Usda Quotes

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It's chick flick disguised as a sword-and-sorcery picture. The only genre film with less balls is probably... freakin' Legend. Anyone who actually enjoys Ladyhawke is a bona fide USDA-choice pussy!
Ernest Cline (Ready Player One (Ready Player One, #1))
Last year, the USDA said for the first time in 150 years that there were more farms in America instead of fewer. I think that's the single most hopeful statistic I know.
Bill McKibben
Me and the folks who buy my food are like the Indians -- we just want to opt out. That's all the Indians ever wanted -- to keep their tepees, to give their kids herbs instead of patent medicines and leeches. They didn't care if there was a Washington, D.C., or a Custer or a USDA; just leave us alone. But the Western mind can't bear an opt-out option. We're going to have to refight the Battle of the Little Big Horn to preserve the right to opt out, or your grandchildren and mine will have no choice but to eat amalgamated, irradiated, genetically prostituted, barcoded, adulterated fecal spam from the centralized processing conglomerate.
Michael Pollan (The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals)
Nick ran smack into me. "Ooof!" he hollered, grabbing me around the waist to keep me from falling down the rest of the staircase. That's when I realized Mom thought Nick and I were going on a date together. Quickly Nick let me go.He looked huge, frowning down at me from the step above. "Why are you stopping in the middle of the stairs?" "Why are you tailgating me?" He put his hand behind me, at butt level, without touching me. "What is that?" he demanded. I bent a little and slapped my butt, "Something the heir to a meat fortune should know all about. USDA grade-A prime,baby." I straightened. "Just kidding. Really, it's my butt." He put his hands on his hips, and from below I noticed his strong superhero chin again.He grumbled, "Why do you have 'boy toy' written across your butt?" "Oh!" I put my hand over the words, realizing that I probably should have been embarrassed about this sooner. "These are my brother's jeans. He wrote it to annoy me. Or to get me a date.
Jennifer Echols (The Ex Games)
I TEND TO believe in government because it was the U.S. government that paid for my brain surgery when I was five months old and provided USDA food so I wouldn’t starve during my poverty-crushed reservation childhood and built the HUD house that kept us warm and gave me scholarship money for the college education that freed me. Of course, the government only gave me all of that good shit because they completely fucked over my great-grandparents and grandparents but, you know, at least some official white folks keep some of their promises.
Sherman Alexie (You Don't Have to Say You Love Me)
Once upon a time, USDA inspectors had to condemn any bird with such fecal contamination. But about thirty years ago, the poultry industry convinced the USDA to reclassify feces so that it could continue to use these automatic eviscerators. Once a dangerous contaminant, feces are now classified as a "cosmetic blemish.
Jonathan Safran Foer (Eating Animals)
To speak only of food inspections: the United States currently imports 80% of its seafood, 32% of its fruits and nuts, 13% of its vegetables, and 10% of its meats. In 2007, these foods arrived in 25,000 shipments a day from about 100 countries. The FDA was able to inspect about 1% of these shipments, down from 8% in 1992. In contrast, the USDA is able to inspect 16% of the foods under its purview. By one assessment, the FDA has become so short-staffed that it would take the agency 1,900 years to inspect every foreign plant that exports food to the United States.
Marion Nestle (Pet Food Politics: The Chihuahua in the Coal Mine)
Food safety oversight is largely, but not exclusively, divided between two agencies, the FDA and the USDA. The USDA mostly oversees meat and poultry; the FDA mostly handles everything else, including pet food and animal feed. Although this division of responsibility means that the FDA is responsible for 80% of the food supply, it only gets 20% of the federal budget for this purpose. In contrast, the USDA gets 80% of the budget for 20% of the foods. This uneven distribution is the result of a little history and a lot of politics.
Marion Nestle (Pet Food Politics: The Chihuahua in the Coal Mine)
A nationwide study published by the USDA in 1996 found that [...] 78.6 percent of the ground beef contained microbes that are spread primarily by fecal matter. The medical literature on the causes of food poisoning is full of euphemisms and dry scientific terms: coliform levels, aerobic plate counts, sorbitol, MacConkey agar, and so on. Behind them lies a simple explanation for why eating hamburger meat makes you sick: There is shit in the meat.
Eric Schlosser (Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal)
The man needed USDA Prime tattooed up his flank.
Maeve Greyson (My Tempting Highlander (Highland Hearts, #3))
One USDA scientist went so far as to claim that there has never been a documented case of food-borne illness from eating fermented vegetables.
Michael Pollan (Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation)
Unless you eat foods clearly marked “Certified organic by the USDA,” you are taking part in a genetic experiment that is unprecedented in earth’s long history.
Alberto Villoldo (One Spirit Medicine: Ancient Ways to Ultimate Wellness)
An apple a day might have kept the doctor away prior to the industrialization of food growing and preparation. But, according to research compiled by the United States Drug Administration (USDA) today’s apple contains residue of eleven different neurotoxins—azinphos, methyl chloripyrifos, diazinon, dimethoate, ethion, omthoate, parathion, parathion methyl, phosalone, and phosmet — and the USDA was testing for only one category of chemicals known as organophosphate insecticides. That doesn’t sound too appetizing does it? The average apple is sprayed with pesticides seventeen times before it is harvested.
Michelle Schoffro Cook (The Brain Wash: A Powerful, All-Naural Program to Protect Your Brain Against Alzheimer's, Depression, Parkinson's and Other Brain Diseases)
USDA’s chief flu researcher David Swayne recommended producers try to recoup the costs of culling by selling sick birds for human consumption.
