Eq Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Eq. Here they are! All 37 of them:

I am not a finished poem, and I am not the song you’ve turned me into. I am a detached human being, making my way in a world that is constantly trying to push me aside, and you who send me letters and emails and beautiful gifts wouldn’t even recognise me if you saw me walking down the street where I live tomorrow for I am not a poem. I am tired and worn out and the eyes you would see would not be painted or inspired but empty and weary from drinking too much at all times and I am not the life of your party who sings and has glorious words to speak for I don’t speak much at all and my voice is raspy and unsteady from unhealthy living and not much sleep and I only use it when I sing and I always sing too much or not at all and never when people are around because they expect poems and symphonies and I am not a poem but an elegy at my best but unedited and uncut and not a lot of people want to work with me because there’s only so much you can do with an audio take, with the plug-ins and EQs and I was born distorted, disordered, and I’m pretty fine with that, but others are not.
Charlotte Eriksson (Another Vagabond Lost To Love: Berlin Stories on Leaving & Arriving)
Life is a balance between emotional intelligence quotient (EQ) and intelligence quotient (IQ).
Amit Ray (Mindfulness Meditation for Corporate Leadership and Management)
Emotional intelligence does not mean merely "being nice". At strategic moment it may demand not "being nice", but rather, for example, bluntly confronting someone with an uncomfortable but consequential truth they've been avoiding.
Daniel Goleman (Working with Emotional Intelligence)
The link between EQ and earnings is so direct that every point increase in EQ adds $1,300 to an annual salary.
Travis Bradberry (Emotional Intelligence 2.0)
EQ is so critical to success that it accounts for 58 percent of performance in all types of jobs. It’s the single biggest predictor of performance in the workplace and the strongest driver of leadership and personal excellence.
Travis Bradberry (Emotional Intelligence 2.0)
Emotions are faster than thoughts. That means emotion trumps competencies, behavior, and character unless we learn to be self-aware and channel our emotions consciously.
Shawn Kent Hayashi (Conversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Maconversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Matters Most Tters Most)
To move up the emotional ladder, you have to stop judging your own emotions. This is a key to getting unstuck emotionally, too. You can stop oscillating in a stuck emotion by being aware.
Shawn Kent Hayashi (Conversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Maconversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Matters Most Tters Most)
When people fight about something, the subject of the argument is rarely the real issue. The real issue is about vulnerability, connectedness, safety, trust or love - which are all emotional states.
Shawn Kent Hayashi (Conversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Maconversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Matters Most Tters Most)
Many people are stuck emotionally and do not even realize it.
Shawn Kent Hayashi (Conversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Maconversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Matters Most Tters Most)
Every body says you need to have high IQ or high EQ. I said high common sense and high imagination are supreme abilities than these. Only thing the later two can't be measured.
Manoj Yadav
Every body says you need to have high IQ or high EQ. I said high common sense and high imagination are supreme abilities than these. Only thing the later two can't be measured.
Manoj Yadav
High EQ decision makers can leverage multifaceted thought processes in making sound judgments and improving the overall decision-making maturity.
Pearl Zhu (Decision Master: The Art and Science of Decision Making (Digital Master Book 13))
A loving heart is not enough to develop a successful relationship. Considerable EQ and social skills are necessary.
Anoir Ou-Chad
Another common recommendation is to turn lights off when you leave a room, but lighting accounts for only 3% of household energy use, so even if you used no lighting at all in your house you would save only a fraction of a metric ton of carbon emissions. Plastic bags have also been a major focus of concern, but even on very generous estimates, if you stopped using plastic bags entirely you'd cut out 10kg CO2eq per year, which is only 0.4% of your total emissions. Similarly, the focus on buying locally produced goods is overhyped: only 10% of the carbon footprint of food comes from transportation whereas 80% comes from production, so what type of food you buy is much more important than whether that food is produced locally or internationally. Cutting out red meat and dairy for one day a week achieves a greater reduction in your carbon footprint than buying entirely locally produced food. In fact, exactly the same food can sometimes have higher carbon footprint if it's locally grown than if it's imported: one study found that the carbon footprint from locally grown tomatoes in northern Europe was five times as great as the carbon footprint from tomatoes grown in Spain because the emissions generated by heating and lighting greenhouses dwarfed the emissions generated by transportation.
William MacAskill (Doing Good Better: How Effective Altruism Can Help You Make a Difference)
It takes consistent and focused practice to become emotionally intelligent. People who learn from their experiences have significantly higher emotional intelligence than those who do not recover. When we do not recover, we get stuck in that emotional pattern and re-create it again and again. We talk about it too much and do not move on.
