Seeker Of Wisdom Quotes

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The moon will guide you through the night with her brightness, but she will always dwell in the darkness, in order to be seen.
Shannon L. Alder
When you are standing in the middle of a storm you have two choices: Pray to God that it goes away. Or, start praying to God that he gives you the wisdom to figure out why you're standing in the middle of a storm.
Shannon L. Alder
Do not conform to seek the seekers, but leave the leavers. Wisdom comes from facing what you do not yet understand.
Shannon L. Alder
Gratitude is the sweetest thing in a seeker's life- in all human life. If there is gratitude in your heart, then there will be tremendous sweetness in your eyes.
Sri Chinmoy (The Jewels of Happiness: Inspiration and Wisdom to Guide Your Life-Journey)
We awaken by asking the right questions. We awaken when we see knowledge being spread that goes against our own personal experiences. We awaken when we see popular opinion being wrong but accepted as being right, and what is right being pushed as being wrong. We awaken by seeking answers in corners that are not popular. And we awaken by turning on the light inside when everything outside feels dark.
Suzy Kassem (Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem)
What you may seek and what you may find are not always one.
Lloyd Alexander (The High King (The Chronicles of Prydain, #5))
And like the sun, I will always rise.
Nikki Rowe
Life in this world,” he said, “is, as it were, a sojourn in a cave. What can we know of reality? For all we see of the true nature of existence is, shall we say, no more than bewildering and amusing shadows cast upon the inner wall of the cave by the unseen blinding light of absolute truth, from which we may or may not deduce some glimmer of veracity, and we as troglodyte seekers of wisdom can only lift our voices to the unseen and say, humbly, ‘Go on, do Deformed Rabbit . . . it’s my favorite.’
Terry Pratchett (Small Gods (Discworld, #13))
It's a strange thing about determined seekers-after-wisdom that, no matter where they happen to be, they'll always seek that wisdom which is a long way off. Wisdom is one of the few things that looks bigger the further away it is.
Terry Pratchett (Witches Abroad (Discworld, #12; Witches #3))
Quoting from Thomas Merton Dialogues With Silence The true contemplative is not one who prepares his mind for a particular message that he wants or expects to hear, but is one who remains empty because he knows that he can never expect to anticipate the words that will transform his darkness into light. He does not even anticipate a special kind of transformation. He does not demand light instead of darkness. He waits on the Word of God in silence, and, when he is answered it is not so much by a word that bursts into his silence. It is by his silence itself, suddenly, inexplicably revealing itself to him as a word of great power, full of the voice of God. (17)
Stephen Cope (The Wisdom of Yoga: A Seeker's Guide to Extraordinary Living)
There is nobody to wake up eternal seekers.
Dejan Stojanovic (Circling: 1978-1987)
I am the seeker, the act of seeking, and the one who is sought.
Karan Bajaj (The Seeker)
Never seek to please anyone. Seek to evolve thyself.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Featherweight by Suzy Kassem One evening, I sat by the ocean and questioned the moon about my destiny. I revealed to it that I was beginning to feel smaller compared to others, Because the more secrets of the universe I would unlock, The smaller in size I became. I didn't understand why I wasn't feeling larger instead of smaller. I thought that seeking Truth was what was required of us all – To show us the way, not to make us feel lost, Up against the odds, In a devilish game partitioned by An invisible wall. Then the next morning, A bird appeared at my window, just as the sun began Spreading its yolk over the horizon. It remained perched for a long time, Gazing at me intently, to make sure I knew I wasn’t dreaming. Then its words gently echoed throughout my mind, Telling me: 'The world you are in – Is the true hell. The journey to Truth itself Is what quickens the heart to become lighter. The lighter the heart, the purer it is. The purer the heart, the closer to light it becomes. And the heavier the heart, The more chained to this hell It will remain.' And just like that, it flew off towards the sun, Leaving behind a tiny feather. So I picked it up, And fastened it to a toothpick, To dip into ink And write my name.
Suzy Kassem (Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem)
You may have fallen down, but you can get back up again. You may have doors shut, but new doors will open for you. You may have been lied on, but the truth will come to the light. You may have been hurt, but the pain will pass. You are a survivor. You have a history of surviving.
Amaka Imani Nkosazana (Heart Crush)
Listen to the air. You can hear it, feel it, smell it, taste it. Woniya wakan—the holy air—which renews all by its breath. Woniya, woniya wakan—spirit, life, breath, renewal—it means all that. Woniya—we sit together, don’t touch, but something is there; we feel it between us, as a presence. A good way to start thinking about nature, talk about it. Rather talk to it, talk to the rivers, to the lakes, to the winds as to our relatives.
John Fire Lame Deer (Lame Deer, Seeker of Visions)
Adversity quickens the mind, awakens the spirit and strength the soul.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
A Sufi is one who is not bound by anything nor does he bind anything
Idries Shah (Seeker After Truth)
May you find what you are searching for in the right places
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
It is possible for you to realise your dream as a scientist, you must be a passionate learner and curious enough to seek this wonderful career path.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Think Great: Be Great! (Beautiful Quotes, #1))
Like calls to like, truth to truth and deceit to deceit.
Idries Shah (Seeker After Truth)
Self-denial is spiritual.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
I don't belong in this world, I am merely a traveller passing through, I repudiate to silence my thought, because they fear my light.
Nikki Rowe
Master the chaos within yourself and I promise you, you will gain the strength to withstand any storm.
Nikki Rowe
Seekers inevitably want to get a better handle on life; we want to figure things out. We know intuitively that the events of our lives are not always arbitrary. We feel connected, however intangibly. We know that it is in our higher self-interest to unravel the mysteries in our own lives. There must be a higher purpose and greater meaning. As we become more and more spiritually evolved, we become more determined to find wisdom and reach a deeper understanding of our lives and our paths.
Surya Das (Letting Go of the Person You Used to Be: Lessons on Change, Loss, and Spiritual Transformation)
It’s a strange thing about determined seekers-after-wisdom that, no matter where they happen to be, they’ll always seek that wisdom which is a long way off. Wisdom is one of the few things that looks bigger the further away it is.*
Terry Pratchett (Witches Abroad (Discworld, #12))
Truth changes with the season of our emotions. It is the shadow that moves with the phases of our inner sun. When the nights falls, only our perception can guess where it hides in the dark. Within every solar system of the soul lies a plan of what truth is--- the design God has created, in our own unique story. This is as varying as the constellations, and as turning as the tide. It is not one truth we live to, but many. If we ever hope to determine if there is such a thing as truth, apart from cultural and personal preferences, we must acknowledge that we are then aiming to discover something greater than ourselves, something that transcends culture and individual inclinations. Some say that we must look beyond ourselves and outside of ourselves. However, we don’t need to look farther than what is already in each other. If there was any great plan from a higher power it is a simplistic, repetitious theme found in all religions; the basic core importance to unity comes from shared theological and humanistic virtues. Beyond the synagogue, mosques, temples, churches, missionary work, church positions and religious rituals comes a simple “message of truth” found in all of us, that binds theology---holistic virtues combined with purpose is the foundation of spiritual evolution. The diversity among us all is not divided truth, but the opportunity for unity through these shared values. Truth is the framework and roadmap of positive virtues. It unifies diversity when we choose to see it and use it. It is simple message often lost among the rituals, cultural traditions and socializing that goes on behind the chapel doors of any religion or spiritual theology. As we fight among ourselves about what religion, culture or race is right, we often lose site of the simple message any great orator has whispered through time----a simplistic story explaining the importance of virtues, which magically reemphasizes the importance of loving one another through service.
Shannon L. Alder
Education is one of the greatest gift for mankind. Each one of us must seek this enlightenment.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Think Great: Be Great! (Beautiful Quotes, #1))
When I was a child, I thought like a child. When I became adult, I seek a deeper understanding of life.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Think Great: Be Great! (Beautiful Quotes, #1))
Ignorance is the Mother of Opposition
Idries Shah (Seeker After Truth)
One should not pray if that prayer is vanity.
