Grade 8 Quotes

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You know, sometimes I'll go to an 8th-grade graduation and there's all that pomp and circumstance and gowns and flowers. And I think to myself, it's just 8th grade ... An 8th-grade education doesn't cut it today. Let's give them a handshake and tell them to get their butts back in the library!
Barack Obama
Henry shrugged. "I've kissed plenty of girls." "I'm not talking about your mom,dork.
Heather Brewer
Incidentally, I really agree with those who say that the capacity to forgive says something about the essential quality of a person. I'm the lowest grade.' 'I didn't mean to criticize you.' 'I promise to be better in my next life...
Jo Nesbø (Panserhjerte (Harry Hole, #8))
Five minutes of planning are worth fifteen minutes of just looking.
E.L. Konigsburg (Literature Guide: From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (Grades 4-8))
Flattery is as important a machine as the lever, isn't it, Saxonberg? Give it a proper place to rest, and it can move the world.
E.L. Konigsburg (Literature Guide: From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (Grades 4-8))
Baby, we have no choice of what colour we're born or who our parents are or whether we're rich or poor. What we do have is some choice over what we make of our lives once we're here.
Mildred D. Taylor (Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry (Literature Guide: Grades 4-8))
Both Jamie and Claudia had acquired a talent for being near but never part of a group. (Some people, Saxonberg, never learn to do that all their lives, and some learn it all too well.)
E.L. Konigsburg (Literature Guide: From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (Grades 4-8))
We have no choice of what color we are born or who our parents are or whether we are rich or poor. What we do have is some choice of what to do with our lives once we are here
Mildred D. Taylor (Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry (Literature Guide: Grades 4-8))
What the hell was it about e-mail that made everybody forget the stuff they learned in second grade, like capitalizing I and proper names, and using periods? Hello? We all learned how to do this less than five years out of diapers!
MaryJanice Davidson (Undead and Unwelcome (Undead, #8))
I have an 8th grade education. Of course, I also have a bachelor’s degree.
Jarod Kintz (This is the best book I've ever written, and it still sucks (This isn't really my best book))
...'I've never told you this, but when you were in your teens one of your teachers called us. He said you'd been fighting in the playground again. With two of the boys from the grade above, but this time it hadn't turned out so well--they'd had to send you to the hospital to have your lip sewn and a tooth taken out. I stopped your allowance, remember? Anyway, Øystein told me about the fight later. You flew at them because they'd filled Tresko's knapsack with water from the school fountain. If I remember correctly, you didn't even like Tresko much. Øystein said the reason you'd been hurt so badly was that you didn't give in. You got up time after time and in the end you were bleeding so much that the big boys became alarmed and went on their way.' Olav Hole laughed quietly. 'I didn't think I could tell you that at the time--it would only have been asking for more fights--but I was so proud I could have wept. You were brave, Harry. You were scared of the dark, but that didn't stop you going there.'...
Jo Nesbø (Panserhjerte (Harry Hole, #8))
If it had been football, Laconia would have had a world-class goalie and a couple of professional strikers against Naomi’s team of four hundred grade school children and three Donnager-class football hooligans.
James S.A. Corey (Tiamat's Wrath (The Expanse, #8))
Being isolated and alone and hurt day after day changes a person, Aden. It turns a child into . . . into a thing that isn’t quite human and not quite animal. Like any trapped creature, that child will gnaw off its own limb to escape—but if that child is a Gradient 9.8 combat-grade telepath named Zaira Neve, it’ll first ask if it can gnaw off its attackers’ limbs instead.
Nalini Singh (Shards of Hope (Psy-Changeling, #14))
Outside of note passing and the occasional tight-lipped kiss after school events, "going together" in seventh grade was pretty meaningless. You couldn't drive, had nowhere to go, and either weren't allowed or couldn't afford to do anything. I was kind of like being an old married couple, except you could control you bowels and stay awake past 8 p.m.
Eric Nuzum (Giving Up the Ghost: A Story About Friendship, 80s Rock, a Lost Scrap of Paper, and What It Means to Be Haunted)
Why can't we repeat 8th grace five times and call that a high school education?
Audrey Regan
8th-grade test scores. Kids in the richest quarter with low test scores are as likely to make it through college as kids in the poorest quarter with high scores (see chart).
Anonymous
It’s not even 8:00 a.m., and I’ve already had my trombone stolen. I fucking hate seventh grade.
Kenny Porpora (The Autumn Balloon)
Your explanation has been quite clear, thank you, Franz,’ Wing said, still frowning. ‘I just think that financial corruption on this scale may be a little more than I can get my head around.’ ‘Poor old ninja boy,’ Shelby said, smiling. ‘Knows twenty-seven ways to take you down with just his pinky, but can’t actually count to twenty-seven.’ ‘So this makes perfect sense to you, I suppose,’ Wing said, handing the sheet to Shelby. ‘Yeah, it’s easy,’ Shelby said, pointing out one area of the diagram. ‘See this piece here is just gobbledegook.’ Her finger moved to another area. ‘Whereas this section is premium-grade incomprehensible gibberish and this section,’ her finger moved again, ‘appears to be mostly in Greek.’ ‘Am I to take it that you have not studied for the test tomorrow at all then?’ Wing asked, raising an eyebrow. ‘Nope,’ Shelby said with a grin. ‘There’s going to be some good old-fashioned last-minute cramming later though. Either that or I’m going to just sit near my best bud Franz here and he’s going to write out all the answers in nice, b-i-i-i-i-g, easily legible letters. Right, bud?’ ‘This is being what I normally do,’ Franz said with a sigh, ‘isn’t it?
Mark Walden (Deadlock (H.I.V.E., #8))
The best part about wearing capes is the pin (well… unless someone puts a tracker in the pin). Most of the time, this is where we wear our family crest—but the Foxfire uniform uses the grade level’s mascot. And Team Valiant has special pins to represent the Prime Sources (because we’re fancy like that!).
Shannon Messenger (Unlocked (Keeper of the Lost Cities, #8.5))
Change the way you look at things, and the things you look at will change.
I got it from language arts teacher in 8th grade
Will has slipped on one of the cliff paths. He’s hanging onto a bush that could break at any moment.” “Oh no!” Mr Spencer exclaimed. “I’ll
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
Mr Spencer smile softened. “Well,
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
be cool to everyone, all the time, because everyone needs it even if it doesn’t seem like they do.
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
I guess it’s true what they say: it’s really hard to spot someone dressed in meat, slinking along a meat wall. —Sadia: The 8th Circle of Heck
Dale E. Basye
In dodge ball, the word for “hello” is “PONG!” along with a searing pain. I wouldn’t recommend visiting the land of dodge ball. Tis a silly place.
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
If we are developing students to be creative, flexible, independent learners, then we cannot scrub away opportunities for mistakes to be made and corrections to be learned. Often times we learn more from what did not go well and we have learned to fix.
