Web We Weave Quotes

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Oh, what a tangled web we weave...when first we practice to deceive.
Walter Scott (Marmion)
Oh what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive
Walter Scott (Marmion)
If I could control tomorrow's haze, The darkened shore wouldn't bother me, If I can't control the web we weave, My life will be lost in the fallen leaves... - No Control
David Bowie
O, the tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive.
Walter Scott
What is evil?" asked the younger man. The round web, with its black center, seemed to watch them both. "A web we men weave." Ged answered.
Ursula K. Le Guin (The Farthest Shore (Earthsea Cycle, #3))
The important thing for the remembering author is not what he experienced, but the weaving of his memory, the Penelope work of recollection. Or should one call it, rather, the Penelope work of forgetting? ... And is not his work of spontaneous recollection, in which remembrance is the woof and forgetting the warp, a counterpart to Penelope's work rather than its likeness? For here the day unravels what the night has woven. When we awake each morning, we hold in our hands, usually weakly and loosely, but a few fringes of the tapestry of a lived life, as loomed for us by forgetting. However, with our purposeful activity and, even more, our purposive remembering each day unravels the web and the ornaments of forgetting.
Walter Benjamin (Illuminations: Essays and Reflections)
We do not weave the web of life, we are merely a strand in it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.
Chief Seattle
That's how history unfolds. People weave a web of meaning, believe in it with all their heart, but sooner or later the web unravels, and when we look back we cannot understand how anybody could have taken it seriously. (p.175)
Yuval Noah Harari (Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow)
What a tangled web we weave. When first we practice to deceive.
Jackie Ivie (Knight after Night (Vampire Assassin League, #1))
Oh, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practice to deceive! - Walter Scott
Dannika Dark (Ravenheart (Crossbreed #2; Mageriverse #18))
Oh what a tangled web we weave...
Walter Scott
Oh, what a tangled web we weave,’ ” I intoned, “ ‘when first we practice to deceive.’ 
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
1. The consciousness that created the universe dwells within us. 2. We exist in the energy web and are one with it. 3. Consciousness weaves and directs energy. 4. Everything exists for us as a possibility.
John Kehoe (Quantum Warrior: The Future of the Mind)
The inner lawyer, the rose-colored mirror, naive realism, and the myth of pure evil—these mechanisms all conspire to weave for us a web of significance upon which angels and demons fight it out. Our ever-judging minds then give us constant flashes of approval and disapproval, along with the certainty that we are on the side of the angels. From this vantage point it all seems so silly, all this moralism, righteousness, and hypocrisy. It’s beyond silly; it is tragic, for it suggests that human beings will never achieve a state of lasting peace and harmony.
Jonathan Haidt (The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom)
Each religion makes scores of purportedly factual assertions about everything from the creation of the universe to the afterlife. But on what grounds can believers presume to know that these assertions are true? The reasons they give are various, but the ultimate justification for most religious people’s beliefs is a simple one: we believe what we believe because our holy scriptures say so. But how, then, do we know that our holy scriptures are factually accurate? Because the scriptures themselves say so. Theologians specialize in weaving elaborate webs of verbiage to avoid saying anything quite so bluntly, but this gem of circular reasoning really is the epistemological bottom line on which all 'faith' is grounded. In the words of Pope John Paul II: 'By the authority of his absolute transcendence, God who makes himself known is also the source of the credibility of what he reveals.' It goes without saying that this begs the question of whether the texts at issue really were authored or inspired by God, and on what grounds one knows this. 'Faith' is not in fact a rejection of reason, but simply a lazy acceptance of bad reasons. 'Faith' is the pseudo-justification that some people trot out when they want to make claims without the necessary evidence. But of course we never apply these lax standards of evidence to the claims made in the other fellow’s holy scriptures: when it comes to religions other than one’s own, religious people are as rational as everyone else. Only our own religion, whatever it may be, seems to merit some special dispensation from the general standards of evidence. And here, it seems to me, is the crux of the conflict between religion and science. Not the religious rejection of specific scientific theories (be it heliocentrism in the 17th century or evolutionary biology today); over time most religions do find some way to make peace with well-established science. Rather, the scientific worldview and the religious worldview come into conflict over a far more fundamental question: namely, what constitutes evidence. Science relies on publicly reproducible sense experience (that is, experiments and observations) combined with rational reflection on those empirical observations. Religious people acknowledge the validity of that method, but then claim to be in the possession of additional methods for obtaining reliable knowledge of factual matters — methods that go beyond the mere assessment of empirical evidence — such as intuition, revelation, or the reliance on sacred texts. But the trouble is this: What good reason do we have to believe that such methods work, in the sense of steering us systematically (even if not invariably) towards true beliefs rather than towards false ones? At least in the domains where we have been able to test these methods — astronomy, geology and history, for instance — they have not proven terribly reliable. Why should we expect them to work any better when we apply them to problems that are even more difficult, such as the fundamental nature of the universe? Last but not least, these non-empirical methods suffer from an insuperable logical problem: What should we do when different people’s intuitions or revelations conflict? How can we know which of the many purportedly sacred texts — whose assertions frequently contradict one another — are in fact sacred?
