For Whom The Bells Toll Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to For Whom The Bells Toll. Here they are! All 100 of them:

β€œ
There's no one thing that's true. It's all true.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend's or of thine own were: any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee.
”
”
John Donne (No man is an island – A selection from the prose)
β€œ
Any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee.
”
”
John Donne (Meditation XVII - Meditation 17)
β€œ
I loved you when I saw you today and I loved you always but I never saw you before.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
The world is a fine place and worth fighting for and I hate very much to leave it.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I had an inheritance from my father, It was the moon and the sun. And though I roam all over the world, The spending of it’s never done.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
This was a big storm and he might as well enjoy it. It was ruining everything, but you might as well enjoy it
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
There is nothing else than now. There is neither yesterday, certainly, nor is there any tomorrow. How old must you be before you know that? There is only now, and if now is only two days, then two days is your life and everything in it will be in proportion. This is how you live a life in two days. And if you stop complaining and asking for what you never will get, you will have a good life. A good life is not measured by any biblical span.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
For what are we born if not to aid one another?
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
No animal has more liberty than the cat, but it buries the mess it makes. The cat is the best anarchist.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
How little we know of what there is to know. I wish that I were going to live a long time instead of going to die today because I have learned much about life in these four days; more, I think than in all other time. I'd like to be an old man to really know. I wonder if you keep on learning or if there is only a certain amount each man can understand. I thought I knew so many things that I know nothing of. I wish there was more time.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls (War Promo))
β€œ
Are you a communist?" "No I am an anti-fascist" "For a long time?" "Since I have understood fascism.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
If we win here we will win everywhere. The world is a fine place and worth the fighting for and I hate very much to leave it.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
There will always be people who say it does not exist because they cannot have it. But I tell you it is true and that you have it and that you are lucky even if you die tomorrow.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
He was just a coward and that was the worst luck any many could have.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
There are many who do not know they are fascists but will find it out when the time comes.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
But did thee feel the earth move?
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I suppose if a man has something once, always something of it remains.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Do you know how an ugly woman feels? Do you know what it is to be ugly all your life and inside to feel that you are beautiful? It is very rare.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I love thee and thou art so lovely and so wonderful and so beautiful and it does such things to me to be with thee that I feel as though I wanted to die when I am loving thee.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Dying was nothing and he had no picture of it nor fear of it in his mind. But living was a field of grain blowing in the wind on the side of a hill. Living was a hawk in the sky. Living was an earthen jar of water in the dust of the threshing with the grain flailed out and the chaff blowing. Living was a horse between your legs and a carbine under one leg and a hill and a valley and a stream with trees along it and the far side of the valley and the hills beyond.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee.
”
”
John Donne (No man is an island – A selection from the prose)
β€œ
Never think that war, no matter how necessary nor how justified, is not a crime. Ask the infantry and ask the dead.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
But in the meantime all the life you have or ever will have is today, tonight, tomorrow, today, tonight, tomorrow, over and over again (I hope), ...