Christopher Lehman (Energize Research Reading and Writing: Fresh Strategies to Spark Interest, Develop Independence, and Meet Key Common Core Standards, Grades 4-8)
Direct orders, Major,” he said. “One, terminate your interest in Vassell and Coomer. Forthwith, and immediately. Two, terminate your interest in General Kramer. We don’t want flags raised on that matter, not under the circumstances. Three, terminate Lieutenant Summer’s involvement in special unit affairs. Forthwith, and immediately. She’s a junior-grade MP and after reading her file as far as I’m concerned she always will be. Four, do not attempt to make further contact with the local civilians you injured. And five, do not attempt to identify the eyewitness against you in that matter.
Lee Child (The Enemy (Jack Reacher, #8))
In the case of a blindingly false allegation of rape against Duke lacrosse players, reporters pursued details about the accused men like starved bloodhounds. We were told the men’s grades, their classes, their professors’ impressions of them, the value of their parents’ homes, their private e-mails, their every encounter with the police—and on and on.8 But a child rapist named “Salvador Aleman Cruz” needs a Spanish translator in court and flees to Mexico after raping at least five little girls—and both the government and media say, Oh yeah, we don’t know his immigration status. Why do you ask?
Ann Coulter (¡Adios, America!: The Left's Plan to Turn Our Country into a Third World Hellhole)
I wish I had asked myself when I was younger. My path was so tracked that in my 8th-grade yearbook, one of my friends predicted— accurately— that four years later I would enter Stanford as a sophomore. And after a conventionally successful undergraduate career, I enrolled at Stanford Law School, where I competed even harder for the standard badges of success. The highest prize in a law student’s world is unambiguous: out of tens of thousands of graduates each year, only a few dozen get a Supreme Court clerkship. After clerking on a federal appeals court for a year, I was invited to interview for clerkships with Justices Kennedy and Scalia. My meetings with the Justices went well. I was so close to winning this last competition. If only I got the clerkship, I thought, I would be set for life. But I didn’t. At the time, I was devastated. In 2004, after I had built and sold PayPal, I ran into an old friend from law school who had helped me prepare my failed clerkship applications. We hadn’t spoken in nearly a decade. His first question wasn’t “How are you doing?” or “Can you believe it’s been so long?” Instead, he grinned and asked: “So, Peter, aren’t you glad you didn’t get that clerkship?” With the benefit of hindsight, we both knew that winning that ultimate competition would have changed my life for the worse. Had I actually clerked on the Supreme Court, I probably would have spent my entire career taking depositions or drafting other people’s business deals instead of creating anything new. It’s hard to say how much would be different, but the opportunity costs were enormous. All Rhodes Scholars had a great future in their past. the best paths are new and untried. will this business still be around a decade from now? business is like chess. Grandmaster José Raúl Capablanca put it well: to succeed, “you must study the endgame before everything else. The few who knew what might be learned, Foolish enough to put their whole heart on show, And reveal their feelings to the crowd below, Mankind has always crucified and burned. Above all, don’t overestimate your own power as an individual. Founders are important not because they are the only ones whose work has value, but rather because a great founder can bring out the best work from everybody at his company. That we need individual founders in all their peculiarity does not mean that we are called to worship Ayn Randian “prime movers” who claim to be independent of everybody around them. In this respect, Rand was a merely half-great writer: her villains were real, but her heroes were fake. There is no Galt’s Gulch. There is no secession from society. To believe yourself invested with divine self-sufficiency is not the mark of a strong individual, but of a person who has mistaken the crowd’s worship—or jeering—for the truth. The single greatest danger for a founder is to become so certain of his own myth that he loses his mind. But an equally insidious danger for every business is to lose all sense of myth and mistake disenchantment for wisdom.
Peter Thiel (Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future)
He was almost at his door when Vik’s earsplitting shriek resounded down the corridor. Tom was glad for the excuse to sprint back toward him. “Vik?” He reached Vik’s doorway as Vik was backing out of it. “Tom,” he breathed, “it’s an abomination.” Confused, Tom stepped past him into the bunk. Then he gawked, too. Instead of a standard trainee bunk of two small beds with drawers underneath them and totally bare walls, Vik’s bunk was virtually covered with images of their friend Wyatt Enslow. There were posters all over the wall with Wyatt’s solemn, oval face on them. She wore her customary scowl, her dark eyes tracking their every move through the bunk. There was a giant marble statue of a sad-looking Vik with a boot on top of its head. The Vik statue clutched two very, very tiny hands together in a gesture of supplication, its eyes trained upward on the unseen stomper, an inscription at its base, WHY, OH WHY, DID I CROSS WYATT ENSLOW? Tom began to laugh. “She didn’t do it to the bunk,” Vik insisted. “She must’ve done something to our processors.” That much was obvious. If Wyatt was good at anything, it was pulling off tricks with the neural processors, which could pretty much be manipulated to show them anything. This was some sort of illusion she was making them see, and Tom heartily approved. He stepped closer to the walls to admire some of the photos pinned there, freeze-frames of some of Vik’s more embarrassing moments at the Spire: that time Vik got a computer virus that convinced him he was a sheep, and he’d crawled around on his hands and knees chewing on plants in the arboretum. Another was Vik gaping in dismay as Wyatt won the war games. “My hands do not look like that.” Vik jabbed a finger at the statue and its abnormally tiny hands. Wyatt had relentlessly mocked Vik for having small, delicate hands ever since Tom had informed her it was the proper way to counter one of Vik’s nicknames for her, “Man Hands.” Vik had mostly abandoned that nickname for “Evil Wench,” and Tom suspected it was due to the delicate-hands gibe. Just then, Vik’s new roommate bustled into the bunk. He was a tall, slim guy with curly black hair and a pointy look to his face. Tom had seen him around, and he called up his profile from memory: NAME: Giuseppe Nichols RANK: USIF, Grade IV Middle, Alexander Division ORIGIN: New York, NY ACHIEVEMENTS: Runner-up, Van Cliburn International Piano Competition IP: 2053:db7:lj71::291:ll3:6e8 SECURITY STATUS: Top Secret LANDLOCK-4 Giuseppe must’ve been able to see the bunk template, too, because he stuttered to a stop, staring up at the statue. “Did you really program a giant statue of yourself into your bunk template? That’s so narcissistic.” Tom smothered his laughter. “Wow. He already has your number, man.” Vik shot him a look of death as Tom backed out of the bunk.
S.J. Kincaid
IF YOUR CHILD IS READY FOR FIRST GRADE: 1979 EDITION 1. Will your child be six years, six months or older when he begins first grade and starts receiving reading instruction? 2. Does your child have two to five permanent or second teeth? 3. Can your child tell, in such a way that his speech is understood by a school crossing guard or policeman, where he lives? 4. Can he draw and color and stay within the lines of the design being colored? 5. Can he stand on one foot with eyes closed for five to ten seconds? 6. Can he ride a small two-wheeled bicycle without helper wheels? 7. Can he tell left hand from right? 8. Can he travel alone in the neighborhood (four to eight blocks) to store, school, playground, or to a friend's home? 9. Can he be away from you all day without being upset? 10. Can he repeat an eight- to ten-word sentence, if you say it once, as "The boy ran all the way home from the store"? 11. Can he count eight to ten pennies correctly? 12. Does your child try to write or copy letters or numbers?
Greg Lukianoff & Jonathan Haidt (The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure)
(John 6:35). “If anyone is thirsty, let him come to me and drink. Whoever believes in me, as the Scripture has said, streams of living water will flow from within him” (John 7:37–38). “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life” (John 8:12). “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me will live, even though he dies; and whoever lives and believes in me will never die” (John 11:25–26). “You call me ‘Teacher’ and ‘Lord,’ and rightly so, for that is what I am” (John 13:13). Do you see a theme developing here? Either Jesus was the most self-centered, self-deluded person in history, or he was indeed the answer to every human’s prayers and the fulfillment of every hungry soul’s dreams. When you enter into a relationship with Jesus, you are not entering into a system that is maintained by your hard work, or one where you will be graded for your performance. You are not told to obey the rules, check off the boxes, or keep a running tally of your deeds. You’re simply invited to know him. Jesus
Will Davis Jr. (10 Things Jesus Never Said: And Why You Should Stop Believing Them)
I always wanted to be the prettiest person in a room', I began my story to Aaron and Wils, feeling desperate for their attention, like a runaway. Lee was prettier than me. She was a better girlfirend. 'Or I always wanted to look like other girls, someone else, not myself, there was always someone who looked better and more beautiful than me.' Aaron took a swing of rum. 'I think you're the most beautiful girl I've ever seen,' he said. 'Once in Grade 8, listen to this, you guys: I slapped my best friend Jen accross the face. She was the most popular, most good-looking girl in the school. I slapped her because she was laughing hysterically. She'd started laughing so hard at her own story about some guy, I don't even remember what the story was, and her laughs became yaps, like hysterical air-swallowing. I just wanted her to shut up so badly that I slapped her. Her ponytail swung from side to side but even that didn't stop her yapping for a second. You get what happened? I mean, right after I smacked her? She started really laughinh after I slapped her cheek. My slapping had actually made things worse. I mean, she couldn't stop that terrible laughing-crying-yapping for another ten minutes!' Wils was smiling at my story but Aaron was grim. 'It felt good to slap her', I said. 'To slap the most beautiful girl to attempt to stop her self-destruction...
Tamara Faith Berger (Maidenhead)
What is ADHD, anyway? For those still wondering what ADHD is, here’s the briefest summary I can muster: ADHD shows up in two areas of our brain function: working memory and executive functioning.[7] Working memory allows us to hold more than one thing in our brains at once. If you’ve ever run up the stairs, only to find yourself standing in your bedroom wondering what you came for, you’ve experienced a failure of working memory. Again, everyone experiences this from time to time. People with ADHD experience it nonstop, to the point where it impairs our ability to function normally. Working memory holds onto information until we’re able to use it.[8] In addition to forgetting why we opened the refrigerator, having a leaky working memory means we lose information before our brains can move it to long-term storage. We forget a lot of things before we have a chance to act on them or write them down. Our executive functions, on the other hand, give us the power to delay gratification, strategize, plan ahead, and identify and respond to others’ feelings.[9] That’s some list, isn’t it? In the same way a diabetic’s body cannot effectively regulate insulin, imagine your brain being unable to control these behaviors. This explains why ADHDers’ behavior so often defies norms and expectations for their age group — and this persists throughout their lifespan, not just grade school. ADHD isn’t a gift. It isn’t a sign of creativity or intelligence, nor is it a simple character flaw. And it’s more than eccentric distractibility, forgetfulness, and impulsivity. ADHD is a far-reaching disorder that touches every aspect of our lives. If we leave it unchecked, it will generate chaos at home, at work, and everywhere in between.
Jaclyn Paul (Order from Chaos: The Everyday Grind of Staying Organized with Adult ADHD)
THE SK8 MAKER VS. GLOBAL INDUSTRIALIZATION This new era of global industrialization is where my personal analogy with the history of the skateboard maker diverges. It’s no longer cost-effective to run a small skateboard company in the U.S., and the handful of startups that pull it off are few and far between. The mega manufacturers who can churn out millions of decks at low cost and record speed each year in Chinese factories employ proprietary equipment and techniques that you and I can barely imagine. Drills that can cut all eight truck holes in a stack of skateboard decks in a single pull. CNC machinery to create CAD-perfect molds used by giant two-sided hydraulic presses that can press dozens of boards in a few hours. Computer-operated cutting bits that can stamp out a deck to within 1⁄64 in. of its specified shape. And industrial grade machines that apply multicolored heat-transfer graphics in minutes. In a way, this factory automation has propelled skateboarding to become a multinational, multi-billion dollar industry. The best skateboarders require this level of precision in each deck. Otherwise, they could end up on their tails after a failed trick. Or much worse. As the commercial deck relies more and more on a process that is out of reach for mere mortals, there is great value in the handmade and one of a kind. Making things from scratch is a dying art on the brink of extinction. It was pushed to the edge when public schools dismissed woodworking classes and turned the school woodshop into a computer lab. And when you separate society from how things are made—even a skateboard—you lose touch with the labor and the materials and processes that contributed to its existence in the first place. It’s not long before you take for granted the value of an object. The result is a world where cheap labor produces cheap goods consumed by careless customers who don’t even value the things they own.
