Electronic Warfare Quotes

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Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They're not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can't do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do ์•ˆ๋…•ํ•˜์„ธ์š” ์ Š์œผ์‹  ๋‚˜์ด์— ์—ฌ์ž๋Š” ํ•˜๊ณ ์‹ถ์ง€ ๋ˆ์€์—†์ง€ ๊ทธ๋ ‡๋‹ค๊ณ  ์—ฌ์ž์นœ๊ตฌ์™€ํ•˜๋Š”๊ฒƒ๋„ ์˜ค๋žœ ๊ฑดํƒœ๊ฐ๋“ฑ์œผ๋กœ ํ™•์‹คํ•œ์žฌ๋ฏธ๋ฅผ ๋ชป๋ณด์‹ค์ˆ˜์žˆ๋Š”๊ฒฝ์šฐ๊ฐ€์žˆ์„๊ฒƒ์ž…๋‹ˆ๋‹ค, ์นดํ†กacd5ํ…”๋ ˆkkd55 ๋”ฐ๋จน๊ณ  ์‹ถ์€ ๊ทธ๋…€ ์ด์ œ ๋”๋Š” ๊ณ ๋ฏผํ•˜์ง€๋งˆ์„ธ์š” ์ €ํฌ๊ฐ€ ๊ณ ๋ฏผ ํ’€์–ด๋“œ๋ฆฌ๊ฒ ์Šต๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ํ™•์‹คํ•œ์ œํ’ˆ์œผ๋กœ ์•”๋‚ด๋‚œ ๊ณ ์–‘์ฒ˜๋Ÿผ ์ฃผ๋™์ ์ธ ํ–‰๋™์œผ๋กœ ๋‹น์‹ ์—๊ฒŒ ๋‹ฌ๋ ค๋“ ๋‹ค๊ณ  ์ƒ๊ฐํ•ด๋ณด์…จ๋‚˜์š”? ๊ทธ๋Ÿฐ์ œํ’ˆ์€ ์–ผ๋งˆ๋“ ์ง€์žˆ์Šต๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ์ •ํ’ˆ์„ ๊ตฌ์ž…ํ•˜์ง€๋ชปํ–ˆ์„๋ฟ์ž…๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ๋ฐ”๋กœ ์—ฌ๊ธฐ์„œ ํ™•์‹คํ•œ ์žฌ๋ฏธ๋Š” ๋ฌผ๋ก  ์›ํ•˜๋Š” ๊ทธ๋…€๋ฅผ ๋”ฐ๋จน์„์ˆ˜์žˆ๋„๋ก ๋„์™€๋“œ๋ฆฌ๊ฒ ์Šต๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ๋‚จ์„ฑ๋ถ„๋“ค์€ ์„ฑ๊ธฐ์ž‘์•„ ๊ณ ๋ฏผํ•˜์‹œ๋Š” ๋ถ„๋“ค ์žˆ์œผ์‹œ๋ฉด ์„ฑ๊ธฐํ™•๋Œ€์™€ ํ•จ๊ป˜ ์žƒ์–ด์ง„ ์ž์กด์‹ฌ๋„ ์ฐพ์„์ˆ˜์žˆ๋„๋ก ๊ฐ•๋ ฅ๋ฐœ๊ธฐ์ œ์™€ ๋‚จ์„ฑ์„ฑ๊ธฐ๊ฐ•์ง๋„๋ฅผ ๋†’์—ฌ์ฃผ๋Š” ์ œํ’ˆ๋„์žˆ์Šต๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ์นดํ†ก acd5 ํ…”๋ ˆ kkd55 ๋กœ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์‹œ๋ฉด ์—ฌ์„ฑ๋ถ„๋ฏธ์น˜๊ฒŒ ํ• ์ˆ˜์žˆ๋Š” ์ž‘์—…์šฉ์ œํ’ˆ (์—ฌ์„ฑํฅ๋ถ„์ œ,์—ฌ์„ฑ์ตœ์Œ์ œ))๊ตฌ์ž…ํ•˜์‹ค์ˆ˜์žˆ์Šต๋‹ˆ๋‹ค qwe114.c33.kr In 1879, Albert Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Zurich by 1909. His 1905 paper explaining the photoelectric effect, the basis of electronics, earned him the Nobel Prize in 1921. His first paper on Special Relativity Theory, also published in 1905, changed the world. After the rise of the Nazi party, Einstein made Princeton his permanent home, becoming a U.S. citizen in 1940. Einstein, a pacifist during World War I, stayed a firm proponent of social justice and responsibility. He chaired the Emergency Committee of Atomic Scientists, which organized to alert the public to the dangers of atomic warfare
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In their struggle for the ethical good, teachers of religion must h ...more
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GCHQ has traveled a long and winding road. That road stretches from the wooden huts of Bletchley Park, past the domes and dishes of the Cold War, and on towards what some suggest will be the omniscient state of the Brave New World. As we look to the future, the docile and passive state described by Aldous Huxley in his Brave New World is perhaps more appropriate analogy than the strictly totalitarian predictions offered by George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. Bizarrely, many British citizens are quite content in this new climate of hyper-surveillance, since its their own lifestyle choices that helped to create 'wired world' - or even wish for it, for as we have seen, the new torrents of data have been been a source of endless trouble for the overstretched secret agencies. As Ken Macdonald rightly points out, the real drives of our wired world have been private companies looking for growth, and private individuals in search of luxury and convenience at the click of a mouse. The sigint agencies have merely been handed the impossible task of making an interconnected society perfectly secure and risk-free, against the background of a globalized world that presents many unprecedented threats, and now has a few boundaries or borders to protect us. Who, then, is to blame for the rapid intensification of electronic surveillance? Instinctively, many might reply Osama bin Laden, or perhaps Pablo Escobar. Others might respond that governments have used these villains as a convenient excuse to extend state control. At first glance, the massive growth of security, which includes includes not only eavesdropping but also biometric monitoring, face recognition, universal fingerprinting and the gathering of DNA, looks like a sad response to new kinds of miscreants. However, the sad reality is that the Brave New World that looms ahead of us is ultimately a reflection of ourselves. It is driven by technologies such as text messaging and customer loyalty cards that are free to accept or reject as we choose. The public debate on surveillance is often cast in terms of a trade-off between security and privacy. The truth is that luxury and convenience have been pre-eminent themes in the last decade, and we have given them a much higher priority than either security or privacy. We have all been embraced the world of surveillance with remarkable eagerness, surfing the Internet in a global search for a better bargain, better friends, even a better partner. GCHQ vast new circular headquarters is sometimes represented as a 'ring of power', exercising unparalleled levels of surveillance over citizens at home and abroad, collecting