Michael Greger (How to Survive a Pandemic)
Both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of the Interior removed from their websites the links to climate change data. The USDA removed the inspection reports of businesses accused of animal abuse by the government. The new acting head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Mick Mulvaney, said he wanted to end public access to records of consumer complaints against financial institutions. Two weeks after Hurricane Maria, statistics that detailed access to drinking water and electricity in Puerto Rico were deleted from the FEMA website. In a piece for FiveThirtyEight, Clare Malone and Jeff Asher pointed out that the first annual crime report released by the FBI under Trump was missing nearly three-quarters of the data tables from the previous year.
Michael Lewis (The Fifth Risk)
It is a veritable revolving door of jobs between the USDA and Big Ag and Big Food. Americans should insist on the establishment of a new Department of Food run through the Department of Health and Human Services, which is paying for the consequences of harmful dietary recommendations through Medicare and Medicaid. In
Mark Hyman (Eat Fat, Get Thin: Why the Fat We Eat Is the Key to Sustained Weight Loss and Vibrant Health)
A nationwide study published by the USDA in 1996 found that 7.5 percent of the ground beef samples taken at processing plants were contaminated with Salmonella, 11.7 percent were contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, 30 percent were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, and 53.3 percent were contaminated with Clostridium perfringens.
Eric Schlosser (Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal)
The popular media and conventional wisdom, including the medical profession's traditional approach to nutrition, have created and continue to perpetuate this problem through inadequate, outdated dietary counseling. Attempts to universalize dietary therapies so that one-diet-fits-all influences the flawed claims against meats and fats, thereby encouraging overconsumption of grains. Government-sponsored guides to healthy eating, such as the USDA's food pyramid, which advocates six to eleven servings of grains daily for everyone, lag far behind current research and continue to preach dangerously old-fashioned ideas. Because the USDA's function is largely the promotion of agriculture and agricultural products, there is a clear conflict of interest inherent in any USDA claim of healthful benefits arising from any agricultural product. Popular beliefs and politically motivated promotion, not science, continue to dictate dietary recommendations, leading to debilitating and deadly diseases that are wholly or partly preventable.
Ron Hoggan (Dangerous Grains: The Devastating Truth about Wheat and Gluten, and How to Restore Your Health)
Big food companies make hot dogs with mechanically separated meat (msm) that, as described matter-of-factly by the [USDA], is "a paste-like and batter-like meat product produced by forcing bones with attached edible meat under high pressure through a sieve or similar device to separate the bone from the edible meat tissue.". I read that and wanted to unread it.
Jennifer Reese (Make the Bread, Buy the Butter: What You Should and Shouldn't Cook from Scratch -- Over 120 Recipes for the Best Homemade Foods)
Said USDA microbiologist Nelson Cox, “Raw meats are not idiot-proof. They can be mishandled and when they are, it’s like handling a hand grenade. If you pull the pin, somebody’s going to get hurt.” While some may question the wisdom of selling hand grenades in the supermarket, Cox disagrees: “I think the consumer has the most responsibility but refuses to accept it.
Michael Greger (How to Survive a Pandemic)
That’s weird. ’Cause many high-ranking staff members at the USDA were employed by, or are otherwise affiliated with, the meat and dairy industries.159 And if the group responsible for “the safety of meat, poultry, and egg products” is run by people from the same industries they’re supposed to be protecting us from . . . well, that would be a conflict of interest. And it is.
Rory Freedman (Skinny Bitch: A No-Nonsense, Tough-Love Guide for Savvy Girls Who Want to Stop Eating Crap and Start Looking Fabulous!)
In April 2013, Judicial Watch released e-mails proving that the U.S. Department of Agriculture was working hand in hand with the Mexican government to sign up illegal aliens for food stamps.
Ann Coulter (In Trump We Trust: E Pluribus Awesome!)
Some USDA inspectors have expressed grave concern about the unhygienic conditions in meat plants, and yet they have little voice to enact change. They no longer have the authority to stop the line if they notice something suspicious, nor can they take remedial action. In fact, in order for a federal inspector's complaint to be seriously considered, the company itself must agree that there is a problem.
Melanie Joy (Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows: An Introduction to Carnism)
So let’s consider an alternative diet, say 1200 kcal consisting of 30% protein, 15% carbs (i.e., 180 kcal or 45 grams), and 55% fat. After a week or two of getting adapted (during which you may experience some of the fuel limitation symptoms discussed above), your serum ketones rise up in the range (1-2 millimolar) where they meet at least half of the brain’s fuel supply. Now if you go for that 5 mile run, almost all of your body’s muscle fuel comes from fat, leaving your dietary carb intake plus gluconeogenesis from protein to meet the minor fraction of your brain’s energy need not provided from ketones. And, oh yes, after your run while on the low carb diet, your ketone levels actually go up a bit (not dangerously so), further improving fuel flow to your brain. So what does this mean for the rest of us who are not compulsive runners? Well, this illustrates that the keto-adapted state allows your body more flexibility in meeting its critical organ energy needs than a ‘balanced’ but energy-restricted diet. And in particular, this also means that your brain is a “carbohydrate dependent organ” (as claimed by the USDA Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee as noted in Chapter 3) ONLY when you are eating a high carbohydrate diet. When carbohydrate is restricted as in the example above, your body’s appropriate production of ketones frees the brain from this supposed state of ‘carbohydrate dependency’. And because exercise stimulates ketone production, your brain’s fuel supply is better supported during and after intense exercise when on a low carbohydrate diet than when your carbohydrate intake is high (see below).
Jeff S. Volek (The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable)
Most Americans don’t realize that our poultry supply is contaminated with fecal matter. Delmer Jones, past president of the U.S. Meat Inspection Union, described USDA labels as misleading to the public. He suggested, “The label should declare that the product has been contaminated with fecal material.”560 Eric Schlosser in Fast Food Nation proposed a more straight-forward approach: “There is shit in the meat.
