Flaubert Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Flaubert. Here they are! All 200 of them:

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Do not read, as children do, to amuse yourself, or like the ambitious, for the purpose of instruction. No, read in order to live.
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Gustave Flaubert
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Books say: She did this because. Life says: She did this. Books are where things are explained to you; life is where things aren't. I'm not surprised some people prefer books.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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Do not read as children do to enjoy themselves, or, as the ambitious do to educate themselves. No, read to live.
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Gustave Flaubert
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Be steady and well-ordered in your life so that you can be fierce and original in your work.
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Gustave Flaubert
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There is not a particle of life which does not bear poetry within it
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Gustave Flaubert
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Human speech is like a cracked kettle on which we tap crude rhythms for bears to dance to, while we long to make music that will melt the stars.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Be regular and orderly in your life, so that you may be violent and original in your work.
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Gustave Flaubert
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Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.
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Gustave Flaubert
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She wanted to die, but she also wanted to live in Paris.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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One can be the master of what one does, but never of what one feels.
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Gustave Flaubert
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Never touch your idols: the gilding will stick to your fingers." (Il ne faut pas toucher aux idoles: la dorure en reste aux mains.)
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Are the days of winter sunshine just as sad for you, too? When it is misty, in the evenings, and I am out walking by myself, it seems to me that the rain is falling through my heart and causing it to crumble into ruins.
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Gustave Flaubert (November)
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Doubt … is an illness that comes from knowledge and leads to madness.
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Gustave Flaubert (Memoirs of a Madman (Hesperus Classics))
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It’s hard to communicate anything exactly and that’s why perfect relationships between people are difficult to find.
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Gustave Flaubert (Sentimental Education)
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I am irritated by my own writing. I am like a violinist whose ear is true, but whose fingers refuse to reproduce precisely the sound he hears within.
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Gustave Flaubert
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To be stupid, and selfish, and to have good health are the three requirements for happiness - though if stupidity is lacking, the others are useless.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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Women scheme when they are weak, they lie out of fear. Men scheme when they are strong, they lie out of arrogance.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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An infinity of passion can be contained in one minute, like a crowd in a small space.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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I was working on the proof of one of my poems all the morning, and took out a comma. In the afternoon I put it back again.
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Oscar Wilde
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The art of writing is the art of discovering what you believe.
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Gustave Flaubert
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The greatest patriotism is to tell your country when it is behaving dishonorably, foolishly, viciously.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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Love, she thought, must come suddenly, with great outbursts and lightnings,--a hurricane of the skies, which falls upon life, revolutionises it, roots up the will like a leaf, and sweeps the whole heart into the abyss.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Books say: She did this because. Life says: She did this. Books are where things are explained to you; life is where things aren't. I'm not surprised some people prefer books. Books make sense of life. The only problem is that the lives they make sense of are other people's lives, never your own.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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To be stupid, selfish, and have good health are three requirements for happiness, though if stupidity is lacking, all is lost.
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Gustave Flaubert
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It is always sad to leave a place to which one knows one will never return. Such are the melancolies du voyage: perhaps they are one of the most rewarding things about traveling.
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Gustave Flaubert (Flaubert in Egypt: A Sensibility on Tour)
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One's duty is to feel what is great, cherish the beautiful, and to not accept the conventions of society with the ignominy that it imposes upon us.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary: Provincial Lives)
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The one way of tolerating existence is to lose oneself in literature as in a perpetual orgy.
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Gustave Flaubert
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What better occupation, really, than to spend the evening at the fireside with a book, with the wind beating on the windows and the lamp burning bright...Haven't you ever happened to come across in a book some vague notion that you've had, some obscure idea that returns from afar and that seems to express completely your most subtle feelings?
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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At the bottom of her heart, however, she was waiting for something to happen. Like shipwrecked sailors, she turned despairing eyes upon the solitude of her life, seeking afar off some white sail in the mists of the horizon. She did not know what this chance would be, what wind would bring it her, towards what shore it would drive her, if it would be a shallop or a three-decker, laden with anguish or full of bliss to the portholes. But each morning, as she awoke, she hoped it would come that day; she listened to every sound, sprang up with a start, wondered that it did not come; then at sunset, always more saddened, she longed for the morrow.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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You don’t make art out of good intentions.
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Gustave Flaubert
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There is no truth. There is only perception.
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Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
And there was that poor sucker Flaubert rolling around on his floor for three days looking for the right word.
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Dorothy Parker
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Everything, even herself, was now unbearable to her. She wished that, taking wing like a bird, she could fly somewhere, far away to regions of purity, and there grow young again.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Pleasure is found first in anticipation, later in memory.
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Gustave Flaubert
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You forget everything. The hours slip by. You travel in your chair through centuries you seem to see before you, your thoughts are caught up in the story, dallying with the details or following the course of the plot, you enter into characters, so that it seems as if it were your own heart beating beneath their costumes.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Everyone, either from modesty or egotism, hides away the best and most delicate of his soul’s possessions; to gain the esteem of others, we must only ever show our ugliest sides; this is how we keep ourselves on the common level
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Gustave Flaubert (November)
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I tried to discover, in the rumor of forests and waves, words that other men could not hear, and I pricked up my ears to listen to the revelation of their harmony.
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Gustave Flaubert (November)
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There are two infinities that confuse me: the one in my soul devours me; the one around me will crush me
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Gustave Flaubert
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Stupidity lies in wanting to draw conclusions.
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Gustave Flaubert
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You must write for yourself, above all. That is your only hope of creating something beautiful.