Matt Berger (The Handmade Skateboard: Design & Build a Custom Longboard, Cruiser, or Street Deck from Scratch)
There is no fault that can’t be corrected [in natural wine] with one powder or another; no feature that can’t be engineered from a bottle, box, or bag. Wine too tannic? Fine it with Ovo-Pure (powdered egg whites), isinglass (granulate from fish bladders), gelatin (often derived from cow bones and pigskins), or if it’s a white, strip out pesky proteins that cause haziness with Puri-Bent (bentonite clay, the ingredient in kitty litter). Not tannic enough? Replace $1,000 barrels with a bag of oak chips (small wood nuggets toasted for flavor), “tank planks” (long oak staves), oak dust (what it sounds like), or a few drops of liquid oak tannin (pick between “mocha” and “vanilla”). Or simulate the texture of barrel-aged wines with powdered tannin, then double what you charge. (““Typically, the $8 to $12 bottle can be brought up to $15 to $20 per bottle because it gives you more of a barrel quality. . . . You’re dressing it up,” a sales rep explained.) Wine too thin? Build fullness in the mouth with gum arabic (an ingredient also found in frosting and watercolor paint). Too frothy? Add a few drops of antifoaming agent (food-grade silicone oil). Cut acidity with potassium carbonate (a white salt) or calcium carbonate (chalk). Crank it up again with a bag of tartaric acid (aka cream of tartar). Increase alcohol by mixing the pressed grape must with sugary grape concentrate, or just add sugar. Decrease alcohol with ConeTech’s spinning cone, or Vinovation’s reverse-osmosis machine, or water. Fake an aged Bordeaux with Lesaffre’s yeast and yeast derivative. Boost “fresh butter” and “honey” aromas by ordering the CY3079 designer yeast from a catalog, or go for “cherry-cola” with the Rhône 2226. Or just ask the “Yeast Whisperer,” a man with thick sideburns at the Lallemand stand, for the best yeast to meet your “stylistic goals.” (For a Sauvignon Blanc with citrus aromas, use the Uvaferm SVG. For pear and melon, do Lalvin Ba11. For passion fruit, add Vitilevure Elixir.) Kill off microbes with Velcorin (just be careful, because it’s toxic). And preserve the whole thing with sulfur dioxide. When it’s all over, if you still don’t like the wine, just add a few drops of Mega Purple—thick grape-juice concentrate that’s been called a “magical potion.” It can plump up a wine, make it sweeter on the finish, add richer color, cover up greenness, mask the horsey stink of Brett, and make fruit flavors pop. No one will admit to using it, but it ends up in an estimated 25 million bottles of red each year. “Virtually everyone is using it,” the president of a Monterey County winery confided to Wines and Vines magazine. “In just about every wine up to $20 a bottle anyway, but maybe not as much over that.
Bianca Bosker (Cork Dork: A Wine-Fueled Adventure Among the Obsessive Sommeliers, Big Bottle Hunters, and Rogue Scientists Who Taught Me to Live for Taste)
As a sexually active teen in a Catholic family, I was given no sex information other than the nun who advised our 8th grade class to “think of a hamburger when you have impure thoughts.
Heather Corinna (S.E.X.: The All-You-Need-To-Know Progressive Sexuality Guide to Get You Through High School and College)
Oh, that’s right,” I said aloud, remembering that I was at school, and my
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
up!” I called out.
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
novels [4]. It follows that authentic text—text written for native speakers—is inappropriate for unassisted ER by all but the most advanced learners. For this reason, many educators advocate the use of learner literature, that is, stories written specifically for L2 learners, or adapted from authentic text [5]. For learners of English, there are over 40 graded reader series, consisting of over 1650 books with a variety of difficulty levels and genres [6].However, the time and expense in producing graded readers results in high purchase costs and limited availability in languages other than English and common L2‘s like Spanish and French. At a cost of £2.50 for a short English reader in 2001 [7] purchasing several thousand readers to cater for a school wide ER program requires a significant monetary investment. More affordable options are required, especially for schools in developing nations. Day and Bamford [8] recommend several alternatives when learner literature is not available. These include children's and young adult books, stories written by learners, newspapers, magazines and comic books. Some educators advocate the use of authentic texts in preference to simplified texts. Berardo [9] claims that the language in learner literature is ―artificial and unvaried‖, ―unlike anything that the learner will encounter in the real world‖ and often ―do not reflect how the language is really used‖. Berardo does concede that simplified texts are ―useful for preparing learners for reading 'real' texts. ‖ 2. ASSISTED READING Due to the large proportion of unknown vocabulary, beginner and intermediate learners require assistance when using authentic text for ER. Two popular forms of assistance are dictionaries and glossing. There are pros and cons of each approach. 1 A group of words that share the same root word, e.g. , run, ran, runner, runs, running. Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. To copy otherwise, or republish, to post on servers or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee.NZCSRSC’11, April 18-21, 2011, Palmerston North, New Zealand
Anonymous
Are you alright?” Faith asked, looking at the death grip I had on the ball. “Yeah, dude,” Brayden joked. “What’d that ball ever do to you?
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
still have to pay for what I did, and I’ll happily do it. I’ll probably get detention or even suspended because of cheating,
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
Impersonal: Hot stove treats all alike. It does not show any favouritism or spare anybody.Similarly, the disciplinary authority should treat all employees alike without any discrimination.[You may feel that past good conduct of the delinquent employee is taken into account while deciding the quantum of penalty. This is not in contravention of the rule of impersonal approach. Even past conduct has to be taken into account in respect of all the employees, without discrimination. ] � Immediate action: Just as the hot stove burns the fingers of those who touch it without any time lag, the disciplinary authority is also expected to impose penalty without delay. This will make the delinquent employee link the misconduct to the penalty; besides it also sends a message that misconduct will be appropriately dealt with.[The rule is attributed to Douglas McGregor who is better known for his ‘X’ and ‘Y’ theories of Management] 7. How to find out who is the Disciplinary Authority? Firstly, it must be remembered that the Disciplinary authority is determined with reference to the employee proceeded against. Schedule to the Rules 1965 lay down the details of the disciplinary authorities in respect of various grade of employees in different services in the Government. The President, the Appointing Authority, the Authority specified in the Schedule ot the Rules (to the extent specified therein) or by any other authority empowered in this behalf by any general or special order of the President may impose any fo the Penalties specified in Rule 11. Appointing Authority as mentioned in the Schedule must be understood with reference to rule2 (a) of the Rules. The question as to who is the appropriate disciplinary authority must be raised and answered not only while issuing charge sheet but also at the time of imposing penalty because there might have been some change in the situation due to delegation of powers, etc. in the organization.8. What are the functions of the Disciplinary Authority? Disciplinary authority is required to discharge the following functions: (a) Examination of the complaints received against the employees (b) Deciding as to who is to be appointed as the investigating authority 5
Anonymous
While we sat at the bar, Dave told me the most important advice about talking to women I had ever received, and that was to be as relaxed as possible and not fear rejection. Dave then began hooking up with some girl who looked like a hybrid of Rosie O’Donnell and Miss Piggy, leaving me alone to ponder his words.” “When I was in 8th grade, there was this girl named Sandra who I used to ride the school bus with. Sandra was about 5’2, 120 lbs, and looked like the Hamburglar. She was the prettiest girl in my class.” “In my mind I was the life of the party and felt as though I could do no wrong when it came to interacting with the opposite sex. That was until Marissa caught me red handed hooking up with some girl who looked like a combination of John Madden and Andre the Giant, tapping me on the shoulder and kicking me square in the nuts.” “I was starting to feel bad about how I treated women. Oh wait, no I wasn’t. The girls at Binghamton were nothing more than a bunch of dumb sluts that just wanted to get drunk and suck dick, and besides, they were all going to make a lot more money than me in the future. So I may as well catch brains while these bitches were dumb enough to blow me.” “Out of all the people I could’ve stumbled into blackout drunk, why did it have to be THE MOOSE? As son as she saw me her 300 lb frame waddled over, and she jammed her tongue down my throat, devouring me as though I were a Big Mac. This was embarrassing. Here I was making out with some girl who looked like Eric Cartman in a dress, and everybody was watching. My life was effectively over.” “After annihilating Ruben’s toilet, I looked over my shoulder for some much-needed toilet paper, when to my shock and dismay there was not a single sheet of paper in sight. There’s no way in hell I was rejoining the party covered in poop and I would have wiped my ass with anything. That’s when I noticed his New York Yankees bath towel.” “I spent the rest of my week off getting completely shitfaced with Chris, and that’s when I realized I might be developing a drinking problem. At Bar None, hooking up with some girl who looked like the Loch Ness Monster; this shit had to stop. Alcohol was turning me into a drunken mess, and I vowed right then and there to quit drinking and start smoking more weed immediately.” “I got a new roommate. His name was Erick and he was an ex-marine. Erick and I didn’t know each other, but he knew Kevin, and he also knew that I didn’t shower and that last semester I left a used condom on the floor for two weeks without throwing it away. Eric therefore did not want to live with me.” “Believe it or not, I got another job working with the disabled. See, Manny was nice enough to hook me up with a position as a job coach at the Lavelle School for the Blind. The kid’s name was Fred and he was blind with cerebral palsy. Fred loved dogs and I loved smoking week. Bad combination, and I was fired with 3 days left in the program after allowing Fred to run across the street into oncoming traffic, because I had smoked a bowl an hour earlier. Manny and I never spoke again.” “My life was a dream and a nightmare rolled into one. Here I was living this carefree existence, getting drunk, boning bitches, and playing Sega Genesis in between. Oh wait, what am I talking about? My life was awesome. It’s the rest of my life that’s going to suck.