Michael Greger (How to Survive a Pandemic)
One of the things that Eva hated the most about being a kid was how everyone always told her that childhood was the best time of their entire lives, and don't grow up too fast, and enjoy these carefree days while you can. In those moments, her body felt like the world's smallest prison, and she escaped in her mind to her chile plants, resting on rock wool substrate under a grow light in a bedroom closet, as much a prisoner of USDA hardiness zone 5b as she was.
J. Ryan Stradal (Kitchens of the Great Midwest)
Before World War II, there was no such thing as organic food. All food was organic. Food was just food—plants, grains, meats, and dairy that we could all recognize or grow. There were no long lists of ingredients on packages that you couldn’t pronounce, much less have any idea what they did to your body or the environment. In 1938, the USDA’s Yearbook of Agriculture was called Soils and Men, and it remains a handbook of organic farming today, but back then that was the norm.
Nora Pouillon (My Organic Life: How a Pioneering Chef Helped Shape the Way We Eat Today)
Widespread introduction of the process [of irradiating foods] has thus far been impeded, however, by a reluctance among consumers to eat things that have been exposed to radiation. According to current USDA regulations, irradiated meat must be identified with a special label and with a radura (the internationally recognized symbol of radiation). The Beef Industry Food Safety Council - whose members include the meatpacking and fast food giants - has asked the USDA to change its rules and make the labeling of irradiated meat completely voluntary. The meatpacking industry is also working hard to get rid of the word 'irradiation,; much preferring the phrase 'cold pasteurization.'...From a purely scientific point of view, irradiation may be safe and effective. But he [a slaughterhouse engineer] is concerned about the introduction of highly complex electromagnetic and nuclear technology into slaughterhouses with a largely illiterate, non-English-speaking workforce.
Eric Schlosser (Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal)
The question is, why is the USDA in charge of the country’s nutrition anyway? In 2003 the Chicago Tribune reported the comments of Senator Peter Fitzgerald (R-Ill.)15: “The primary mission of the USDA is, after all, to promote the sale of agricultural products…So putting the USDA in charge of dietary advice is in some respects like putting the fox in charge of the henhouse.” So who should be in charge of our nutrition? How about anyone without a vested interest in pushing the poison?
Robert H. Lustig (Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease)
[from an entry by her daughter Camille] On the other hand, if cattle remain on pasture right to the end, that kind of beef is called "grass finished." The difference between this and CAFO beef are not just relevant to how kindly you feel about animals: meat and eggs of pastured animals also have a measurably different nutrient composition. A lot of recent research has been published on this subject, which is slowly reaching the public. USDA studies found much lower levels of saturated fats and higher vitamin E, beta-carotene, and omega-3 levels in meat from cattle fattened on pasture grasses (their natural diet), compared with CAFO animals ... Free-range beef also has less danger of bacterial contamination because feeding on grass maintains normal levels of acidity in the animal's stomach. At the risk of making you not want to sit at my table, I should tell you that the high-acid stomachs of grain-fed cattle commonly harbor acid-resistant strains of E. coli that are very dangerous to humans ... Free-range grazing is not just kinder to the animals and the surrounding environment; it produces an entirely different product.
Barbara Kingsolver (Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life)
More than any USDA rule or regulation, this transparency is their best assurance that the meat they're buying has been humanely and cleanly processed. "You can't regulate integrity," Joel is fond of saying; the only genuine accountability comes from a producer's relationship with his or her customers, and their freedom "to come out to the farm, poke around, sniff around. If after seeing how we do things they want to buy food from us, that should be none of the government's business." Like fresh air and sunshine, Joel believes transparency is a more powerful disinfectant than any regulation or technology.
Michael Pollan (The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals)
Bring on the veggies In 1980, the first Guidelines directed consumers to “Eat foods with adequate starch and fiber.” By 1990, that had become “Choose a diet with plenty of vegetables, fruits, and grain products.” Today, the new, direct directive is to make half of your plate vegetables and fruits. Maybe the whole plate: The Guidelines say right out, no mincing words here, those vegetarian-style diets are associated with a variety of health benefits including lower weight, a lower risk of heart disease, and — best of all — a longer life. Finally, two new charts, Appendix 8 and Appendix 9, detail (respectively) “Lacto-ova Adaptations of USDA Food Patterns” (meal planning for vegetarians who eat dairy products)
Carol Ann Rinzler (Nutrition for Dummies)
The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) provides safe food handling tips.
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) sets quality standards for meat, poultry, eggs, dairy products, fruits, vegetables, and nuts. The U.S. Department of Commerce (USDC) sets quality standards for fish and seafood.