Alan Sokal
This we know… the earth does not belong to man, man belongs to the earth. All things are connected; like blood which connects one family. Whatever befalls the earth befalls the children of the earth. Man did not weave the web of life – but is merely a strand in it. Whatever he does to the web, he does to himself.” Chief Seattle, 1854
Doug Lamoreux (Apparition Lake)
I nod in the darkness. He embraces me and before long he's fast asleep, a man with clear consiense and an open heart. I stay awake, listening to his breath and thinking of the webs we weave.
Lizbeth Gabriel (The Theater Of Dusk (A Short Story Collection))
No one is Sighet suspected that our fate was already sealed. In Berlin we had been condemned, but we didn't know it. We didn't know that a man called Adolf Eichmann was already in Budapest weaving his black web, at the head of an elite, efficient detachment of thirty-five SS men, planning the operation that wold crown his career; or that all the necessary means for "dealing with" us were already at hand in a place called Birkenau.
Elie Wiesel (All Rivers Run to the Sea)
That’s how history unfolds. People weave a web of meaning, believe in it with all their heart, but sooner or later the web unravels, and when we look back we cannot understand how anybody could have taken it seriously.
Yuval Noah Harari (Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow)
She could do nothing. Djuna’s words illuminated her chaos, but changed nothing. What was it Djuna said: that life tended to crystallize into patterns which became traps and webs. That people tended to see each other in their first “state” or “form” and to adopt a rhythm in consequence. That they had greatest difficulty in seeing the transformations of the loved one, in seeing the becoming. If they did finally perceive the new self, they had the greatest difficulty nevertheless in changing the rhythm. The strong one was condemned to perpetual strength, the weak to perpetual weakness. The one who loved you best condemned you to a static role because he had adapted his being to the past self. If you attempted to change, warned Djuna, you would find a subtle, perverse opposition, and perhaps sabotage! Inwardly and outwardly, a pattern was a form which became a prison. And then we had to smash it. Mutation was difficult. Attempts at evasion were frequent, blind evasions, evasions from dead relips, false relationships, false roles, and sometimes from the deeper self too, because of the great obstacle one encountered in affirming it. All our emotional history was that of the spider and the fly, with the added tragedy that the fly here collaborated in the weaving of the web. Crimes were frequent. People in desperation turned about and destroyed each other. No one could detect the cause or catch the criminal. There was no visible victim. It always had the appearance of suicide.
Anaïs Nin (Ladders to Fire)
Sometimes it takes years for us to change. We build defenses around ourselves, putting brick after brick in a wall around our hearts. We weave a web of lies that hides who we really are. It takes time to create that armor. But when we meet the right person—the one who makes us realize what we’re missing, and what we need—we can change so much faster. The walls that took years to build come tumbling down in months.
Harper Dallas (Ride (The Wild Sequence, #1))
I had argued that it was ridiculous for a person to have two separate interfaces, one for local information (the desktop of their own computer) and one for remote information (a browser to reach other computers). Why did we need an entire desktop for our own computer but get only a window through which to view the entire rest of the planet? Why, for that matter, should we have folders on our desktop but not on the web?
