Real Life)
โ€œ
The centripetal force on our planet is still fearfully strong, Alyosha. I have a longing for life, and I go on living in spite of logic. Though I may not believe in the order of the universe, yet I love the sticky little leaves as they open in spring. I love the blue sky, I love some people, whom one loves you know sometimes without knowing why. I love some great deeds done by men, though Iโ€™ve long ceased perhaps to have faith in them, yet from old habit oneโ€™s heart prizes them. Here they have brought the soup for you, eat it, it will do you good. Itโ€™s first-rate soup, they know how to make it here. I want to travel in Europe, Alyosha, I shall set off from here. And yet I know that I am only going to a graveyard, but itโ€™s a most precious graveyard, thatโ€™s what it is! Precious are the dead that lie there, every stone over them speaks of such burning life in the past, of such passionate faith in their work, their truth, their struggle and their science, that I know I shall fall on the ground and kiss those stones and weep over them; though Iโ€™m convinced in my heart that itโ€™s long been nothing but a graveyard. And I shall not weep from despair, but simply because I shall be happy in my tears, I shall steep my soul in emotion. I love the sticky leaves in spring, the blue sky โ€” thatโ€™s all it is. Itโ€™s not a matter of intellect or logic, itโ€™s loving with oneโ€™s inside, with oneโ€™s stomach.
โ€
โ€
Fyodor Dostoevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there--on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.
โ€
โ€
Carl Sagan (Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space)
โ€œ
In the shop window you have promptly identified the cover with the title you were looking for. Following this visual trail, you have forced your way through the shop past the thick barricade of Books You Haven't Read, which are frowning at you from the tables and shelves, trying to cow you...And thus you pass the outer girdle of ramparts, but then you are attacked by the infantry of Books That If You Had More Than One Life You Would Certainly Also Read But Unfortunately Your Days Are Numbered. With a rapid maneuver you bypass them and move into the phalanxes of the Books You Mean To Read But There Are Others You Must Read First, the Books Too Expensive Now And You'll Wait Till They're Remaindered, the Books ditto When They Come Out in Paperback, Books You Can Borrow From Somebody, Books That Everybody's Read So It's As If You Had Read Them, Too.
โ€
โ€
Italo Calvino (If on a Winter's Night a Traveler)
โ€œ
Maybe happiness didn't have to be about the big, sweeping circumstances, about having everything in your life in place. Maybe it was about stringing together a bunch of small pleasures. Wearing slippers and watching the Miss Universe contest. Eating a brownie with vanilla ice cream. Getting to level seven in Dragon Master and knowing there were twenty more levels to go. Maybe happiness was just a matter of the little upticks- the traffic signal that said "Walk" the second you go there- and downticks- the itch tag at the back of your collar- that happened to every person in the course of the day. Maybe everybody had the same allotted measure of happiness within each day. maybe it didn't matter if you were a world-famous heartthrob or a painful geek. Maybe it didn't matter if your friend was possibly dying. Maybe you just got through it. Maybe that was all you could ask for.
โ€
โ€
Ann Brashares (The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (Sisterhood, #1))
โ€œ
Disappointment will come when your effort does not give you the expected return. If things donโ€™t go as planned or if you face failure. Failure is extremely difficult to handle, but those that do come out stronger. What did this failure teach me? is the question you will need to ask. You will feel miserable. You will want to quit, like I wanted to when nine publishers rejected my first book. Some IITians kill themselves over low grades โ€“ how silly is that? But that is how much failure can hurt you. But itโ€™s life. If challenges could always be overcome, they would cease to be a challenge. And remember โ€“ if you are failing at something, that means you are at your limit or potential. And thatโ€™s where you want to be. Disappointmentโ€™ s cousin is Frustration, the second storm. Have you ever been frustrated? It happens when things are stuck. This is especially relevant in India. From traffic jams to getting that job you deserve, sometimes things take so long that you donโ€™t know if you chose the right goal. After books, I set the goal of writing for Bollywood, as I thought they needed writers. I am called extremely lucky, but it took me five years to get close to a release. Frustration saps excitement, and turns your initial energy into something negative, making you a bitter person. How did I deal with it? A realistic assessment of the time involved โ€“ movies take a long time to make even though they are watched quickly, seeking a certain enjoyment in the process rather than the end result โ€“ at least I was learning how to write scripts, having a side plan โ€“ I had my third book to write and even something as simple as pleasurable distractions in your life โ€“ friends, food, travel can help you overcome it. Remember, nothing is to be taken seriously. Frustration is a sign somewhere, you took it too seriously.