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
You never kill anyone you want to kill in a war, he said to himself.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I am thee and thou art me and all of one is the other.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Oh, now, now, now, the only now, and above all now, and there is no other now but thou now and now is thy prophet.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Today is only one day in all the days that will ever be.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
The world is a fine place, and worth fighting for.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I am an old man who will live until I die," Anselmo said.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Everything you have is to give. Thou art a phenomenon of philosophy and an unfortunate man.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls (War Promo))
β€œ
And another thing. Don’t ever kid yourself about loving some one. It is just that most people are not lucky enough ever to have it. You never had it before and now you have it. What you have with Maria, whether it lasts just through today and a part of tomorrow, or whether it lasts for a long life is the most important thing that can happen to a human being. There will always be people who say it does not exist because they cannot have it. But I tell you it is true and that you have it and that you are lucky even if you die tomorrow.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
If you stop complaining and asking for what you never will get, you will have a good life. A good life is not measured by any biblical span.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Of all men the drunkard is the foulest. The thief when he is not stealing is like another. The extortioner does not practice in the home. The murderer when he is at home can wash his hands. But the drunkard stinks and vomits in this own bed and dissolves his organs in alcohol.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
He did not care for the lying at first. He hated it. Then later he had come to like it. It was part of being an insider but it was a very corrupting business.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I am drunk, seest thou? When I am not drunk I do not talk. You have never heard me talk much. But an intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend his time with fools.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
But are there not many fascists in your country?" "There are many who do not know they are fascists but will find it out when the times comes.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
The world is a fine place and worth the fighting for and I hate very much to leave it. And you had a lot of luck, he told himself, to have had such a good life. You've had just as good a life as grandfather's though not as long. You've had as good a life as any because of these last days. You do not want to complain when you have been so lucky. I wish there was some way to pass on what I've learned, though.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Thou wilt go now, rabbit. But I go with thee. As long as there is one of us there is both of us.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
For him it was a dark passage which led to nowhere, then to nowhere, then again to nowhere, once again to nowhere, always and forever to nowhere, heavy on the elbows in the earth to nowhere, dark, never any end to nowhere, hung on all time always to unknowing nowhere, this time and again for always to nowhere, now not to be borne once again always and to nowhere, now beyond all bearing up, up, up and into nowhere, suddenly, scaldingly, holdingly all nowhere gone and time absolutely still and they were both there, time having stopped and he felt the earth move out and away from under them.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
No Pilar," Agustin said. "You are not smart. You are brave. You are loyal. You have decision. You have intuition. Much decision and much heart. But you are not smart.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls (War Promo))
β€œ
Now, feel. I am thee and thou art me and all of one is the other. And feel now. Thou hast no heart but mine.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Bigotry is an odd thing. To be bigoted you have to be absolutely sure you are right and nothing makes that surety and righteousness like continence. Continence is the foe of heresy.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
For her everything was red, orange, gold-red from the sun on the closed eyes, and it all was that color, all of it, the filling, the possessing, the having, all of that color, all in a blindness of that color." - Ernest Hemingway,
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom The Bell Tolls - The Snows Of Kilimanjaro - Fiesta - The Short Happy Life Of Francis Macomber - Across The River And Into The Trees - The Old Man And The Sea)
β€œ
Today is only one day in all the days that will ever be. But what will happen in all the other days that ever come can depend on what you do today.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Every one needs to talk to some one," the woman said. "Before we had religion and other nonsense. Now for every one there should be some one to whom one can speak frankly, for all the valor that one could have one becomes very alone.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
He was violating the second rule of the two rules for getting on well with people that speak Spanish; give the men tobacco and leave the women alone
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Clearly I miss Him, having been brought up in religion. But now a man must be responsible to himself.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
All mankind is of one author, and is one volume; when one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language; and every chapter must be so translated... As therefore the bell that rings to a sermon, calls not upon the preacher only, but upon the congregation to come: so this bell calls us all... No man is an island, entire of itself... any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.
”
”
John Donne (Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions and Death's Duel)
β€œ
let us sleep," he said and he felt the long light body, warm against him, comforting against him, abolishing loneliness against him, magically, by a simple touching of flanks, of shoulders and of feet, making an alliance against death with him.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I obscenity in the milk of my shame.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Good. I go. And if thou dost not love me, I love thee enough for both.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I wish I did not think about it so much, he thought.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I have watched them all day and they are the same men that we are. I believe that I could walk up to the mill and knock on the door and I would be welcome except that they have orders to challenge all travelers and ask to see their papers. It is only orders that come between us. Those men are not fascists. I call them so, but they are not. They are poor men as we are. They should never be fighting against us and I do not like to think of the killing.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
So if your life trades seventy years for seventy hours I have that value now and I am lucky enough to know it. And if there is not any such thing as a long time, nor the rest of your lives, nor from now on, but there is only now, why then now is the thing to praise and I am very happy with it.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
You have never heard me talk much. But an intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend his time with fools.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Heresy is the foe of countenance
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
So now do not worry, take what you have, and do your work and you will have a long life and a very merry one.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Spanish girls make wonderful wives. I've never had one so I know.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
There is a lot of time between now and the fall term. There is a lot of time between now and the day after tomorrow if you want to put it that way ...