Shawn Kent Hayashi (Conversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Maconversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Matters Most Tters Most)
You know that it’s hard work to consistently apply self-awareness, empathy, and self-control,
Jen Shirkani (EGO vs. EQ: How Top Leaders Beat 8 Ego Traps with Emotional Intelligence)
We can experience an emotional hijack as a result of change, or we can self-regulate and catch ourselves before we head into an emotional uproar.
Shawn Kent Hayashi (Conversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Maconversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Matters Most Tters Most)
...seven core emotions show up chemically in the body: Love, Joy, Hope, Sadness, Envy, Anger, Fear
Shawn Kent Hayashi (Conversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Maconversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Matters Most Tters Most)
Intentionally think thoughts and take actions that enable you to choose the next highest feeling on the scale and make decisions from higher emotional states.
Shawn Kent Hayashi (Conversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Maconversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Matters Most Tters Most)
How you bring people into your home is just as important as when they walk through the door. Frame well. #marketing
Richie Norton
Every single negative emotion is an arrow sign pointing towards a problem which needs your attention
Ian Tuhovsky (Emotional Intelligence Training: A Practical Guide to Making Friends with Your Emotions and Raising Your EQ (Positive Psychology Coaching Series Book 8))
We advocate the creation of an organizational culture that fosters trust as compared to command-and-control obedience, one which focuses on empowerment and not merely on authority.
Avik Chanda (From Command to Empathy: Using EQ in the Age of Disruption)
Are Human Problems insoluble? Human Chaos necessary?? Answer: Personally I refuse to have problems!
Abha Maryada Banerjee (Nucleus: Power Women: Lead from the Core)
Reality Testing—the ability to see things as they actually are, rather than the way you wish or fear they might be;
Steven J. Stein (The EQ Edge: Emotional Intelligence and Your Success)
Suicide has become fashionable nowadays. A Low EQ generation. Never think about anyone else and choose the easiest option for ending life. Don’t have the guts to face a situation like a true man. For God’s sake, life is not a video game where you get numerous chances. You have only one chance to live. Learn to value your life. Don’t throw it away like an idiot.
Devayu (College Days)
Unfortunately, empathy often falls by the wayside because when we need it most, we're least open to using it—that is, when we're under stress, misunderstood, irritated, or defensive.
Steven J. Stein (The EQ Edge: Emotional Intelligence and Your Success)
It embraces Emotional Self-Awareness—the ability to recognize how you're feeling and why you're feeling that way, and the impact your emotions have on the thoughts and actions of yourself and others; Self
Steven J. Stein (The EQ Edge: Emotional Intelligence and Your Success)
Emotions are like water, turning opaque when disturbed, yet transparent when still. As mindfulness calms our emotions, we can peer into their depths and see our overshadowing spiritual values reflected on the surface.
Michael Benner (Fearless Intelligence: The Extraordinary Wisdom of Awareness)
With self-awareness we can change our inner conversation about what we are feeling and create different outcomes in conversations with others. To create conversations for change we must be able to process ourselves and others through emotions.
Shawn Kent Hayashi (Conversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Maconversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Matters Most Tters Most)
We are getting richer, but less and less happy. Depression, suicide, relationship breakdowns, loneliness of choice, fear of closeness, addictions - this is the clear evidence we are getting increasingly worse when it comes to dealing with our emotions.
Ian Tuhovsky (Emotional Intelligence Training: A Practical Guide to Making Friends with Your Emotions and Raising Your EQ (Positive Psychology Coaching Series Book 8))
There are times when we RISE up to situations and recognise our INNER POWER,STRENTHS and CAPABILITY by the way we handled a siutation ! How about recognising ourselves,our POWER. our TALENT, our CAPABILITIES and then handle each situation from our BEST levels. The RESULTS are bound to be UP'd!
Abha Maryada Banerjee (Nucleus: Power Women: Lead from the Core)
At its core, empathy is the ability to see the world from another person's perspective, the capacity to tune in to what someone else might be thinking and feeling about a situation—regardless of how that view might differ from your own perception. It is an extremely powerful interpersonal tool.
Steven J. Stein (The EQ Edge: Emotional Intelligence and Your Success)
You will be more emotionally aware when you are able to see the connection between the symptoms and what you are doing now. As yourself, "What feeling is underlying my current actions?" This is a way to become aware. Self-awareness is the first step in emotional intelligence. We cannot self-regulate if we are not aware of what we are feeling.