Tim Berners-Lee (Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web)
The writer's craft, explained! I have stood on the shores of imagination, gazing at a sea of dreams. It is a lonely place, for not many can stand on that shifting sand and call it home. I can see others who also weave a web of dreams and will share them. We are called storytellers and we alone have that gift that feed the needs of the many. We are a strange family, united in our separate talents and bonded by our willingness to share. The price we pay, is a dependence on others, reaching out to listen to our stories. WE must never forget our need for the herd or they will forget us! There is no savage punishment for such as we, than to be easily forgotten! This is our greatest fear and all of us share that terror. So write brothers and sisters, write and bare your souls without fear. If you are good enough, they will listen and they will remember you. Its all we can ask!
Barry Woodham
That’s how history unfolds. People weave a web of meaning, believe in it with all their heart, but sooner or later the web unravels, and when we look back we cannot understand how anybody could have taken it seriously. With hindsight, going on crusade in the hope of reaching Paradise sounds like utter madness. With hindsight, the Cold War seems even madder. How come thirty years ago people were willing to risk nuclear holocaust because of their belief in a communist paradise? A hundred years hence, our belief in democracy and human rights might look equally incomprehensible to our descendants.
Yuval Noah Harari (Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow)
In his book Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, emphasizes the importance of the brain in the forming of connections (the italics are mine): A piece of information is really defined only by what it’s related to, and how it’s related. There really is little else to meaning. The structure is everything. There are billions of neurons in our brains, but what are neurons? Just cells. The brain has no knowledge until connections are made between neurons. All that we know, all that we are, comes from the way our neurons are connected. Berners-Lee
Richard Restak (Mozart's Brain and the Fighter Pilot: Unleashing Your Brain's Potential)
Paint in several colors was squeezed out of tubes and mixed and applied to woven fabric stretched on a wooden frame so artfully we say we see a woman hanging out a sheet rather than oil on canvas. Ana Teresa Fernandez’s image on that canvas is six feet tall, five feet wide, the figure almost life-size. Though it is untitled, the series it’s in has a title: Telaraña. Spiderweb. The spiderweb of gender and history in which the painted woman is caught; the spiderweb of her own power that she is weaving in this painting dominated by a sheet that was woven. Woven now by a machine, but before the industrial revolution by women whose spinning and weaving linked them to spiders and made spiders feminine in the old stories. In this part of the world, in the creation stories of the Hopi, Pueblo, Navajo, Choctaw, and Cherokee peoples, Spider Grandmother is the principal creator of the universe. Ancient Greek stories included an unfortunate spinning woman who was famously turned into a spider as well as the more powerful Greek fates, who spun, wove, and cut each person’s lifeline, who ensured that those lives would be linear narratives that end. Spiderwebs are images of the nonlinear, of the many directions in which something might go, the many sources for it; of the grandmothers as well as the strings of begats. There’s a German painting from the nineteenth century of women processing the flax from which linen is made. They wear wooden shoes, dark dresses, demure white caps, and stand at various distances from a wall, where the hanks of raw material are being wound up as thread. From each of them, a single thread extends across the room, as though they were spiders, as though it came right out of their bellies. Or as though they were tethered to the wall by the fine, slim threads that are invisible in other kinds of light. They are spinning, they are caught in the web. To spin the web and not be caught in it, to create the world, to create your own life, to rule your fate, to name the grandmothers as well as the fathers, to draw nets and not just straight lines, to be a maker as well as a cleaner, to be able to sing and not be silenced, to take down the veil and appear: all these are the banners on the laundry line I hang out.
Rebecca Solnit (Men Explain Things to Me)
Even in a forest, there are loners, would-be hermits who want little to do with others. Can such antisocial trees block alarm calls simply by not participating? Luckily, they can't. For usually there are fungi present that act as intermediaries to guarantee quick dissemination of news. These fungi operate like fiber-optic Internet cables. Their thin filaments penetrate the ground, weaving through it in almost unbelievable density. One teaspoon of forest soil contains many miles of these "hyphae." Over centuries, a single fungus can cover many square miles and network an entire forest. The fungal connections transmit signals from one tree to the next, helping the trees exchange news about insects, drought, and other dangers. Science has adopted a term first coined by the journal Nature for Dr. Simard's discovery of the "wood wide web" pervading our forests. What and how much information is exchanged are subjects we have only just begun to research. For instance, Simard discovered that different tree species are in contact with one another, even when they regard each other as competitors. And the fungi are pursuing their own agendas and appear to be very much in favor of conciliation and equitable distribution of information and resources.