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
There is no language so filthy as Spanish. There are words for all the vile words in English and there are other words and expressions that are used only in countries where blasphemy keeps pace with the austerity of religion.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
That I am a foreigner is not my fault. I would rather have been born here.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
How little we know of what there is to know.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
But you have no house and no courtyard to your no-house, he thought. You have no family but a brother who goes to battle tomorrow and you own nothing but the wind and the sun and an empty belly. The wind is small, he thought, and there is no sun. You have four grenades in your pocket but they are only good to throw away. You have a carbine on your back but it is only good to give away bullets. You have a message to give away. And you're full of crap that you can give to the earth, he grinned in the dark. You can anoint it also with urine. Everything you have is to give. Thou art a phenomenon of philosophy and an unfortunate man, he told himself and grinned again.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
But I could tell thee of other things, InglΓ©s, and do not doubt what thou simply cannot see nor cannot hear. Thou canst not hear what a dog hears. Nor canst thou smell what a dog smells. But already thou hast experienced a little of what can happen to man.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
To understand is to forgive.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
He missed the prayers but he thought it would be unfair and hypocritical to say them and he did not wish to ask any favors or for any different treatment than all the men were receiving.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
He had only one thing to do and that was what he should think about and he must think it out clearly and take everything as it came along, and not worry. To worry was a bad as to be afraid. It simply made things more difficult.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
And send not to ask for whom the fucking bell tolls, because you're not going to like the answer.
”
”
Mike Carey (Vicious Circle (Felix Castor, #2))
β€œ
What do you want? Everything. I want everything and I will take whatever I get.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Viva my husband who was Mayor of this town
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I would not wish to bring either a son or a daughter into this world as this world is. And also you take all the love I have to give
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
It is the fault of the orders, which are too rigid. There is no allowance for a change in circumstance.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Oh, geyser, my geyser, Let us spew then, you and I, Upon this midnight dreary, while we ponder Whose woods are these? For we have not gone gentle into this good night, But have wandered lonely as clouds. We seek to know for whom the bell tolls, So I hope, springs eternal, That the time has come to talk of many things!
”
”
Rick Riordan (The Hidden Oracle (The Trials of Apollo, #1))
β€œ
Who do you suppose has it easier? Ones with religion or just taking it straight? It comforts them very much but we know there is no thing to fear. It is only missing it that's bad. Dying is only bad when it takes a long time and hurts so much that it humiliates you.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
What you have with Maria, whether it lasts just through today and a part of tomorrow, or whether it lasts for a long life is the most important thing that can happen to a human being. There will always be people who say it does not exist because they cannot have it. But I tell you it is true and that you have it and that you are lucky even if you die tomorrow.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
You felt, in spite of all bureaucracy and inefficiency and party strife something that was like the feeling you expected to have and did not have when you made your first communion. It was a feeling of consecration to a duty toward all of the oppressed of the world which would be as difficult and embarrasing to speak about as religious experience and yet it was as authentic as the feeling you had when you heard Bach, or stood in Chartres Cathedral or the Cathedral at LeΓ³n and saw the light coming through the great windows; or when you saw Mantegna and Greco and Brueghel in the Prado. It gave you a part in something that you could believe in wholly and completely and in which you felt an absolute brotherhood with the others who were engaged in it. It was something that you had never known before but that you had experienced now and you gave such importance to it and the reasons for it that you own death seemed of complete unimportance; only a thing to be avoided because it would interfere with the performance of your duty. But the best thing was that there was something you could do about this feeling and this necessity too. You could fight.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