every email, every telephone and every instance of internet acces. It has even been asserted that GCHQ is engaged in nothing short of 'algorithmic warfare' as part of a battle for control of global communications. By contrast, the occupants of 'Celtenham's Doughnut' claim that in reality they are increasingly weak, having been left behind by the unstoppable electronic communications that they cannot hope to listen to, still less analyse or make sense of. In fact, the frightening truth is that no one is in control. No person, no intelligence agency and no government is steering the accelerating electronic processes that may eventually enslave us. Most of the devices that cause us to leave a continual digital trail of everything we think or do were not devised by the state, but are merely symptoms of modernity. GCHQ is simply a vast mirror, and it reflects the spirit of the age.
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Richard J. Aldrich (GCHQ)
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In no class of warfare,โ€ C. E. Callwell had written a hundred years earlier, about the โ€œsmall warsโ€ of the nineteenth century, โ€œis a well organized and well served intelligence department more essential than in that against guerrillas.โ€ The same qualities that made intelligence so important when countering guerrillas thenโ€”the difficulty of finding the enemy, of striking him, and of predicting his next move and defending against itโ€”were increased a hundredfold when trying to counter terrorists in the age of electronic communication and car bombs.
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Stanley McChrystal (My Share of the Task: A Memoir)
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Vault 7 --- A series of documents published by WikiLeaks in 2017 that detail the capabilities of the CIA to perform electronic surveillance and cyber warfare. The files, dated from 2013โ€“2016, include
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Dave Hayes (Calm before the Storm (Q Chronicles Book 1))
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the use of what he called โ€œelectronic dossiersโ€ as โ€œwarfare on the American people.
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Betty Medsger (The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover's Secret FBI)
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I mean, these guys started with horses and six shooters and now we're talking about twenty-two million dollar business jets, ship at sea refueling, electronic warfareโ€ฆ
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Jack Silkstone (PRIMAL Nemesis (PRIMAL #6))
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Originating in large scale electronic warfare and anti-jamming technologies for the battlefield devised by two Russian immigrants, these now one-chip systems can fit in a handset and enable intercommunication among the towers of Babel in urban America.
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George Gilder (The Israel Test: Why the World's Most Besieged State is a Beacon of Freedom and Hope for the World Economy)
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โ€”Students are being required in some schools and universities to use biometric id employing rfid for electronic monitoring.
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Thomas Horn (Forbidden Gates: How Genetics, Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Biology, Nanotechnology, and Human Enhancement Herald The Dawn Of TechnoDimensional Spiritual Warfare)
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The agents of imperial demise would certainly be backed up by military powerโ€”the Chinese have never wavered in that viewโ€”but the agents would be many and varied: economic, legal, public relationsโ€”and electronic sabotage. The success of George Sorosโ€™s then recent speculative attack on the currencies of several East Asian nations impressed but appalled the Chinese (who have pegged their own currency to the dollar in part to discourage such tactics). Soros and his traders had driven down the value of these currencies, forcing them into line with their true worth! But that point was lost on Qiao and Wang, as it was lost on noncapitalists (i.e., most people) around the world, who saw only economic chaos in Asia created by Western capitalists. To the authors of Unrestricted Warfare, these attacks were a form of economic terrorism on par with bin Ladenโ€™s bombings of U.S. embassies in East Africa, Aum Shinrikyoโ€™s sarin gas attack in the Tokyo subway, and the depredations of malicious hackers on the Internet. They โ€œrepresent semi-warfare, quasi-warfare, and sub-warfare, that is, the embryonic form of another kind of warfare.โ€ Such warfare knows no boundaries, and against it, borders have no meaning.
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Joel Brenner (Glass Houses: Privacy, Secrecy, and Cyber Insecurity in a Transparent World)