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Gustave Flaubert
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I go dreaming into the future, where I see nothing, nothing. I have no plans, no idea, no project, and, what is worse, no ambition. Something – the eternal β€˜what’s the use?’ – sets its bronze barrier across every avenue that I open up in the realm of hypothesis.
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Gustave Flaubert (Flaubert in Egypt: A Sensibility on Tour)
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But, in her life, nothing was going to happen. Such was the will of God! The future was a dark corridor, and at the far end the door was bolted.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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I don't believe that happiness is possible, but I think tranquility is.
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Gustave Flaubert
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She would have liked not to be alive, or to be always asleep.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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She was the amoureuse of all the novels, the heroine of all the plays, the vague β€œshe” of all the poetry books.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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The writer must be universal in sympathy and an outcast by nature: only then can he see clearly.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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The denigration of those we love always detaches us from them in some degree. Never touch your idols: the gilding will stick to your fingers.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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The public wants work which flatters its illusions.
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Gustave Flaubert
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(on grief) And you do come out of it, that’s true. After a year, after five. But you don’t come out of it like a train coming out of a tunnel, bursting through the downs into sunshine and that swift, rattling descent to the Channel; you come out of it as a gull comes out of an oil-slick. You are tarred and feathered for life.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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He had the vanity to believe men did not like him – while men simply did not know him.
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Gustave Flaubert (November)
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A pier is a disappointed bridge; yet stare at it for long enough and you can dream it to the other side of the Channel.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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Haven't you ever happened to come across in a book some vague notion that you've had, some obscure idea that returns from afar and that seems to express completely your most subtle feelings?
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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He had carefully avoided her out of the natural cowardice that characterizes the stronger sex.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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We must laugh and cry, enjoy and suffer, in a word, vibrate to our full capacity … I think that’s what being really human means.
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Gustave Flaubert
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Of all the icy blasts that blow on love, a request for money is the most chilling.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Writing is a dog’s life, but the only one worth living.
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Gustave Flaubert
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Sadness is a vice.
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Gustave Flaubert
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The more you approach infinity, the deeper you penetrate terror
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Gustave Flaubert
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The idea of bringing someone into the world fills me with horror. I would curse myself if I were a father. A son of mine! Oh no, no, no! May my entire flesh perish and may I transmit to no one the aggravations and the disgrace of existence.
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Gustave Flaubert
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An author in his book must be like God in the universe, present everywhere and visible nowhere.
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Gustave Flaubert
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As you get older, the heart shed its leaves like a tree. You cannot hold out against certain winds. Each day tears away a few more leaves; and then there are the storms that break off several branches at one go. And while nature’s greenery grows back again in the spring, that of the heart never grows back.
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Gustave Flaubert
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He feared me as many men fear women: because their mistresses (or their wives) understand them. They are scarcely adult, some men: they wish women to understand them, and to that end they tell them all their secrets; and then, when they are properly understood, they hate their women for understanding them.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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You need a high degree of corruption or a very big heart to love absolutely everything
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Gustave Flaubert (November)
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And she felt as though she had been there, on that bench, for an eternity. For an infinity of passion can be contained in one minute, like a crowd in a small space.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Be regular and orderly in your life like a bourgeois, so that you may be violent and original in your work.
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Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
La parole humaine est comme un chaudron fΓͺlΓ© oΓΉ nous battons des mΓ©lodies Γ  faire danser les ours, quand on voudrait attendrir les Γ©toiles.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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I'm absolutely removed from the world at such times...The hours go by without my knowing it. Sitting there I'm wandering in countries I can see every detail of - I'm playing a role in the story I'm reading. I actually feel I'm the characters - I live and breath with them.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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After the pain of this disappointment her heart once more stood empty, and the succession of identical days began again.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Talent is a long patience, and originality an effort of will and intense observation.
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Gustave Flaubert
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What wretched poverty of language! To compare stars to diamonds!
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Gustave Flaubert (Flaubert in Egypt: A Sensibility on Tour)
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Mystification is simple; clarity is the hardest thing of all.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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And he beholds the moon; like a rounded fragment of ice filled with motionless light.
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Gustave Flaubert (The Temptation of St. Antony)
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He didn’t really like travel, of course. He liked the idea of travel, and the memory of travel, but not travel itself.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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By trying to understand everything, everything makes me dream
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Gustave Flaubert
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Everything you invent is true: you can be sure of that. Poetry is a subject as precise as geometry.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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Maybe happiness too is a metaphor invented on a day of boredom
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Gustave Flaubert (November)
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[Flaubert] didn’t just hate the railway as such; he hated the way it flattered people with the illusion of progress. What was the point of scientific advance without moral advance? The railway would merely permit more people to move about, meet and be stupid together.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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Everything measurable passes, everything that can be counted has an end. Only three things are infinite: the sky in its stars, the sea in its drops of water, and the heart in its tears.
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Gustave Flaubert (The Letters of Gustave Flaubert, 1830-1857)
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What baffled him was that there should be all this fuss about something so simple as love.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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When you’re young you prefer the vulgar months, the fullness of the seasons. As you grow older you learn to like the in-between times, the months that can’t make up their minds. Perhaps it’s a way of admitting that things can’t ever bear the same certainty again.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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The whole dream of democracy is to raise the proletariat to the level of stupidity attained by the bourgeoisie.
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Gustave Flaubert
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Doesn't it seem to you," asked Madame Bovary, "that the mind moves more freely in the presence of that boundless expanse, that the sight of it elevates the soul and gives rise to thoughts of the infinite and the ideal?
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Love art. Of all lies, it is the least untrue.
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Gustave Flaubert
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Isn’t β€˜not to be bored’ one of the principal goals of life?
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Gustave Flaubert (Flaubert in Egypt: A Sensibility on Tour)
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Anything becomes interesting if you look at it long enough.