โ€
โ€
Chetan Bhagat
โ€œ
Reading list (1972 edition)[edit] 1. Homer โ€“ Iliad, Odyssey 2. The Old Testament 3. Aeschylus โ€“ Tragedies 4. Sophocles โ€“ Tragedies 5. Herodotus โ€“ Histories 6. Euripides โ€“ Tragedies 7. Thucydides โ€“ History of the Peloponnesian War 8. Hippocrates โ€“ Medical Writings 9. Aristophanes โ€“ Comedies 10. Plato โ€“ Dialogues 11. Aristotle โ€“ Works 12. Epicurus โ€“ Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus 13. Euclid โ€“ Elements 14. Archimedes โ€“ Works 15. Apollonius of Perga โ€“ Conic Sections 16. Cicero โ€“ Works 17. Lucretius โ€“ On the Nature of Things 18. Virgil โ€“ Works 19. Horace โ€“ Works 20. Livy โ€“ History of Rome 21. Ovid โ€“ Works 22. Plutarch โ€“ Parallel Lives; Moralia 23. Tacitus โ€“ Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania 24. Nicomachus of Gerasa โ€“ Introduction to Arithmetic 25. Epictetus โ€“ Discourses; Encheiridion 26. Ptolemy โ€“ Almagest 27. Lucian โ€“ Works 28. Marcus Aurelius โ€“ Meditations 29. Galen โ€“ On the Natural Faculties 30. The New Testament 31. Plotinus โ€“ The Enneads 32. St. Augustine โ€“ On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine 33. The Song of Roland 34. The Nibelungenlied 35. The Saga of Burnt Njรกl 36. St. Thomas Aquinas โ€“ Summa Theologica 37. Dante Alighieri โ€“ The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy 38. Geoffrey Chaucer โ€“ Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales 39. Leonardo da Vinci โ€“ Notebooks 40. Niccolรฒ Machiavelli โ€“ The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy 41. Desiderius Erasmus โ€“ The Praise of Folly 42. Nicolaus Copernicus โ€“ On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres 43. Thomas More โ€“ Utopia 44. Martin Luther โ€“ Table Talk; Three Treatises 45. Franรงois Rabelais โ€“ Gargantua and Pantagruel 46. John Calvin โ€“ Institutes of the Christian Religion 47. Michel de Montaigne โ€“ Essays 48. William Gilbert โ€“ On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies 49. Miguel de Cervantes โ€“ Don Quixote 50. Edmund Spenser โ€“ Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene 51. Francis Bacon โ€“ Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis 52. William Shakespeare โ€“ Poetry and Plays 53. Galileo Galilei โ€“ Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences 54. Johannes Kepler โ€“ Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World 55. William Harvey โ€“ On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals 56. Thomas Hobbes โ€“ Leviathan 57. Renรฉ Descartes โ€“ Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy 58. John Milton โ€“ Works 59. Moliรจre โ€“ Comedies 60. Blaise Pascal โ€“ The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises 61. Christiaan Huygens โ€“ Treatise on Light 62. Benedict de Spinoza โ€“ Ethics 63. John Locke โ€“ Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education 64. Jean Baptiste Racine โ€“ Tragedies 65. Isaac Newton โ€“ Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics 66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz โ€“ Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology 67. Daniel Defoe โ€“ Robinson Crusoe 68. Jonathan Swift โ€“ A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal 69. William Congreve โ€“ The Way of the World 70. George Berkeley โ€“ Principles of Human Knowledge 71. Alexander Pope โ€“ Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man 72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu โ€“ Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws 73. Voltaire โ€“ Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary 74. Henry Fielding โ€“ Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones 75. Samuel Johnson โ€“ The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
โ€
โ€
Mortimer J. Adler (How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading)