Geek Love Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Geek Love. Here they are! All 200 of them:

The truth is always an insult or a joke, lies are generally tastier. We love them. The nature of lies is to please. Truth has no concern for anyone's comfort
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Could a scar be like the rings of a tree, reopened with each emotional season?
Magenta Periwinkle (Cutting Class)
They thought to use and shame me but I win out by nature, because a true freak cannot be made. A true freak must be born.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Sometimes we know in our bones what we really need to do, but we're afraid to do it. Taking a chance and stepping beyond the safety of the world we've always known is the only way to grow, though and without risk there is no reward.
Wil Wheaton (Just a Geek: Unflinchingly Honest Tales of the Search for Life, Love, and Fulfillment Beyond the Starship Enterprise)
Can you be happy with the movies, and the ads, and the clothes in the stores, and the doctors, and the eyes as you walk down the street all telling you there is something wrong with you? No. You cannot be happy. Because, you poor darling baby, you believe them.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
My idea of a fun night was diving into a massive pile of To Be Read pile of books stacked near my dresser... I was the girl who loved everything geeky.
Jeff Sampson (Vesper (Deviants, #1))
I get glimpses of the horror of normalcy. Each of these innocents on the street is engulfed by a terror of their own ordinariness. They would do anything to be unique.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
When your mama was the geek, my dreamlets," Papa would say, "she made the nipping off of noggins such a crystal mystery that the hens themselves yearned toward her, waltzing around her, hypnotized with longing.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
There are the those whose own vulgar normality is so apparent and stultifying that they strive to escape it. They affect flamboyant behaviour and claim originality according to the fashionable eccentricities of their time. They claim brains or talent or indifference to mores in desperate attempts to deny their own mediocrity.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
No popularity exists when tragedy strikes. All that's left are human hearts and love and ache. We all love each other, deep down, and when we see another soul in pain we can't help but hurt too.
Maya Van Wagenen (Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek)
A true freak cannot be made. A true freak must be born.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
There are parts of Texas where a fly lives ten thousand years and a man can't die soon enough. Time gets strange there from too much sky, too many miles from crack to crease in the flat surface of the land.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
He must love me, i thought, amazed. A faint whiff of nausea hit me at seeing pain as proof of love, but it seemed true. Unavoidable.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Genius or jock, it didn't seem to matter. Boys were born with a gene that kept girls, no matter how smart they might be, from understanding them.
Charity Tahmaseb (The Geek Girl's Guide to Cheerleading)
Wet towel under the door,' said Barry. 'It's what you do when you're smoking weed in a hotel and you don't want everyone calling security. You're always supposed to have a towel. I read about it in a guide for hitchhiking through the galaxy.
Christopher Moore (Bite Me (A Love Story, #3))
It was the fangirl code for every book geek: read, chat, squeal. Re-read, chat, and squeal again, until it’s all over and the dreaded book funk sets in. Find the next best thing to fill the void, then repeat steps one through three as necessary.
Rachael Wade (Love and Relativity (Preservation))
Adorkable. It's in its own category.
Anne Eliot
Being a fangirl is the best thing that's ever happened to me. ...We know what we're into, we love hard, and we're okay with it.
Sam Maggs (The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy: A Handbook for Girl Geeks)
We survive until, by sheer stamina, we escape into the dim innocence of our own adulthood and its forgetfulness.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
We know what we’re into, we love hard, and we’re okay with it. But we don’t have it easy.
Sam Maggs (The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy: A Handbook for Girl Geeks)
I am not going to get into it myself, except to say (1) if I am writing "boy fiction," who are all those boys with breasts who keep turning up by the hundreds at my signings and readings? and (2) thank you, geek girls! I love you all.
George R.R. Martin
It is, I suppose, the common grief of children at having to protect their parents from reality. It is bitter for the young to see what awful innocence adults grow into, that terrible vulnerability that must be sheltered from the rodent mire of childhood.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Geeks are smart and talented and passionate. I don’t think that’s a bad thing.
Sandhya Menon (From Twinkle, with Love)
In the end I would always pull up with a sense of glory, that loving is the strong side. It's feeble to be an object. What's the point of being loved in return, I'd ask myself.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
There are parts of Texas where a fly lives ten thousand years and a man can't die soon enough.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
As an adult, getting paid thousands of dollars a week to say, “Aye, Sir. Course laid in” is a seriously sweet gig, but when I was a teenager, it sucked.
Wil Wheaton (Just a Geek: Unflinchingly Honest Tales of the Search for Life, Love, and Fulfillment Beyond the Starship Enterprise)
The truth is always an insult or a joke. Lies are generally tastier. We love them. The nature of lies is to please. Truth has no concern for anyone’s comfort.” —
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
You must have wished a million times to be normal.” “No.” “No?” “I’ve wished I had two heads. Or that I was invisible. I’ve wished for a fish’s tail instead of legs. I’ve wished to be more special.” “Not normal?” “Never.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
What's bred in the bones, when you have bones, comes through. And they looked at her, watched her, wanted to squirt her full of baby juice.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
[Pride and power] are the same except that pride leaves the lights on and power can do it in the dark.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
What greater gift could you offer your children than an inherent ability to earn a living just by being themselves?
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
And girls do want boys who are interesting. Girls want the shy geeks who know everything and have big hands and good teeth and say sweet things.
Christina Lauren (Love and Other Words)
Who knew that you would be The One," I smile, "which I guess makes me your Trinity." "My Amidala." "Your Zira." "My Sylvia." "Your..." I scour my brain, trying to remember some other great sci-fi love interest. "Ha! I'm your Saphira," I settle back smugly, only for Trevor to start laughing. "Saphira is a dragon.
Cindy C. Bennett (Geek Girl)
It goes in streaks. But some things never go out of fashion.' Hunger artists, fat folks, giants, and dog acts come and go but real freaks never lose their appeal.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
In defense of geeks," Justine said, "they're great in bed. They fantasize a lot, so they're really creative. And they love to play with gadgets.
Lisa Kleypas (Rainshadow Road (Friday Harbor, #2))
They thought to use and shame me but I win out by nature, because a true freak cannot be made. A true freak must be born. There
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
How deep and sticky is the darkness of childhood, how rigid the blades of infant evil, which is unadulterated, unrestrained by the convenient cushions of age and its civilizing anesthesia.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Matt laughed. "Close. That was last year. This year it's Obsessive Deovtion to Fourier Analysis Theory and Applications. And my personal favorite, Quantum Physics II: Romantic Entanglements of Energy and Matter." Julie turned her head to Matt. "You're a double major? Physics and math? Jesus..." "I know. Nerdy." He shrugged. "No, I'm impressed. I'm just surprised your brains fit in your head." "I was fitted with a specially desinged compression filter that allows excessive information to lie dormant until I need to access it. It's only the Beta version, so excuse any kinks that may appear. I really can't be held responsible.
Jessica Park (Flat-Out Love (Flat-Out Love, #1))
We walk a fine line between commendable passion for that which we love--starships, superpowers, costumes, fantastic stories--and an almost frightening militancy about the Right Way to Enjoy Them.
Stephen H. Segal (Geek Wisdom: The Sacred Teachings of Nerd Culture)
Just being visible is my biggest confession, so they try to set me at ease by revealing our equality, by dragging out their own less-apparent deformities.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
I don’t mind being lord of all I survey but I don’t want to have to work at it. It just wouldn’t be practical.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
The whiskey looks like transparent wood in my glass.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Like colors or a spring tree against that kind ofblue sky that pulls your heart out through your eyes. Pretty things will swarm you like that, like your heart was a hive of electric bees.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Like colors or a spring tree against that kind of blue sky that pulls your heart out through your eyes. Pretty things will swarm you like that, like your heart was a hive of electric bees.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
If I could describe myself, I'd say that I am a poetic gerd. (A geek and nerd combo) I love Shakespeare and romance, but sci-fi and action have a big slice of my heart. When I meet a man who can quote some Hitchcock out of thin air, do a perfect ''Timey Whimey'' impression, play me some classic rock when I'm sad and can give a 'Gone with the Wind' kiss, I will have my soul mate.
Melanie Kay Taylor
The hope you get from religion is a three-ring, all-star hope because the risk is outrageous.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
the top head would have controlled everything and made his poor little butt-brother miserable.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
A carnival in daylight is an unfinished beast, anyway. Rain makes it a ghost. The wheezing music from the empty, motionless rides in a soggy, rained-out afternoon midway always hit my chest with a sweet ache. The colored dance of the lights in the seeping air flashed the puddles in the sawdust with an oily glamour.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Why do women love The Princess Bride so much? Here's a thought: because its hero, Westley, is able to simultaneously fill the roles of dashing romantic adventurer and seriously devoted (maybe even borderline henpecked) fiance.
Stephen H. Segal (Geek Wisdom: The Sacred Teachings of Nerd Culture)
Then there are those who feel their own strangeness and are terrified by it. They struggle toward normalcy. They suffer to exactly that degree that they are unable to appear normal to others, or to convince themselves that their aberration does not exist. These are true freaks, who appear, almost always, conventional and dull.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
There are those whose own vulgar normality is so apparent and stultifying that they strive to escape it. They affect flamboyant behavior and claim originality according to the fashionable eccentricities of their time. They claim brains or talent or indifference to mores in desperate attempts to deny their own mediocrity. These are frequently artists and performers, adventurers and wide-life devotees. Then there are those who feel their own strangeness and are terrified by it. They struggle toward normalcy. They suffer to exactly that degree that they are unable to appear normal to others, or to convince themselves that their aberration does not exist. These are true freaks, who appear, almost always, conventional and dull.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
I suspect people are suckers for a prick. I suspect folks just naturally go belly-up for a snob. Folks figure if a guy acts like he’s King Tut and everybody else is donkey shit, he must be an aristocrat.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
It is, I suppose, the common grief of children at having to protect their parents from reality. It is bitter for the young to see what awful innocence adults grow into, that terrible vulnerability that must be sheltered from the rodent mire of childhood. Can we blame the child for resenting the fantasy of largeness? Big, soft arms and deep voices in the dark saying, "Tell Papa, tell Mama, and we'll make it right." The child, screaming for refuge, senses how feeble a shelter the twig hut of grown-up awareness is. They claim strength, these parents, and complete sanctuary. The weeping earth itself knows how desperate is the child's need for exactly that sanctuary. How deep and sticky is the darkness of childhood, how rigid the blades of infant evil, which is unadulterated, unrestrained by the convenient cushions of age and its civilizing anesthesia. Grownups can deal with scraped knees, dropped ice-cream cones, and lost dollies, but if they suspected the real reasons we cry they would fling us out of their arms in horrified revulsion. Yet we are small and as terrified as we are terrifying in our ferocious appetites. We need that warm adult stupidity. Even knowing the illusion, we cry and hide in their laps, speaking only of defiled lollipops or lost bears, and getting lollipop or a toy bear'd worth of comfort. We make do with it rather than face alone the cavernous reaches of our skull for which there is no remedy, no safety, no comfort at all. We survive until, by sheer stamina, we escape into the dim innocence of our own adulthood and its forgetfulness.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Understand, daughter, that the only reason for your existing was as a tribute to your uncle-father. You were meant to love him. I planned to teach you how to serve him and adore him. You would be his monument and his fortress against mortality. Forgive me. As soon as you arrived I realized that you were worth far more than that.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Taxis are expensive for moderately employed dwarfs who rent extra apartments, swim at private clubs, and fancy themselves as righteous assassins.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
All he had to do to make me like him was need me. All he had to do to make Arty like him was drop dead.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
lunatics are created deliberately by those who wish to be presided over.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Love can be just like hot peppers, exciting on the way in and agonizing on the way out.
Sorin Suciu (The Scriptlings)
I wonder if The Lesson is that, in order to succeed, I need to rely upon myself, trust myself, love myself, and not put my happiness and sadness into the hands of others.
Wil Wheaton (Just a Geek: Unflinchingly Honest Tales of the Search for Life, Love, and Fulfillment Beyond the Starship Enterprise)
It is coincidence, I decide, and I am getting old and batty, thinking the universe revolves around me.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
I’ve conquered them. They thought to use and shame me but I win out by nature, because a true freak cannot be made. A true freak must be born.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
There are parts of Texas where a fly lives ten thousand years and a man can’t die soon enough. Time gets strange there from too much sky, too many miles from crack to crease in the flat surface of the land.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
When your mama was the geek, my dreamlets,” Papa would say, “she made the nipping off of noggins such a crystal mystery that the hens themselves yearned toward her, waltzing around her, hypnotized with longing.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
You just want to know that you’re all right. You just want to feel all right.” And now he dives into the sneer. Arty’s sneer could flay a rhino. “That’s all you need other people’s love for!
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Geeks like to make things. Indeed, the drive to create is an intrinsic geeky quality (right up there with loving genre fiction and drinking too much Mountain Dew). And while many geeks may not think of themselves as creative in an artistic sense, most geeky pursuits--from rolling up a new D&D character to assembling the LEGO Star Wars Death Star kit (you know, the one with all the cool minifigures)--are acts of creation.
Ken Denmead
My heart died. Arty would despise her. But Mama told me to go on hoping. "Go ahead and love her," Mama said. I've wondered since whether those were Mama's last words, the final sizzle of her synapses.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
The moment I walk into a bookstore, I remember what I love about them. They are an oasis of intellectual calm. Perhaps it’s the potential of all the ideas hidden behind those delicious covers. Or perhaps it’s the social reverence for the library-like quiet. You don’t yell in a bookstore; you’ll piss off the books.
Michael Lopp (Being Geek: The Software Developer's Career Handbook)
I love crafting. Knitting, decoupage, scrapbooking, any "lady-ish" art form, I'm a fan. For about six months each. Then I shove all the supplies in a closet, alongside the skeletons of long dead New Year's resolutions, like saber fencing, playing the ukulele, and Japanese brush painting.
Felicia Day (You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost))
there are those who feel their own strangeness and are terrified by it. They struggle toward normalcy. They suffer to exactly that degree that they are unable to appear normal to others, or to convince themselves that their aberration does not exist. These are true freaks, who appear, almost always, conventional and dull.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
He had Oly letter a little card that he taped on his wall. The thing read, ‘The only liars bigger than the quack are the quack’s patients.’ Arty used to just keep me in stitches. Eleven years old he was then.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
No, I don't party; no, I don't dress in black leather and chains; that's not my style. That's how I was raised. I worry about getting good grades and I go to church and I watch sci-fi movies and I generally follow the rules. Most people would call me a geek or a nerd. You've called me that many times. But that isn't everything that defines me. I mean, look at me, sitting here in a rainstorm under a tree that's probably going to kill us when the lightning hits it, holding the hand of a pretty cool girl who really is the opposite of me, a girl that I happen to be in love with. A girl I couldn't have imagined would want to be with me. But here she is, letting me hold her hand, trying to tell me why she isn't good enough for me. That's crazy.
Cindy C. Bennett (Geek Girl)
The more people we exclude, the more people will want to join. That’s what exclusive means.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Crystal Lil, her door propped open, sits in front of the television with a pan in her lap, a brown bag at her feet. She
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
The old man is spread out on the worm buffet and
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
I stared in silence as Miranda swooped, shrieking, down the playground slide, searching to see alive in her all the dead love in me.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Dreams, stories, art- they were, and are, instruments of divine intervention that molded you into a woman who dwells in possibility: who now feels herself serene with comfort and strength.
Marjorie M. Liu (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls)
There are two ways to ruin any chances of leading a happy life. The first is to chase a goal twenty-four hours a day, day after day, and gladly give up all the little laughs and joys that life has to offer in exchange for that ever-elusive moment of jubilation. The second way is far worse, in that it NEVER fails. You know what it is, Sam? Falling in love with someone who chases a goal twenty four hours a day.
Ali Sheikh (Closure of the Helpdesk — A Geek Tragedy)
Grownups can deal with scraped knees, dropped ice-cream cones, and lost dollies, but if they suspected the real reasons we cry they would fling us out of their arms in horrified revulsion. Yet we are small and as terrified as we are terrifying in our ferocious appetites
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
How proud I am, dancing in the air full of eyes rubbing at me uncovered, unable to look away because of what I am. Those poor hop toads behind me are silent. I've conquered them. They thought to use and shame me but I win out by nature, because a true freak cannot be made. A true freak must be born. (20)
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
A lot of people feel that way. That if you didn’t pay your dues by being ostracized then you’re not *really* a geek. I don’t think that though. It’s not an exclusive club that you need to pay some social price to get in. Being a geek is about loving something passionately beyond all reason or sense. And it need not necessarily be related to science fiction, fantas, superheroes, etcetera. You can be a gardening geek, a model train geek, stamp collecting geek, a baby geek… It’s about enthusiasm, in my opinion. From his blog RE: Thirty years of D&D
Patrick Rothfuss
In the grim blasted regions where the soil had failed or the factories were shut down, whole congregations would drift through the gates,
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Their bodies lifted up, clean and simple to her in the clear, unconscious awareness of each of their cells’ sensing that she would grunt out strong young.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Sometimes all we have is the knowledge that something extraordinary exists in the universe, even if we can't be the ones to claim it. Sometimes that has to be enough.
Sarvenaz Tash (The Geek's Guide to Unrequited Love)
He was quiet for a moment. “So, in this analogy, you’re Mary Jane?” “You got that right, Tiger.
J.M. Richards (Tall, Dark Streak of Lightning (Dark Lightning Trilogy, #1))
The only liars bigger than the quack are the quack’s patients.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
It takes a lady of a certain age to contain the stuff [whiskey]. Particularly the Irish. No offense but a bit of weathering and experience are required not to go right off the edge with it. I would heisitate to serve Irish to a green schoolgirl. Mixes and vodka are enough for them to go wrong on. I couldn't look at myself shaving if I poured Irish for the young.
Katherine Dunn
The saddest thing I have ever experienced is watching a fellow nerd I've known forever and befriended, trying to unnerdify themselves. It was painful because that great geeky personality I loved so much is hidden behind a plaster of trends, and he may end up with a girl who will never understand him.
Melanie Kay Taylor
But I could never see what was so awful and wrong about being honest. And I didn’t think it had anything to do with being an only child. I believed it had more to do with the fact that I had an inherently low bullshit tolerance, and what the hell is wrong with that?
Josie Bloss (Band Geek Love)
Sometimes, parody or pastiche shows a deeper love for the original source material than a hundred official sequels ever could. In forty years, has there really ever been a better Star Trek movie than Galaxy Quest--or a better Fantastic Four movie than The Incredibles?
Stephen H. Segal (Geek Wisdom: The Sacred Teachings of Nerd Culture)
Only a lunatic would want to be president. These lunatics are created deliberately by those who wish to be presided over. You’ve seen it a thousand times. We create a leader by locating one in the crowd who is standing up. This may well be because there are no chairs or because his knees are fused by arthritis. It doesn’t matter. We designate this victim as a ‘stand-up guy’ by the simple expedient of sitting down around him.” ARTURISM:
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
The only liars bigger than the quack are the quack's patients.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
So the world was nuts and he'd suddenly discovered a kink for geeks. There were worse things.
Louisa Edwards (Just One Taste (Recipe for Love, #3))
It's true - we never say what we mean. But for once, I want to.
Sarvenaz Tash (The Geek's Guide to Unrequited Love)
It is bitter for the young to see what awful innocence adults grow into, that terrible vulnerability that must be sheltered from the rodent mire of childhood.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Only a lunatic would want to be president. These lunatics are created deliberately by those who wish to be presided over.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Alan shrugged. “I love the CBC, really, but being voted its president—” “Co-president,” Sputnik corrected. “—is kind of like being declared King of Nerds.” “Co-king,” Sputnik asserted.
J.M. Richards (Tall, Dark Streak of Lightning (Dark Lightning Trilogy, #1))
Beside Mama, in my own folding chair, with my feet sticking out in front of me, I thought about my own innards. Just a few months before I'd had no idea whether my reproductive equipment worked. There was no evidence. But that week I had become a full-fledged bleeder and was still absorbed by this first change in myself that I had ever noticed. The click and buzz of my synapses kept making the same connection. If you can change, you can also end. Death had always been a theory to me. Now I knew. The terror hurt good and I nursed it and played it like a loose tooth.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Consider the whole thing as occupational therapy. Power as cottage industry for the mad. The shepherd is slave to the sheep. A gardener is in thrall to his carrots. Only a lunatic would want to be president. These lunatics are created deliberately by those who wish to be presided over. You've seen it a thousand times. We create a leader by locating one in the crowd who is standing up. This may well be because there are no chairs or because his knees are fused by arthritis. It doesn't matter. We designate this victim as a 'stand-up guy' by the simple expedient of sitting down around him.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Arty's growing flock, however, was different. I dreamed one night that Arty cried them into the world. They came out of his eyes as a green liquid that dripped to the ground making puddles. The puddles thickened and jelled into bodies that got up and hung around Arty. But Dr. P. and the advance man and McGurk, and later Sanderson and the Bag Man and the nebbishes and the simps who mooned and crooned around him, were all there because of Arty, no matter what other pretext they might claim. They all belonged to him.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
We don't unfold ourselves like pieces of paper for everyone to see: that's not how humans work. There are always parts of us we shut away or hide. Bits of ourselves we can't touch because they're too precious and buried too deep. Fragments of truth we barely admit to ourselves. Because sometimes editing our own story is the only way to get through it.
Holly Smale (All That Glitters (Geek Girl, #4))
The roses started him thinking, how the oddity of them was beautiful and how that oddity was contrived to give them value. “It just struck me – clear and complete all at once – no long figuring about it.” He realized that children could be designed. “And I thought to myself, now that would a rose garden worthy of a man’s interest.” We children would smile and hug him and he would grin around at us and send the twins for a pot of cocoa from the drink wagon and me for a bag of popcorn because the red-haired girls would just throw it out when they finished closing the concession anyway. And we would all be cozy in the warm booth of the van, eating popcorn and drinking cocoa and feeling like Papa’s roses.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Amazing? My heart fluttered. “But I don’t want Flash or Harry,” I murmured. “You want Spider-Man,” he finished for me, looking a little wistful. I shrugged. “And Peter Parker.” He looked at me, very seriously. “Then don’t settle,” he said.
J.M. Richards (Tall, Dark Streak of Lightning (Dark Lightning Trilogy, #1))
high heels are each big enough to bury an Egyptian in.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
I can lose myself in symbolism as deeply as the next lit-geek...
Tanya Egan Gibson (How to Buy a Love of Reading)
The sad fact is, there are 7.220.400.641 people on the planet, but right now I haven't got a single one to talk to.
Holly Smale (Picture Perfect (Geek Girl, #3))
The past, the present, and the future walked into a bar. It was tense.
Martin Lex
We're all constantly changing and evolving and growing up. You're a writer. You should get that more than anyone.
Sarvenaz Tash (The Geek's Guide to Unrequited Love)
He pinned me in place with a direct look, his dark brown eyes smoldering. “You’re Mary Jane,” he said finally. “And you have all these Flash Thompsons and Harry Osborns hovering around you, trying to make a move. Because...you’re basically amazing.
J.M. Richards (Tall, Dark Streak of Lightning (Dark Lightning Trilogy, #1))
There were oil wells everywhere. The soil had been abandoned to dust and lizards, and the backyard of every wind-blistered bungalow in town had thrown over ideas of shade or geraniums in favor of the whiskey promise in the mutter of those green grasshopper pumps...A dozen ravenous steel insects sucked at the shit-caked loam in the mile-square meatfield of empty pens where the beeves, when there were beeves, milled waiting for the knife. (125)
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Well, then. There's no aspiring about it. If you write, you're a writer. Maybe getting paid for it is a different can of worms, but being a writer itself? Don't doubt that's what you are" -Emmett
Sarvenaz Tash (The Geek's Guide to Unrequited Love)
And who wouldn't wish that? Certainly everyone here- dressed up as aliens, and wizards, and zombies, and superheroes- wants desperately to be inside a story, to be part of something more logical and meaningful than real life seems to be. Because even worlds with dragons and time machines seem to be more ordered than our own. When you live for stories, when you spend so much of your time immersed in careful constructs of three and five acts, it sometimes feels like you're just stumbling through the rest of life, trying to divine meaningful narrative threads from the chaos. Which, as I learned the hard way this weekend, can be painfully fruitless. Fiction is there when real life fails you. But it's not a substitute.
Sarvenaz Tash (The Geek's Guide to Unrequited Love)
Well, I’ve got three things working against me before I even walk into the room: 1. I’m the last speaker of the day. The fans are tired and a little burned out. 2. I’m following Michael Dorn and Marina Sirtis. They do conventions together all the time, have a set routine that never fails, and the fans adore them. 3. I was Wesley Crusher.
Wil Wheaton (Just a Geek: Unflinchingly Honest Tales of the Search for Life, Love, and Fulfillment Beyond the Starship Enterprise)
She talks. People talk easily to me. They think a bald albino hunchback can’t hide anything. My worst is all out in the open. It makes it necessary for people to tell you about themselves. They begin out of simple courtesy. Just being visible is my biggest confession, so they try to set me at ease by revealing our equality, by dragging out their apparent deformities. That’s how it starts. But I am like a stranger on the bus and they get hooked on having a listener. They go too far because I am one listener who is in no position to judge or find fault. They stretch out their dampest secrets because a creature like me has no values or morals. If I am “good" (and they assume that I am), it’s obviously for lack of opportunity to be otherwise. And I listen. I listen eagerly, warmly, because I care. They tell me everything eventually.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
And me all the while having to pee—coughing into the mike when my throat was tired and raw—eyes stinging and lips and chin crumpling in grief at his anger. The sweet tinkle of Electra on the bass and Iphy on the treble with Mama’s voice counting, “One and two and …” as the twins had their piano lesson inside the trailer. The gurgle and hum of the pumps that filtered my brother Arty’s “Aqua Boy” tank. And the dim round moon of baby Fortunato’s face peering at me from the dark of the risers above Papa.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
But for once, I see all those characters and I don't really envy them their fantasy worlds. I'm okay with my reality, as messy and imperfect as it may be. I don't really know what comes next, but honestly isn't that the best part of writing a story anyway? Maybe it's the best part of real life, too" -Graham
Sarvenaz Tash (The Geek's Guide to Unrequited Love)
If there is a single factor that spells out the difference between the cafeteria fringe headed for greatness and those doomed for low self-worth, even more than a caring teacher or a group of friends, it is supportive, accepting parents who not only love their children unconditionally, but also don't make them feel as if their idiosyncrasies qualify as "conditions" in the first place.
Alexandra Robbins (The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth: Popularity, Quirk Theory and Why Outsiders Thrive After High School)
You might not hit the target or win the stuffed dog, you might lose your money and look like a fool. You don’t get the surge without the risk. Well. Religion works the same way. The only difference is that it’s more amazing than even Chick or the twins. And it’s a whole lot scarier than the Roll-a-plane or the Screamer, or any simp twister. This scare stuff laps over into the hope department too. The hope you get from religion is a three-ring, all-star hope because the risk is outrageous. Bad! Well, I’m working on it. I’ve got the amazing part down. And the scary bits are a snap. But I’ve got to come up with a hope.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
This was a conversation I had with a so-called-fellow-trekkie the other day: ''So Picard or Kirk?'' I asked. ''What?'' ''Star Trek...'' ''Oh, Kirk.'' ''Why?'' ''I like the name better.'' I could have slammed his head against the table.
Melanie Kay Taylor
Dear daughter, I won't try to call my feeling for Arty love. Call it focus. My focus on Art was an ailment, noncommunicable, and, even to me all these years later, incomprehensible. Now I despise myself. But even so I remember, in hot floods, the way he slept, still as death, with his face washed flat, stony as a carved tomb and exquisite. His weakness and his ravening bitter needs were terrible, and beautiful, and irresistible as an earthquake. He scalded or smothered anyone he needed, but his needing and the hurt that it caused me were the most life I ever had. Remember what a poor thing I have always been and forgive me. He saw no use for you and you interfered with his use of me. I sent you away to please him, to prove my dedication to him, and to prevent him from killing you... My job was to come back [from the convent] directly, with nothing leaking from beneath my dark glasses, to give Arty his rubdown and then paint him for the next show, nodding cheerfully all the while, never showing anything but attentive care for his muscular wonderfulness. Because he could have killed you. He could have cut off the money that schooled and fed you. He could have erased you so entirely that I never would have had those letters and report cards and photos, or your crayon pictures, or the chance to spy on you, and to love you secretly when everything else was gone.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Believe me, if Archimedes ever had the grand entrance of a girl as pretty as Gloria to look forward to, he would never have spent so much time calculating the value of Pi. He would have been baking her a Pie! If Euclid had ever beheld a vision of loveliness like the one I see walking into my anti-math class, he would have forgotten all the geometry of lines and planes, and concentrated on the sweet simplicity of soft curves. If Pythagoras had ever had a girl look at him the way Gloria's eyes fix in my direction, he would have given up his calculations on the hypotenuse of right triangles and run for the hills to pick a bouquet of wildflowers.
David Klass (You Don't Know Me)
Summoning my inner Kojak, I tried to convince myself that she would have sat next to me even had there been somewhere else on the bus to sit. Unfortunately, I didn't do a very good job of self-persuasion. Good thing I wasn't in court suing myself, because I would have lost. From: "My Best Valentine's Day.Ever: A Short Story
Zack Love (Stories and Scripts: an Anthology)
Sometimes when I felt the eyes crawling on me from all sides, I got scared thinking someone was looking who wasn’t just curious. I knew it was my imagination and I got used to it, learned to shunt it away. But sometimes I held onto it quietly, that feeling that someone behind or beside me in the crowd – some guy leaning on the target booth with a rifle, or some cranky sweating father spending too much on ride tickets to keep his kids away from him – anybody could be looking at me in the sidelong way that norms use to look at freaks, but thinking of me twitching and biting at the dirt while my guts spilled out of the big escape hatch he’d cut for them… a feeling like that is special. Sometimes you hold onto it quietly for a while.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
It's interesting that when these individuals choose-and it is their choice always-to endure voluntary amputations for their own personal benefit, society professes itself shocked and disapproving. Yet this same society respects the concept that any individual should risk total annihilation in war, subject to the judgement of any superior officer at all and for purposes ranging from a promotion for the lieutenant to higher profits for the bullet company. Hell, they don't just respect that idea, they flat out expect it. And they'll shoot your ass if you don't go along with it. -Arturo in response to critics
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Hiding the book in my lap, I’d lose myself in stories of dashing buccaneers falling in love with beautiful heiresses. I did this with no guilt whatsoever—I figured the books filled in the gaping holes left by the cut-and-dried sex-ed unit we covered in health class.
Piper Banks (Geek High (Geek High, #1))
I can change my plans. But I can't change my family.
Holly Smale (Picture Perfect (Geek Girl, #3))
Cutest geek i ever saw.
Steven Key Meyers (Queer's Progress)
As far as I could tell, the quickest way to a geeky guy's heart usually involved geometric shapes.
Angela N. Blount (Once Upon an Ever After (Once Upon a Road Trip, #2))
It's the geek who gets the girl, not the jock.
Ahmed Mostafa
Broken hearts mend.
Sarvenaz Tash (The Geek's Guide to Unrequited Love)
When all else fails, there is music. When that fails you, there is beer.
James Hauenstein
The huge buoyant air sack of love that filled his body had just exploded and the collapse was devastating.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
So I'm delighted to open up a bit about these particular details, in honor of Valentine's Day (when every balding, chubby, and short actuary wants people - especially the babes out there - to know about his studly past" From: "My Best Valentine's Day.Ever: a Short Story
Zack Love (Stories and Scripts: an Anthology)
I wouldn’t joke if you weren’t always patching me up,” Davin retorted. He looked at Chad again. “You must have noticed, right? It’s kind of cute, actually.” Though my heart fluttered, I tried to shoot him a warning glare. He ignored me. “I like to call her Doctor Fisher.
J.M. Richards (Tall, Dark Streak of Lightning (Dark Lightning Trilogy, #1))
People often hold technology responsible for infidelity. (...) But while things like Facebook, texting, and email certain make it easier for people (particularly lazy people!) to blur the boundaries of their relationships, it's still the people involved who are to blame.
Erin Cossar (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls)
Then he dreamed that he was in the open door of a plane several thousand feet above the earth and he had to jump holding a baby in his arms. It was his baby. He jumped, pulled the rip cord on the parachute, and it didn’t open. The emergency release didn’t work. He was falling fast. The wind tore at him fiercely. He was gripping the baby as tightly as he could but the wind pried under his arms, strained at his muscles, and suddenly the baby was loose, falling beside him, just out of reach. He flailed and groped in the air, trying to reach it. The baby was falling just a little bit faster than he was. It was below him, falling away from him as he fell after it. The earth screamed up at him. He knew that the baby was going to hit first and he would see it, would know it for a whole fraction of a second before he was smashed into a pulp himself. The terrible millisecond of that grief burst in him and he woke shrieking. He couldn’t get the dream out of his head. He prayed that he would have the dream again but that this time he would fall faster and be allowed to die first.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
All due respect, Renny,” said Mary Jo, “I have a pretty freaking good idea of your capabilities. And I think Mr. Traegar’s decision to bring us in first was the correct one. We don’t really know what we’re dealing with when it comes to the fae—there is no way that the sheriff’s office would. We had two werewolves, Mercy and the goblin king out there—and if it weren’t for the goblin king we’d have failed to bring him in ourselves.” He gave her a look. “I am going to ignore—just for a minute—how much my geek side is loving that apparently there is a goblin king in the world. And that he is—again apparently—here in the Tri-Cities. Even knowing that David Bowie is gone, I am giddy about this.” He said all that in a very dry, professional tone. I was starting to really like this guy.
Patricia Briggs (Storm Cursed (Mercy Thompson, #11))
Love is intense. You break down all your walls to let someone in. But if they’re not good for you, they can tear you up from the inside. And you think what you have together is love, so you let them.
Jen Wilde (Queens of Geek)
The dumb little fuck was supposed to be so goddamn sensitive, how come he couldn’t figure it out? All he had to do to make me like him was need me. All he had to do to make Arty like him was drop dead.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
A solid relationship is about two people trusting each other. About two people complementing each other. Not just one person putting all their hopes into someone else. Because no one can live up to that.
Adrienne Kress (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls)
Hey, nit squat! These are written by norms to scare norms. And do you know what the monsters and demons and rancid spirits are? Us, that’s what. You and me. We are the things that come to the norms in nightmares. The thing that lurks in the bell tower and bites out the throats of the choirboys—that’s you, Oly. And the thing in the closet that makes the babies scream in the dark before it sucks their last breath—that’s me. And the rustling in the brush and the strange piping cries that chill the spine on a deserted road at twilight—that’s the twins singing practice scales while they look for berries. Don't shake your head at me! These books teach me a lot. They don't scare me because they're about me. Turn the page.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
I think I’m getting a notion of how to do this. O.K., a carnival works because people pay to feel amazed and scared. They can nibble around a midway getting amazed here and scared there, or both. And do you know what else? Hope. Hope they’ll win a prize, break the jackpot, meet a girl, hit a bull’s-eye in front of their buddies. In a carnival you call it luck or chance, but it’s the same as hope. Now hope is a good feeling that needs risk to work. How good it is depends on how big the risk is if what you hope doesn’t happen. You hope your old auntie croaks and leaves you a carload of shekels, but she might leave them to her cat. You might not hit the target or win the stuffed dog, you might lose your money and look like a fool. You don’t get the surge without the risk. Well. Religion works the same way. The only difference is that it’s more amazing than even Chick or the twins. And it’s a whole lot scarier than the Roll-a-plane or the Screamer, or any simp twister. This scare stuff laps over into the hope department too. The hope you get from religion is a three-ring, all-star hope because the risk is outrageous. Bad! Well, I’m working on it. I’ve got the amazing part down. And the scary bits are a snap. But I’ve got to come up with a hope.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
There are those whose own vulgar normality is so apparent and stultifying that they strive to escape it. They affect flamboyant behavior and claim originality according to the fashionable eccentricities of their time. They claim brains or talent or indifference to mores in desperate attempts to deny their own mediocrity. These are frequently artists and performers, adventurers and wide-life devotees. Then there are those who feel their own strangeness and are terrified by it. They struggle toward normalcy. They suffer to exactly that degree that they are unable to appear normal to others, or to convince themselves that their aberration does not exist. These are true freaks, who appear, almost always, conventional and dull (281-2)
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
I can only conclude that her feelings toward me are very similar to what I've read about love: passionate, random, inexplicable, and totally uncontrollable. She can't help hating me any more than Heathcliff could help loving Cathy. It's simply written in the stars. Which would be quite sweet if she wasn't such a cow all the time.
Holly Smale (Geek Girl (Geek Girl, #1))
But in fanfiction anything was fair game. If we could turn protagonists into vampires, bounty hunters, or elves, we could sure as heck turn them homosexual, bisexual, asexual or any ot he wonderful, beautiful in-betweens. Characters slid all over the rainbow. And through fanfiction I learned about identities like transgendered, genderfluid, and demisexual.
J.M. Frey (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls)
Ada’s ability to appreciate the beauty of mathematics is a gift that eludes many people, including some who think of themselves as intellectual. She realized that math was a lovely language, one that describes the harmonies of the universe and can be poetic at times.
Walter Isaacson (The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution)
[...]i’m not a leftist trying to smuggle in my evil message by the nefarious means of fantasy novels. I’m a science fiction and fantasy geek. I love this stuff. And when I write my novels, I’m not writing them to make political points. I’m writing them because I passionately love monsters and the weird and horror stories and strange situations and surrealism, and what I want to do is communicate that. But, because I come at this with a political perspective, the world that I’m creating is embedded with many of the concerns that I have [...] I’m trying to say I’ve invented this world that I think is really cool and I have these really big stories to tell in it and one of the ways that I find to make that interesting is to think about it politically. If you want to do that too, that’s fantastic. But if not, isn’t this a cool monster?
China Miéville
In my experience, a lot of the boys who are real computer-heads tend to be pale-skinned sci-fi fans. Not that there’s anything wrong with that—I happen to be a pale-skinned sci-fi fan myself—but that doesn’t mean I have to fancy other seethrough geeks. So let’s hope Adam isn’t as picky as me.
Kate le Vann (Things I Know About Love)
Gates was the prime example of the innovator’s personality. “An innovator is probably a fanatic, somebody who loves what they do, works day and night, may ignore normal things to some degree and therefore be viewed as a bit imbalanced,” he said. “Certainly in my teens and 20s, I fit that model.
Walter Isaacson (The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution)
Once upon a teenage mistake, Ash thought he was in forever love, the kind of love that started wars and built the Taj Mahal. He knew at that moment how wrong he'd been. Without his even realizing it, Ash had fallen for Fee, harder and faster than he'd ever fallen for anyone. This was the love he'd thought he'd had before, but there was no real comparison between the two. It was like putting a matchstick beside a raging inferno—one of them would be completely consumed.
Piper Vaughn (The Party Boy's Guide to Dating a Geek (Clumsy Cupid Guidebooks, #1))
I mean, really, can someone answer this for me: Why are all female superheroes packed into spandex and hot shorts? Okay, of course I know the answer. I know why they’re all scantily clad. It’s because men draw them and if there is one thing men love it’s boobs! And legs! And boobs! But really what they love is boobs.
Olivia Munn (Suck It, Wonder Woman!: The Misadventures of a Hollywood Geek)
The defining characteristic of [being a nerd] is that we love things.
Wil Wheaton (Still Just a Geek: An Annotated Memoir)
I need to rely upon myself, trust myself, love myself and not put my happiness and sadness into the hands of others.
Wil Wheaton (Still Just a Geek: An Annotated Memoir)
There was a lonely intensity to him, reflected in his love of long-distance running and biking.
Walter Isaacson (The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution)
I’m slowly beginning to realise how ironic it is that I’m so good at learning lessons inside school, and so terrible at learning any outside it.
Holly Smale (Forever Geek (Geek Girl, #6))
I loved all of this boy: the good bits and the bad. And I knew that, when it came, I would love his sadness too.
Holly Smale (Forever Geek (Geek Girl, #6))
My Best Friend and I have spent plenty of time together, despite me being in my First Ever Relationship. This is because friends should always come first.
Holly Smale (Picture Perfect (Geek Girl, #3))
A project is like love; it has clear intentions at the beginning, but it can get complicated.
Gerry Geek
She was very aware of her body. She was a big girl and she’d accepted long ago she was not going to be any smaller. Heck, she’d embraced her curves and had come to love them.
Milly Taiden (Geek Bearing Gifts (Paranormal Dating Agency, #2))
I love you, Nita. Will you spend the winters putting up with my growly ass and the summers mating with me in every way possible?
Milly Taiden (Geek Bearing Gifts (Paranormal Dating Agency, #2))
Because falling in love doesn't have to mean dropping your best friend in the process.
Holly Smale (All That Glitters (Geek Girl, #4))
And this way, l'll leave everything behind before it gets the chance to do the same to me.
Holly Smale (Picture Perfect (Geek Girl, #3))
Why do you always rescue me?" — "Every Cinderella needs a fairy godmother. But sometimes your fairy godmother needs you right back.
Holly Smale (Picture Perfect (Geek Girl, #3))
Boys say that we girls gossip too much—maybe we do. Or maybe we gossip just enough. And maybe that’s our secret weapon. So pass it on.
Hope Nicholson (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls)
I learned some girls are sweethearts, some are bitches, but all of them have pussies that beg to be worshiped.
Deana Farrady (Unfriended: A Geek and Stud Romance (Love in New Highland, #1))
A code is like love, it has created with clear intentions at the beginning, but it can get complicated.
Gerry Geek (Ice Breakers for Project Managers: Jokes, Quotes, and Brainteasers)
I don't date as an active activity anymore because the work of loving myself is enough.
Gita Jackson (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls)
They say that life is just a blank chain, and precious moments are the beads we hang off it to make it beautiful.
Holly Smale (Picture Perfect (Geek Girl, #3))
Girls don't want boys, girls want high-speed internet and dragons.
Speranza
Her brother's desk was austere, save for a small photo of Lewis and a coffee mug featuring a math geek's coy declaration of love: √-1 <3 μ.
Nova Jacobs (The Last Equation of Isaac Severy)
I wonder, for example, if the twins’ piano training had given them the Tomaini brand of dexterity with hand jobs? Could a non-musician learn it? Could I? Children stumble through these most critical acts with no real help from the elders who are so anxious to teach them everything else. We were given rules and taboos for the toilet, the sneeze, the eating of an artichoke. Papa taught us all a particular brush stroke for cleaning our teeth, a special angle for the pen in our hand, the exact words for greeting elders, with fine-tuned distinctions for male, female, show folk, customers, or tradesmen. The twins and Arty were taught to design an act, whether it lasted three minutes or thirty, to tease, coax, and startle a crowd, to build to crescendo and then disappear in the instant of climax. From what I have come to understand of life, this show skill, this talk-’em, sock-’em, knock-’em-flat information, is as close as we got to that ultimate mystery. I throw death aside. Death is not mysterious. We all understand death far too well and spend chunks of life resisting, ignoring, or explaining away that knowledge. But this real mystery I have never touched, never scratched. I’ve seen the tigers with their jaws wide, their fangs buried in each other’s throats, and their shadowed hides sizzling, tip to tip. I’ve seen the young norms tangled and gasping in the shadows between booths. I suspect that, even if I had begun as a norm, the saw-toothed yearning that whirls in me would bend me and spin me colorless, shrink me, scorch every hair from my body, and all invisibly so only my red eyes would blink out glimpses of the furnace thing inside. In fact, I smell the stench of longing so clearly in the streets that I’m surprised there are not hundreds exactly like me on every corner.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Nice slippers,” Davin grinned. They were green and furry. “Thanks.” I shrugged and looked him over, half expecting to see a new injury. “So what’s up?” He had one hand behind his back.
J.M. Richards (Tall, Dark Streak of Lightning (Dark Lightning Trilogy, #1))
Byron published the first two cantos of his epic poem Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, a romanticized account of his wanderings through Portugal, Malta, and Greece, and, as he later remarked, “awoke one morning and found myself famous.” Beautiful, seductive, troubled, brooding, and sexually adventurous, he was living the life of a Byronic hero while creating the archetype in his poetry. He became the toast of literary London and was feted at three parties each day, most memorably a lavish morning dance hosted by Lady Caroline Lamb. Lady Caroline, though married to a politically powerful aristocrat who was later prime minister, fell madly in love with Byron. He thought she was “too thin,” yet she had an unconventional sexual ambiguity (she liked to dress as a page boy) that he found enticing. They had a turbulent affair, and after it ended she stalked him obsessively. She famously declared him to be “mad, bad, and dangerous to know,” which he was. So was she.
Walter Isaacson (The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution)
Later, at the sink in our van, Mama rinsed the blue stain and the odd spiders, caterpillars, and stems from the bucket. "Not what we usually start with, but we can go again tomorrow. And this will set up nicely in about six, eight jars." The berries were beginning to simmer in the big pot on the back burner. Mama pushed her dark wooden spoon into the foaming berries and cicrcled the wall of the pot slowly. I leaned my hot arms on the table and said, "Iphy better not go tomorrow. She got tired today." I was smelling the berries and Mamaa's sweat, and watching the flex of the blue veins behind her knees. "Does them good. The twins always loved picking berries, even more than eating them. Though Elly likes her jam." "Elly doesn't like anything anymore." The knees stiffened and I looked up. The spoon was motionless. Mama stared at the pot. "Mama, Elly isn't there anymore. Iphy's changed. Everything's changed. This whole berry business, cooking big meals that nobody comes for, birthday cakes for Arty. It's dumb, Mama. Stop pretending. There isn't any family anymore, Mama." Then she cracked me with the big spoon. It smacked wet and hard across my ear, and the purple-black juice spayed across the table. She started at me, terrified, her mouth and eyes gaping with fear. I stared gaping at her. I broke and ran. I went to the generator truck and climbed up to sit by Grandpa. That's the only time Mama ever hit me and I knew I deserved it. I also knew that Mama was too far gone to understand why I deserved it. She'd swung that spoon in a tigerish reflex at blasphemy. But I believed that Arty had turned his back on us, that the twins were broken, that the Chick was lost, that Papa was weak and scared, that Mama was spinning fog, and that I was an adolescent crone sitting in the ruins, watching the beams crumble, and warming myself in the smoke from the funeral pyre. That was how I felt, and I wanted company. I hated Mama for refusing to see enough to be miserable with me. Maybe, too, enough of my child heart was still with me to think that if she would only open her eyes she could fix it all back up like a busted toy.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
My first crush was a sarcastic know-it-all Immortal named Methos, a character from Highlander. To this day I am convinced he is my perfect soulmate. And the focus of my sexual awakening. Lots of people cite the boiler room scene from My So-Called Life, Jareth in Labyrinth, Colin Firth in Pride & Prejudice, or any/all members of the Fellowship of the Ring. But mine happened when Methos rolled out of bed in nothing but boxers to defend his life with a Roman short sword. Unf.
J.M. Frey (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls)
But I also know he'll probably be a more complex characters because of some of the things I've just gone through. Isn't that what writers are supposed to do? Gather life experience so that they can channel them and create great art?" -Graham
Sarvenaz Tash (The Geek's Guide to Unrequited Love)
But I don't know if everything is going to be exactly like it was before. But come one, Graham - when is that ever true? We're all constantly changing and evolving and growing up. You're a writer. You should get that more than anyone" -Felicia
Sarvenaz Tash (The Geek's Guide to Unrequited Love)
In whatever relationship I get into, I have to keep some parts of myself tucked away. Another part of it is that meeting new people is often a lesson for them on race and there is just not enough time in my life to continue delivering that lecture.
Gita Jackson (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls)
QUIRK THEORY: Many of the differences that cause a student to be excluded in school are the same traits or real-world skills that others will value, love, respect, or find compelling about that person in adulthood and outside of the school setting.
Alexandra Robbins (The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth: Popularity, Quirk Theory and Why Outsiders Thrive After High School)
I remembered that the real world was wide, and that a varied field of hopes and fears, of sensations and excitements, awaited those who had the courage to go forth into its expanse, to seek real knowledge of life amidst its perils.” —Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre
Hope Nicholson (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls)
Because it's not the walking away from love that's the hard part: it's the falling in. It's losing yourself to it and not knowing who you are without it. It's needing somebody else more than you need yourself. It's being happier with them than you are on your own.
Holly Smale (Head Over Heels (Geek Girl, #5))
Also," Bunty adds cheerfully, "how many cats did you have when you left?" "One," Annabel says, putting her hand over her face. "You have three now." Bunty swings hrt bag over her shoulder. "See you at Christmas, lovelies!" And my grandmother disappears as abruptly as she arrived.
Holly Smale (Picture Perfect (Geek Girl, #3))
«All the Amazon guys around Seattle were also aware of the trend. They all knew that, someday, European haute couture would sell online. The problem was that feat couldn’t be done by anybody from Amazon. Because Amazon guys were hacker geeks and cheesy hicks. Amazon had been invented to sell sci-fi books. The least chic thing in the world. The European couture biz would never go anywhere near a dorky sci-fi geek like Jeff Bezos. As for Jeff himself, Jeff would much rather conquer outer space with his private rocket than ever dress the First Lady of France.»
Bruce Sterling (Love is Strange)
– Мама, Элли больше нет. Ифи изменилась. Все изменилось. Это варенье из ежевики, готовка обедов на всю семью, которая давно уже не собирается за одним столом, торты на дни рождения Арти… Зачем это, мама? Перестань притворяться. Семьи больше нет. Она ударила меня ложкой. Сильно, с размаху – прямо по уху. Фиолетово-черный сок забрызгал весь стол. Мама в ужасе уставилась на меня. Я тоже уставилась на нее, открыв рот. Потом развернулась и убежала. Я пришла к дедушке и забралась на капот грузовика с генератором. Мама никогда в жизни меня не била. Это был первый и единственный раз, и я знала, что получила заслуженно. Также я знала, что мама уже давно выпала из реальности и никогда не поймет, почему это было заслуженно. Она ударила, не задумываясь. Это был рефлекторный, животный отклик на святотатство. Но я сама верила, что все плохо, что Арти отвернулся от нас, близнецы сломлены, Цыпа потерян, папа слаб и испуган, у мамы туманится сознание, и я осталась совсем одна – юная старуха, сидящая на руинах, глядя на то, как все рушится, и греясь в дыму этого погребального костра. Мне было так одиноко и грустно, и рядом не было никого, кто сумел бы меня утешить. Я ненавидела маму за то, что она не желает признать очевидное и разделить со мной горе. Наверное, в моем взрослеющем сердце еще теплилась детская надежда, что если мама откроет глаза и увидит, что́ происходит, она все исправит, починит, как сломанную игрушку, и все станет, как прежде. Я сидела в фургоне совсем одна, забившись в свой шкафчик. Меня тошнило. Мутило так, что бросало то в жар, то в холод. Дверцы шкафчика были открыты, и я видела участок блестящего линолеума. Узор из оранжевых кирпичей. Мне хотелось, чтобы пол был голубой или серый – и охлаждал взгляд.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Writing is hard. Writing that is good, writing that is powerful enough to evoke a change or an authentic emotion or even just an idea in another human being is about as mysterious as an alchemical recipe, but there are a few known ingredients. Craft? Yes, absolutely. Devotion? A load - yes! Humility? Not vital, I suppose, but all my favorites include at least a dash. Before those can be added to the cauldron though, you must have a base of Honesty. Honesty is difficult to find in public spaces these days (and getting harder every goddamn day) but if you're quiet, and patient, you can usually find some hidden in your room somewhere. (It helps to turn off the lights, for some reason.) Problem is, Honesty is invariably bound to Vulnerability and the only thing that cuts the bitterness of Vulnerability is Courage. And Courage? Well. Courage is the hardest thing of all.
Kelly Sue DeConnick (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls)
This is what Grandma was worried about, you know.' 'Me eating a whole chocolate cake practically all by myself in a single sitting?' 'You falling in love with a computer geek. Sure, they have good stock options and smokin' hot bods, but what about that dark side of genius that reanimates the dead?
Laurie Frankel (Goodbye for Now)
He was a beautiful pagan god with the voice of a serial killer, but that didn’t make him any less god like. It just meant rather than dying in some dank basement or isolated cabin, I’d die bound on an altar as part of some gruesome sacrificial rite. Exsanguinating while he stood over my naked body with my blood dripping from an obsidian blade...Angelina Martin
Candace Vianna (The Science of Loving)
It’s the major difference between a geek and a hipster, you know: When a hipster sees someone else grooving on the thing they love, their reaction is to say “Oh, crap, now the wrong people like the thing I love.” When a geek sees someone else grooving on the thing they love, their reaction is to say “ZOMG YOU LOVE WHAT I LOVE COME WITH ME AND LET US LOVE IT TOGETHER.
Anonymous
When your mama was the geek, my dreamlets,' Papa would say, 'she made the nipping off of noggins such a crystal mystery that the hens themselves yearned toward her, waltzing around her, hypnotized with longing. "Spread your lips, sweet Lil," they'd cluck, "and show us your choppers!"' This same Crystal Lil, our star-haired mama, sitting snug on the built-in sofa that was Arty's bed at night, would chuckle at the sewing in her lap and shake her head. 'Don't piffle to the children, Al. Those hens ran like whiteheads.' Nights on the road this would be, between shows and towns in some campground or pull-off, with the other vans and trucks and trailers of Binewski's Carnival Fabulon ranged up around us, safe in our portable village. After supper, sitting with full bellies in the lamp glow, we Binewskis were supposed to read and study. But if it rained the story mood would sneak up on Papa. The hiss and tick on the metal of our big living van distracted him from his papers. Rain on a show night was catastrophe. Rain on the road meant talk, which, for Papa, was pure pleasure. 'It's a shame and a pity, Lil,' he'd say, 'that these offspring of yours should only know the slumming summer geeks from Yale.' 'Princeton, dear,' Mama would correct him mildly. 'Randall will be a sophomore this fall. I believe he's our first Princeton boy.' We children would sense our story slipping away to trivia. Arty would nudge me and I'd pipe up with, 'Tell about the time when Mama was the geek!' and Arty and Elly and Iphy and Chick would all slide into line with me on the floor between Papa's chair and Mama. Mama would pretend to be fascinated by her sewing and Papa would tweak his swooping mustache and vibrate his tangled eyebrows, pretending reluctance. 'WellIll . . .' he'd begin, 'it was a long time ago . . .' 'Before we were born!' 'Before . . .' he'd proclaim, waving an arm in his grandest ringmaster style, 'before I even dreamed you, my dreamlets!' 'I was still Lillian Hinchcliff in those days,' mused Mama. 'And when your father spoke to me, which was seldom and reluctantly, he called me "Miss." ' 'Miss!' we would giggle. Papa would whisper to us loudly, as though Mama couldn't hear, 'Terrified! I was so smitten I'd stutter when I tried to talk to her. "M-M-M-Miss . . ." I'd say.' We'd giggle helplessly at the idea of Papa, the GREAT TALKER, so flummoxed. 'I, of course, addressed your father as Mister Binewski.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Many would be surprised to find that there is a whole world of woemen and girls who dedicate a significant portion of theri energy and emotions into the concept of story found in countless genres. These woman are often left out when you limit your definition of fangirl to geek or musik culture. This book is a tribute to my fiction-loving tribe. It's for the law student who unearths strength from the strut of a TV attorney. For the mother who unwinds with a glass of wine and a little bit of zombie apocalypse. For the teenage rwho points to a novel's heroine and says, "Yes. I'll have more of that please." To the woman and girls who get that forming online friendships isn't a symptom of isolation from reality but an opportunity to from commmon bonds that will cheer us through our victories and comfort us when life gets rough.
Kathleen Smith (The Fangirl Life: A Guide to All the Feels and Learning How to Deal)
Even after six years, he was still turned on by the bastard, still desperate to kiss his lips and see how it felt to kiss him into submission, until he saw him as more than a loser geek. He wanted to taste his tongue, to touch his abs and stroke his cock; do all the things that it was so wrong to want to do to him. Wrong because of Ben, because of his love for Ben, because he barely knew Jaxton, back then and now. What the hell was wrong with him?
Elaine White (The Cellist)
Speaking of body decorations, I luuhhhvv your belly piercing!” Heeb said, looking at the gold ring in the center of her slim, tan waist. Despite the artic cold, Angelina had opted for a skin tight, black tube top that ended just above her belly, on the assumption that a warm cab, a winter coat, and a short wait to get into the club was an adequate frosty weather strategy. Heeb was still reverently staring at her belly when Angelina finally caught her breath from laughing. “Do you really like it? You’re just saying that so that you can check out my belly!” “And what’s so bad about that? I mean, didn’t you get that belly piercing so that people would check out your belly?” “No. I just thought it would look cool…Do you have any piercings?” “Actually, I do,” Heeb replied. “Where?” “My appendix.” “Huh?” “I wanted to be the first guy with a pierced organ. And the appendix is a totally useless organ anyway, so I figured why the hell not?” “That’s pretty original,” she replied, amused. “Oh yeah. I’ve outdone every piercing fanatic out there. The only problem is when I have to go through metal detectors at the airport.” Angelina burst into laughs again, and then managed to say, “Don’t you have to take it out occasionally for a cleaning?” “Nah. I figure I’ll just get it removed when my appendix bursts. It’ll be a two for one operation, if you know what I mean.
Zack Love (Sex in the Title: A Comedy about Dating, Sex, and Romance in NYC (Back When Phones Weren't So Smart))
Could you love reading and still love punk? I had assumed that you couldn't be a skate punk and geek out on books, but Philip had changed that perspective. I had wanted to ensure that I would fit in, and suppressed my nerdiness as anathema to punk rock. But Philip had obliterated that premise in an instant with a copy of The Stranger. Maybe this was my opportunity to be regarded as someone different, more interesting and complicated than the Vietnamese kid or a skate punk.
Phuc Tran (Sigh, Gone: A Misfit's Memoir of Great Books, Punk Rock, and the Fight to Fit In)
Nick grinned, swooping in for another kiss and then leaning back and scruffing his hair up. “Harriet Manners, I’m about to give you six stamps. Then I’m going to write something on a piece of paper and put it in an envelope with your address on it.” “OK …” “Then I’m going to put the envelope on the floor and spin us as fast as I can. As soon as either of us manage to stick a stamp on it, I’m going to race to the postbox and post it unless you can catch me first. If you win, you can read it.” Nick was obviously faster than me, but he didn’t know where the nearest postbox was. “Deal,” I agreed, yawning and rubbing my eyes. “But why six stamps?” “Just wait and see.” A few seconds later, I understood. As we spun in circles with our hands stretched out, one of my stamps got stuck to the ground at least a metre away from the envelope. Another ended up on a daisy. A third somehow got stuck to the roundabout. One of Nick’s ended up on his nose. And every time we both missed, we laughed harder and harder and our kisses got dizzier and dizzier until the whole world was a giggling, kissing, spinning blur. Finally, when we both had one stamp left, I stopped giggling. I had to win this. So I swallowed, wiped my eyes and took a few deep breaths. Then I reached out my hand. “Too late!” Nick yelled as I opened my eyes again. “Got it, Manners!” And he jumped off the still-spinning roundabout with the envelope held high over his head. So I promptly leapt off too. Straight into a bush. Thanks to a destabilised vestibular system – which is the upper portion of the inner ear – the ground wasn’t where it was supposed to be. Nick, in the meantime, had ended up flat on his back on the grass next to me. With a small shout I leant down and kissed him hard on the lips. “HA!” I shouted, grabbing the envelope off him and trying to rip it open. “I don’t think so,” he grinned, jumping up and wrapping one arm round my waist while he retrieved it again. Then he started running in a zigzag towards the postbox. A few seconds later, I wobbled after him. And we stumbled wonkily down the road, giggling and pulling at each other’s T-shirts and hanging on to tree trunks and kissing as we each fought for the prize. Finally, he picked me up and, without any effort, popped me on top of a high wall. Like Humpty Dumpty. Or some kind of really unathletic cat. “Hey!” I shouted as he whipped the envelope out of my hands and started sprinting towards the postbox at the bottom of the road. “That’s not fair!” “Course it is,” he shouted back. “All’s fair in love and war.” And Nick kissed the envelope then put it in the postbox with a flourish. I had to wait three days. Three days of lingering by the front door. Three days of lifting up the doormat, just in case it had accidentally slipped under there. Finally, the letter arrived: crumpled and stained with grass. Ha. Told you I was faster. LBxx
Holly Smale (Picture Perfect (Geek Girl, #3))