Shawn Kent Hayashi (Conversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Maconversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Matters Most Tters Most)
The core components of high EQ are the following: The ability to self-soothe. The key to managing emotion is to allow, acknowledge, and tolerate our intense emotions so that they evaporate, without getting stuck in them or taking actions we’ll later regret. Self-soothing is what enables us to manage our anxiety and upsets, which in turn allows us to work through emotionally charged issues in a constructive way. Emotional self-awareness and acceptance. If we don’t understand the emotions washing over us, they scare us, and we can’t tolerate them. We repress our hurt, fear, or disappointment. Those emotions, no longer regulated by our conscious mind, have a way of popping out unmodulated, as when a preschooler socks his sister or we (as adults) lose our tempers or eat a pint of ice cream. By contrast, children raised in a home in which there are limits on behavior but not on feelings grow up understanding that all emotions are acceptable, a part of being human. That understanding gives them more control over their emotions. Impulse control. Emotional intelligence liberates us from knee-jerk emotional reactions. A child (or adult) with high EQ will act rather than react and problem-solve rather than blame. It doesn’t mean you never get angry or anxious, only that you don’t fly off the handle. As a result, our lives and relationships work better. Empathy. Empathy is the ability to see and feel something from the other’s point of view. When you’re adept at understanding the mental and emotional states of other people, you resolve differences constructively and connect deeply with others. Naturally, empathy makes us better communicators.
Laura Markham (Peaceful Parent, Happy Kids: How to Stop Yelling and Start Connecting)
Each of the following states of being is distinctly tied to one of the seven core emotions...Freedom, Passion, Enthusiasm, Positive Expectations, Optimism, Contentment, Boredom, Pessimism, Frustration, A sense of being overwhelmed, Disappointment, Doubt, Worry, Blame, Discouragement, Bitterness, Vengefulness, Hatred, Jealousy, Insecurity, Guilt, Unworthiness, Grief, Depression, Powerlessness, Inability to concerntrate
Shawn Kent Hayashi (Conversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Maconversations for Change: 12 Ways to Say It Right When It Matters Most Tters Most)
Before Evie could protest, Mal sighed. “Of course there is. The party of the year. A real rager, didn’t you hear?” Mal looked her up and down and shook her head sadly. “Oh, I guess you didn’t hear.” She mock-winced, looking at Carlos conspiratorially. “Everyone’s going to be there.” “They are?” Carlos looked confused. “But you only just told me to have it—” He quickly got the message. “Everyone,” he agreed. Evie smiled. “Sounds awesome. I haven’t been to a party in a long, long time.” Mal raised an eyebrow. “Oh, I’m sorry. This is a very exclusive party, and I’m afraid you didn’t get an invitation.” With those parting words, Mal went ahead of them into the classroom—she was in their next class too, of course (her EQ was legendary)—and left them to each other. “Sorry,” Carlos mumbled. “I guess I was wrong, Mal doesn’t just talk a big game.” “Yeah, me too. The party sounds like fun,” Evie said sadly. “You want to see what I’m making?” he asked, trying to change the subject as they settled into their seats. He took out of his bag a black box, with wires and an antenna poking out from one side—the same contraption he’d
Melissa de la Cruz (The Isle of the Lost (Descendants, #1))
10 Watch EQ at the Movies Hollywood. It’s the entertainment capital of the world known for glitz, glamour, and celebrity. Believe it or not, Hollywood is also a hotbed of EQ, ripe for building your social awareness skills. After all, art imitates life, right? Movies are an abundant source of EQ skills in action, demonstrating behaviors to emulate or completely avoid. Great actors are masters at evoking real emotion in themselves; as their characters are scripted to do outrageous and obvious things, it’s easy to observe the cues and emotions on-screen. To build social awareness skills, you need to practice being aware of what’s happening with other people; it doesn’t matter if you practice using a box office hero or a real person. When you watch a movie to observe social cues, you’re practicing social awareness. Plus, since you are not living the situation, you’re not emotionally involved, and the distractions are limited. You can use your mental energy to observe the characters instead of dealing with your own life. This month, make it a point to watch two movies specifically to observe the character interactions, relationships, and conflicts. Look for body language clues to figure out how each character is feeling and observe how the characters handle the conflicts. As more information about the characters unfold, rewind and watch past moments to spot clues you may have missed the first time. Believe it or not, watching movies from the land of make-believe is one of the most useful and entertaining ways to practice your social awareness skills for the real world.
Travis Bradberry (Emotional Intelligence 2.0)