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
The USDA has an established voluntary system for grading the quality of products. There are two types of grade: yield grade and quality grade.Δ
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
Specifications for fresh, frozen, and canned fruits and vegetables should include the following information:Δ Name of product Style or type of product (whole, cut, trimmed, and so forth) USDA grade, brand, or other quality designation Size of container or shipping container Quantity or weight per shipping unit Other pertinent factors, depending on the product (packing medium, syrup density, variety, stage of maturity, drained weight, and so forth)
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
Pork Pork is produced from young animals and is less variable in quality than beef. The USDA rates pork according to two quality levels: acceptable and unacceptable.Δ
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
Lamb The five USDA grades for lamb are “prime,” “choice,” “select,” “commercial,” “utility” and “cull.”Δ
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
Veal Veal is meat from calves up to 4 months of age that are milk or formula fed. The six USDA grades for veal are “prime,” “choice,” “select,” “standard,” “commercial,” “utility,” and “cull.”Δ
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
The USDA organic seal appears on foods labeled as: 100 percent organic: Products made entirely from organic ingredients Organic: Products containing 95 percent organic ingredients Made with some organic ingredients: Products containing 70 percent organic ingredients Some organic ingredients: Products containing less than 70 percent organic ingredients (Dimitri and Greene, 2002)Δ
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
For wholesale purposes grading is important for pricing of fruit. The Agricultural Marketing Service of the USDA is responsible for the grading standards. These grades are:Δ U.S. Fancy Premium produce U.S. No. 1 Chief trading grade U.S. No. 2 Intermediate quality grade U.S. No. 3 Lowest commercially useful grade
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
TABLE 17.3 Official USDA Size Categories for Shell EggsΔ Verified by Egg Board 1981 and 2010. U.S. Weights or Classes, Size Minimum Weight per Dozen, Ounces Minimum Weight* per 30-Dozen Case, Pounds Jumbo 30 56 lbs. Extra large 27 50 1/2 lbs. Large 24 45 lbs. Medium 21 39 1/2 lbs. Small 18 34 lbs. Peewee 15 28 lbs. *Weight may include corrugated fiber case and filler between layers of eggs.
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
There are a few other programs for low-income people that are less known. There are HOME Funds and Community Development Block Grants that help bring down the cost of renovating existing housing in disrepair for low-income persons. The Guaranteed Rural Rental Housing Program is nearly identical to the USDA loan we previously talked about except that you do not have to live in the project, and tenants are capped to incomes of 30 percent of 115 percent area median income.
James Petty (Architect & Developer: A Guide to Self-Initiating Projects)
mad-scientist approach to dairy production has created a monster cow who, according to the USDA national agricultural statistics on milk production, currently yields about 45 pounds of milk per day, significantly more than she would produce in nature. By comparison, USDA statistics reveal that milk production for the average dairy cow in 1960 was only about 20 pounds per day. As a result of this outrageous increase, cows’ bodies are under constant stress and at risk for numerous infections, diseases, and other health problems.
Joanne Stepaniak (The Vegan Sourcebook (Sourcebooks))
The USDA’s “Dairy Management Practices” report indicates that approximately one in seven dairy cows in the United States suffers from clinical mastitis, a painful bacterial infection of the udders that is exacerbated by accelerated milk production. In advanced stages, mastitis can be fatal; it is the second leading cause of death in dairy cows who die prior to slaughter. Mastitis, termed a “production disease,” is one of the most frequent and costly afflictions in intensive dairy production. In fact, mastitis is, and has been, such a common and financially catastrophic ailment that the dairy industry established the National Mastitis Council in 1961 specifically to study and combat this disease.
Joanne Stepaniak (The Vegan Sourcebook (Sourcebooks))
An American killed by his spinach can justifiably blame the FDA, but an American killed by his steak is the responsibility of the Department of Agriculture. Cheese pizzas are the FDA’s problem; pepperoni pizzas are supervised by the USDA.
Michael Lewis (The Fifth Risk)
After Trump took office, DJ Patil watched with wonder as the data disappeared across the federal government. Both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of the Interior removed from their websites the links to climate change data. The USDA removed the inspection reports of businesses accused of animal abuse by the government. The new acting head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Mick Mulvaney, said he wanted to end public access to records of consumer complaints against financial institutions. Two weeks after Hurricane Maria, statistics that detailed access to drinking water and electricity in Puerto Rico were deleted from the FEMA website. In a piece for FiveThirtyEight, Clare Malone and Jeff Asher pointed out that the first annual crime report released by the FBI under Trump was missing nearly three-quarters of the data tables from the previous year. “Among the data missing from the 2016 report is information on arrests, the circumstances of homicides (such as the relationships between victims and perpetrators), and the only national estimate of annual gang murders,” they wrote. Trump said he wanted to focus on violent crime, and yet was removing the most powerful tool for understanding
Michael Lewis (The Fifth Risk)
the USDA noted that Zoo Nebraska lacked “an adequate number of employees to carry out this level of husbandry and care” and that “the supervisor on premises . . . had no or limited background, knowledge, and experience in the proper husbandry and care of nonhuman primates.” Despite all this, Zoo Nebraska remained open.
Carson Vaughan (Zoo Nebraska: The Dismantling of an American Dream)
In 2001 Science featured an article, “The Soft Science of Dietary Fat,” that argued a low-fat diet is not necessarily healthful and that the public had been misled about the relative merits of fat and starch.16 A few years ago Scientific American declared: “It’s time to end the war on salt: the zealous drive by politicians to limit our salt intake has little basis in science.”17 About the same time the Department of Agriculture tossed out its iconic food pyramid for a food plate and juggled several of its recommendations.18 Recently the USDA was reported to be poised to recommend that Americans eat less meat—not because it’s better for individuals, but because it may be better for the environment, which indirectly could affect our health too.19
Michael J. Behe (Darwin Devolves: The New Science About DNA That Challenges Evolution)
Why are you stopping in the middle of the stairs?” “Why are you tailgating me?” He put his hand behind me, at butt level, without touching me. “What is that?” he demanded. I bent a little and slapped my butt. “Something the heir to a meat fortune should know all about. USDA grade-A prime, baby.” I straightened. “Just kidding. Really, it’s my butt.” He put his hands on his hips, and from below I noticed his strong superhero chin again. He grumbled, “Why do you have ‘boy toy’ written across your butt?” “Oh!” I put my hand over the words, realizing I probably should have been embarrassed about this sooner. “These are my little brother’s jeans. He wrote it to annoy me. Or to get me a date.