Idries Shah (Seeker After Truth)
What lies ahead is often unknown. But keep traveling.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Life in this world,” he said, “is, as it were, a sojourn in a cave. What can we know of reality? For all we see of the true nature of existence is, shall we say, no more than bewildering and amusing shadows cast upon the inner wall of the cave by the unseen blinding light of absolute truth, from which we may or may not deduce some glimmer of veracity, and we as troglodyte seekers of wisdom can only lift our voices to the unseen and say, humbly, ‘Go on, do Deformed Rabbit…it’s my favorite.
Terry Pratchett (Small Gods (Discworld, #13))
Elsewhere there are no mobile phones. Elsewhere sleep is deep and the mornings are wonderful. Elsewhere art is endless, exhibitions are free and galleries are open twenty-four hours a day. Elsewhere alcohol is a joke that everybody finds funny. Elsewhere everybody is as welcoming as they’d be if you’d come home after a very long time away and they’d really missed you. Elsewhere nobody stops you in the street and says, are you a Catholic or a Protestant, and when you say neither, I’m a Muslim, then says yeah but are you a Catholic Muslim or a Protestant Muslim? Elsewhere there are no religions. Elsewhere there are no borders. Elsewhere nobody is a refugee or an asylum seeker whose worth can be decided about by a government. Elsewhere nobody is something to be decided about by anybody. Elsewhere there are no preconceptions. Elsewhere all wrongs are righted. Elsewhere the supermarkets don’t own us. Elsewhere we use our hands for cups and the rivers are clean and drinkable. Elsewhere the words of the politicians are nourishing to the heart. Elsewhere charlatans are known for their wisdom. Elsewhere history has been kind. Elsewhere nobody would ever say the words bring back the death penalty. Elsewhere the graves of the dead are empty and their spirits fly above the cities in instinctual, shapeshifting formations that astound the eye. Elsewhere poems cancel imprisonment. Elsewhere we do time differently. Every time I travel, I head for it. Every time I come home, I look for it.
Ali Smith (Public Library and Other Stories)
But it is not emancipation that the great majority seeks. When pressed, most men will admit that it takes but little to be happy. (Not that they practice this wisdom!) Man craves happiness here on earth, not fulfillment, not emancipation. Are they utterly deluded, then, in seeking happiness? No, happiness is desirable, but it is a by-product, the result of a way of life, not a goal which is forever beyond one's grasp. Happiness is achieved en route. And if it be ephemeral, as most men believe, it can also give way, not to anxiety of despair, but to a joyousness which is serene and lasting. To make happiness the goal is to kill it in advance. If one must have a goal, which is questionable, why not self-realization? The unique and healing quality in this attitude toward life is that in the process goal and seeker become one.
Henry Miller (Stand Still Like the Hummingbird)
Is it not by learning to read the book of nature with the eyes of faith that we come to recognize the drop of divinity that resides in our own souls though hidden, master? In the end is this not faith; to seek the light that takes us further, the light of Christ that brings that to which reason and knowledge alone can never raise itself? This is truth!
Adriana Koulias (Temple of the Grail (Rosicrucian Quartet, #1))
Our unconscious ideals cause us to sacrifice our true lives to a beautiful chimera, a haunting dream, a compelling illusion.
Stephen Cope (The Wisdom of Yoga: A Seeker's Guide to Extraordinary Living)
The Sufis have said: ‘The importance of something is in inverse proportion to its attractiveness.
Idries Shah (Seeker After Truth)
Q: How can I help myself? A: By remembering the proverb: ‘The Path is not to be found anywhere except in human service’, from Saadi.
Idries Shah (Seeker After Truth)
Whatever goes into a salt-mine becomes salt.
Idries Shah (Seeker After Truth)
May God brighten your path.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
What you are seeking is yourself.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Deteriorated science is a cult, so is imitative or deteriorated Sufism.
Idries Shah (Seeker After Truth)
It is experience which teaches, not controversy based on supposed logic and assumptions of what is likely to be true.
Idries Shah (Seeker After Truth)
At present, the successful office-seeker is a good deal like the center of the earth; he weighs nothing himself, but draws everything else to him. There are so many societies, so many churches, so many isms, that it is almost impossible for an independent man to succeed in a political career. Candidates are forced to pretend that they are catholics with protestant proclivities, or christians with liberal tendencies, or temperance men who now and then take a glass of wine, or, that although not members of any church their wives are, and that they subscribe liberally to all. The result of all this is that we reward hypocrisy and elect men entirely destitute of real principle; and this will never change until the people become grand enough to allow each other to do their own thinking. Our government should be entirely and purely secular. The religious views of a candidate should be kept entirely out of sight. He should not be compelled to give his opinion as to the inspiration of the bible, the propriety of infant baptism, or the immaculate conception. All these things are private and personal. The people ought to be wise enough to select as their officers men who know something of political affairs, who comprehend the present greatness, and clearly perceive the future grandeur of our country. If we were in a storm at sea, with deck wave-washed and masts strained and bent with storm, and it was necessary to reef the top sail, we certainly would not ask the brave sailor who volunteered to go aloft, what his opinion was on the five points of Calvinism. Our government has nothing to do with religion. It is neither christian nor pagan; it is secular. But as long as the people persist in voting for or against men on account of their religious views, just so long will hypocrisy hold place and power. Just so long will the candidates crawl in the dust—hide their opinions, flatter those with whom they differ, pretend to agree with those whom they despise; and just so long will honest men be trampled under foot.
Robert G. Ingersoll (Some Mistakes of Moses)
Emergencies send sparks to the darkest corner of us. They wake up our hormones and neurotransmitters, they remove the rust from our body and mind, and they show us we can still handle crisis with poise. Emergencies push us to our limits. At those limits, the best inside us comes out. The eyes of our mind open, exceptional vision occurs to us, and we have a chance to become extraordinary.
Indrajit Garai (The Seeker of Well-Being)
My own acid-eating experience is limited in terms of total consumption, but widely varied as to company and circumstances ... and if I had a choice of repeating any one of the half dozen bouts I recall, I would choose one of those Hell's Angels parties in La Honda, complete with all the mad lighting, cops on the road, a Ron Boise sculpture looming out of the woods, and all the big speakers vibrating with Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man." It was a very electric atmosphere. If the Angels lent a feeling of menace, they also made it more interesting ... and far more alive than anything likely to come out of a controlled experiment or a politely brittle gathering of well-educated truth-seekers looking for wisdom in a capsule. Dropping acid with the Angels was an adventure; they were too ignorant to know what to expect, and too wild to care. They just swallowed the stuff and hung on ... which is probably just as dangerous as the experts say, but a far, far nuttier trip than sitting in some sterile chamber with a condescending guide and a handful of nervous, would-be hipsters.
Hunter S. Thompson (Hell's Angels)
We are the Children of Stardust. The Seekers of Truth and ever growing Wisdom of Nature. Our beliefs may change, our form may alter, and even our World may crumble, but our Essence will live in this Universe forever!
Carla VanKoughnett
Quoting from Phillip Moffitt Will Yoga and Meditation Really Change My Life? The most profound change I’m aware of just now is a growing realization that life is not personal. This may seem a surprising or even strange view to those unfamiliar with Eastern spirituality, but it has powerful implications. It’s very freeing to see that events in my life are arising because of circumstances in which I am not involved, but that I’m not at the center of them in any particular way. They’re impersonal. They’re arising because of causes and conditions. They are not “me.” There is a profound freedom in this. It makes life much more peaceful and harmonious because I’m not in reaction to events all the time. (134)
Stephen Cope (The Wisdom of Yoga: A Seeker's Guide to Extraordinary Living)
I am loving. I am caring. I am inspiring. I am daring. I am always kind. I have peace of mind. I am worthy of trust. I am true and just. I am compassionate. I am passionate. I am a seeker. I am a giver. I am very simple. I am an example.