Alexander Strenger
on Tuesdays and Thursdays, I thought it’d be nice to provide a light breakfast – y’know,
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
Fluffy Pancakes Makes: 12 pancakes Ingredients: ●           3/4 cup blanched almond flour ●           1/4 cup coconut flour ●           1/4 Tbsp baking soda ●           1/2 tsp cream of tartar ●           1/8 tsp sea salt ●           Palm shortening ●           3 large eggs ●           1/2 cup almond milk or full fat coconut milk ●           1/8 cup coconut oil ●           1/8 cup honey or coconut crystals ●           1/2 tsp vanilla extract   Instructions: Combine together the flours, baking soda, cream of tartar, and sea salt in a bowl. In another bowl, beat the eggs, then whisk in the milk, flour mixture, oil, honey or coconut crystals, and vanilla extract. Blend until smooth. Place a cast iron skillet or griddle over medium flame and grease with palm shortening. Pour 1/4 cup of batter into the hot skillet and cook for a minute on one side, or until bubbles start to form. Turn over and cook for another minute. Cook all pancakes, then serve with honey or grade B maple syrup.
Marie Richler (Grain Free: Top 45 Grain Free Recipes Including Dessert Recipes, Baked Goods, And Main Dishes-Eating Healthy Can Be Fun, Taste Delicious, And Be Disguised ... Grain Free Desserts, Grain Free Cookbook))
  A wedge of wild geese flew South across the moon over Beaver Crossing,
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
learners receiving intensive ESL instruction for five hours every day for five months of one school year (in Grade 5 or 6) were compared to learners at the end of secondary school who had received the same total amount of instruction spread over 7–8 years of schooling. On a number of measures, the students who received the intensive instruction performed as well as or better than those whose instruction was delivered in what has been called a ‘drip feed’ approach (Lightbown and Spada 1994). In subsequent research, comparisons were made between groups of Grade 5 and 6 students who participated in intensive English language instruction during a single school year, but with the time distributed differently: some students received five hours of English a day for five months; others received the same total number of hours, doing two and a half hours of English each day for 10 months. The researchers found that both groups benefited from the overall increase in hours of instruction with some additional advantages for learners receiving the more intensive instruction (Collins et al. 1999; Collins and White 2011). The advantages were evident not only in superior language abilities but also in attitudes toward the language and satisfaction with language learning experiences. Similar findings have been reported for different models of intensive and core French programmes (Netten and Germain 2004; Lapkin, Hart, and Harley 1998).
Patsy M. Lightbown (How Languages are Learned)
I got a puncture in my tire, so it took longer than I expected,” Will explained. “By
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
Will frowned as he saw some marks on the sound. “It
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
That doesn’t make him not a crook,” Amy
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
Amy pointed to the shed. “The dogs attacked me. Fortunately for me they were tied up.
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
The opening was not much bigger around than a car tire.
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
1. Get a Story. If you don’t have a story, create one. Use the past, present, or future.  For example, if you could travel anywhere tomorrow where would you go?   2. Enjoy Your Story. Love it. If you don’t love it, then the listener won’t. Have fun with your story.   3. Add Emotion. Visualize…   4. Add Pauses. This heightens the tension and gives the audience time to listen, laugh, and/or respond, and adds suspense.   5. Use Body Language. You know it–your body often says more than your words, so use it!   6.  Use Your 5 Senses to Amplify the Story. How did it feel when you were looking at that crystal clear water?  What sounds were around you? The 5 senses bring the story to life!   7. Characterization. Bring your characters to life–what personality traits did they have?   8. Know the Audience. Are you talking to a bunch of children in grade school or are you talking to a stranger you just met in a bar? Relate to your audience.   9. Make Sure There is a Point to Your Story. Enough said! What is the bottom line?   10. Write Your Story and Cut It in Half. We’re all busy, so KISS–“Keep It Short and Simple
Matt Morris (Do Talk To Strangers: A Creative, Sexy, and Fun Way To Have Emotionally Stimulating Conversations With Anyone)
meanies are
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
When I was on the boat, the radio man contacted someone, and when I heard the person reply, they spoke with a thick cockney accent. And, as I had only come in contact with one person who had this kind of accent, I straight away thought of the sergeant.
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
Not getting a response from Will, he glanced around and got a shock. Will wasn’t there!
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
That’s when he saw it. Halfway down the path, a dark shape lay against the rocks. He knew that whatever it was, it couldn’t have been there when he and Will had come up earlier. He raised the binoculars to his eyes. He stiffened as he realised it was a person. As he took a closer look, he realised that the motionless figure was Will.