He felt the long light body, warm against him, comforting against him, abolishing loneliness against him, magically, by a simple touching of flanks, of shoulders and of feet, making an alliance against death with him.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Augustin stood there looking down at him and cursed him speaking slowly clearly bitterly and contemptuously and cursing as steadily as though he were dumping manure on a field lifting it with a dung fork out of a wagon.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Look at the ugliness. Yet one has a feeling within one that blinds a man while he loves you. You, with that feeling, blind him, and blind yourself. Then, one day, for no reason, he sees you as ugly as you really are and he is not blind anymore and then you see yourself as ugly as he sees you and you lose your man and your feeling... After a while, when you are as ugly as I am, as ugly as women can be, then, as I say after a while the feeling, the idiotic feeling that you are beautiful, grows slowly in one again. It grows like a cabbage. And then, when the feeling is grown, another man sees you and thinks you are beautiful and it is all to do over.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
If he had known how many men in history have had to use a hill to die on it would not have cheered him any for, in the moment he was passing through, men are not impressed by what has happened to the other men in similar circumstances any more than a widow of one day is helped by the knowledge that other loved husbands have died.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Coward,” Pablo said bitterly. β€œYou treat a man as coward because he has a tactical sense. Because he can see the results of an idiocy in advance. It is not cowardly to know what is foolish.” β€œNeither is it foolish to know what is cowardly,” said Anselmo, unable to resist making the phrase.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I love thee as I love all that we have fought for. I love thee as I love liberty and dignity and the rights of all men to work and not be hungry. I love thee as I love Madrid that we have defended and as I love all my comrades that have died. And many have died. Many. Many. Thou canst not think how many. But I love thee as I love what I love most in the world and I love thee more.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I hope I am not for the killing, Anselmo was thinking. I think that after the war there will have to be some great penance done for the killing. If we no longer have religion after the war then I think there must be some form of civic penance organized that all may be cleansed from the killing or else we will never have a true and human basis for living. The killing is necessary, I know, but still the doing of it is very bad for a man and I think that, after all this is over and we have won the war, there must be a penance of some kind for the cleansing of us all.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
How would that premise stand up if he examined it? That was probably why the Communists were always cracking down on Bohemiansism. When you were drunk or when you committed adultery you recognised your own personal fallability of that so mutable substitute for the apostles' creed, the party line. Down with Bohemianism, the sin of Majakowski.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
After a while, when you are as ugly as I am, as ugly as women can be, then, as I say, after a while the feeling, the idiotic feeling that you are beautiful, grows slowly in one again. It grows like a cabbage. And then, when the feeling is grown, another man sees you and thinks you are beautiful and it is all to do over. Now I think I am past it, but it still might come. You are lucky, 'guapa', that you are not ugly
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom The Bell Tolls)
β€œ
This was the greatest gift that he had, the talent that fitted him for war; that ability not to ignore but to despise whatever bad ending there could be. This quality was destroyed by too much responsibility for others or the necessity of undertaking something ill planned or badly conceived. For in such things the bad ending, failure, could not be ignored. It was not simply a possibility of harm to one's self, which could be ignored. He knew he himself was nothing, and he knew death was nothing. He knew that truly, as truly as he knew anything. In the last few days he had learned that he himself, with another person, could be everything. But inside himself he knew that this was the exception. That we have had, he thought. In that I have been most fortunate. That was given to me, perhaps, because I never asked for it. That cannot be taken away nor lost. But that is over and done with now on this morning and what there is to do now is our work.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Nessun uomo Γ¨ un'isola, completo in se stesso; ogni uomo Γ¨ un pezzo del continente, una parte del tutto. Se anche solo una nuvola venisse lavata via dal mare, l'Europa ne sarebbe diminuita, come se le mancasse un promontorio, come se venisse a mancare una dimora di amici tuoi, o la tua stessa casa. La morte di qualsiasi uomo mi sminuisce, perchΓ© io sono parte dell'umanitΓ . E dunque non chiedere mai per chi suona la campana: suona per te.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