Debasish Mridha
External conflicts we can avoid, resolve, or manage. But, when it comes to internal conflicts, there is only one viable option: resolve. Whatever internal conflict, major or minor, we don't resolve will grate within us nonstop. Fortunately, we can resolve all our internal conflicts with one simple strategy: Act the way it feels right, no matter how inconvenient the consequences are.
Indrajit Garai (The Seeker of Well-Being)
I see the faces that stop by my cart here. Their smiles are hollow, their eyes are hungry. The yogi's faces are different. Silent, complete. Like the mountains around them. Asking no questions, seeking no answers, just certain, as though they knew exactly who they were.
Karan Bajaj (The Seeker)
A picture is worth a thousand words, But my thousand words slice deeper. What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger, Fuck that. I’ve become a hide and seeker. Treat others how you want to be treated, But what if tonight I want to be burned? You told us it’s better to be safe than sorry, And little sister listened, but I was the one who learned. Reap, reap, reap, you don’t even know, All you did suffer is what you did sow! Necessitate, medicate, eradicate, resuscitate. Swallow your Pearls, but for me it was too late. Do better, be more, too many, too much, I’m about to fucking choke, I can’t force it down. So string up the little Wisdoms and wrap them ‘round my neck, I’ll strangle myself with your Pearls of Wisdom and die a wreck.
Penelope Douglas (Punk 57)
Wonder acts upon a man like a shock, he is "moved" and "shaken", and in the dislocation that succeeds all that he had taken for granted as being natural or self-evident loses its compact solidity and obviousness; he is literally dislocated and no longer knows where he is. If this were only to involve the man of action in all of us, so that a man only lost his sense of certainty of everyday life, it would be relatively harmless; but the ground quakes beneath his feet in a far more dangerous sense, and it is his whole spiritual nature, his capacity to know, that is threatened. It is an extremely curious fact that this is the only aspect of wonder, or almost the only aspect, that comes to evidence in modern philosohpy, and the old view that wonder was the beginning of philosophy takes on a new meaning: doubt is the beginning of philosophy. . . . The innermost meaning of wonder is fulfilled in a deepened sense of mystery. It does not end in doubt, but is the awakening of the knowledge that being, qua being, is mysterious and inconceivable, and that it is a mystery in the full sense of the word: neither a dead end, nor a contradiction, nor even something impenetrable and dark. Rather, mystery means that a reality cannot be comprehended because its light is ever-flowing, unfathomable, and inexhaustible. And that is what the wonderer really experiences. . . . Since the very beginning philosophy has always been characterized by hope. Philosophy never claimed to be a superior form of knowledge but, on the contrary, a form of humility, and restrained, and conscious of this restraint and humility in relation to knowledge. The words philosopher and philosophy were coined, according to legend--and the legend is of great antiquity--by Pythagoras in explicit contrast to the words sophia and sophos: no man is wise, and no man "knows"; God alone is wise and all-knowing. At the very most a man might call himself a lover of wisdom and a seeker after knowledge--a philosopher. --from The Philosophical Act, Chapter III
Josef Pieper (Leisure, the basis of culture, and, The philosophical act!)
When prayer, rituals and ascetic life are just a means of self-indulgence, they are harmful rather than beneficial. This is quite obvious to people nowadays, when it is widely recognised that fixations are not the same as valuable and laudable observances. One should not pray if that prayer is vanity; rituals are wrong when they provide lower satisfactions, like emotional stimulus instead of enlightenment; he or she should not be an ascetic who is only enjoying it.
Idries Shah (Seeker After Truth)
Almost I feel the pulsebeat of the ages, Now swift, now slow, beneath my fingertips. The heartthrobs of the prophets and the sages Beat through these bindings; and my quick hand slips Old books from dusty shelves, in eager seeking For truths the flaming tongues of the ancients tell; For the words of wisdom that they still are speaking As clearly as an echoing silver bell. Here is the melody that lies forever At the deep heart of living; here we keep The accurate recorded discs that never Can be quite silenced, though their makers sleep The still deep sleep, so long as a seeker finds The indelible imprint of their moving minds.
Grace Noll Crowell
I am the seeker of love, I am the giver of love, and I became the love.
Debasish Mridha
Steadily, we are listening more to the intelligence of our hearts—and acting on that wisdom. And that's what spirituality is—an expression of Love.
Danielle LaPorte (White Hot Truth: Clarity for Keeping It Real on Your Spiritual Path from One Seeker to Another)
Think the truth - act the truth - live the truth.
Abhijit Naskar
We find happiness doing what we love.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Love is not for thrill-seekers, dreamers, or children with short attention spans. And you, son, fit into all three of those categories.
Jaime Reed (Keep Me In Mind)
Daily seek the divine presence of God.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Think Great: Be Great! (Beautiful Quotes, #1))
The beginning of wisdom is found in doubting; by doubting we come to the question, and by seeking we may come upon the truth.” ~ Pierre Abelard
David Litwack (The Children of Darkness (Seekers #1))
At His door, what is the difference between Muslim and Christian, virtuous and guilty? At his door all are seekers and He the sought.
Idries Shah (The World of the Sufi: An Anthology of Writings about Sufis and Their Work)
AWARENESS IS THE OCEAN FLOOR, THINKING THE SURFACE. SPIRITUAL SEEKER THE DIVER, NONSEEKER THE SWIMMER
Nara InneresGold
You must passionately pursue all your dreams.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Awaken the divinity within thy soul.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
We all make mistakes. We must keep finding the right paths.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Be great!
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Hope keeps the spirit awake.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Seekers of wisdom, seekers of life.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
The sacred writing gives instructions on how to live life.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
A seeker of knowledge is the search for wise words.
Lailah Gifty Akita
The more you read the Bible, the more transform your life will be.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Think Great: Be Great! (Beautiful Quotes, #1))
Sufism is education, in that it has a body of knowledge which it transmits to those who have not got it.
Idries Shah (Seeker After Truth)
Seeking enlightenment is a waste of your time. ..In reality there is no seeker, no search, and no words.
Bert McCoy
day. Its first touch is like a finger pressing into a still pool of water, creating a ripple that grows larger until it reaches the edges. Once the ripple disappears, the stillness of the water suddenly seems insufficient to eyes that have already seen its movement. Like fame and glory, it yearns for more, the finger pressing into it again and again until the water bounces with waves reverberating in all directions. Soon the water is merely a violent tempest — as are the lives of the seekers of glory.   If you seek power, prepare for its seductions.  Though many fools drown in glory's pool, the cautious emerge clean.
Illuminatiam (Illuminations: Wisdom From This Planet's Greatest Minds)
The very word philosophy terrifies many women. In Quintessence I strive to exorcise this patriarchally embedded fear that undermines our intelligence and passion. We were all philosophers when we were five years old. Re-Calling our connections with nature at that age, many women can Re-member our sense of wonder and our urgent need to know. We were always asking “Why?” This state of mind can be called Wonderlust—meaning a strong and unconquerable longing for Elemental adventure and knowledge. What happened to our Wonderlust? Our visions, dreams, and far-out questions have been stunted by phallocratic society and its institutions. When we come into contact with our own deep and passionate intellectuality, we become intolerably threatening to the patriarchy. This is why there is an overwhelming taboo against women becoming philosophers, that is, seekers of wisdom on our own terms/turf. Philosophy—of our own kind, for our own kind—is a source of wholeness and power that rightfully belongs to women. Breaking the patriarchal taboo against it—against us—we break out of the state of deception. Moreover, we open gateway after gateway into our own Other-world, our Homeland. From this perspective we can See, Name, and Act to end the atrocities perpetrated against ourSelves and all the Biophilic beings.
