Hausa Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Hausa. Here they are! All 18 of them:

Now I know that speaking good English is not the measure of intelligent mind and sharp brain. English is only a language, like Yoruba and Igbo and Hausa. Nothing about it is so special, nothing about it makes anybody have sense.
Abi Daré (The Girl with the Louding Voice)
Peace is not given,” Ngozi says in a voice as hard as the metal of an Igwe. “It is taken. For so long, they have visited violence upon us. It never starts with machetes. It starts with shutting the Igbo out of government. Then it becomes giving all the good jobs to the Hausa andthe Fulani and the Yoruba. Then we are accused of crimes we do not commit. Called animals. They say we infest this country. Then we become the reason the Sahara grows larger and more and more of Nigeria turns to desert. We are blamed for the drought. We are blamed for the radiation. Then we are thrown in jail. Then we are murdered.
Tochi Onyebuchi (War Girls (War Girls, #1))
Expressions to designate homosexuality exist in some fifty (Sub-Saharan) African languages - gor-jigeen in Wolof, ngochani in Shona, Hasini in Nandi, 'yan daudu in Hausa, mashoga ("passive" homosexual), mabasha ("virile" partner) in Kiswahili. [They refer] to ancestral practices in "traditional", that is pre-industrial, societies [...].
Chantal Zabus (Out in Africa: Same-Sex Desire in Sub-Saharan Literatures and Cultures)
We were the Fon, the Ibo, the Hausa, the Ashanti, the Mandinka, the Ewe, the Tiv, and the Ga. We were the Fante, the Fulani, the Ijaw, the Mende, the Wolof, the Yoruba, the BaKongo, and the Mbundu. We were the Serere, the Akan, the Bambara and the Bassa. And we were proud. We knew our ancestors by name. They
Daniel Black (The Coming)
The Igbo culture, being receptive to change, individualistic, and highly competitive, gave the Igbo man an unquestioned advantage over his compatriots in securing credentials for advancement in Nigerian colonial society. Unlike the Hausa/Fulani he was unhindered by a wary religion, and unlike the Yoruba he was unhampered by traditional hierarchies. This kind of creature, fearing no god or man, was custom-made to grasp the opportunities, such as they were, of the white man’s dispensations. And
Chinua Achebe (There Was a Country: A Memoir)
Ki yi a hankali - Be careful.
Fatima Bala
We are educated for whatever sake. For Nigeria to move forward, we must stop comparison and ignore religious views in dealing with sensitive issues that can make or mar our Country's existence. Evil, evil is evil, coming from either of the geopolitical regions. We were humans before we choose our religion.
Olawale Daniel
Out of 160 physicians in Nigeria in the early 1950s, 76 were Yorubas, 49 were Ibos and only one was Hausa-Fulani.
Thomas Sowell (Conquests and Cultures: An International History)
In preparation for market, medicine men concocted ceremonial baths of brewed plant roots laced with the powers of forgetting, to cleanse people of their old lives. Hausa traders made their captives eat a legume they called màntà uwa, forget mother, its toxins intended to steal the memories of everyone they loved. In the markets, mountains of cowrie shells, harvested by South Asian laborers in the Indian Ocean, were used to purchase and enslave West Africans on the Gold Coast. Their jagged little teeth an omen of how they sucked the blood of innocent people.
Tanaïs (In Sensorium: Notes for My People)
Every Religion says humanity can’t live, share, create and evolve meaningfully without their beliefs and creeds. I say it is a very big LIE. The foundation of the lie is religion saying humanity is nothing without their respective beliefs, doctrines, and creeds. This lie has disrupted the development of humans for so many years now, that is why humanity is yet to understand how powerful they are. We have tried developing religion; can we try developing HUMANITY? When we focus and what brings us together; Humanity and understand that we don’t have any problem with Hausa, Igbo, or Yoruba, then we see our diversity and differences become one of our greatest catalysts to growth. I ask again, can we still be humans? Your Humanity is enough and my humanity is enough. Let us embrace it to the fullest.
Chidi Ejeagba
La falsa familiaridad de tener la cultura “latina” en común la repelía, y socialmente —en la sociedad global de los escritores, a la que pertenecía, aunque fuera de manera forzosamente reacia e itinerante— no había nada peor que recalar en el grupo de los desclasados por su monolengua. Mona se sentía mucho más cómoda en compañía de otros idiomas, es decir, prefería vivir en traducción, acorde a sus gustos literarios, más interesada en la lírica de terror nipona o la poesía nigeriana en hausa que por la vida de los narcos ricos, los intelectuales ricos y los intelectuales que se hacían ricos escribiendo sobre los pobres en Miraflores, Buenos Aires, Ciudad de México o Santiago, que tanto aborrecía.