And Barcelona. You should see Barcelona.” β€œHow is it?” β€œIt is all still comic opera. First it was the paradise of the crackpots and the romantic revolutionists. Now it is the paradise of the fake soldier. The soldiers who like to wear uniforms, who like to strut and swagger and wear red-and-black scarves. Who like everything about war except to fight. Valencia makes you sick and Barcelona makes you laugh.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
No. The two kinds of fools we have in Russia," karkov grinned and began. "First there is the winter fool. The winter fool comes to the door of your house and he knocks loudly. You go to the door and you see him there and you have never seen him before. He is an impressive sight. He is a very big man and he has on high boots and a fur coat and a fur hat and he is all covered with snow. First he stamps his boots and snow falls from them. Then he takes off his fur coat and shakes it and more snow falls from them, Then he takes off his fur hat and knocks it against the door. More snow falls from his fur hat. Then he stamps his boots again and advances into the room. Then you look at him and you see he is a fool. That is the winter fool." "Now in the summer you see a fool going down the street and he is waving his arms and jerking his head from side to side and everybody from two hundred yards away can tell he is a fool. that is a summer fool. This economist is a winter fool.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
He lay flat on the brown, pine-needled floor of the forest, his chin on his folded arms, and high overhead the wind blew in the tops of the pine trees. The mountainside sloped gently where he lay; but below it was steep and he could see the dark of the oiled road winding through the pass. There was a stream alongside the road and water of the dam, white in the summer sunlight.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Robert Jordan saw them there on the slope, close to him now, and below he saw the road and the bridge and the long lines of vehicles below it. He was completely integrated now and he took a good long look at everything. Then he looked up at the sky. There were big white clouds in it. He touched the palm of his hand against the pine needles where he lay and he touched the bark of the pine trunk that he lay behind... He was waiting until the officer reached the sunlit place where the first trees of the pine forest joined the green slope of the meadow. He could feel his heart beating against the pine needle floor of the forest.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
That's my town,' Joaquin said. 'What a fine town, but how the buena gente, the good people of that town, have suffered in this war.' Then, his face grave, 'There they shot my father. My mother. My brother-in-law and now my sister.' 'What barbarians,' Robert Jordan said. How many times had he heard this? How many times had he watched people say it with difficulty? How many times had he seen their eyes fill and their throats harden with the difficulty of saying my father, or my brother, or my mother, or my sister? He could not remember how many times he heard them mention their dead in this way. Nearly always they spoke as this boy did now; suddenly and apropos of the mention of the town and always you said, 'What barbarians.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
He smelled the odor of the pine boughs under him, the piney smell of the crushed needles and the sharper odor of the resinous sap from the cut limbs. ... This is the smell I love. This and fresh-cut clover, the crushed sage as you ride after cattle, wood-smoke and the burning leaves of autumn. That must be the odor of nostalgia, the smell of the smoke from the piles of raked leaves burning in the streets in the fall in Missoula. Which would you rather smell? Sweet grass the Indians used in their baskets? Smoked leather? The odor of the ground in the spring after rain? The smell of the sea as you walk through the gorse on a headland in Galicia? Or the wind from the land as you come in toward Cuba in the dark? That was the odor of cactus flowers, mimosa and the sea-grape shrubs. Or would you rather smell frying bacon in the morning when you are hungry? Or coffee in the morning? Or a Jonathan apple as you bit into it? Or a cider mill in the grinding, or bread fresh from the oven?
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
You had to have these peasant leaders quickly in this sort of war and a real peasant leader might be a little too much like Pablo. You couldn't wait for the real Peasant Leader to arrive and he might have too many peasant characteristics when he did. So you had to manifacture one. At that, from what he had seen of Campesino, with his black beard, his thick negroid lips, and his feverish, staring eyes, he thought he might give almost as much trouble as a real peasant leader. The last time he had seen him he seemed to have gotten to believe his own publicity and think he was a peasant.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
His copy was full of lofty echoes: Greek Tragedy; Damocle's sword; manna from heaven; the myth of Sisyphus; the last of the Mohicans; hydra-headed and Circe-voiced; experiments with truth; discovery of India; biblical resonance; the lessons of Vedanta; the centre does not hold; the road not taken; the mimic men; for whom the bell tolls; a hundred visions and revisions; the power and the glory; the heart of the matter; the heart of darkness; the agony and the ecstasy; sands of time; riddle of the Sphinx; test of tantalus; murmurs of mortality; Falstaffian figure; Dickensian darkness; ...