Mary Daly (Quintessence...Realizing the Archaic Future)
You Who'd be Wise" from "Ben Mishle" written sometime between 1013 and 1050 C.E. You who'd be wise should inquire into the nature of justice and evil from your teachers, seekers like yourself, and the students who question your answer.
Shmuel HaNagid
The path of the spiritual revolutionary is a long-term and gradual journey toward awakening. If you are looking for a quick fix or easy salvation, turn back now, plug back into the matrix, and enjoy your delusional existence. This is a path for rebels, malcontents, and truth seekers. The wisdom and compassion of the Buddha is available to us all, but the journey to freedom is arduous. It will take a steadfast commitment to truth and, at times, counterinstinctual action. You have at your disposal
Noah Levine (Against the Stream: A Buddhist Manual for Spiritual Revolutionaries)
The wisdom of the time traveler, I realized, can be deceiving. We return to the past armed with more information and cutting-edge innovations. But there are hazards in having so much wizardry at hand. The feast of data means there are more circumstances to bend and connect. You're tempted to build your villain with the abundance of pieces. It's understandable. We're pattern-seekers, all of us. We glimpse the rough outline of what we seek and we get snagged on it, sometimes remaining stuck when we could get free and move on.
Michelle McNamara (I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer)
As a spiritual seeker, I understand that this journey requires you to not only embrace all that is whole and good in your life but also to continually examine the long-buried wounds hidden beneath your carefully crafted surface. This is what I mean when I say, “Turn your wounds into wisdom.
Oprah Winfrey (The Wisdom of Sundays: Life-Changing Insights from Super Soul Conversations)
Throughout my life, I have been a seeker of wisdom and truth, always intrigued by the great mysteries of life. It has been mostly through forgiveness, humility and a daily practice with presence that I have grown in love, spirit and wisdom, and discovered as well as united with the authentic Self that lies within me. I have also grown a great deal through pain and suffering. In the words of Maya Angelou: “Those who learn, teach.” And so, my mission in life is to share the wisdom of my soul with the world. I believe that the soul is the place where the God within us resides. It’s where love lives.
Sarah Dakhili
For Seekers of Faith (By St. Benedict)   GRACIOUS and holy Father, give us the wisdom to discover you, the intelligence to understand you, the diligence to seek after you, the patience to wait for you, eyes to behold you, a heart to meditate upon you, and a life to proclaim you, through the power of the spirit of Jesus, our Lord. Amen.
Jeremiah Vallery (Catholic Prayer Book: An Anthology and Introduction to Prayer)
Original sin is a self-initiating act because it evidences human free will. If humanity were devoid of free will, it would relegate humankind to living by instinct. A person who lives by instinct might survive for an enviable period, but they will never live a heroic existence. Every hero’s story commences with an unsatisfied and optimistic person venturing out from the comfortable confines of their common day world, facing forces of fabulous power, and fighting a magnificent personal battle. The greatest traditional heroes were warriors whom survived on the battlefield and learned valuable lessons of honor, love, loyalty, and courage. Heroic warriors and spiritual seekers undertook a rigorous quest, an enduring ordeal that enabled them to transcend their own personhood’s shallow desire merely to survive. By enduring hardships, experiencing breathtaking encounters with the physical world, and undergoing a spiritual renaissance, the hero gains a hard-won sense self-discovery, comprehends his or her place in society, and accepts their role as a teacher. A hero is a bearer of light, wisdom, and charity. The hero reenters society and shares their culmination of knowledge by devoting their life to teaching other people.
Kilroy J. Oldster (Dead Toad Scrolls)
Life’s shrouded crossing seems to jump off with a hunger to take a blood-quickening journey, a desire to search for enchantment over the next hillock. We launch our feral voyage with a primitive pulsation to explore unknown lands and a desire to become acquainted with both village people and sophisticated ancient civilizations. Along the way, we will meet friends and foes. In our lightest moments, we will make love to a beautiful mate under a canopy of stars. In the darkest hours, we will fret about how to evade danger and scheme how best to conquer our enemies. The rainbow of experiences that we endure will undoubtedly bemuse, bruise, batter, and occasionally sully us. These hard on the hide shards of experience will also reveal our polychromatous character. By undertaking vivid encounters in the wilderness, with any luck, we will discover a numinous interior world. With immersion into a myriad of life shaping experiences, an undeterred person will stumble onto a path leading to personal illumination. The passage of liberation that a crusader must inevitably endure leads to a shocking psychological transformation, a spiritual overhaul allowing the seeker to finally overcome infantile images and febrile delusions that would otherwise continue to derail their fervent urge to forge an emergent personality, acquire wisdom, and attain bliss.
Kilroy J. Oldster (Dead Toad Scrolls)
In Fez Yasmin had another dream. „I saw myself in a shower. Water poured over me, washing and purifying me and I was told ‚All your sins have been washed away by that water. You‘ve been cleansed. Your sins have been washed away and you‘re blessed.‘ „I feel that Allah has been knocking on my door for some time now, perhaps all my life. ‚But you just haven‘t recognized Me‘, He says, ‚You haven‘t recognized Me. You keep waiting but I have been there all along.‘“ (p.195)
Michael Sugich (Hearts Turn: Sinners, Seekers, Saints and the Road to Redemption)
[T]he very existence of such powers argues a counterforce. We call powers of the first kind dark, though they may use a species of deadly light... and we call those of the second kind bright, though I think that they may at times employ darkness, as a good man nevertheless draws the curtains of his bed to sleep. Yet there is truth to the talk of darkness and light, because it shows plainly that one implies the other. The tale I read to little Severian said that the universe was but a long word of the Increate's. We, then, are syllables of that word. But the speaking of any word is futile unless there are other words, words that are not spoken. If a beast has but one cry, the cry tells nothing; and even the wind has a multitude of voices, so that those who sit indoors may hear it and know if the weather is tumultuous or mild. The powers we call dark seem to me to be the words the Increate did not speak... and these words must be maintained in a quasi-existence, if the other word, the word spoken is to be distinguished. What is not said can be important - but what is said is more important... And if the seekers after dark things find them, may not the seekers after bright find them as well? And are they not more apt to hand their wisdom on?
Gene Wolfe (Sword & Citadel (The Book of the New Sun #3-4))
If they understand that their paativratyam and fidelity are like these sand pots, they will be able to live in peace.’ Sita was confused. ‘To make this pot, you need a lot of concentration. Those who did not know this thought I was making a miracle happen by virtue of my chastity, my paativratyam. Since there was no flaw in my character anyway, I let them think what they liked. Concentration can be broken at any time. The cause may be anything. In my case, a man became the cause of distraction. My husband was enraged. He believed that my paativratyam was violated by the mere act of looking at that man. A good pot is a product of many things—practice, concentration, sand, the right amount of water and so on. Sage Jamadagni was a man of great wisdom, yet he did not understand such a simple truth. But such is the wisdom of these spiritual seekers. No matter how much wisdom they earn through penance, they continue to have a dogmatic view on the paativratyam of their wives.’ Sarcasm was evident in Renuka’s voice.
Volga (The Liberation of Sita)
Jesus walked a path of "suffering servanthood." We Christians say glibly that we are "saved by the death and resurrection of Jesus" but seem to understand this as some kind of heavenly transaction on his part, instead of an earthly transformation on his and our part. We need to deeply trust and allow both our own dyings and our own certain resurrections, just as Jesus did! This is the full pattern of transformation. If we trust both, we are indestructible. That is how Jesus "saves" us from meaninglessness, cynicism, hatred, and violence--which is indeed death. God is Light, yet this full light is hidden in darkness so only the sincere seeker finds it. It seems we all must go into darkness to see the light, which is counter-intuitive for the ego. Our age and culture resists this language of "descent." We made Christianity, instead, into a religion of "ascent," where Jesus became a self-help guru instead of a profound wisdom-guide who really transformed our mind and heart. Reason, medicine, wealth, technology, and speed (all good in themselves) have allowed us to avoid the quite normal and ordinary "path of the fall" as the way to transform the separate and superior self into a much larger identity that we call God.