Jennifer Echols (The Ex Games)
Sinclair James International Review: What to With Your Pets on a Flight Most of the times, most pet owners do not know what to do with their pets when on a flight. To make it easier, we have allotted today’s feature for pet owners and address their challenges when flying with their pets. Whether you are flying with your pet or it is flying without you, it is important to choose an airline that serves the entire route from beginning to end. After finding your airline, you will need to know their pet policies. Will the airline allow your dog or cat to fly in the cabin with you? What are the restrictions? Will your pet need to travel in the cargo hold? Health Certificate A health certificate is required when shipping your pet as cargo. Most airlines will require a health certificate for all pets checked as baggage. Some destination states may require a health certificate for your pet such as health cities like Manila, Philippines or Singapore. It is best to ask you veterinarian for more requirements. If a health certificate is required, it must be issued by a licensed veterinarian within 10 days of transport. It must be authentic and not fraud. Airlines now have a lot of ways to know the authenticity of your documents. It must include: • shipper’s name and address • tag numbers or tattoos assigned to the animal • age of the animal being shipped (USDA regulations require animals be at least 10 weeks old and fully weaned before traveling) • statement that the animal is in good health (If the shipper knows that the pet is pregnant, it must be noted on the health certificate) • list of administered inoculations, when applicable • signature of the veterinarian • date of the certificate Live Animal Checklist/Confirmation of Feeding When you check in your pet, you will be asked to complete a live animal checklist. When you sign this checklist, you are confirming that your pet has been offered food and water within four hours of check-in. On the checklist, you must also provide feeding and watering instructions for a 24-hour period. If in-transit feeding is necessary, you must provide food. This is to avoid any complaints of improper handling of animals on board. Tranquilizers The use of pet tranquilizers at high altitudes is unpredictable. If you plan to sedate your pet, you must have written consent from the pet’s veterinarian. This information must be attached to the kennel. Please keep in mind that some airline agents cannot administer medication of any kind.
James Sinclair
Grass has it tough,” Shad observed. “The buffalo trample it, eat most and cover the survivors in crap. It just supports my theory that all vegans are secret supporters of genocide.” “How do you figure?” Derek asked, mainly to pass the time. “Think about it: you get hundreds of burgers from one cow, but a salad will kill two or three plants, and a sprout sandwich will slaughter hundreds. People don’t become vegans for any other reason than the idea of mass slaughter. To be kosher animals have to be killed without trauma or pain, and the USDA rules likewise set standards for slaughterhouses. But who cares how much planets suffer? They get ripped apart under the most callous of conditions. Therefore vegans change their diet simply to inflict the maximum suffering and death upon a chosen population, and that meets the textbook definition of genocide.
R.W. Krpoun
He conducted interviews with nearly a hundred USDA poultry inspectors from thirty-seven plants. “Every week,” he reports, “millions of chickens leaking yellow pus, stained by green feces, contaminated by harmful bacteria, or marred by lung and heart infections, cancerous tumors, or skin conditions are shipped for sale to consumers.” Next
Jonathan Safran Foer (Eating Animals)
The USDA’s ranking of foods by antioxidant capacity lists small dried red beans as having the highest antioxidant capacity per serving size of any food tested; in fact, of the four top-scoring foods, three were beans (red beans, red kidney beans, and pinto beans).
Jonny Bowden (The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth: The Surprising, Unbiased Truth about What You Should Eat and Why)
Hallelujah! For our Lord God Almighty reigns. Let us rejoice and be glad and give him glory! For the wedding of the Lamb has come, and his bride has made herself ready” (Revelation 19:6–7). As you pull up a chair to the banquet table, take a look at what’s on the menu from Isaiah 25:6–8: “On this mountain the Lord Almighty will prepare a feast of rich food for all peoples, a banquet of aged wine—the best of meats and the finest of wines. On this mountain he will destroy the shroud that enfolds all peoples, the sheet that covers all nations; he will swallow up death forever. The Sovereign Lord will wipe away the tears from all faces; he will remove the disgrace of his people from all the earth. The Lord has spoken.” There’s no mistaking. This is a real banquet. And a specific one too. They won’t be serving bologna or Spam. It won’t be USDA-approved meat; it will be “the best of meats.” And the beverage selection will not be Kool-Aid or cheap wine, but “aged wine…the finest of wines.
Joni Eareckson Tada (Heaven: Your Real Home)
If the Trump administration were to pollute the scientific inquiry at the USDA with politics, scientific inquiry would effectively cease. “These high-level discussions really worry me,” she says. Research grants will go not to the most promising ideas but to the closest allies. “There is already good science that isn’t being funded,” she said. “That will get worse.” Junk science will be used to muddy issues like childhood nutrition. Maybe sodium isn’t as bad for kids as people say! There’s no such thing as too much sugar! The science will suddenly be “unclear.” There will no longer be truth and falsehood. There will just be stories, with two sides to them.
Michael Lewis (The Fifth Risk)
We know now that fructose is a chronic hepatotoxin, just like alcohol. However, because fructose does not get partially metabolized by the brain like alcohol, we do not get any of the instant effects acute alcohol consumption brings. In everything else, both substances are the same. But this lack of acute toxicity is exactly why the FDA and the USDA won’t regulate it—in addition to the economic hit American producers would take if it were announced that fructose is a toxin that leads to metabolic syndrome and its host of disorders.