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Gustave Flaubert
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What stops me from taking myself seriously, even though I am essentially a serious person, is that I find myself extremely ridiculous, not in the sense of the small-scale ridiculousness of slap-stick comedy, but rather in the sense of ridiculousness that seems intrinsic to human life and that manifests itself in the simplest actions and the most extraordinary gestures.
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Gustave Flaubert
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Deep down, all the while, she was waiting for something to happen. Like a sailor in distress, she kept casting desperate glances over the solitary waster of her life, seeking some white sail in the distant mists of the horizon. She had no idea by what wind it would reach her, toward what shore it would bear her, or what kind of craft it would be – tiny boat or towering vessel, laden with heartbreaks or filled to the gunwhales with rapture. But every morning when she awoke she hoped that today would be the day; she listened for every sound, gave sudden starts, was surprised when nothing happened; and then, sadder with each succeeding sunset, she longed for tomorrow.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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She loved the sea for its storms alone, cared for vegetation only when it grew here and there among ruins. She had to extract a kind of personal advantage from things and she rejected as useless everything that promised no immediate gratification β€” for her temperament was more sentimental than artistic, and what she was looking for was emotions, not scenery.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Pride makes us long for a solution to things – a solution, a purpose, a final cause; but the better telescopes become, the more stars appear.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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Years passed; and he endured the idleness of his intelligence and the inertia of his heart.
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Gustave Flaubert (Sentimental Education)
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The most glorious moments in your life are not the so-called days of success, but rather those days when out of dejection and despair you feel rise in you a challenge to life, and the promise of future accomplishments.
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Gustave Flaubert
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[T]he truth is that fullness of soul can sometimes overflow in utter vapidity of language, for none of us can ever express the exact measure of his needs or his thoughts or his sorrows; and human speech is like a cracked kettle on which we tap crude rhythms for bears to dance to, while we long to make music that will melt the stars.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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She was not happy--she never had been. Whence came this insufficiency in life--this instantaneous turning to decay of everything on which she leaned? But if there were somewhere a being strong and beautiful, a valiant nature, full at once of exaltation and refinement, a poet's heart in an angel's form, a lyre with sounding chords ringing out elegiac epithalamia to heaven, why, perchance, should she not find him? Ah! How impossible! Besides, nothing was worth the trouble of seeking it; everything was a lie. Every smile hid a yawn of boredom, every joy a curse, all pleasure satiety, and the sweetest kisses left upon your lips only the unattainable desire for a greater delight.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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He was bored now when Emma suddenly began to sob on his breast; and his heart, like the people who can only stand a certain amount of music, became drowsy through indifference to the vibrations of a love whose subtleties he could no longer distinguish.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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A work of art is never finished. It is merely abandoned.
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E.M. Forster
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Just when the gods had ceased to be, and the Christ had not yet come, there was a unique moment in history, between Cicero and Marcus Aurelius, when man stood alone.
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Gustave Flaubert (The Letters, 1830-1880)
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She was as sated with him as he was tired of her. Emma had rediscovered in adultery all the banality of marriage.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Be regular and orderly in your life, so that you may be violent and original in your work.” β€”Gustave Flaubert
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Austin Kleon (Steal Like an Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative)
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As humanity perfects itself, man becomes degraded. When everything is reduced to the mere counter-balancing of economic interests, what room will there be for virtue? When Nature has been so subjugated that she has lost all her original forms, where will that leave the plastic arts? And so on. In the mean time, things are going to get very murky.
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Gustave Flaubert
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Loving humanity means as much, and as little, as loving raindrops, or loving the Milky Way. You say that you love humanity? Are you sure you aren’t treating yourself to easy self-congratulation, seeking approval, making certain you’re on the right side?
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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for her, life was as cold as an attic with a window looking to the north, and ennui, like a spider, was silently spinning its shadowy web in every cranny of her heart.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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For him the universe did not extend beyond the circumference of her petticoat.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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Is despair wrong? Isn’t it the natural condition of life after a certain age? … After a number of events, what is there left but repetition and diminishment? Who wants to go on living? The eccentric, the religious, the artistic (sometimes); those with a false sense of their own worth. Soft cheeses collapse; firm cheeses indurate. Both go mouldy.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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It's easy, after all, not to be a writer. Most people aren't writers, and very little harm comes to them.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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To be simple is no small matter.
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Gustave Flaubert (Selected Letters)
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Sentences must stir in a book like leaves in a forest, each distinct from each despite their resemblance.
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Gustave Flaubert (The Letters of Gustave Flaubert, 1830-1857)
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Life … is a bit like reading. … If all your responses to a book have already been duplicated and expanded upon by a professional critic, then what point is there to your reading? Only that it’s yours. Similarly, why live your life? Because it’s yours. But what if such an answer gradually becomes less and less convincing?
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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The indifference of the world which Keats and Flaubert and other men of genius have found so hard to bear was in her case not indifference but hostility. The world did not say to her as it said to them, Write if you choose; it makes no difference to me. The world said with a guffaw, Write? What's the good of your writing?
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Virginia Woolf (A Room of One’s Own)
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Flaubert was right when he said that our use of language is like a cracked kettle on which we bang out tunes for bears to dance to, while all the time we need to move the very stars to pity.
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Christopher Hitchens (Hitch 22: A Memoir)
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Thought is the greatest of pleasures β€”pleasure itself is only imaginationβ€”have you ever enjoyed anything more than your dreams?
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Gustave Flaubert
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The best life for a writer is the life which helps him write the best books he can.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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(Egypt) is a great place for contrasts: splendid things gleam in the dust.