Richard Rohr
Creativity is alive And thriving in my body. The energy you bring out in me Is within me infinitely. My power is overflowing. My lips are soft and welcoming To the exhale, The new Braille, The silence that persists After our moans die away, I look at myself and say, "Root down so you can burn. Beautiful girl, it's your turn To create magic within yourself. This time, without his help. Find your roots and find your fire, Be mindful of what you desire, Persist in what you know is true, Stay focused on the endless route Toward your own potential. Allow the existential Void to swallow you whole. Take on your old role: The lone seeker. Become quieter. Become meeker. Become the beauty that you seek. Embody strength if you feel weak. Find love within the walls Of this sacred temple. Let yourself shake and tremble, But keep your eyes ever fixed On the horizon Where it's rising, No revising, Fears capsizing As you sail, sail, sail Toward the wail Of your siren spirit Beckoning you to bloom The flower in your womb, The seed of creativity, Your triumphant legacy." These words, I will carry Within me as I bury Grains of wisdom In the whispers of the wind. And when I arrive To the altar of our origin, I'll be dressed in white and black, And I'll cradle that exact Feeling left on our sheets. And you'll be on your knees, Ready to receive The wholeness of my broken mind, Pried open by The sparkle gleaming in your eyes. And your hands will be full Of supple fruit and you'll Smile at me, and I will see That you have fed your hunger. You'll ooze with courage and wonder. And then, we will know That we've already lost each other A thousand times before. And I have found you As clear water after mud settles. And you have found me As a bee deep in a flower's petals. We have danced before, Pulled art out of each other's spines. We have died and birthed and died. We've already kissed a million times. This wasn't our first five act play, And it will not be the last. So when I thirst for your hands, I will sit and chant. We will meet again. We will meet again.
Vironika Tugaleva
Apologetics is both a science and an art. It is not just about knowledge; it is about wisdom. It’s like a skilled and experienced medical practitioner, who knows the theory of medicine well. But she has to apply it to her patients, and that means learning how to relate to them—how to help them tell her what the real problems are, finding ways of communicating technical medical terms in ordinary language, and explaining how they can be addressed.
Mere Apologetics: How to Help Seekers and Skeptics Find Faith
Nan Fink Gefen, a Jewish meditation teacher and author of an introduction to Jewish meditation, identifies three major sources of contemporary Jewish meditation techniques: (1) the Jewish meditative tradition, (2) the creative work of meditation teachers today who use Jewish symbols and images, and (3) the influence of Buddhism today. She remarks that “almost a third of American Buddhists are Jewish by birth. Many of these people have found a spiritual path within Buddhism that they didn’t find within Judaism, but they want to reconnect with their Jewish roots.”7 She does not seem to be bothered by this intrusion, for she adds, “We are pleased to introduce them [i.e, the seekers] to Jewish meditation. As they learn about it, they bring the knowledge and wisdom gained from Buddhism to their practices. Their insights help to shape the direction of Jewish meditation.” In fact, there are those who, like Sylvia Boorstein, a teacher of mindfulness and a practicing psychotherapist, say that one can easily be “a faithful Jew and a passionate Buddhist.”8
Rifat Sonsino (Six Jewish Spiritual Paths: A Rationalist Looks at Spirituality)
Who will sup with me in the upper chambers?
Paul Frederick (The Wisdom and Musings of a Seeker)
Being needy in God is not being needy at all.
Paul Frederick (The Wisdom and Musings of a Seeker)
When I am weak, I am long.
Paul Frederick (The Wisdom and Musings of a Seeker)
Willpower is the caveman approach to life.
Stephen Cope (The Wisdom of Yoga: A Seeker's Guide to Extraordinary Living)
you only know that which is verified by the agreement of all forms of experience in its totality—experience of the senses, moral experience, psychic experience, the collective experience of other seekers for the truth, and finally the experience of those whose knowing merits the title of wisdom and whose striving has been crowned by the title of saint.
Valentin Tomberg (Meditations on the Tarot: A Journey into Christian Hermeticism)
If all was told, supposing there lived a person who could tell all, there would be no mysteries left, and the would be very bad. Man cannot live without mystery. He had a great need of it.
Lame Deer Seeker of Visions
Those who, from the start, are the unfortunate, the downtrodden, the broken – these are the ones, the weakest, who most undermine life amongst men, who introduce the deadliest poison and scepticism into our trust in life, in man, in ourselves. Where can we escape the surreptitious glance imparting a deep sadness, the backward glance of the born misfit revealing how such a man communes with himself, – that glance which is a sigh. ‘If only I were some other person!’ is what this glance sighs: ‘but there’s no hope of that. I am who I am: how could I get away from myself ? And oh – I’m fed up with myself!’ . . . In such a soil of self-contempt, such a veritable swamp, every kind of weed and poisonous plant grows, all of them so small, hidden, dissembling and sugary. Here, the worms of revenge and rancour teem all round; here, the air stinks of things unrevealed and unconfessed; here, the web of the most wicked conspiracy is continually being spun, – the conspiracy of those who suffer against those who are successful and victorious, here, the sight of the victorious man is hated. And what mendacity to avoid admitting this hatred as hatred! What expenditure of big words and gestures, what an art of ‘righteous’ slander! These failures: what noble eloquence flows from their lips! How much sugared, slimy, humble humility swims in their eyes! What do they really want? At any rate, to represent justice, love, wisdom, superiority, that is the ambition of these who are ‘the lowest’, these sick people! And how skilful such an ambition makes them! In particular, we have to admire the counterfeiter’s skill with which the stamp of virtue, the ding-a-ling golden ring of virtue is now imitated. They have taken out a lease on virtue to keep it just for themselves, these weak and incurably sick people, there is no doubt about it: ‘Only we are good and just’ is what they say, ‘only we are the homines bonæ voluntatis’. They promenade in our midst like living reproaches, like warnings to us, – as though health, success, strength, pride and the feeling of power were in themselves depravities for which penance, bitter penance will one day be exacted: oh, how ready they themselves are, in the last resort, to make others penitent, how they thirst to be hangmen! Amongst them we find plenty of vengeance-seekers disguised as judges, with the word justice continually in their mouth like poisonous spittle, pursing their lips and always at the ready to spit at anybody who does not look discontented and who cheerfully goes his own way. Among their number there is no lack of that most disgusting type of dandy, the lying freaks who want to impersonate ‘beautiful souls’ and put their wrecked sensuality on the market, swaddled in verses and other nappies, as ‘purity of the heart’: the type of moral onanists and ‘self-gratifiers.’ The will of the sick to appear superior in any way, their instinct for secret paths, which lead to tyranny over the healthy, – where can it not be found, this will to power of precisely the weakest!
Friedrich Nietzsche
Within each being exists the voice of wisdom: a quiet and unassuming voice that longs to guide us out of darkness, to lift the veil of ignorance and shepherd the seeker to higher ground. Whether one calls it the Sadguru, the Holy Spirit, or the Still Small Voice, one thing is certain—this inner voice will never yell or compete for attention. Only by quieting the mind can this voice be heard. But when you take the time to listen—really listen—this voice is as evident as the warm sun on your face.
Darren Main (The River of Wisdom: Reflections on Yoga, Meditation, and Mindful Living)
A seeker of radical strenght Keeps everything on track, Feeble force yields at length, Not sure where to go back. When one can't find courage, And all the efforts seem vain, It's advised to fight like a sage: Be powerful like a bullet train! Too much work and no play Can make a brain go astray! Determined to live and stay Can lead life into a long way.