Peter Wohlleben (The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World)
It is relatively easy to accept that money is an intersubjective reality. Most people are also happy to acknowledge that ancient Greek gods, evil empires and the values of alien cultures exist only in the imagination. Yet we don’t want to accept that our God, our nation or our values are mere fictions, because these are the things that give meaning to our lives. We want to believe that our lives have some objective meaning, and that our sacrifices matter to something beyond the stories in our head. Yet in truth the lives of most people have meaning only within the network of stories they tell one another. Meaning is created when many people weave together a common network of stories. Why does a particular action – such as getting married in church, fasting on Ramadan or voting on election day – seem meaningful to me? Because my parents also think it is meaningful, as do my brothers, my neighbours, people in nearby cities and even the residents of far-off countries. And why do all these people think it is meaningful? Because their friends and neighbours also share the same view. People constantly reinforce each other’s beliefs in a self-perpetuating loop. Each round of mutual confirmation tightens the web of meaning further, until you have little choice but to believe what everyone else believes. Yet over decades and centuries the web of meaning unravels and a new web is spun in its place. To study history means to watch the spinning and unravelling of these webs, and to realise that what seems to people in one age the most important thing in life becomes utterly meaningless to their descendants.
Yuval Noah Harari (Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow)
Death Vision I think it’s a multiplication of sight, Like after a low hovering autumn rain When the invisible web of funnel weaves And sheetweb weavers all at once are seen Where they always were, spread and looping The grasses, every strand, waft and leaf- Crest elucidated with water-light and frost, completing the fullest aspect of field. Or maybe the grace of death is split-second Transformation of knowledge, an intricate, Turning realization, as when a single Sperm-embracing deep ovum transforms, In an instant, from stasis to replicating, Star-shifting shimmer, rolls, reaches, Alters its plane of intentions, becomes A hoofing, thumping host of purpose. I can imagine not merely The falling away of blank walls And blinds in that moment, not merely A shutter flung open for the first time Above a valley of interlocking forests And constellations but a sweeping, Penetrating circumference of vision Encompassing both knotweed bud And its seed simultaneously, seeing Blood bone and its ash as one, The repeated light and fall and flight Of hawk-owl and tundra vole As a union of origin and finality. A mathematics of flesh and space might Take hold if we ask for it in that last Moment, might appear as if it had always Existed within the eyes, translucent, Jewel-like in stained glass patterns Of globes and measures, equations, Made evident by a revelation of galaxies In the knees, spine, fingers, all The ceasings, all the deaths within deaths That compose the body becoming at once Their own symbolic perception and praise Of river salt, blooms and breaths, strings, Strains, sun-seas of gravels and gills; This one expression breaking, this same Expression healing.