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Gustave Flaubert (Flaubert in Egypt: A Sensibility on Tour)
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I've been working hard on [Ulysses] all day," said Joyce. Does that mean that you have written a great deal?" I said. Two sentences," said Joyce. I looked sideways but Joyce was not smiling. I thought of [French novelist Gustave] Flaubert. "You've been seeking the mot juste?" I said. No," said Joyce. "I have the words already. What I am seeking is the perfect order of words in the sentence.
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James Joyce
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Before her marriage she had thought that she had love within her grasp; but since the happiness which she had expected this love to bring her hadn’t come, she supposed she must have been mistaken. And Emma tried to imagine just what was meant, in life, by the words β€œbliss,” β€œpassion,” and β€œrapture” - words that had seemed so beautiful to her in books.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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WHORES. Necessary in the nineteenth century for the contraction of syphilis, without which no one could claim genius.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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For every bourgeois, in the heat of youth, if only for a day, for a minute, has believed himself capable of immense passions, of heroic enterprises. The most mediocre libertine has dreamed of oriental princesses; every rotary carries about inside him the debris of a poet.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary: Provincial Lives)
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Irony - The modern mode: either the devil’s mark or the snorkel of sanity.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
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I detest common heroes and moderate feelings, the sort that exist in real life
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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One mustn't look at the abyss, because there is at the bottom an inexpressible charm which attracts us.
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Gustave Flaubert
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There are some men whose only mission among others is to act as intermediaries; one crosses them like bridges and keeps going.
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Gustave Flaubert (Sentimental Education)
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Read in order to live.
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Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
I love the autumnβ€”that melancholy season that suits memories so well. When the trees have lost their leaves, when the sky at sunset still preserves the russet hue that fills with gold the withered grass, it is sweet to watch the final fading of the fires that until recently burnt within you.
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Gustave Flaubert (Memoirs of a Madman and November)
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She did not believe that things could remain the same in different places, and since the portion of her life that lay behind her had been bad, no doubt that which remained to be lived would be better.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
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If the writer were more like a reader, he’d be a reader, not a writer. It’s as uncomplicated as that.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
β€œ
In my view, the novelist has no right to express his opinions on the things of this world. In creating, he must imitate God: do his job and then shut up.
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Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
Love, to her, was something hat comes suddenly, like a blinding flash of lightening - a heaven-sent storm hurled into life, uprooting it, sweeping every will before it like a leaf, engulfing all feelings.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
He seriously thought that there is less harm in killing a man than producing a child: in the first case you are relieving someone of life, not his whole life but a half or a quarter or a hundredth part of that existence that is going to finish, that would finish without you; but as for the second, he would say, are you not responsible to him for all the tears he will shed, from the cradle to the grave? Without you he would never have been born, and why is he born? For your amusement, not for his, that’s for sure; to carry your name, the name of a fool, I’ll be bound – you may as well write that name on some wall; why do you need a man to bear the burden of three or four letters?
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Gustave Flaubert (November)
β€œ
When you reduce a woman to writing, she makes you think of a thousand other women
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Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
And the more he was irritated by her basic personality, the more he was drawn to her by a harsh, bestial sensuality, illusions of a moment, which ended in hate.
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Gustave Flaubert (Sentimental Education)
β€œ
Remember the botched brothel-visit in L’Education sentimentale and remember its lesson. Do not participate: happiness lies in the imagination, not the act. Pleasure is found first in anticipation, later in memory.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
β€œ
Never have things of the spirit counted for so little. Never has hatred for everything great been so manifest – disdain for Beauty, execration of literature. I have always tried to live in an ivory tower, but a tide of shit is beating at its walls, threatening to undermine it.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
One day, I shall explode like an artillery shell and all my bits will be found on the writing table.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
He took it for granted that she was content; and she resented his settled calm, his serene dullness, the very happiness she herself brought him.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
Language is like a cracked kettle on which we beat out tunes for bears to dance to, while all the time we long to move the stars to pity.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
Emma was no asleep, she was pretending to be asleep; and, while he was dozing off at her side, she lay awake, dreaming other dreams.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
The hearts of women are like those little pieces of furniture with secret hiding - places, full of drawers fitted into each other; you go to a lot of trouble, break your nails, and in the bottom find some withered flower, a few grains of dust - or emptiness!
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Sentimental Education)
β€œ
I have always tried to live in an ivory tower, but a tide of shit is beating at its walls, threatening to undermine it.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
How we keep these dead souls in our hearts. Each one of us carries within himself his necropolis.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
It was the fault of destiny!
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
As for the piano, the faster her fingers flew over it, the more he marveled. She struck the keys with aplomb and ran from one end of the keyboard to the other without a stop.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
It is an excellent habit to look at things as so many symbols.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Bouvard and Pecuchet)
β€œ
Soyez rΓ©glΓ© dans votre vie et ordinaire comme un bourgeois, afin d'Γͺtre violent et original dans vos Ε“uvres.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
Not to me," I said. Kafka wrote his first story in one night. Stendhal wrote The Charterhouse of Parma in forty-nine days. Melville wrote Moby- Dick in sixteen months. Flaubert spent five years on Madame Bovary. Musil worked for eighteen years on The Man Without Qualities and died before he could finish. Do we care about any of that now?
”
”
Paul Auster (The Brooklyn Follies)
β€œ
Better to work for yourself alone. You do as you like and follow your own ideas, you admire yourself and please yourself: isn’t that the main thing? And then the public is so stupid. Besides, who reads? And what do they read? And what do they admire?