Ana Claudia Antunes (The Tao of Physical and Spiritual)
It has been said that the body is the temple of the spirit and the mind is the altar within that temple. When we practice hatha yoga we allow ourselves to come fully into the temple of the body—not simply as a tourist wishing to admire the fine architecture, but as a seeker on a pilgrimage of deep devotion and reverence. Meditation is the devotional practice of placing on the altar of the mind that which is sacred, holy, and revered. Just as you would not place garbage on the altar of a great temple, meditation allows a yogi to place on the altar of her mind that which is noble, pure, and free from attachment.
Darren Main (The River of Wisdom: Reflections on Yoga, Meditation, and Mindful Living)
You are the last. The last seeker who will come to Gaia, the oracle of Apollo, the sanctuary of the old wisdom. I have many things to tell you, and you must listen with your heart and promise to remember.” Hannah nodded and knelt upon the floor at the base of the dais. “I promise,” she said. “But─” “Good,” said the oracle firmly. “Do not despair over Delfi. Anything that dies is reborn a thousand times. In this way, there is nothing that does not live forever. “What blossoms must also wilt. What dies will be reborn. It is the way of life eternal, and the greatest secret the Earth possesses. All tides must flow in two directions; their source is what remains the same. But no matter how they ebb and flow, all seasons, all tides, all contraries are connected. Forever. It has always been this way: one extreme becoming the other in a never-ending spiral of birth, decay, rebirth.
K. Hollan Van Zandt (Written in the Ashes)
Struggle,” says Swami Kripalu, “changes an ordinary human into a spiritually awake person.
Stephen Cope (The Wisdom of Yoga: A Seeker's Guide to Extraordinary Living)
Campbell, a prominent midcentury wisdom seeker, was asked by the Zen Buddhist popularizer Alan Watts what he did for spiritual exercise, Campbell answered, “I underline sentences.
Joel Isaac (The Worlds of American Intellectual History)
The point of the pilgrimage,” as a Buddhist priest told the traveling author Oliver Statler on his journey around the Japanese island of Shikoku, “is to improve yourself by enduring and overcoming difficulties.” In other words, if the journey you have chosen is indeed a pilgrimage, a soulful journey, it will be rigorous. Ancient wisdom suggests if you aren't trembling as you approach the sacred, it isn't the real thing. The sacred, in its various guises as holy ground, art, or knowledge, evokes emotion and commotion.
Phil Cousineau (The Art of Pilgrimage: The Seeker's Guide to Making Travel Sacred)
When consciousness is disturbed, Pure Awareness cannot be distinguished from the waves of mind. The restlessness of the mind, like a choppy pond, fractures the reflection. When consciousness is stilled, however, a great mystery is revealed: Pure Awareness abides in its very nature. And what is this nature? This consciousness, when stilled, has two remarkable characteristics: it is reflective, reflecting Pure Awareness back to itself; and it is transparent, allowing itself to be completely seen and penetrated. It is one of the glories of this technique that the end of the path is present even in the beginning. For even from the first days of practice, the meditator begins to “know” and “be known.” And to understand that knowing and seeing is what it is all about.
Stephen Cope (The Wisdom of Yoga: A Seeker's Guide to Extraordinary Living)
Both Buddhism and the Twelve Steps present our spiritual journey as a process, a movement from pain and confusion to happiness and wisdom. The process they describe is not, I think, unique to either of them, but reflects each tradition's attempt to solve the human riddle of suffering. As such, I think that they each tap into something deeper than the forms, language, cultural trappings, and historical context from which they spring. I believe that they each express something archetypal, a path deeply embedded in human consciousness that has been explored by seekers since humans awakened to their own mortality.
Kevin Griffin (Buddhism & The Twelve Steps Workbook: A Workbook for Individuals and Groups)
Hate is never an option for a truth seeker. It binds, stifles, constipates and causes the gears of philosophical progress to come to a grinding halt. From Fillossofee: Messages From a Grandfather - an ebook
Robert Gately
Make time daily for the development of your spiritual life.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Think Great: Be Great! (Beautiful Quotes, #1))
Spiritual seekers let their light shine so that others may see; not only to give service by example, but also to constantly remind themselves that spirituality is most gloriously embodied in our actions, our habits of being.
bell hooks (All About Love: New Visions)
Those who search for happiness do not find it because they do not understand that the object of the search is the seeker.
Alan W. Watts (The Meaning of Happiness: The Quest for Freedom of the Spirit in Modern Psychology and the Wisdom of the East)
Life in this world,” he said, “is, as it were, a sojourn in a cave. What can we know of reality? For all we see of the true nature of existence is, shall we say, no more than bewildering and amusing shadows cast upon the inner wall of the cave by the unseen blinding light of absolute truth, from which we may or may not deduce some glimmer of veracity, and we as troglodyte seekers of wisdom can only lift our voices to the unseen and say, humbly, ‘Go on, do Deformed Rabbit . . . it’s my favorite.
Terry Pratchett (Small Gods (Discworld, #13))
A seeker must have a receptive mind to understand and accept the right wisdom by rejecting unwanted intelligence duly created by mankind.
Vishal Chipkar (Enter Heaven)
We must be even wiser knowledge seekers now, and look even deeper for the most sacred truth, for truth is sacred, and we must honor it as such.
Ora Nadrich (Live True: A Mindfulness Guide to Authenticity)
The sickly are the greatest danger to man: not the wicked, not the ‘beasts of prey’. Those who, from the start, are the unfortunate, the downtrodden, the broken – these are the ones, the weakest, who most undermine life amongst men, who introduce the deadliest poison and scepticism into our trust in life, in man, in our- selves. Where can we escape the surreptitious glance imparting a deep sadness, the backward glance of the born misfit revealing how such a man communes with himself, – that glance which is a sigh. ‘If only I were some other person!’ is what this glance sighs: ‘but there’s no hope of that. I am who I am: how could I get away from myself? And oh – I’m fed up with myself!’ . . . In such a soil of self-contempt, such a veritable swamp, every kind of weed and poisonous plant grows, all of them so small, hidden, dissembling and sugary. Here, the worms of revenge and rancour teem all round; here, the air stinks of things unrevealed and unconfessed; here, the web of the most wicked conspiracy is continually being spun, – the conspiracy of those who suffer against those who are successful and victorious, here, the sight of the victorious man is hated. And what mendacity to avoid admitting this hatred as hatred! What expenditure of big words and gestures, what an art of ‘righteous’ slander! These failures: what noble eloquence flows from their lips! How much sugared, slimy, humble humility swims in their eyes! What do they really want? At any rate, to represent justice, love, wisdom, superiority, that is the ambition of these who are ‘the lowest’, these sick people! And how skilful such an ambition makes them! In particular, we have to admire the counterfeiter’s skill with which the stamp of virtue, the ding-a-ling golden ring of virtue is now imitated. They have taken out a lease on virtue to keep it just for themselves, these weak and incurably sick people, there is no doubt about it: ‘Only we are good and just’ is what they say, ‘only we are the homines bonæ voluntatis’.90 They promenade in our midst like living reproaches, like warnings to us, – as though health, success, strength, pride and the feeling of power were in themselves depravities for which penance, bitter penance will one day be exacted: oh, how ready they themselves are, in the last resort, to make others penitent, how they thirst to be hangmen! Amongst them we find plenty of vengeance-seekers disguised as judges, with the word justice continually in their mouth like poisonous spittle, pursing their lips and always at the ready to spit at anybody who does not look discontented and who cheerfully goes his own way. Among their number there is no lack of that most disgusting type of dandy, the lying freaks who want to impersonate ‘beautiful souls’91 and put their wrecked sensuality on the market, swaddled in verses and other nappies, as ‘purity of the heart’: the type of moral onanists and ‘self-gratifiers’ [die Species der moralischen Onanisten und ‘Selbstbefriediger’]. The will of the sick to appear superior in any way, their instinct for secret paths, which lead to tyranny over the healthy, – where can it not be found, this will to power of precisely the weakest!