Pattiann Rogers (Quickening Fields)
Unchopping a Tree. Start with the leaves, the small twigs, and the nests that have been shaken, ripped, or broken off by the fall; these must be gathered and attached once again to their respective places. It is not arduous work, unless major limbs have been smashed or mutilated. If the fall was carefully and correctly planned, the chances of anything of the kind happening will have been reduced. Again, much depends upon the size, age, shape, and species of the tree. Still, you will be lucky if you can get through this stages without having to use machinery. Even in the best of circumstances it is a labor that will make you wish often that you had won the favor of the universe of ants, the empire of mice, or at least a local tribe of squirrels, and could enlist their labors and their talents. But no, they leave you to it. They have learned, with time. This is men's work. It goes without saying that if the tree was hollow in whole or in part, and contained old nests of bird or mammal or insect, or hoards of nuts or such structures as wasps or bees build for their survival, the contents will have to repaired where necessary, and reassembled, insofar as possible, in their original order, including the shells of nuts already opened. With spider's webs you must simply do the best you can. We do not have the spider's weaving equipment, nor any substitute for the leaf's living bond with its point of attachment and nourishment. It is even harder to simulate the latter when the leaves have once become dry — as they are bound to do, for this is not the labor of a moment. Also it hardly needs saying that this the time fro repairing any neighboring trees or bushes or other growth that might have been damaged by the fall. The same rules apply. Where neighboring trees were of the same species it is difficult not to waste time conveying a detached leaf back to the wrong tree. Practice, practice. Put your hope in that. Now the tackle must be put into place, or the scaffolding, depending on the surroundings and the dimension of the tree. It is ticklish work. Almost always it involves, in itself, further damage to the area, which will have to be corrected later. But, as you've heard, it can't be helped. And care now is likely to save you considerable trouble later. Be careful to grind nothing into the ground. At last the time comes for the erecting of the trunk. By now it will scarcely be necessary to remind you of the delicacy of this huge skeleton. Every motion of the tackle, every slightly upward heave of the trunk, the branches, their elaborately reassembled panoply of leaves (now dead) will draw from you an involuntary gasp. You will watch for a lead or a twig to be snapped off yet again. You will listen for the nuts to shift in the hollow limb and you will hear whether they are indeed falling into place or are spilling in disorder — in which case, or in the event of anything else of the kind — operations will have to cease, of course, while you correct the matter. The raising itself is no small enterprise, from the moment when the chains tighten around the old bandages until the boles hands vertical above the stump, splinter above splinter. How the final straightening of the splinters themselves can take place (the preliminary work is best done while the wood is still green and soft, but at times when the splinters are not badly twisted most of the straightening is left until now, when the torn ends are face to face with each other). When the splinters are perfectly complementary the appropriate fixative is applied. Again we have no duplicate of the original substance. Ours is extremely strong, but it is rigid. It is limited to surfaces, and there is no play in it. However the core is not the part of the trunk that conducted life from the roots up to the branches and back again. It was relatively inert. The fixative for this part is not the same as the one for the outer layers and the bark, and if either of these is involved
W.S. Merwin
Oh what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive.” - Sir Walter Scott
Nikki Sex (Fate (Fate #1))
I'd never thought I'd have anything to do with her. The webs we weave. Ties that bind.
NisiOisiN (Bakemonogatari, Part 2: Monster Tale (Bakemonogatari, #1, Part 2))
First we molt, then spin a web, after this we weave, until our food is dead. Next dancing a jig, And waiting for a meal, Then we wrestle a bit Til we sit and eat our fill.” Captain Muntweight
Craig Froman (Of Secrets, Spiders & and the End of the World (Always Rune #1))
Oh what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive’ Sir Walter Scott.
Lucy White (The House of Trysts)
Something stirred within her as she felt the truth in Anna’s words, but just to be sure she understood correctly, asked, “The Akashic record is a library?” Anna smiled. “Yes, a non-physical library containing all the knowledge of every souls life since before time. Look at it as similar to human technology, the internet, you can't see the connection, yet all the information is available at your fingertips. It works like that, we each have the capability to connect from inside. Only, most humans haven't learned to unlock the code, yet. Vo-ror-bla is the bright center of an invisible universal web called Siathia, which weaves and connects all life in existence.
Tracey-anne McCartney (A Carpet of Purple Flowers)
Oh, what a tangled web we weave when first
Debra Burroughs (Paradise Valley Mysteries Boxed Set (Paradise Valley Mystery #1-3))
Oh, what a fucked-up web we’ve weaved.
Ella Fields (Frayed Silk)
That big man, with his white hair and battered face, her father, was also a son, anyone who refuses to understand this knows little of life, the webs that weave around human relationships in general and family relationships in particular, especially close family relationships, are more complex than they seem at first sight, we talk about parents and children, and think we know perfectly well what we mean, and we do not ask ourselves about the profound reasons for the affection that lies therein or indeed the indifference or the hatred.
José Saramago (The Cave)
This we know: All things are connected like the blood that unites us. We did not weave the web of life, We are merely a strand in it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.