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
From time to time, I open a newspaper. Things seem to be proceeding at a dizzying rate. We are dancing not on the edge of a volcano, but on the wooden seat of a latrine, and it seems to me more than a touch rotten. Soon society will go plummeting down and drown in nineteen centuries of shit. There’ll be quite a lot of shouting. (1850)
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
We must not touch our idols; the gilt sticks to our fingers.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
ΒΏQuΓ© mejor cosa que estarse por la noche al amor de la lumbre con un libro, mientras el viento pega en los cristales, y arde la lΓ‘mpara...?
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
Abstraction can provide stumbling blocks for people of strange intelligence.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Bouvard and Pecuchet)
β€œ
Let us not kid ourselves; let us remember that literature is of no use whatever, except in the very special case of somebody's wishing to become, of all things, a Professor of Literature.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
My foregrounds are imaginary, my backgrounds real.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
On certain occasions art can shake very ordinary spirits, and whole worlds can be revealed by its clumsiest interpreters.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Bouvard and Pecuchet)
β€œ
She loved the sea only for its storms, and greenery only when it was scattered among ruins.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
It is a delicious thing to write, to be no longer yourself but to move in an entire universe of your own creating. Today, for instance, as man and woman, both lover and mistress, I rode in a forest on an autumn afternoon under the yellow leaves, and I was also the horses, the leaves, the wind, the words my people uttered, even the red sun that made them almost close their love-drowned eyes.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
He loved the extensive vaults where you could hear the night birds and the sea breeze; he loved the craggy ruins bound together by ivy, those dark halls, and any appearance of death and destruction. Having fallen so far from so high a position, he loved anything that had also fallen from a great height
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
The writer must wade into life as into the sea, but only up to the navel.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
For a long time now my heart has had its shutters closed, its steps deserted, formerly a tumultuous hotel, but now empty and echoing like a great empty tomb.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
My life which I dream will be so beautiful, so poetic, so vast, so filled with love will turn out to be like everybody else's - monotonous, sensible, stupid.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
I'm not surprised some people prefer books. Books make sense of life. The only problem is that the lives they make sense of are other people's lives, never your own.
”
”
Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
β€œ
A man is a critic when he cannot be an artist, in the same way that a man becomes an informer when he cannot be a soldier
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
You can define a net two ways, depending on your point of view. Normally you would say it is a meshed instrument designed to catch fish. But you could, with no great injury to logic, reverse the image and define the net as a jocular lexicographer once did: he called it a collection of holes tied together with string.
”
”
Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
β€œ
If you participate in life, you don’t see it clearly: you suffer from it too much or enjoy it too much. The artist, to my way of thinking, is a monstrosity, something outside nature. All the misfortunes Providence inflicts on him come from his stubborness in denying that maxim.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
I'm no more modern than ancient, no more French than Chinese, and the idea of a native country, that is to say, the imperative to live on one bit of ground marked red or blue on the map and to hate the other bits in green or black, has always seemed to me narrow-minded, blinkered and profoundly stupid. I am a soul brother to everything that lives, to the giraffe and to the crocodile as much as to man.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
The smooth folds of her dress concealed a tumultuous heart, and her modest lips told nothing of her torment. She was in love.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
Having no intercourse with anyone, she lived in the torpid state of a sleep-walker.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (A Simple Heart (New Directions Bibelot))
β€œ
L'avenir nous tourmente, le passΓ© nous retient, c'est pour Γ§a que le prΓ©sent nous Γ©chappe.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
What an awful thing life is, isn’t it? It’s like soup with lots of hairs floating on the surface. You have to eat it nevertheless.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
God is in the details.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
Do not imagine you can exorcise what oppresses you in life by giving vent to it in art.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
Indeed, for the last three years, he had carefully avoided her, as a result of the natural cowardice so characteristic of the stronger sex...
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary.)
β€œ
Come, let’s be calm: no one incapable of restraint was ever a writer.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Flaubert in Egypt: A Sensibility on Tour)
β€œ
His air of failure had nothing desperate about it; rather, it seemed to stem from an unresented realisation that he was not cut out for success, and his duty was therefore to ensure only that he failed in the correct and acceptable fashion.
”
”
Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
β€œ
In a sense, fear is the daughter of God, redeemed on Good Friday. She is not beautiful, mocked, cursed or disowned by all. But don’t be mistaken, she watches over all mortal agony, she intercedes for mankind; for there is a rule and an exception. Culture is the rule, and art is the exception. Everybody speaks the rule; cigarette, computer, t-shirt, television, tourism, war. Nobody speaks the exception. It isn’t spoken, it is written; Flaubert, Dostoyevsky. It is composed; Gershwin, Mozart. It is painted; CΓ©zanne, Vermeer. It is filmed; Antonioni, Vigo. Or it is lived, then it is the art of living; Srebrenica, Mostar, Sarajevo. The rule is to want the death of the exception. So the rule for cultural Europe is to organise the death of the art of living, which still flourishes.
”
”
Jean-Luc Godard
β€œ
… Her heart remained empty once more, and the procession of days all alike began again. So they were going to follow one another, like this, in line, always identical, innumerable, bringing nothing!
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
We think of women at every age: while still children, we fondle with a naΓ―ve sensuality the breasts of those grown-up girls kissing us and cuddling us in their arms; at the age of ten, we dream of love; at fifteen, love comes along; at sixty, it is still with us, and if dead men in their tombs have any thought in their heads, it is how to make their way underground to the nearby grave, lift the shroud of the dear departed women, and mingle with her in her sleep
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (November)
β€œ
Everything in art depends on execution: the story of a louse can be as beautiful as the story of Alexander. You must write according to your feelings, be sure those feelings are true, and let everything else go hang. When a line is good it ceases to belong to any school. A line of prose must be as immutable as a line of poetry.