Nietszche
Except to the most avid seekers of wisdom, Stoicism is either unknown or misunderstood. Indeed, it would be hard to find a word dealt a greater injustice at the hands of the English language than “Stoic.” To the average person, this vibrant, action-oriented, and paradigm-shifting way of living has become shorthand for “emotionlessness.” Given the fact that the mere mention of philosophy makes most nervous or bored, “Stoic philosophy” on the surface sounds like the last thing anyone would want to learn about, let alone urgently need in the course of daily life. What a sad fate for a philosophy that even one of its occasional critics, Arthur Schopenhauer, would describe as “the highest point to which man can attain by the mere use of his faculty of reason.” Our goal with this book is to restore Stoicism to its rightful place as a tool in the pursuit of self-mastery, perseverance, and wisdom: something one uses to live a great life, rather than some esoteric field of academic inquiry. Certainly, many of history’s great minds not only understood Stoicism for what it truly is, they sought it out: George Washington, Walt Whitman, Frederick the Great, Eugène Delacroix, Adam Smith, Immanuel Kant, Thomas Jefferson, Matthew Arnold, Ambrose Bierce, Theodore Roosevelt, William Alexander Percy, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Each read, studied, quoted, or admired the Stoics.
Ryan Holiday (The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living)
The Pilgrim's Law”: A soulful traveler replenishes the camp before moving on for those who will follow, and you must share whatever wisdom you've been blessed with on your journey with those who are about to set out on their own journey.
Phil Cousineau (The Art of Pilgrimage: The Seeker's Guide to Making Travel Sacred)
These men were not servants, but masters; not the agents of community, but seekers after divine love and wisdom. They undertook their work with high consecration. And the academy or the university was a place consecrated to the apprehension of an order more than human and a duty more than mundane.
Russell Kirk (Academic Freedom: An Essay in Definition)
In Joseph Campbell's popular book of essays Myths to Live By, he described something pertinent to our theme of sacred journeys: “The ultimate aim of the quest, if one is to return, must be neither release nor ecstasy for oneself, but the wisdom and the power to serve others.
Phil Cousineau (The Art of Pilgrimage: The Seeker's Guide to Making Travel Sacred)
The last words of Buddha were: Be a light to yourself. You are born with a light within you. You are enough to yourself. You are sufficient to yourself. Listen to the still, small voice within, and that will guide you. Buddha defines wisdom as living in the light of your own consciousness. This message of Buddha functions as a reminder to the seeker of truth on the path to enlightenment. 
Swami Dhyan Giten (When the Drop becomes the Ocean)
But then Yasmin changed her mind and hopped a flight to Fez. „I knew I had to go. I didn‘t know why but I had to go. And I was really quite scared because I was going alone and I‘d never been to Morocco. I didn‘t know anyone. I traveled at night so I call it my ‚isra‘, my Night Journey. I landed late. I was really scared but I prayed to Allah, „I trust in You to look after me and protect me. I‘m here for whatever the purpose You‘ve planned for me. (p. 193)
Michael Sugich (Hearts Turn: Sinners, Seekers, Saints and the Road to Redemption)
If you do not believe that God can take you at this moment and make you one of His friends (Awliya) then you are ignorant of His power. - Ibn Ata‘illah Al-Iskandari (p. 334)
Michael Sugich (Hearts Turn: Sinners, Seekers, Saints and the Road to Redemption)
He was what I would call one of the Hidden Ones (Saints). His patience with me was extraordinary. He was connected with Allah. That was the only important thing for him, nanosecond to nanosecond. There was nothing else that mattered. And all the spiritual courtesy (adab) of the conventional Muslim – don‘t waste time, don‘t talk about trivia, all of these things – it came from the fact that he was connected. He didn‘t have to make the effort. He wouldn‘t involve himself in trivia. (p. 206)
Michael Sugich (Hearts Turn: Sinners, Seekers, Saints and the Road to Redemption)
When I read al-Ghazali, I thought, „Oh my God, this is true“. Al Ghazali wrote: „I am on a crumbling bank. My soul is crying „Up, up and away. If not now, when?“ I was about twenty-three years old and I thought, „My God, I am on a crumbling bank! If I don‘t do it – up, up and away – I‘ve blown it! I knew that if I didn‘t do it now, I would have blown it.“ Gray had been looking for a spiritual path all along and was drawn to Sufism. She embraced the religion of Islam and took the name Aisha. (p. 213)
Michael Sugich (Hearts Turn: Sinners, Seekers, Saints and the Road to Redemption)
In „The Secret of Secrets“, al-Jilani refers to the Hadith Qudsi, where God speaks through His Messenger, peace be upon him: „Man is My secret and I am his secret. The inner knowledge of the spiritual essence (ilm al-batin) is a secret of My secrets. Only I put this into the heart of My good servant, and none may know his state other than Me.“ (p. 192)
Michael Sugich (Hearts Turn: Sinners, Seekers, Saints and the Road to Redemption)
Content yourself with being a lover of wisdom, a seeker of the truth. Return and return again to what is essential and worthy. Do not try to seem wise to others. If you want to live a wise life, live it on your own terms and in your own eyes.
Epictetus (The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness)
If answers are produced, where do they come from: Gods, spirits, those who have gone before, the seeker's subconscious? Rational- liberal anthropology, of course, says the latter. Jungian psychology would suggest a collective-unconscious origin. The answers do not always have meaning for the speaker, but they do seem to for the questioner. Practitioners have their own answers. 'It's not archetypes and the collective unconscious, or at least it's more than that as well,' says Jordsvin. 'I expect most of this is coming from the dead people, because that's where I go.' He journeys within Hel's realm: in Norse tradition, wisdom comes from the dead, from the mound. Others may focus on deities as the source of the answers, depending on what is asked: rituals may involve deity-possession (described by Wallis 1999b: chapter 2).
Jenny Blain (Nine Worlds of Seid-Magic: Ecstasy and Neo-Shamanism in North European Paganism)
In my experience an insane person (and I have met a few) is someone who believes that the entire universe and everything in it is conspiring against him. The sane person, on the other hand, is the one who believes that the entire universe and everything in it is conspiring for him. I, fortunately, am a denizen of the latter category. (p. 283)
Michael Sugich (Hearts Turn: Sinners, Seekers, Saints and the Road to Redemption)
In other words, if the journey you have chosen is indeed a pilgrimage, a soulful journey, it will be rigorous. Ancient wisdom suggests if you aren't trembling as you approach the sacred, it isn't the real thing. The sacred, in its various guises as holy ground, art, or knowledge, evokes emotion and commotion.
Phil Cousineau (The Art of Pilgrimage: A Seeker's Guide to Making Travel Sacred)
Eagerly desire to know thy Creator.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Think Great: Be Great! (Beautiful Quotes, #1))
A gardener cannot make a seed grow. She can simply create the conditions for growth to occur and then patiently wait. A physician cannot heal the body. She can simply create the conditions for healing to occur and then patiently wait. A spiritual seeker cannot enlighten the mind or fill the heart with compassion. She can simply create the conditions for grace to pour in and then patiently wait.
Darren Main (The River of Wisdom: Reflections on Yoga, Meditation, and Mindful Living)
So many consumers are mistaking volume for wisdom.
Danielle LaPorte (White Hot Truth: Clarity for Keeping It Real on Your Spiritual Path from One Seeker to Another)
If citta is the sea, its movements (vrttis) are the ripples. Body, mind and consciousness are in communion with the soul; they are now free from attachments and aversions, memories of place and time. The impurities of body and mind are cleansed, the dawning light of wisdom vanquishes ignorance, innocence replaces arrogance and pride, and the seeker becomes the seer. Vibhuti
B.K.S. Iyengar (Light on the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali)
Use time to be a seeker of the Kingdom
Sunday Adelaja
On all the earth there is not one leaf that is exactly like another. The Great Spirit likes it that way. He only sketches out the path of life roughly for all the creatures on earth, shows them where to go, where to arrive at, but leaves them to find their own way to get there. He wants them to act independently according to their nature, to the urges in each of them.