Samantha Quinn (The Real Truth About Sugar-- Dr. Robert Lustig's Video Lecture "Sugar: The Bitter Truth")
One day in his new job he was handed the budget for the Department of Agriculture. “I was like, Oh yeah, the USDA—they give money to farmers to grow stuff.” For the first time, he looked closely at what this arm of the United States government actually does. Its very name is seriously misleading—most of what it does has little to do with agriculture. It runs 193 million acres of national forest and grasslands, for instance. It is charged with inspecting almost all the animals Americans eat, including the nine billion birds a year. Buried inside it is a massive science program, a large fleet of aircraft for firefighting, and a bank with $ 220 billion in assets. It monitors catfish farms. It maintains a shooting range inside its DC headquarters. It keeps an apiary on its roof, to study bee-colony collapse. There’s a drinking game played by people who have worked at the Department of Agriculture: Does the USDA do it? Someone names an odd function of government (say, shooting fireworks at Canada geese that flock too near airport runways) and someone else has to guess if the USDA does it. (In this case, it does.)
Michael Lewis (The Fifth Risk)
When they heard that Joel Leftwich, the guy Trump wanted to lead his USDA transition team, had been a lobbyist for PepsiCo, they brought in a mini-fridge stocked with Pepsis. That was just the way they were at the USDA. They didn’t think: How the fuck can people paid to push sugary drinks on American kids be let anywhere near the federal department with the most influence on what American kids eat? Instead they thought: I hear he’s a nice guy!
Michael Lewis (The Fifth Risk)
Jenny Hopkinson, a Politico reporter, obtained the curricula vitae of the new Trump people. Into USDA jobs, some of which paid nearly $ 80,000 a year, the Trump team had inserted a long-haul truck driver, a clerk at AT& T, a gas-company meter reader, a country-club cabana attendant, a Republican National Committee intern, and the owner of a scented-candle company, with skills like “pleasant demeanor” listed on their résumés. “In many cases [the new appointees] demonstrated little to no experience with federal policy, let alone deep roots in agriculture,” wrote Hopkinson. “Some of those appointees appear to lack the credentials, such as a college degree, required to qualify for higher government salaries.
Michael Lewis (The Fifth Risk)
In 1995, the meat industry did everything it could to stop the USDA from implementing food-safety regulations that would require testing for salmonella in ground beef.
Rip Esselstyn (My Beef with Meat: The Healthiest Argument for Eating a Plant-Strong Diet--Plus 140 New Engine 2 Recipes)
The USDA has been in cahoots with these guys since its inception in 1862, because it has always had the dual mandate of protecting American agricultural interests and advising the public about food choices. In plain speak, this is called “the fox guarding the henhouse.” Or as my father likes to say, “This would be like having Al Capone do your taxes.
Rip Esselstyn (My Beef with Meat: The Healthiest Argument for Eating a Plant-Strong Diet--Plus 140 New Engine 2 Recipes)
Fighting wildfires is the most visible thing the USDA does. It's the places in our government where the cameras never roll that you have to worry about most.
Michael Lewis (The Fifth Risk)
With the American people facing an epidemic of obesity andnhardened arteries, the "People's Department" [USDA, United States Department of Agriculture) doesn't regulate fat as much as it grants the [food] industry's every wish. Indeed when it comes to the greatest sources of fat--meant and cheese--the Department of Agriculture has joined industry as a full partner in the most urgent mission of all: cajoling the people to eat more.
Michael Moss (Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us)
The USDA statistics, however, were based on guesses, not reliable evidence. These statistics, known as “food disappearance data” and published yearly, estimate how much we consume each year of any particular food, by calculating how much is produced nationwide, adding imports, deducting exports, and adjusting or estimating for waste. The resulting numbers for per-capita consumption are acknowledged to be, at best, rough estimates.
Gary Taubes (Good Calories, Bad Calories: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Control, and Disease)
Take chicken, for example. In 1896, the USDA determined chicken was about 23 percent protein and less than 2 percent fat by weight,1857 which is even leaner than some wild game like venison.1858 Today, with ten times the fat, chicken has 1,000 percent more fat than it did just over a century ago.1859 These days, more than 70 percent of the calories in chicken may come from fat.
Michael Greger (How Not to Diet: The Groundbreaking Science of Healthy, Permanent Weight Loss)
There is no requirement that the cows, pigs, or hens who were exploited to create “natural” products be treated any different from how other factory farmed animals are treated. Farmed animals who are exploited for “natural” products are not allowed to live in natural conditions—they are not even allowed to satisfy their most basic natural behaviors. Despite consumer assumptions about what “natural” means, . . . the USDA’s “natural” food labels only regulate “the presence of artificial additives and the degree of processing.” “Free range,” “cage free,” and “certified humane” labels are just as meaningless for farmed animals as are “all natural” labels. Just like farmed animals enslaved by organic industries, farmed animals exploited by “free range,” “cage free,” and “certified humane” producers are routinely debeaked, disbudded, detoed, castrated, their tails are docked, and/or they are branded (depending on the species). Neither do “free range” and “certified humane” labels protect cows from perpetual impregnation, pregnancy, birth, calfsnatching, transport, or dismemberment (slaughter) at a very young age. Finally, “free range,” “cage free,” and “certified humane” labels fail to help “spent” hens, who are sent to slaughter at the same youthful age.
Lisa Kemmerer (Speaking Up for Animals: An Anthology of Women's Voices)
Artificial sweeteners (noncaloric sweeteners, as the USDA calls them) as a replacement for sugar muddy these waters even more. Much of the anxiety about these sweeteners was generated in the 1960s and 1970s by the research, partly funded by the sugar industry, as we’ve seen, that led to the banning of cyclamates as a possible carcinogen, and the suggestion that saccharin could cause cancer (at least in rats, at extraordinarily high doses). Though this particular anxiety has tapered off with time, it has been replaced by the suggestion that maybe these artificial sweeteners can cause metabolic syndrome, and thus obesity and diabetes. This conjecture comes primarily from epidemiological studies that show an association between the use of artificial sweeteners and obesity and diabetes. But whether this means artificial sweeteners cause obesity and diabetes is, again, impossible to say.