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
He let out a gasp of relief as Will slowly turned around and put a finger to his lips, motioning for him to be quiet. Wondering
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
Let’s you and
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
problem with age and grade equivalent scores is that instruments will vary in the scoring. One publisher’s test could give a child a sixth grade, eighth month score (6.8), and another publisher’s instrument could result in a score of 7.1. Although the two scores may be related to small differences between the instruments, consumers of the scores may have very different interpretations of scores that are really not all that discrepant. Another problem with age or grade equivalent scores is that teachers or administrators may expect all students to perform at or above their respective age or grade level. For example, teachers have been reprimanded because students have had scores below grade level. These misconceptions fail to take into account that the instruments are norm-referenced; thus, the expectations are that 50% of the students will fall above the appropriate age or grade score and 50% will fall below this score. Therefore, in most classrooms, expecting all students to fall above the mean is unrealistic as well as inappropriate given norm-referenced testing. 36 Section I Principles of Assessment Copyright 2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial
Susan C. Whiston (Principles and Applications of Assessment in Counseling)
keep a straight face. “Fibber!” Sarah
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
The school gave me a test. I scored very high on some parts and very low on others. They said that made me Dyslexic and it couldn’t be fixed. That was in 8th grade. I was already devastated emotionally because I was being molested by a “priest. I just gave up.” —
Yvonna Graham (Dyslexia Tool Kit for Tutors and Parents: What to do when phonics isn't enough)
Fire (The Book of Fire Trilogy 1)
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
My path was so tracked that in my 8th-grade yearbook, one of my friends predicted—accurately—that four years later I would enter Stanford as a sophomore. And after a conventionally successful undergraduate career, I enrolled at Stanford Law School, where I competed even harder for the standard badges of success. The highest prize in a law student’s world is unambiguous: out of tens of thousands of graduates each year, only a few dozen get a Supreme Court clerkship. After clerking on a federal appeals court for a year, I was invited to interview for clerkships with Justices Kennedy and Scalia. My meetings with the Justices went well. I was so close to winning this last competition. If only I got the clerkship, I thought, I would be set for life. But I didn’t. At the time, I was devastated. In 2004, after I had built and sold PayPal, I ran into an old friend from law school who had helped me prepare my failed clerkship applications. We hadn’t spoken in nearly a decade. His first question wasn’t “How are you doing?” or “Can you believe it’s been so long?” Instead, he grinned and asked: “So, Peter, aren’t you glad you didn’t get that clerkship?” With the benefit of hindsight, we both knew that winning that ultimate competition would have changed my life for the worse. Had I actually clerked on the Supreme Court, I probably would have spent my entire career taking depositions or drafting other people’s business deals instead of creating anything new. It’s hard to say how much would be different, but the opportunity costs were enormous. All Rhodes Scholars had a great future in their past.
Peter Thiel (Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future)
Principal
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
The joy comes when there is a challenge, but one we can master.
Bernard J. Nebel (Building Foundations of Scientific Understanding: A Science Curriculum for K-8 and Older Beginning Science Learners, Vol. I, Grades K-2)
A bunch of incompetents no other secret society would touch with a ten-foot Sceptre of Authority. The sort to dislocate their fingers with even the simplest secret handshake. But incompetents with possibilities, nevertheless. Let the other societies take the skilled, the hopefuls, the ambitious, the self-confident. He’d take the whining resentful ones, the ones with a bellyful of spite and bile, the ones who knew they could make it big if only they’d been given the chance. Give him the ones in which the floods of venom and vindictiveness were dammed up behind thin walls of ineptitude and low-grade paranoia. And stupidity, too. They’ve all sworn the oath, he thought, but not a man jack of ’em has even asked what a figgin is.
Terry Pratchett (Guards! Guards! (Discworld, #8))
The Banach-Tarski Theorem is an astonishing result. We have decomposed a ball into finitely many pieces, moved around the pieces without changing their size or shape, and then reassembled them into two balls of the same size as the original. I think the theorem teaches us something important about the notion of volume. As noted earlier, it is an immediate consequence of the theorem that some of the Banach-Tarski pieces must lack definite volumes and, therefore, that not every subset of the unit ball can have a well-defined volume. A little more precisely, the theorem teaches us that there is no way of assigning volumes to the Banach-Tarski pieces while preserving three-dimensional versions of the principles we called Uniformity and (finite) Additivity in chapter 7. (Proof: Suppose that each of the (finitely many) Banach-Tarski pieces has a definite finite volume. Since the pieces are disjoint, and since their union is the original ball, Additivity entails that the sum of the volumes of the pieces must equal the volume of the original ball. But Uniformity ensures that the volume of each piece is unchanged as we move it around. Since the reassembled pieces are disjoint, and since their union is two balls, Additivity entails that the sum of their volumes must be twice the volume of the original ball. But since the volume of the original ball is finite and greater than zero, it is impossible for the sum of the pieces to equal both the volume of the original ball and twice the volume of the original ball.) If I were to assign the Banach-Tarski Theorem a paradoxicality grade of the kind we used in chapter 3, I would assign it an 8. The theorem teaches us that although the notion of volume is well-behaved when we focus on ordinary objects, there are limits to how far it can be extended when we consider certain extraordinary objects - objects that can only be shown to exist by assuming the Axiom of Choice.
Agustín Rayo (On the Brink of Paradox: Highlights from the Intersection of Philosophy and Mathematics (Mit Press))
High-yield bonds—which Graham calls “second-grade” or “lower-grade” and today are called “junk bonds”—get a brisk thumbs-down from Graham. In his day, it was too costly and cumbersome for an individual investor to diversify away the risks of default.;1 (To learn how bad a default can be, and how carelessly even “sophisticated” professional bond investors can buy into one, see the sidebar on p. 146.) Today, however, more than 130 mutual funds specialize in junk bonds. These funds buy junk by the cartload; they hold dozens of different bonds. That mitigates Graham’s complaints about the difficulty of diversifying. (However, his bias against high-yield preferred stock remains valid, since there remains no cheap and widely available way to spread their risks.) Since 1978, an annual average of 4.4% of the junk-bond market has gone into default—but, even after those defaults, junk bonds have still produced an annualized return of 10.5%, versus 8.6% for 10-year U.S. Treasury bonds.2 Unfortunately, most junk-bond funds charge high fees and do a poor job of preserving the original principal amount of your investment. A junk fund could be appropriate if you are retired, are looking for extra monthly income to supplement your pension, and can tolerate temporary tumbles in value. If you work at a bank or other financial company, a sharp rise in interest rates could limit your raise or even threaten your job security—so a junk fund, which tends to outper-forms most other bond funds when interest rates rise, might make sense as a counterweight in your 401(k). A junk-bond fund, though, is only a minor option—not an obligation—for the intelligent investor.
Benjamin Graham (The Intelligent Investor)
But before it came to that, the show needed a quizmaster, an adult who, like Clifton Fadiman on Information, Please, gave it exactly the right edge. This chair was as vital to the show’s success as were the young panelists. A pair of college professors auditioned: they were too impressed with themselves, giving the kids no time to talk. A candidate from the lecture circuit gave away half the answers. Among the 20-odd people who auditioned was Joe Kelly, a thirdgrade dropout, seasoned vaudevillian, and host of the hayseed music show The National Barn Dance. “His height of intellectual polish before The Quiz Kids was to ring a cowbell and chortle, ‘I’m teakettled pink to be here,’” wrote John Lear in the Saturday Evening Post. Kelly was far from dumb: he had finished third grade a year ahead of schedule but at age 8 had gone into show business.
John Dunning (On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio)
After all, best friends are the ones who can just hang out and be real without having to say a word.