Susan Jeffers (Brother Eagle, Sister Sky)
It is relatively easy to accept that money is an intersubjective reality. Most people are also happy to acknowledge that ancient Greek gods, evil empires and the values of alien cultures exist only in the imagination. Yet we don’t want to accept that our God, our nation or our values are mere fictions, because these are the things that give meaning to our lives. We want to believe that our lives have some objective meaning, and that our sacrifices matter to something beyond the stories in our head. Yet in truth the lives of most people have meaning only within the network of stories they tell one another. Meaning is created when many people weave together a common network of stories. Why does a particular action – such as getting married in church, fasting on Ramadan or voting on election day – seem meaningful to me? Because my parents also think it is meaningful, as do my brothers, my neighbours, people in nearby cities and even the residents of far-off countries. And why do all these people think it is meaningful? Because their friends and neighbours also share the same view. People constantly reinforce each other’s beliefs in a self-perpetuating loop. Each round of mutual confirmation tightens the web of meaning further, until you have little choice but to believe what everyone else believes. Yet over decades and centuries the web of meaning unravels and a new web is spun in its place. To study history means to watch the spinning and unravelling of these webs, and to realise that what seems to people in one age the most important thing in life becomes utterly meaningless to their descendants.
Yuval Noah Harari (Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow)
Oh, what a tangled web we weave When first we practise to deceive! —Sir Walter Scott, Marmion
Rachael Anderson (The Fall of Lord Drayson (Tanglewood))
Oh, what a tangled web we weave when first we practise to deceive!
Imogen Clark (Where the Story Starts)
Oh, what a tangled web we weave... when first we practice to deceive.”   - Walter Scott, Marmion
C.J. Berry (Trust Me Not - Part One: (The Trust Me Not Series, Book 1))
Oh what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive.
Anonymous
What a tangle web we weave when we first practice to deceive
Kwabena Frimpong Marfo
All things are connected like the blood that unites us. We do not weave the web of life, we are merely a strand in it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.” Chief Seattle
Heather Harder (Dimensions & Awakenings of Divine Consciousness: Understanding Earth's Journey from 3rd to 5th Dimension (A Lightworker's Guide to Life ))
People weave a web of meaning, believe in it with all their heart, but sooner or later the web unravels, and when we look back we cannot understand how anybody could have taken it seriously.
Yuval Noah Harari (Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow)
own incitements, have been changing. The global weaving continues; the orbital web grows. In 2014, the European Space Agency launched a rocket from its spaceport in French Guyana, carrying Sentinel 1A, the first satellite in its Copernicus project, which is in many ways the most ambitious Earth observation program to date. Copernicus will include a fleet of orbiting craft to be launched over the ensuing decade, which will obtain continuous coverage of the entire planet in unprecedented detail over multiple wavelengths. Sentinel 1A can monitor any location on the globe using radar imaging, a technique we’ve employed with great success elsewhere in the solar system,
David Grinspoon (Earth in Human Hands: Shaping Our Planet's Future)
Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive,
J.L. Langland (Into The Abyss (Demons of Astlan, #1))
That’s how history unfolds. People weave a web of meaning, believe in it with all their heart, but sooner or later the web unravels, and when we look back we cannot understand how anybody could have taken it seriously. With
Yuval Noah Harari (Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow)
We have adopted the policy of Sorel of propaganda of the deed. The best rhetoric comes from building and testing models and running experiments. Let philosophers weave webs of words; such webs break easily.
Herbert A. Simon (Models of My Life)
Oh, what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive.” ~ Sir Walter Scott
Debra Burroughs (Paradise Valley Mysteries Boxed Set 2 (Paradise Valley Mystery, #4-6))
What a tangled web we weave when at first we practice to deceive.” - William Shakespeare
Norman Blume (Cultivate An Unstoppable Character)
...someone stops writing because [s]he listens to that tiny voice that says, 'What you're writing isn't any good because someone else has already said it.' Well, you shouldn't listen to that voice, because while it's partially right, it's also wrong. The stories we craft, the webs we weave, they are all drawn from the same common threads scattered throughout our shared histories. There's no such thing as originality in the components of a story — our ancestors saw to that a long ago with those ancient fireside tales.