Gary Taubes (The Case Against Sugar)
Most people agree, whether or not they think that carbohydrates are inherently fattening, that by focusing on fat, the nutritional establishment gave people license to over-consume carbohydrates and that this contributed to the obesity epidemic. The new threat is that by focusing now on fructose, the AHA and USDA and other organizations are giving implicit license to over-consume starch — almost guaranteed since these agencies are still down on fat and protein. 
Richard David Feinman (The World Turned Upside Down: The Second Low-Carbohydrate Revolution)
Salmonella is both common and potentially lethal. It infects more than a million Americans each year, sending nineteen thousand victims to the hospital, and killing more people than any other food-borne pathogen. A recent U.S.D.A study found that twenty-four per cent of all cut-up chicken parts are contaminated by some form of salmonella. Another study, by Consumer Reports, found that more than a third of chicken breasts tainted with salmonella carried a drug-resistant strain.
Anonymous
Our government’s laws, subsidies, and diet education efforts (grain-based USDA food pyramid, anyone?) are seemingly driven more by lobbyists for the beef, grain, and dairy industries than by unbiased scientific evaluation and concern for human health.
Mark Sisson (The Primal Blueprint: Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy (Primal Blueprint Series))
A recent USDA report says that our consumption of meat is at a “record high,” and this impression is repeated in the media. It implies that our health problems are associated with this rise in meat consumption, but these analyses are misleading because they lump together red meat and chicken into one category to show the growth of meat eating overall, when it’s just the chicken consumption that has gone up astronomically since the 1970s.
Nina Teicholz (The Big Fat Surprise: Why Meat, Butter, and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet)
For thirty to forty years, industry cranked up trans all it could,” confirmed a trans-fat expert at the USDA.
Nina Teicholz (The Big Fat Surprise: Why Meat, Butter, and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet)
Foreman believed McGovern’s Dietary Goals supported her conviction that “people were getting sick and dying because we ate too much,” and she believed it was incumbent on the USDA to turn McGovern’s recommendations into official government policy. Like Mottern and Hegsted, Foreman was undeterred by the scientific controversy.
Gary Taubes (Good Calories, Bad Calories: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Control, and Disease)
the USDA prohibited farms that received grain subsidies from growing fruits and vegetables. This put the American government in the insane position of subsidizing the cost of fast food while actively prohibiting some farms from growing fruits and vegetables.
Anonymous
According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 16% of men and 13% of women ages 20 to 39 eat pizza every single day.
Anonymous
The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) provides safe food handling tips. The program titled Fight BAC™ provides four guidelines to keep food safe: 1. Clean—Wash hands and work surfaces often. 2. Separate—Don’t cross contaminate. 3. Cook—Cook to proper temperature. 4. Chill—Refrigerate promptly.
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
Regardless of how much meat is purchased at any one time, the written specifications to be given the vendor should include the following information:Δ Government inspected (when buying locally be aware of this requirement) (mandatory) Name of the cut Requirements for boning, rolling, and tying (if applicable) USDA grade or other quality designation Weight/thickness of cut or individual portion (state tolerance allowed) Fat tolerance IMPS or MBG number (if applicable) Chilled or frozen delivery Packaging or number of units per shipping container
Ruby Parker Puckett (Foodservice Manual for Health Care Institutions (J-B AHA Press))
USDA regulations spell out precisely what sort of facility and system is permissible, but they don’t set thresholds for food-borne pathogens. (That would require the USDA to recall meat from packers who failed to meet the standards, something the USDA, incredibly, lacks the authority to do.)
Michael Pollan (The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals)
In America, where the USDA’s interpretation of the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act exempts chicken slaughter, the voltage is kept low — about one-tenth the level necessary to render the animals unconscious. After it has traveled through the bath, a paralyzed bird’s eyes might still move. Sometimes the birds will have enough control of their bodies to slowly open their beaks, as though attempting to scream. The next stop on the line for the immobile-but-conscious bird will be an automated throat slitter. Blood will slowly drain out of the bird, unless the relevant arteries are missed, which happens, according to another worker I spoke with, “all the time.” So you’ll need a few more workers to function as backup slaughterers —“kill men” — who will slit the throats of the birds that the machine misses. Unless they, too, miss the birds, which I was also told happens “all the time.” According to the National Chicken Council — representatives of the industry — about 180 million chickens are improperly slaughtered each year.
Jonathan Safran Foer (Eating Animals)
The most reliable pork and chicken label is “USDA Organic” (used mainly for meat and much different from the FDA’s version of organic), which requires a 100 percent organic diet, no antibiotics (ever), and bans feed made with synthetic pesticides. For poultry shoppers, Smart Chicken is a national brand owned by Tecumseh Poultry, founded in 1998 to fill the void in the quality chicken market. It comes in organic and regular versions, both of which are completely antibiotic and animal by-product free, using a 100 percent vegetarian or 100 percent organic vegetarian diet. I buy Smart Chicken regularly. For pork, the Niman Ranch brand is antibiotic free with a 100 percent vegetarian diet.
Larry Olmsted (Real Food/Fake Food: Why You Don't Know What You're Eating and What You Can Do about It)
As Joseph T. Judd, a USDA biochemist and a central figure in trans-fat research, explains, “The scientific literature would be flooded with enough contradictory studies so that no one could conclude anything for certain.” One study would show a bad effect of trans, “but for every study showing bad effects, there was one showing the opposite—something from industry,” he said. Generating a lot of conflicting scientific findings was a tactic that industry has employed to great effect, since uncertainty is a climate in which a questionable ingredient can thrive.