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
The nail that stands up will be hammered down,
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
Melvin
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
thorough search
Paul Moxham (8 Exciting Middle Grade Novels)
passed
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
Glenn Hammond Curtiss was a bicycle enthusiast before he started building motorcycles. Although he only attended grammar school to the 8th grade, his interests motivated him to move on to greater things. In 1904, as a self-taught engineer, he began to manufacture engines for airships. During this time, Curtiss became known for having won a number of international air races and for making the first long-distance flight in the United States. On September 30, 1907, Curtiss was invited to join a non-profit pioneering research program named the “Aerial Experimental Association,” founded under the leadership of Dr. Alexander Graham Bell, to develop flying machines. The organization was established having a fixed time period, which ended in March of 1909. During this time, the members produced several different aircraft in a cooperative, rather than a competitive, spirit.
Hank Bracker
It’s not mine. 2. I don’t have her permission. 3. She’s told us we can’t. 4. No living fourth-grader has ever dared to look in there before. 5. I might see one of her cooties walking across the page. 6. The cootie could attack me and bite me, and I’d turn into a grumpy, gray-faced fourth-grade teacher with lint on my skirt. 7. What if Ms. Adolf set a finger trap in there that would snap onto my fingers and never come off? 8. I need all my fingers, in case one day I decide to play keyboards in a rock band. 9. Come on, Hank. Who are you kidding???? You know you’re going to do it! P.S. I know, I know. You don’t have to remind me that there are only nine reasons on the list. I couldn’t come up with the tenth. As soon as I do, I’ll let you know. But don’t hold your breath.
Henry Winkler (Help! Somebody Get Me Out of Fourth Grade)
Twins for help during the holidays.
R.K. Davenport (The Missing Present (Mystery Book for Kids Ages 6-8, 9-12, Free Stories, Bedtime Stories) (Zooey & Caleb 6th Grade Detectives 3))
1. The Doctrine for Men and Devas. The Buddha, to meet temporarily the spiritual needs of the uninitiated, preached a doctrine concerning good or bad Karma as the cause, and its retribution as the effect, in the three existences (of the past, the present, and the future). That is, one who commits the tenfold sin[FN#324] must be reborn after death in hell, when these sins are of the highest grade;[FN#325] among Pretas,[FN#326] when of the middle grade; and among animals, when of the lowest grade. [FN#324] (1) Taking life, (2) theft, (3) adultery, (4) lying, (5) exaggeration, (6) abuse, (7) ambiguous talk, (8) coveting, (9) malice, (10) unbelief. [FN#325]
Kaiten Nukariya (The Religion of the Samurai A Study of Zen Philosophy and Discipline in China and Japan)
1. The Doctrine for Men and Devas. The Buddha, to meet temporarily the spiritual needs of the uninitiated, preached a doctrine concerning good or bad Karma as the cause, and its retribution as the effect, in the three existences (of the past, the present, and the future). That is, one who commits the tenfold sin[FN#324] must be reborn after death in hell, when these sins are of the highest grade;[FN#325] among Pretas,[FN#326] when of the middle grade; and among animals, when of the lowest grade. [FN#324] (1) Taking life, (2) theft, (3) adultery, (4) lying, (5) exaggeration, (6) abuse, (7) ambiguous talk, (8) coveting, (9) malice, (10) unbelief. [FN#325] There are three grades in each of the tenfold sin. For instance, the taking of the life of a Buddha, or of a sage, or of a parent, etc., is of the highest grade; while to kill fellow-men is of the middle; and to kill beasts and birds, etc., is of the lowest. Again, to kill any being with pleasure is of the highest grade; while to repent after killing is of the middle; and killing by mistake is of the lowest.
Kaiten Nukariya (The Religion of the Samurai A Study of Zen Philosophy and Discipline in China and Japan)
I don’t think I’m too wrapped up in these identities until someone gets it wrong. I know it sounds pathetic, and believe me I am embarrassed to admit it, but I sometimes—more often than I wish—find myself wanting to be identified by something I’ve done or accomplished. Most of us grew up being taught that our identity as a person is based on our accomplishments. Your identity is closely tied to the points you score, the trophies you win, the grades you make, the diplomas you earn, the jobs you get, the promotions you receive, the portfolio you build. We build our resumés, display our achievements, and frame our accomplishments. In Philippians 3 Paul talks about how his identity used to be wrapped up in these things. He had some pretty impressive credentials. He was born into the right family, attended notable schools, received impressive degrees, landed in a powerful position. If he was introduced by someone who was identifying him, everyone would have been impressed. But here’s Paul’s conclusion about all of that. I once thought these things were valuable, but now I consider them worthless because of what Christ has done. Yes, everything else is worthless when compared with the infinite value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have discarded everything else, counting it all as garbage, so that I could gain Christ. (Philippians 3:7–8 NLT) I am a follower of Jesus. No mistake I have ever made and no success I have ever had says as much about me as that. And when I embrace that identity and understand that a follower is who I am, then following is what I will do. Nominative
Kyle Idleman (Not a Fan: Becoming a Completely Committed Follower of Jesus)
Off the roof… onto the kiddie slide… ollie into the empty pool… up the other side… do a 360, yeah!… carve around the side… handplant on the lip… hmmm, kinda high up here…
Richard Clark (8th Grade Fugitive)
Anyone?
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
By 12th grade, the average black or Hispanic is reading and doing math at the level of the average white 8th-grader. 38
Jared Taylor (White Identity: Racial Consciousness in the 21st Century)
Another aspect noticed in L1 acquisition is the low acquisition of multi- morphemic words (i. e., complex words composed of three or more morphemes) by preschool age English children. Preschool age English children acquire solely 0.5 multi-morphemic words per day and multi-morphemic words constitute 8% of the vocabulary first grade English children own (Anglin, 1993, 71-79). First to third grade English children acquire 2 multi-morphemic words per day. Multi-morphemic words constitute 12 % of the third grade English children’s vocabulary. Fourth to fifth grade English children acquire 7.1 multi-morphemic words per day and multi-morphemic words constitute 19% of the fifth grade English children’s vocabulary (1993, 71-79). The low acquisition rate of multi-morphemic words by preschool age English children can be explained in terms of lack of parsability of multi-morphemic words. In his ‘Complexity-Based Ordering’ Model, Hay (2000, 2002) upholds that Level 1 suffixes (usually being Non-neutral suffixes), which occur inside other suffixes, are not parsed out during the processing of a multi-suffixed word by native speakers. Level 2 suffixes (usually being Neutral suffixes), which occur outside another suffix, are parsed out during the processing of multi-suffixes words. Level 1 suffixes: -al, -an, -ant, -ance, -ary, -ate, -ic, -ify, -ion, -ity, -ive, -ory, -ous, -y, -ity, -ation. Level 1 prefixes: sub-, de-, in-. Level 2 suffixes: -able, -age, -en, -er, -ful, -hood, -ish, -ism, -ist, -ize, -ly, -ment, -ness. (Fab, 1988, 531). Level 2 prefixes: re-, un-, non-. Obviously, such lack of parsability obscures the semantic transparency of multi-morphemic words and impedes the analytical acquisition of multi-morphemic words by preschool age English children. A strenuous effort to acquire multi-morphemic words would result in acquisition of such words as a unit (as the Lexeme-Based Model suggests, see Aronoff, 1994), rather than analytically (as argued by Morpheme-Based Model). Such lack of parsability also obscures the semantic transparency of multi-morphemic words and impedes the analytical acquisition of multi-morphemic words by pre intermediate L2 learners. The degree of Morphological Translation Equivalence that L2 multi-morphemic words share with their counterparts in pupils’ L1 is also lower compared to bi-morphemic words. Consequently, multi-morphemic words will be acquired as a unit rather than analytically by pre intermediate L2 learners. Elementary books designed for pre intermediate L2 learners - in addition to the insertion of root words - should also comprise less multi-morphemic words; perhaps solely or less than 8% of their vocabulary.