Pola Oloixarac (Mona (Spanish Edition))
If everything is preordained, then isn’t the choice we made that day part of our fate? Is free will not part of an already written script that we unknowingly act out even in our rebellion?
Fatima Bala (Hafsatu Bebi: A story about identity and loss)
French, a bit of Hausa; I’m pretty good with Arabic,” Sasha said. “Arabic?” Chichi said. “Really?” “My father taught me,” he said. “He’s in the military. He was stationed in Iraq for four years.” “Can you write in it?” Chichi asked. “Yep. Even better than I can speak it.” “Nice,” Chichi said.
Nnedi Okorafor (Akata Witch (The Nsibidi Scripts #1))
Hausa, Urdu, Yoruba, Arabic, Efik, German, Igbo, Egyptian hieroglyphs, Sanskrit, even one written in a language Chichi called Nsibidi. “Can you read N—
Nnedi Okorafor (Akata Witch (The Nsibidi Scripts #1))
there are plenty of Caucasians who have lips quite as thick and noses quite as broad as any of us. As a matter of fact there has been considerable exaggeration about the contrast between Caucasian and Negro features. The cartoonists and minstrel men have been responsible for it very largely. Some Negroes like the Somalis, Filanis, Egyptians, Hausas and Abyssinians have very thin lips and nostrils. So also have the Malagasys of Madagascar. Only in certain small sections of Africa do the Negroes possess extremely pendulous lips and very broad nostrils. On the other hand, many so-called Caucasians, particularly the Latins, Jews and South Irish, and frequently the most Nordic of peoples like the Swedes, show almost Negroid lips and noses. Black up some white folks and they could deceive a resident of Benin. Then when you consider that less than twenty per cent of our Negroes are without Caucasian ancestry and that close to thirty per cent have American Indian ancestry, it is readily seen that there cannot
George S. Schuyler (Black No More)
there are plenty of Caucasians who have lips quite as thick and noses quite as broad as any of us. As a matter of fact there has been considerable exaggeration about the contrast between Caucasian and Negro features. The cartoonists and minstrel men have been responsible for it very largely. Some Negroes like the Somalis, Filanis, Egyptians, Hausas and Abyssinians have very thin lips and nostrils. So also have the Malagasys of Madagascar. Only in certain small sections of Africa do the Negroes possess extremely pendulous lips and very broad nostrils. On the other hand, many so-called Caucasians, particularly the Latins, Jews and South Irish, and frequently the most Nordic of peoples like the Swedes, show almost Negroid lips and noses. Black up some white folks and they could deceive a resident of Benin. Then when you consider that less than twenty per cent of our Negroes are without Caucasian ancestry and that close to thirty per cent have American Indian ancestry, it is readily seen that there cannot be the wide difference in Caucasian and Afro-American facial characteristics that most people imagine.
George S. Schuyler (Black No More)
Tienen una energía desbordante, de veras, pero me temo que muy poca higiene». Le explicó que los hausas del norte eran gente muy digna, los igbos eran ariscos y amantes del dinero, y los yorubas eran sobre todo alegres aunque también muy aduladores. Los sábados por la noche, al mostrarle a las multitudes vestidas con prendas llamativas que bailaban frente a los toldos callejeros iluminados, le decía: «Ahí los tienes. Los yorubas se endeudan hasta la médula con tal de montar estas fiestas».
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Medio sol amarillo (Spanish Edition))
Dear Black Man (Poem) ***** I love you because you make me feel things that I have never felt before. You erase my pain and you bring me so much gain. You embrace me and hide me in your well built African and manly body. You make me want to never look at other bodies. I love how you cut your hair. I love to feel your love in the air. The texture of your hair, so beautiful, so artistic. Your beautiful smile, so amazing; it reminds me of hiding places. You walk like you own the world; at least, I assure you that you own mine and the rest of my words. Black Man, you are beautiful. Your skin tone is so dark, it makes me want to bark. Please allow me to run my hands on the hills of that skin. You are handsome, my amazing king. The way you speak your language. The way you speak your Xhosa. Your Hausa. Your Zulu. Your Kituba. Your Tswana. Your Lingala. Your Venda. Your Gadomba. Your Tsonga. Your Shona. Your Bateke. Your Ga. Your Sotho. Your Igbo. Your eyes. Black Man, your eyes tell me a story never heard before. You teach me; from your wisdom, I learn. From your strength, I know 'I can'. Black Man, they enslaved you because they found you intimidating. But today, they look for you to be their mate in dating. You look at my stretchmarks with an eye of an artist. You appreciate my big behind with no judgement. You kiss my big lips with love. And in my big thighs, you hide. You love me when I have no hair. You love me when I have fake hair. Black Man, I thought of you and I wrote to you. All hail the Black king! From your Black Woman, (with African curves) .
Mitta Xinindlu