Chris Kluwe (Beautifully Unique Sparkleponies: On Myths, Morons, Free Speech, Football, and Assorted Absurdities)
Oh, what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive.” ~ Sir Walter Scott Prologue
Debra Burroughs (Paradise Valley Mysteries Boxed Set (Paradise Valley Mystery #1-3))
The combined activities of our enormous population are already producing breathtaking effects. Our planet is only 12,700 kilometers in diameter—about three times the distance between New York and Los Angeles—and we can easily travel halfway around it in less than a day. We have turned much of its land surface into a patchwork of cities, industrial parks, farms, and rangeland. We have laid on this land a web of roads, canals, and pipelines. We have dug out of it hundreds of billions of tons of material, moved this material around, processed it, and dumped it. Our factory ships and trawlers crisscross the world’s oceans to exploit every valuable fishery. Our planes and satellites weave themselves around its sphere. We are moving so much rock and dirt, blocking and diverting so many rivers, converting so many forests to cropland, releasing such huge quantities of heavy metals and organic chemicals into air and water, and generating so much energy, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrogen compounds that we are perturbing the deepest dynamics of our global ecosystems. Between one-third and one-half of the planet’s land area has been fundamentally transformed by our actions: row-crop agriculture, cities, and industrial areas occupy 10 to 15 percent of Earth’s land surface; 6 to 8 percent has been converted to pasture; and an area the size of France is now submerged under artificial reservoirs. We have driven to extinction a quarter of all bird species. We use more than half of all accessible fresh water. In regions of major human activity, large rivers typically carry three times as much sediment as they did in pre-human times, while small rivers carry eight times the sediment. Along the world’s tropical and subtropical coastlines, our activities—especially the construction of cities, industries, and aquaculture pens—have changed or destroyed 50 percent of mangrove ecosystems, which are vital to the health of coastal fisheries. And about two-thirds of the world’s marine fisheries are either overexploited, depleted, or at their limit of exploitation. The decline of global fish stocks has followed a predictable pattern: like roving predators, we have shifted from one major stock to another as each has reached its maximum productivity and then begun to decline.30
Thomas Homer-Dixon (The Ingenuity Gap: How Can We Solve the Problems of the Future?)
Promises are like spiderwebs we weave to trap our own dreams, but dreams have a way of thinning out until you’re left with nothing but the web.
V.C. Andrews (Tarnished Gold (Landry, #5))
Learn All About Computer from First Generation to the Last Generation A PC is a machine or gadget that performs cycles, calculations, and functions based on the guidelines provided by a product or equipment program. It can detect data (input), measure it, and then produce yield. PCs can similarly store data for later use of indomitable power gadgets and recover important keys. Current PCs are designed to provide a repository of applications and systems by integrating electronic gadgets used for web guessing, archiving, recording changes, application creation, computer games, and the tools connected to them. Taco Pedia has made it clear to computers that soon computerized electronic gadgets that could be identified as the main current PCs are the Kolas as below 1943-44, the German encryption machine Lorenz SZ 40/42K used to assist in military exchanges during World War II. Kansas was backed to break up. The gadget used 2,400 vacuum cylinders to perform various Boolean intelligent tasks to uncover encoded data. Current PCs come in all shapes and sizes to play a wide range of different capabilities. Despite the severity, the first things that hit Jaraj are workspaces and PCs, various low-acceptance gadgets - for example, basic food item scanners, ATMs, and even conscious TVs. The proliferation of cell phones, game consoles, wearable, and an intelligent system has made PCs instantly accessible to us life. A PC has different parts and sections that encourage the client's utility. An authentic calculation was not for PC entertainment or email, but for urgent solutions. By 1880, the U.S. population had grown so rapidly that it took more than seven years to classify U.S. registration results. The legislature sought a quick way to take care of the business by proposing to occupy the entire space and climb into five card-based PCs. Today, we have shown more obvious power in our cell phones than being accessible in these early models. A brief history with figures is how PCs moved from their modern beginnings to today's machines, despite the math, surfing the Internet, messing around, and transferring media. 1801: Joseph Marie Jacquard hypnotizes a loom in France, using structure cards naturally to weave structure schemes. Early PCs will use comparative punch cards. 1822: English mathematician Charles Babbage considers the steam-powered figure machine as an alternative to number table processing. This initiative, funded by the English government, is disappointing. More than a century later, as it were, the world's first PC was indeed built. 1890 Herman Hollerith plans a punch card structure to calculate the 1880 figure, achieving the task in just three years and surpassing five million dollars to the administration. He created a company that would eventually become IBM. 1936 Alan Turing introduces the concept of an all-encompassing machine, later known as the Turing machine, suitable for recording computing. The central concept of the cutting edge PC depends on his thinking. 1936 Fourth State University Materials Science and Arithmetic J.V. Atamans has tried to make the original PC without closing, gear, cam, belt, or shaft.