”
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
β€œ
I am an obscure and patient pearl-fisherman who dives into the deepest waters and comes up with empty hands and a blue face. Some fatal attraction draws me down into the abysses of thought, down into those innermost recesses which never cease to fascinate the strong. I shall spend my life gazing at the ocean of art, where others voyage or fight; and from time to time I’ll entertain myself by diving for those green and yellow shells that nobody will want. So I shall keep them for myself and cover the walls of my hut with them.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
At last she sighed. "But the most wretched thing β€” is it not? β€” is to drag out, as I do, a useless existence. If our pains were only of some use to someone, we should find consolation in the thought of the sacrifice.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
When I was still quite young I had a complete presentiment of life. It was like the nauseating smell of cooking escaping from a ventilator: you don't have to have eaten it to know that it would make you throw up.
”
”
Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
β€œ
Books aren’t made in the way that babies are: they are made like pyramids, There’s some long-pondered plan, and then great blocks of stone are placed one on top of the other, and it’s back-breaking, sweaty, time consuming work. And all to no purpose! It just stands like that in the desert! But it towers over it prodigiously. Jackals piss at the base of it, and bourgeois clamber to the top of it, etc. Continue this comparison.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
I will cover you with love when next I see you, with caresses, with ecstasy. I want to gorge you with all the joys of the flesh, so that you faint and die. I want you to be amazed by me, and to confess to yourself that you had never even dreamed of such transports... When you are old, I want you to recall those few hours, I want your dry bones to quiver with joy when you think of them.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
...as if the fullness of the soul did not sometimes overflow in the emptiest metaphors, since no one can ever give the exact measure of his needs, nor of his conceptions, nor of his sorrows; and since human speech is like a cracked tin kettle, on which we hammer out tunes to make bears dance when we long to move the stars.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
It would have been better to do what everyone else does, neither taking life too seriously nor seeing it as merely grotesque, choosing a profession and practicing it, grabbing one's share of the common cake, eating it and saying, "It's delicious!" rather than following the gloomy path that I have trodden all alone; then I wouldn’t be here writing this, or at least it would have been a different story. The further I proceed with it, the more confused it seems even to me, like hazy prospects seen from too far away, since everything passes, even the memory of our most scalding tears and our heartiest laughter; our eyes soon dry, our mouths resume their habitual shape; the only memory that remains to me is that of a long tedious time that lasted for several winters, spent in yawning and wishing I were dead
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Gustave Flaubert (November)
β€œ
Because lascivious or venal lips had murmured the same words to him, he now had little belief in their sincerity when he heard them from Emma; they should be taken with a grain of salt, he thought, because the most exaggerated speeches usually hid the weakest feelings - as though the fullness of the soul did not sometimes overflow into the emptiest phrases, since no one can ever express the exact measure of his needs, his conceptions, or his sorrows, and human speech is like a cracked pot on which we beat out rhythms for bears to dance to when we are striving to make music that will wring tears from the stars.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
...Je n’ai pas cessΓ© de l’Γͺtre si c’est d’Γͺtre jeune que d’aimer toujours !... L’humanitΓ© n’est pas un vain mot. Notre vie est faite d’amour, et ne plus aimer c’est ne plus vivre." (I have never ceased to be young, if being young is always loving... Humanity is not a vain word. Our life is made of love, and to love no longer is to live no longer.)
”
”
George Sand (The George Sand-Gustave Flaubert Letters)
β€œ
76. David Hume – Treatise on Human Nature; Essays Moral and Political; An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding 77. Jean-Jacques Rousseau – On the Origin of Inequality; On the Political Economy; Emile – or, On Education, The Social Contract 78. Laurence Sterne – Tristram Shandy; A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy 79. Adam Smith – The Theory of Moral Sentiments; The Wealth of Nations 80. Immanuel Kant – Critique of Pure Reason; Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals; Critique of Practical Reason; The Science of Right; Critique of Judgment; Perpetual Peace 81. Edward Gibbon – The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; Autobiography 82. James Boswell – Journal; Life of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D. 83. Antoine Laurent Lavoisier – TraitΓ© Γ‰lΓ©mentaire de Chimie (Elements of Chemistry) 84. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison – Federalist Papers 85. Jeremy Bentham – Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation; Theory of Fictions 86. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe – Faust; Poetry and Truth 87. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier – Analytical Theory of Heat 88. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel – Phenomenology of Spirit; Philosophy of Right; Lectures on the Philosophy of History 89. William Wordsworth – Poems 90. Samuel Taylor Coleridge – Poems; Biographia Literaria 91. Jane Austen – Pride and Prejudice; Emma 92. Carl von Clausewitz – On War 93. Stendhal – The Red and the Black; The Charterhouse of Parma; On Love 94. Lord Byron – Don Juan 95. Arthur Schopenhauer – Studies in Pessimism 96. Michael Faraday – Chemical History of a Candle; Experimental Researches in Electricity 97. Charles Lyell – Principles of Geology 98. Auguste Comte – The Positive Philosophy 99. HonorΓ© de Balzac – PΓ¨re Goriot; Eugenie Grandet 100. Ralph Waldo Emerson – Representative Men; Essays; Journal 101. Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlet Letter 102. Alexis de Tocqueville – Democracy in America 103. John Stuart Mill – A System of Logic; On Liberty; Representative Government; Utilitarianism; The Subjection of Women; Autobiography 104. Charles Darwin – The Origin of Species; The Descent of Man; Autobiography 105. Charles Dickens – Pickwick Papers; David Copperfield; Hard Times 106. Claude Bernard – Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine 107. Henry David Thoreau – Civil Disobedience; Walden 108. Karl Marx – Capital; Communist Manifesto 109. George Eliot – Adam Bede; Middlemarch 110. Herman Melville – Moby-Dick; Billy Budd 111. Fyodor Dostoevsky – Crime and Punishment; The Idiot; The Brothers Karamazov 112. Gustave Flaubert – Madame Bovary; Three Stories 113. Henrik Ibsen – Plays 114. Leo Tolstoy – War and Peace; Anna Karenina; What is Art?; Twenty-Three Tales 115. Mark Twain – The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; The Mysterious Stranger 116. William James – The Principles of Psychology; The Varieties of Religious Experience; Pragmatism; Essays in Radical Empiricism 117. Henry James – The American; The Ambassadors 118. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche – Thus Spoke Zarathustra; Beyond Good and Evil; The Genealogy of Morals;The Will to Power 119. Jules Henri PoincarΓ© – Science and Hypothesis; Science and Method 120. Sigmund Freud – The Interpretation of Dreams; Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis; Civilization and Its Discontents; New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis 121. George Bernard Shaw – Plays and Prefaces
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Mortimer J. Adler (How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading)
β€œ
Deep in her soul, however, she was waiting for something to happen. Like a sailor in distress, she would gaze out over the solitude of her life with desperate eyes, seeking some white sail in the mists of the far-off horizon. She did not know what this chance event would be, what wind would drive it to her, what shore it would carry her to, whether it was a longboat or a three-decked vessel, loaded with anguish or filled with happiness up to the portholes. But each morning, when she awoke, she hoped it would arrive that day.… β€”GUSTAVE FLAUBERT, Madame Bovary
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Lena Dunham (Not That Kind of Girl: A Young Woman Tells You What She's "Learned")
β€œ
The melancholy of the antique world seems to me more profound than that of the moderns, all of whom more or less imply that beyond the dark void lies immortality. But for the ancients that β€˜black hole’ is infinity itself; their dreams loom and vanish against a background of immutable ebony. No crying out, no convulsionsβ€”nothing but the fixity of the pensive gaze. With the gods gone, and Christ not yet come, there was a unique moment, from Cicero to Marcus Aurelius, when man stood alone. Nowhere else do I find that particular grandeur.
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Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
Je ne suis pas plus moderne qu'ancien, pas plus Français que Chinois, et l'idée de la patrie c'est-à-dire l'obligation où l'on est de vivre sur un coin de terre marqué en rouge ou en bleu sur la carte et de détester les autres coins en vert ou en noir m'a paru toujours étroite, bornée et d'une stupidité féroce.
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Gustave Flaubert (Correspondance)
β€œ
When you are young, you think that the old lament the deterioration of life because this makes it easier for them to die without regret. When you are old, you become impatient with the way in which the young applaud the most insignificant improvements … while remaining heedless of the world’s barbarism. I don’t say things have got worse; I merely say the young wouldn’t notice if they had. The old times were good because then we were young, and ignorant of how ignorant the young can be.
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Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
β€œ
In her enthusiasms she had always looked for something tangible: she had always loved church for its flowers, music for its romantic words, literature for its power to stir the passions and she rebelled before the mysteries of faith just as she grew ever more restive under discipline, which was antipathetic to her nature.
”
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
I believe in the Supreme Being, in a Creator, whatever he may be. I care little who has placed us here below to fulfil our duties as citizens and fathers of families; but I don't need to go to church to kiss silver plates, and fatten, out of my pocket, a lot of good-for-nothings who live better than we do. For one can know him as well in a wood, in a field, or even contemplating the eternal vault like the ancients. My God! mine is the God of Socrates, of Franklin, of Voltaire, and of Beranger! I am for the profession of faith of the 'Savoyard Vicar,' and the immortal principles of '89! And I can't admit of an old boy of a God who takes walks in his garden with a cane in his hand, who lodges his friends in the belly of whales, dies uttering a cry, and rises again at the end of three days; things absurd in themselves, and completely opposed, moreover, to all physical laws, which proves to us, by the way, that priests have always wallowed in turpid ignorance, in which they would fain engulf the people with them.
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Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
At other times, at the edge of a wood, especially at dusk, the trees themselves would assume strange shapes: sometimes they were arms rising heavenwards, , or else the trunk would twist and turn like a body being bent by the wind. At night, when I woke up and the moon and the stars were out, I would see in the sky things that filled me simultaneously with dread and longing. I remember that once, one Christmas Eve, I saw a great naked women, standing erect, with rolling eyes; she must have been a hundred feet high, but along she drifted, growing ever longer and ever thinner, and finally fell apart, each limb remaining separate, with the head floating away first as the rest of her body continued to waver
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (November)
β€œ
Sometimes you find the panel, but it doesn’t open; sometimes it opens, and your gaze meets nothing but a mouse skeleton. But at least you’ve looked. That’s the real distinction between people: not between those who have secrets and those who don’t, but between those who want to know everything and those who don’t. This search is a sign of love I maintain.