Nina Teicholz (The Big Fat Surprise: Why Meat, Butter, and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet)
The room held her scent, that elusive fragrance that sometimes reminded him of spring flowers and other times made him think of summer afternoons and ripe peaches. Gracie seemed to be part of all the seasons. The warm glints of autumn shone in her hair, the clear light of winter sun sparkled in those intelligent gray eyes. He had to keep reminding himself that she wasn't a U.S.D.A. prime-cut female because lately he'd had a tendency to forget. It was just . . . She was so damned cute.
Susan Elizabeth Phillips (Heaven, Texas (Chicago Stars, #2))
One thing is clear: There is no nutritional deficiency that develops when you stop consuming wheat and other processed foods. Furthermore, you will simultaneously experience reduced exposure to sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup, artificial food colorings and flavors, cornstarch, and the list of unpronounceables on the product label. Again, there is no genuine nutritional deficiency from any of this. But this hasn’t stopped the food industry and its friends at the USDA, the American Heart Association, the American Dietetic Association, and the American Diabetes Association from suggesting that these foods are somehow necessary for health and that doing without them might be unhealthy. Nonsense. Absolute, unadulterated, 180-proof, whole grain nonsense.
William Davis (Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back To Health)
beef industry, that was very good news. But a few Americans were not reassured. They weren’t convinced the USDA had done what it could to protect them. They knew that the agency’s image as a protector of consumers was part myth, because the
D.T. Max (The Family That Couldn't Sleep: A Medical Mystery)
A major factor influencing the nation’s dietary policies is the revolving door that shuttles industry leaders into roles as legislators and government regulators, then back into industry. Members of the USDA have had known associations with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the National Pork Board, the National Livestock and Meat Board, the American Egg Board, ConAgra Foods, the National Dairy Council, and Dairy Management Inc.4,5 In other words, health care, nutrition policy, and agribusiness are all tucked cozily together in a king-size bed.
John A. McDougall (The Starch Solution: Eat the Foods You Love, Regain Your Health, and Lose the Weight for Good!)
According to the USDA, it takes 11 calories of fossil fuel to produce 1 calorie of protein in the form of meat, poultry, or fish; soy is forty-five times more efficient.
Victoria Moran (Main Street Vegan: Everything You Need to Know to Eat Healthfully and Live Compassionately in the Real World)
With the postwar depression, however, the farmers' problems became the bankers' problems, and the insurance companies', and the USDAs. Suddenly, everyone was interested in helping the farmer become modern.21
Deborah Fitzgerald (Every Farm A Factory: The Industrial Ideal In American Agriculture)
Explosive population growth in much of Asia was making it less and less plausible that nations like India, Pakistan, and the Philippines would ever be able to feed themselves. In Famine—1975! America’s Decision: Who Will Survive? William and Paul Paddock argued that a Time of Famines would soon lay waste the developing world. “The famines are inevitable,” they warned. And “riding alongside [them] will surely be riots and other civil tensions which the central government[s] will be too weak to control.” The Paddocks derided the naïve hope that “something [would] turn up” to forestall this doom.102 And the Paddocks were not alone in their assessment. Stanford biologist Paul Ehrlich, for example, argued that Famine—1975! “may be remembered as one of the most important books of our age.” The Rockefeller Foundation shared these men’s sense of urgency. But, rather than advocate a triage system (as the Paddocks did), in which the worst-off nations would be denied assistance and left to their Darwinian fate, the foundation looked for new ways to attack the problem. The foundation had first extended its agriculture programs to India in 1956, at the request of the Indian national government. In the ensuing years, Rockefeller partnered with USAID and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Together, they “helped establish five state agriculture universities in India. ” 103 These universities collaborated with their American counterparts on research and training. As it had in Mexico, the foundation thereby contributed to the development, in India, of a community of homegrown agriculturalists with access to the most advanced technologies in the world.
Joel L. Fleishman (The Foundation: A Great American Secret; How Private Wealth is Changing the World)
The USDA has always suffered from a conflict of interest, since its entire mission is to promote American food commodities, and the agency has long been heavily influenced by those very industries.
Nina Teicholz (The Big Fat Surprise: Why Meat, Butter, and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet)
As former senator Peter Fitzgerald noted, putting the USDA in charge of our nutritional guidelines is “like putting the fox in charge of the henhouse.” USDA subsidies to farmers for growing specific crops total $19 billion annually.
Deirdre Barrett (Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose)
USDA statistics, as of 2012, showed 99 percent of durum wheat, 97 percent of spring wheat, and 61 percent of winter wheat as part of the harvesting process had been doused with Roundup, the world’s
Jim Marrs (Population Control: How Corporate Owners Are Killing Us)
In a Washington Post interview, the former USDA chief economist Joe Glauber acknowledged the hypocrisy of the farm lobby taking a stand against income testing for eligibility for farm subsidies, while “you have a knockdown drag-out over whether you’ll give SNAP payments to someone earning $26,000 instead of $25,000. Give me a break.”21
Stuart Stevens (It Was All a Lie: How the Republican Party Became Donald Trump)
Cheese pizzas are the FDA’s problem; pepperoni pizzas are supervised by the USDA.
Michael Lewis (The Fifth Risk)
pure, U.S.D.A Government inspected table grade bullshit.
Joe Nobody (Holding Their Own II: The Independents (Holding Their Own, #2))
Fighting wildfires is the most visible thing the USDA does. It’s the places in our government where the cameras never roll that you have to worry about most.
Michael Lewis (The Fifth Risk)