”
”
Tarun J. Tejpal (The Alchemy of Desire)
β€œ
one cup of it took the place of the evening papers, of all the old evenings in cafΓ©s, of all chestnut trees that would be in bloom now in this month, of the great slow horses of the outer boulevards, of book shops, of kiosques, and of galleries, of the Parc Montsouris, of the Stade Buffalo, and of the Butte Chaumont, of the Guaranty Trust Company and the Ile de la CitΓ©, of Foyot’s old hotel, and of being able to read and relax in the evening; of all the things he had enjoyed and forgotten and that came back to him when he tasted that opaque, bitter, tongue-numbing, brain-warming, stomach-warming, idea-changing liquid alchemy.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
I was born ugly. All my life I have been ugly. You, 'InglΓ©s', who know nothing about women. Do you know how an ugly woman feels? Do you know what it is to be ugly all your life and inside to feel that you are beautiful? I would have made a good man, but I am all woman and all ugly. Yet many men have loved me and I have loved many men. It is curious. Listen, 'InglΓ©s', this is interesting. Look at me, as ugly as I am. Look closely, Thou art not ugly." "'QuΓ© no?' Don't lie to me. Or," she laughed the deep laugh. "Has it begun to work with thee? No. That is a joke. No. Look at the ugliness. Yet one has a feeling within one that blinds a man while he loves you. You, with that feeling, blind him, and blind yourself. Then one day, for no reason, he sees you ugly as you really are and he is not blind any more and then you see yourself as ugly as he sees you and you lose your man and your feeling. Do you understand, guapa?
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
Then there was the smell of heather crushed and the roughness of the bent stalks under her head and the sun bright on her closed eyes and all his life he would remember the curve of her throat with her head pushed back into the heather roots and her lips that moved smally and by themselves and the fluttering of the lashes on the eyes tight closed against the sun and against everything, and for her everything was red, orange gold-red from the sun on the closed eyes, and it all was that color, all of it, the filling, the possessing, the having, all of that color, all in a blindness of that color. For him it was a dark passage which led to nowhere, then to nowhere, then again to nowhere, once again to nowhere, always and forever to nowhere, heavy on the elbows in the earth to nowhere, dark, never any end to nowhere, hung on all time always to unknowing nowhere, this time and again for always to nowhere, now not to be borne once again always and to nowhere, now beyond all bearing up, up, up and into nowhere, suddenly, scaldingly, holdingly all nowhere gone and time absolutely still and they were both there, time having stopped and he felt the earth move out and away from under them.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom the Bell Tolls)
β€œ
There was no wind, and, outside now of the warm air of the cave, heavy with smoke of both tobacco and charcoal, with the odor of cooked rice and meat, saffron, pimentos, and oil, the tarry, wine-spilled smell of the big skin hung beside the door, hung by the neck and all the four legs extended, wine drawn from a plug fitted in one leg, wine that spilled a little onto the earth of the floor, settling the dust smell; out now from the odors of different herbs whose names he did not know that hung in bunches from the ceiling, with long ropes of garlic, away now from the copper-penny, red wine and garlic, horse sweat and man sweat died in the clothing (acrid and gray the man sweat, sweet and sickly the dried brushed-off lather of horse sweat, of the men at the table, Robert Jordan breathed deeply of the clear night air of the mountains that smelled of the pines and of the dew on the grass in the meadow by the stream.
”
”
Ernest Hemingway (For Whom The Bell Tolls - The Snows Of Kilimanjaro - Fiesta - The Short Happy Life Of Francis Macomber - Across The River And Into The Trees - The Old Man And The Sea)