Оракула создаёт тот, кто задаёт вопрос и думает, будто слышит ответ." Пока я резала мясо на тарелке Арти, мою грудь распирала тоска, грозившая пролиться слезами из глаз и соплями из носа. Как я теперь понимаю, это была растерянность и печаль, какую испытывают все дети, когда им приходится защищать родителей от жестокой реальности. Детям горько и странно видеть, какими наивными, хрупкими и уязвимыми могут быть взрослые. И их, этих взрослых, конечно же, нужно беречь от всей едкой грязи детства. Можно ли винить ребенка в том, что его возмущают иллюзии взрослых? Большие мягкие руки, тихий шепот в темноте: «Скажи маме и папе, что приключилось. Мы прогоним любую беду». Ребенок, в слезах ищущий утешения, чувствует, как ненадежно убежище, что ему предлагают. Как дом из соломы, домик из веточек. Взрослые не понимают. Они называются большими и сильными, обещают защиту от всего плохого. И видит бог, как отчаянно дети нуждаются в этой защите. Как непроглядна густая тьма детства, беспощадны клинки детской злобы – незамутненной, чистейшей злобы, которую не сдерживают ни возраст, ни наркоз воспитания. Взрослые прекрасно справляются с расцарапанными коленками, упавшим на землю мороженым и потерявшимися куклами, но если они заподозрят истинную причину, по которой мы ревем в три ручья, то сразу выпустят нас из объятий и оттолкнут от себя с ужасом и отвращением. И все же мы – маленькие и напуганные, хотя и страшные в своих лютых желаниях. Нам нужна эта уютная глупость взрослых. Даже зная, что это лишь иллюзия, мы все равно плачем и прячемся у них на коленях, как в домике, но говорим только об уроненных в грязь леденцах или потерянных плюшевых медвежатах и получаем себе в утешение новую конфету или игрушку. Мы обходимся этим малым, чтобы не оставаться один на один с черной бездной у нас в голове, от которой нет избавления, защиты и утешения. Но мы все-таки выживаем – мы вообще очень живучи – и в итоге спасаемся бегством в сумеречную невинность своей собственной взрослости с ее блаженным беспамятством. Есть в Техасе такие места, где муха живет десять тысяч лет и человек не может умереть в срок. Нечто странное творится со временем. Слишком много там неба, слишком много там миль между трещинками и складками на безысходно ровной земле. Хорст говорил, что теперь мы все проживем дольше положенного, потому что "зимуем в этих оголённых пространствах". – У нас любовь, – говорит она. Это звучит, как ЛЮБ[сердечко]ВЬ. – Он хочет на мне жениться! – стонет она. Она изливала слова пополам со слезами, подруга по переписке до мозга костей. Из раза в раз одно и то же. Норвал не был нахрапистым и бесцеремонным. Он был маневренным и терпеливым, как вода, бегущая по камням. «Правда – это всегда оскорбление или шутка. Ложь обычно изящнее и тоньше. Мы её любим. Природа лжи – доставлять удовольствие. Правда не озабочена чьим-то удобством». "Есть лжецы и похуже врача-шарлатана. Это его пациенты." Порой, когда я просто смотрела на Ала или Хрустальную Лил, мне хотелось схватить монтировку и стукнуть их по голове. Не для того, чтобы убить, а чтобы разбудить. Папа расхаживал с важным видом, мама все глубже и глубже погружалась в себя, оба витали в своих облаках и утратили всякую связь с реальностью, как я ее понимала. Наверное, мне хотелось, чтобы они защитили меня от всех горестей и обид, от разрушительной муки ревности. Я мечтала вернуться в детство, где мама и папа были большими и сильными и могли уберечь меня от моей собственной злобы. «Почему? Вы спрашиваете, почему? Я думал, вы сами мне скажете. Я не в том положении, чтобы знать. Знать – это ваша работа. Я могу лишь догадываться. У меня есть подозрение, что людям нравится, когда их унижают. Они готовы ползать на брюхе перед каждым снобом. Люди считают, что если парень ведет себя, словно он Тутанхамон, а все остальные – ослиное дерьмо, значит, он аристократ». Детям приходится постигать самые важные вещи без помощи взрослых, столь озабоченных тем, чтобы научить их всему остальному.
Katherine Dunn (Geek Love)
Because I only want what’s best for you. I only want you to be happy.” “Why?” Charlie gave a frustrated growl, grabbed her hand and yanked her into his arms. The towel fell to the sand behind her. “Because, Geek Girl, I fucking love you. And if you’re not happy, I can’t be happy.” And with that, he crushed his lips to hers, and kissed her as though there were no tomorrow. As though he’d almost lost the woman he loved and couldn’t quite believe he held her in his arms again. As though he’d never let her go.
Jess Dee (More Than Lovers (More Than, #2))
You remember: countless drives by night, two hours north or south from home to your grandparents’ house and back again, you in the back seat with your head on a pillow staring out the window at the stars, so lost in your imagination, so lost in some powerful adventure of your devising, so caught up in the lives of men and women filling your head with their flesh and blood that you might as well have slipped from this world into another. Inside your head: that was reality. Those were the real people. Those were the real people you wanted to become: sometimes the more dangerous, the better.
Hope Nicholson (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls)
The invisibility factor of women in this industry is not unlike the invisibility of girl geeks. We know we exist, but everyone else seems to think we’re an enigma every time they get the notion to write about us and what we apparently want. What we want isn’t any different than what anyone wants. Good stories. With characters we can relate to or identify with or that are interesting to read about. And we’d like to feel welcome, not the perpetual other. We don’t want to feel excluded or like props in every narrative. We don’t want or need every story to be about a girl character. But we’d like them to be treated with the same care and attention male characters are. And it is possible, even in male dominated narratives.
Mariah Huehner (Whedonistas: A Celebration of the Worlds of Joss Whedon by the Women Who Love Them)
C. P. Snow was right about the need to respect both of “the two cultures,” science and the humanities. But even more important today is understanding how they intersect. Those who helped lead the technology revolution were people in the tradition of Ada, who could combine science and the humanities. From her father came a poetic streak and from her mother a mathematical one, and it instilled in her a love for what she called “poetical science.” Her father defended the Luddites who smashed mechanical looms, but Ada loved how punch cards instructed those looms to weave beautiful patterns, and she envisioned how this wondrous combination of art and technology could be manifest in computers. (...) This innovation will come from people who are able to link beauty to engineering, humanity to technology, and poetry to processors. In other words, it will come from the spiritual heirs of Ada Lovelace, creators who can flourish where the arts intersect with the sciences and who have a rebellious sense of wonder that opens them to the beauty of both.
Walter Isaacson (The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution)
Kyle worked in technology; he knew it would only be a matter of time before the video of Daniela and the A-list actor went viral and spread everywhere. So he did what any pissed-off, red-blooded computer geek would do after catching his girlfriend giving an underwater blowjob to another man: he hacked into Twitter and deleted both the video and her earlier tweet from the site. Then, raging at the world that had devolved so much in civility that 140-character breakups had become acceptable, he shut down the entire network in a denial-of-service attack that lasted two days. And so began the Great Twitter Outage of 2011. The Earth nearly stopped on its axis. Panic and mayhem ensued as Twitter unsuccessfully attempted to counteract what it deemed the most sophisticated hijacking they’d ever experienced. Meanwhile, the FBI waited for either a ransom demand or political statement from the so-called “Twitter Terrorist.” But neither was forthcoming, as the Twitter Terrorist had no political agenda, already was worth millions, and had most inconveniently taken off to Tijuana, Mexico to get shit-faced drunk on cheap tequila being served by an eight-fingered bartender named Esteban.
Julie James (A Lot like Love (FBI/US Attorney, #2))
Now give me some advice about how to take full advantage of this city. I’m always looking to improve my odds.” “Just what I’d expect from a horny actuary.” “I’m serious.” Carlos reflected for a moment on the problem at hand. He actually had never needed or tried to take full advantage of the city in order to meet women, but he thought about all of his friends who regularly did. His face lit up as he thought of some helpful advice: “Get into the arts.” “The arts?” “Yeah.” “But I’m not artistic.” “It doesn’t matter. Many women are into the arts. Theater. Painting. Dance. They love that stuff.” “You want me to get into dance? Earthquakes have better rhythm than me…And can you really picture me in those tights?” “Take an art history class. Learn photography. Get involved in a play or an independent film production. Get artsy, Sammy. I’m telling you, the senoritas dig that stuff.” “Really?” “Yeah. You need to sign up for a bunch of artistic activities. But you can’t let on that it’s all just a pretext to meet women. You have to take a real interest in the subject or they’ll quickly sniff out your game.” “I don’t know…It’s all so foreign to me…I don’t know the first thing about being artistic.” “Heeb, this is the time to expand your horizons. And you’re in the perfect city to do it. New York is all about reinventing yourself. Get out of your comfort zones. Become more of a Renaissance man. That’s much more interesting to women.
Zack Love (Sex in the Title: A Comedy about Dating, Sex, and Romance in NYC (Back When Phones Weren't So Smart))