Endri Shqerra (Acquisition of Word Formation Devices in First & Second Languages: Morphological Cross-linguistic Influence)
In my MTC®s we used 35% food grade hydrogen peroxide diluted in 6 to 8 ounces of distilled water or aloe juice 3 times a day on an empty stomach—this is important or you may experience vomiting. We started with 3 drops 3 times a day (always diluted in 8 ounces of distilled water) and added one drop each day until we reached 25 drops 3 times per day for 35 days. We then started to cut down to 2 times a day and then once a day, while slowly getting down to 8 drops a day. As maintenance we used 8 drops of food grade 35% hydrogen peroxide in 8 ounces of distilled water three times day. It is highly toxic and can be even deadly if it is not
Leonard Coldwell (The Only Answer to Cancer)
By 1920, he was living back home with his parents while pursuing a degree at Michigan State Agricultural College.5 Specializing in chicken breeding, he proved to be so proficient that, immediately after his graduation, he received a summer school appointment as “instructor in poultry husbandry for federal students”—young veterans attending college with governmental aid.6 In addition to his academic work, the religiously committed Huyck was active in the Student Volunteer Movement, a campaign begun in 1886 to enlist college students for missionary work abroad with the ultimate goal of bringing about (as its watchword put it) “the evangelization of the world in this generation.”7 In April 1922, just prior to his graduation from Michigan State Agricultural College and three months shy of his twenty-eighth birthday, Emory accepted the position of superintendent of the Bath Consolidated School at an annual salary of $2,300. Eight months later, two days after Christmas, Emory married Ethel Newcomb of Pierson, Michigan, six years his senior; she would also join the faculty at the newly built school, teaching “vocal music” and second grade.8
Harold Schechter (Maniac: The Bath School Disaster and the Birth of the Modern Mass Killer)
actually shake sticks at things? Like, who does that? Ugh,
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
Chapter Five Monday. 12:50 PM. The wrestling room. Because of the assembly, classes for the rest of the day were shortened so school could still dismiss on time, which meant that my science class wasn’t going to start until one-o-clock. After I saw that it was ten ‘til, I rushed out of the assembly and headed straight for the wrestling room. It was the first day of training with my new ninja clan, and I was already behind schedule. A few months ago, during the week of the talent show, I stumbled upon a second gymnasium that wasn’t being used. It was the wrestling room. Coach Cooper, the gym teacher (same last name as me, but not related… or is he? Dun dun dunnnnnnn… no, I’m kidding. We’re not related), said that Buchanan School used to have a wrestling team, but cut it from the program because of money issues about ten years back. I asked if it was cool that I used the room for a martial arts club, and he said yeah.
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
Wait… yogurt’s made from milk?” Slug said, slapping his forehead like he was worried. “My entire life has been a lie.
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
8
Claudia Mills (Fourth Grade Disasters (Mason Dixon, #2))
grumble
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
I come from the land of dirty laundry and half empty soda cans, also known as my bedroom.
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
Zoe is such a natural leader. I wish that was something in my family’s blood, that way maybe I could be a good leader too.” “You’re kidding, right?” Faith asked. “You’ve been one of the best leaders I’ve ever seen.” Poor Faith. If only she knew that my whole ninja clan left me to join the Scavengers.
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
Dag gummit!” Gavin shouted,
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
After re-entering the forest, the trail begins a steady climb, reaching a bench at an overlook at mile 20.4 (9,778). Cross a jeep road at mile 21.2 (9,863). There are several potential campsites in this area. Walk over a footbridge at Fiddler Creek, mile 21.7 (9,967), then continue south until reaching US Hwy 24 at mile 22.1 (9,966). Cross the highway, then a set of railroad tracks, followed by footbridges over three small creeks. After leaving the swampy area, the CT turns to the southwest and follows Mitchell Creek in a wide grassy meadow, which features several potential campsites. At mile 23.6 (10,180), the trail turns east and begins following an old railroad grade. After bending to the south, the trail crosses a footbridge over a seasonally wet area and a railroad bridge before reaching the remains of old coke ovens at mile 25.2 (10,382). Reach the parking area for Tennessee Pass and US Hwy 24 at mile 25.4 (10,424). Camping is allowed more than 100 feet from the trail and parking lot. This is the end of Segment 8.
Colorado Trail Foundation (The Colorado Trail)
Sure, we have a locker clean out every two weeks, but you know how life can get busy sometimes, right? That and I was pretty sure I was feeding a small family of rodents living at the bottom of it. I’m not sure I could live with myself if I did anything to take food off their table.
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
The first bell went off just as I got to my locker. After spinning the combination into the padlock, I yanked on the handle while pressing my shoulder into the door. It was my usual routine whenever I visited my locker so none of my stuff would fall out. Sure, we have a locker clean out every two weeks, but you know how life can get busy sometimes, right? That and I was pretty sure I was feeding a small family of rodents living at the bottom of it. I’m not sure I could live with myself if I did anything to take food off their table. Squeezing my fingers into the cold, dark, and somehow damp locker, I managed to scrape the top of my math book just enough so that it would tip into my hand. “Gotcha!” I exclaimed as I slid the book out slowly. After it was free from the locker, I slammed the door shut with my knee since that was the spot where it clicked shut. Suddenly, like she materialized out of thin air, Naomi was standing
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))
The first bell went off just as I got to my locker. After spinning the combination into the padlock, I yanked on the handle while pressing my shoulder into the door. It was my usual routine whenever I visited my locker so none of my stuff would fall out. Sure, we have a locker clean out every two weeks, but you know how life can get busy sometimes, right? That and I was pretty sure I was feeding a small family of rodents living at the bottom of it. I’m not sure I could live with myself if I did anything to take food off their table. Squeezing my fingers into the cold, dark, and somehow damp locker, I managed to scrape the top of my math book just enough so that it would tip into my hand. “Gotcha!
Marcus Emerson (Spirit Week Shenanigans (Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja, #8))