”
”
Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
β€œ
Love, she felt, ought to come all at once, with great thunderclaps and flashes of lightning; it was like a storm bursting upon life from the sky, uprooting it, overwhelming the will, and sweeping the heart into the abyss. It did not occur to her that rain forms puddles on a flat roof when the drainpipes are clogged, and she would have continued to feel secure if she had not suddenly discovered a crack in the wall.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
You both love Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky, Hawthorne and Melville, Flaubert and Stendahl, but at that stage of your life you cannot stomach Henry James, while Gwyn argues that he is the giant of giants, the colossus who makes all other novelists look like pygmies. You are in complete harmony about the greatness of Kafka and Beckett, but when you tell her that Celine belongs in their company, she laughs at you and calls him a fascist maniac. Wallace Stevens yes, but next in line for you is William Carlos Williams, not T.S. Eliot, whose work Gwyn can recite from memory. You defend Keaton, she defends Chaplin, and while you both howl at the sight of the Marx Brothers, your much-adored W.C. Fields cannot coax a single smile from her. Truffaut at his best touches you both, but Gwyn finds Godard pretentious and you don't, and while she lauds Bergman and Antonioni as twin masters of the universe, you reluctantly tell her that you are bored by their films. No conflicts about classical music, with J.S. Bach at the top of the list, but you are becoming increasingly interested in jazz, while Gwyn still clings to the frenzy of rock and roll, which has stopped saying much of anything to you. She likes to dance, and you don't. She laughs more than you do and smokes less. She is a freer, happier person than you are, and whenever you are with her, the world seems brighter and more welcoming, a place where your sullen, introverted self can almost begin to feel at home.
”
”
Paul Auster (Invisible (Rough Cut))
β€œ
Deep in her soul, however, she was waiting for something to happen. Like a sailor in distress, she would gaze out over the solitude of her life with desperate eyes, seeking some white sail in the mists of the far-off horizon. She did not know what this chance event would be, what wind would drive it to her, what shore it would carry her to, whether it was a longboat or a three-decked vessel, loaded with anguish or filled with happiness up to the portholes. But each morning, when she awoke, she hoped it would arrive that day, and she would listen to every sound, spring to her feet, feel surprised that it had not come; then at sunset, always more sorrowful, she would wish the next day were already there.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
But the flames did die down, perhaps from lack, perhaps from excess of fuel. Little by little, love was quenched by absence, and longing smothered by routine; and that fiery glow which tinged her pale sky scarlet grew more clouded, then gradually faded away. Her benumbed consciousness even led her to mistake aversion toward her husband for desire for her loved, the searing touch of hatred for the rekindling of love; but, as the storm still raged on and her passion burnt itself to ashes, no help came and no sun rose, the darkness of night closed in on every side, and she was left to drift in a bitter icy void. So the bad days of Tostes began again. She believed herself much more unhappy, now, because she had experienced sorrow, and knew for certain that ti would ever end.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert (Madame Bovary)
β€œ
What makes us want to know the worst? Is it that we tire of preferring to know the best? Does curiosity always hurdle self-interest? Or is it, more simply, that wanting to know the worst is love’s favourite perversion? … I loved Ellen, and i wanted to know the worst. I never provoked her; I was cautious and defensive, as is my habit; I didn’t even ask questions; but I wanted to know the worst. Ellen never returned this caress. She was fond of me - she would automatically agree, as if the matter weren’t worth of discussing, that she loved me - but she unquestioningly believed the best about me. That’s the difference. She didn’t ever search for that sliding panel which opens the secret chamber of the heart, the chamber where the memory and corpses are kept. Sometimes you find the panel but it doesn’t open; sometimes it opens, and your gaze meets nothing but a mouse skeleton. But at least you’ve looked. That’s the real distinction between people: not between those who have secrets and those who don’t, but between those who want to know everything and those who don’t. This search is a sign of love, I maintain.
”
”
Julian Barnes (Flaubert's Parrot)
β€œ
An overwhelming curiosity makes me ask myself what their lives might be like. I want to know what they do, where they're from, their names, what they're thinking about at that moment, what they regret, what they hope for, their past loves, their current dreams ... and if they happen to be women (especially the young ones) then the urge becomes intense. How quickly would you want to see her naked, admit it, and naked through to her heart. How you try to learn where she comes from, where she's going, why she's here and not elsewhere! While letting your eyes wander all over her, you imagine love affairs for her, you ascribe her deep feelings. You think of the bedroom she must have, and a thousand things besides ... right down to the battered slippers into which she must slip her feet when she gets out of bed.
”
”
Gustave Flaubert
β€œ
A thought expressed is a falsehood." In poetry what is not said and yet gleams through the beauty of the symbol, works more powerfully on the heart than that which is expressed in words. Symbolism makes the very style, the very artistic substance of poetry inspired, transparent, illuminated throughout like the delicate walls of an alabaster amphora in which a flame is ignited. Characters can also serve as symbols. Sancho Panza and Faust, Don Quixote and Hamlet, Don Juan and Falstaff, according to the words of Goethe, are "schwankende Gestalten." Apparitions which haunt mankind, sometimes repeatedly from age to age, accompany mankind from generation to generation. It is impossible to communicate in any words whatsoever the idea of such symbolic characters, for words only define and restrict thought, but symbols express the unrestricted aspect of truth. Moreover we cannot be satisfied with a vulgar, photographic exactness of experimental photoqraphv. We demand and have premonition of, according to the allusions of Flaubert, Maupassant, Turgenev, Ibsen, new and as yet undisclosed worlds of impressionability. This thirst for the unexperienced, in pursuit of elusive nuances, of the dark and unconscious in our sensibility, is the characteristic feature of the coming ideal poetry. Earlier Baudelaire and Edgar Allan Poe said that the beautiful must somewhat amaze, must seem unexpected and extraordinary. French critics more or less successfully named this feature - impressionism. Such are the three major elements of the new art: a mystical content, symbols, and the expansion of artistic impressionability. No positivistic conclusions, no utilitarian computation, but only a creative faith in something infinite and immortal can ignite the soul of man, create heroes, martyrs and prophets... People have need of faith, they need inspiration, they crave a holy madness in their heroes and martyrs. ("On The Reasons For The Decline And On The New Tendencies In Contemporary Literature")
”
”
Dmitry Sergeyevich Merezhkovsky (Silver Age of Russian Culture (An Anthology))