Musabbir
Okay, judged on raw brain power, humans do no better than our hairier cousins. So, then, what are we using our great big brains for? Maybe we’re more cunning. That’s the crux of the ‘Machiavellian intelligence’ hypothesis, named after the Italian Renaissance philosopher Niccolò Machiavelli, author of The Prince (1513). In this handbook for rulers, Machiavelli counsels weaving a web of lies and deception to stay in power. According to adherents of this hypothesis, that’s precisely what we’ve been doing for millions of years: devising ever more inventive ways to swindle one another. And because telling lies takes more cognitive energy than being truthful, our brains grew like the nuclear arsenals of Russia and the US during the Cold War. The result of this mental arms race is the sapien superbrain. If this hypothesis were true, you’d expect humans to beat other primates handily in games that hinge on conning your opponent. But no such luck. Numerous studies show that chimps outscore us on these tests and that humans are lousy liars.9 Not only that, we’re predisposed to trust others, which explains how con artists can fool their marks.10 This brings me to another odd quirk of Homo sapiens. Machiavelli, in his classic book, advises never revealing your emotions. Work on your poker face, he urges; shame serves no purpose. The object is to win, by fair means or foul. But if only the shameless win, why are humans one of the only species in the whole animal kingdom to blush?
Rutger Bregman (Humankind: A Hopeful History)
The only other person who’s ever worn sunglasses in rainy Cromwey was some random soap opera actress who turned on the Christmas lights in 2009.
Michelle Morgan (The Webs We Weave)
They had been to the late-night showing of that Queen movie. Yes, I know it’s already out on DVD, but Pete wanted to see it on the big screen, because of the whole Live Aid thing…’ ‘Kate! Get to the point!
Michelle Morgan (The Webs We Weave)
Now you mustn’t worry, dear. You’ll find someone else one of these days. If serial killers in prison can find partners, I’m sure there’s hope for you, too.
Michelle Morgan (The Webs We Weave)
I help myself to another slice of cake. No wonder Craig goes for younger women – they’ve had less time to pile on the pounds.
Michelle Morgan (The Webs We Weave)
Oh, what a tangled web we weave,’” I intoned, “‘when first we practice to deceive.
Diana Gabaldon (Voyager (Outlander, #3))
Oh what a tangled web we weave When first we practise to deceive! (Sir Walter Scott, Marmion)
Colin Dexter (The Wench Is Dead (Inspector Morse, #8))
Let’s stop talking. The effort you make to talk tires me out... The gap between what you think and what you say grieves me ... I can feel in my skin my consciousness floating on the surface of my sensations’ terrified stupor. I don’t know what that means, but it’s what I feel ... I need to say longish, confusing sentences that are hard to say ... Doesn’t all of this feel to you like a huge spider that between us is weaving, from soul to soul, a black web we can’t escape?
Fernando Pessoa (The Selected Prose of Fernando Pessoa)
The earth grows white with harvest; all day long The sickles gleam, until the darkness weaves Her web of silence o'er the thankful song Of reapers bringing home the golden sheaves. The wave tops whiten on the sea fields drear, And men go forth at haggard dawn to reap; But ever 'mid the gleaners' song we hear The half-hushed sobbing of the hearts that weep.
John McCrae