Lame Deer Seeker of Visions
We have been redeemed from darkness to the light. So we must live as people of light!
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Most organized religions often succeed in enslaving the soul through useless traditions, prejudices and ideological divisions. Yet, true spiritual enlightenment and everlasting freedom can only be found in the perfect wisdom that LOVE is the truest most fundamental foundation of every faith which should, inevitably, lead every seeker down the path to the most profound introspective spiritual understanding one could ever know...we are all one.
Jason Versey
The great storehouse of truth is the word of God— the written word, the book of nature, and the book of experience in God’s dealing with human life. Here are the treasures from which Christ’s workers are to draw. In the search after truth they are to depend upon God, not upon human intelligences, the great men whose wisdom is foolishness with God. Through His own appointed channels the Lord will impart a knowledge of Himself to every seeker.
Ellen G. White (Christ's Object Lessons-Illustrated (Heritage Edition Book 8))
May your life be illuminated by a spark of divinity.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
The spirit awaken, the soul revive.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Be life seeker. Seek what you want.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
May the Creator ignite the spark of light within our soul.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Hope is a great believe.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Awake my great spirit.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
May we be zealous for more of God.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Awake my great soul.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Lord guide us along the best pathways.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Lord thy will be done in my life.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
The knowledge of the Holy Scripture is a great wisdom.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
God will fulfill your wishes.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Lord help me! Lord help me! Lord help me!
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
You are a great genius. Seek to fulfil it.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
If you observe nature daily, it brings harmony with you and God.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Think Great: Be Great! (Beautiful Quotes, #1))
Watch out, every day miraculous encounter with you and God!
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Every day is filled with spectacular moments. Seek them!
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
May you find comfort by reading and mediation on God’s word.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
We all have that divine moment, when our lives are transformed by the knowledge of the truth.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Every citizen must pray for its nation.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Do you want to acquire God's own wisdom? Relate with the Holy Spirit. Be a seeker of divine guidance by the Holy Spirit. You can't be a man or woman of solution without God.
Patience Johnson (Why Does an Orderly God Allow Disorder)
Every man must seek self-enlightenment
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Desire, dream and seek.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Day by day, there exists the possibility for the dream to come true.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Life in this world,’ he said, ‘is, as it were, a sojourn in a cave. What can we know of reality? For all we see of the true nature of existence is, shall we say, no more than bewildering and amusing shadows cast upon the inner wall of the cave by the unseen blinding light of absolute truth, from which we may or may not deduce some glimmer of veracity, and we as troglodyte seekers of wisdom can only lift our voices to the unseen and say humbly, “Go on, do Deformed Rabbit... it’s my favourite.
Terry Pratchett (Small Gods (Discworld, #13))
The imagery of intoxication pervades the mystical poetry of Islam, from Attar to Hafiz to Rumi to Ibn al-Arabi and Ibn al-Farid, to Sidi Ahmed al-Alawi and Ibn al-Habib. „The Tavern“, „Wine“, „the Cup“, „Drunkenness“ are powerful mystical symbols that indicate the deep rapture and illumination experienced by the lovers of God. Those who deny the intoxication that comes from worship and remembrance are those who have never experienced it […] hearts overflowing with remembrance of God, filled with Light. Through worship and self-abnegation, they share a taste of the intoxication experienced by those who have entered the Tavern of the Presence and drunk the wine of Light. To deny the possibility of spiritual intoxication is to remove a powerful incentive for purification and worship: an intoxication that removes confusion, a drunkenness with no hangover. What a difference between effulgent rapture and the darkness of an alcoholic stupor! (p. 273)
Michael Sugich (Hearts Turn: Sinners, Seekers, Saints and the Road to Redemption)
We must seek to behold the greatness of our God.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
Every seeker after truth must remember one thing: that the first step in the path of truth is to become true to oneself.
Hazrat Inayat Khan (The Heart of Sufism)
Each of the aforementioned quests involve uncertainty and risk. In becoming a world traveler, we expose ourselves to the unknown dangers that lurk in the unfamiliar corners of the world. In questing for knowledge, in becoming what Emerson called “an endless seeker” who “unsettles all things”, we can stumble upon terrible truths and knowledge that shakes the foundations of our worldview. “For in much wisdom, there is much sorrow.” says the book of Ecclesiastes. In going on a quest to appreciate beauty, we may become more aware of the transience of life and the sorrows of death: “The force that through the green fuse drives the flower…Is my destroyer.”, the poet Dylan Thomas penned. And finally, in seeing our life as a quest to create beauty, we might become a target of the envious. For as Rollo May explained: it is the “artists, poets, and saints [who] are the ones who threaten the status quo, which each society is devoted to protecting.” (Rollo May, The Courage to Create)
Academy of Ideas
The seeker after truth must have a care he is not deceived, for false knowledge is far more dangerous than ignorance. All men wish to possess knowledge, but few are willing to pay the price. Always men will seek to take the short cut, the quick route to power, and it is a man’s own mind, not his enemy or foe, that will lure him to evil ways. True knowledge is gained only after the acquisition of wisdom. Without wisdom, a powerful person does not become more powerful, he becomes reckless. His power will turn on him and eventually destroy all he has built.
Graham McNeill (A Thousand Sons (The Horus Heresy #12))
It's said in our Tradition that the human heart is a treshold between two worlds. The treshold is between the limited material world and the infinite spiritual reality. The heart is the treshold. We should be on that treshold all the time, bridging these two worlds. When we live in that reality and are aware of that presence, we are in remembrance. It changes everything. We can realize that we are not just the content of our experience. We're also this beautiful context, which is divine and purposeful, guiding us stage by stage to deeper and deeper truth. Every stage of our life, if we're seekers, leads to a greater richness of meaning in our lives. Then we can be grateful even for the thorns because we know it has come from the Beloved. (p. 26-27)
Kabir Helminski (In the House of Remembering: The Living Tradition of Sufi Teaching)
If you think too much you're a seeker.
Bert McCoy
Seeking peace anywhere else but inside your chest is a waste of your time.
Bert McCoy
Not everyone who reads ancient books is a seeker. Most of them just relate to the characters and stories just like we relate to the characters of other books and TV shows.
Shunya
It is curious how sometimes the memory of death lives on for so much longer than the memory of the life that it purloined. Over the years, as the memory of Sophie Mol (the seeker of small wisdoms: Where do old birds go to die? Why don’t dead ones fall like stones from the sky?
Arundhati Roy (The God of Small Things)
Except to the most avid seekers of wisdom, Stoicism is either unknown or misunderstood. Indeed, it would be hard to find a word dealt a greater injustice at the hands of the English language than “Stoic.” To the average person, this vibrant, action-oriented, and paradigm-shifting way of living has become shorthand for “emotionlessness.” Given the fact that the mere mention of philosophy makes most nervous or bored, “Stoic philosophy” on the surface sounds like the last thing anyone would want to learn about, let alone urgently need in the course of daily life. What a sad fate for a philosophy that even one of its occasional critics, Arthur Schopenhauer, would describe as “the highest point to which man can attain by the mere use of his faculty of reason.
Ryan Holiday (The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living)
Still another barrier for many people which closes the door to success is the mania or passion for reading too many books, because of their inability to make a definite choice. Getting one on a theme which interests them, they invariably soon seek something “new,” and as soon as that has been read, they again start their interminable searching. Their lives pass without being properly and reasonably used. Such men forget that books are much more numerous than the weeks and months they have yet to live through. So what is the good of having read even half of them and dying before making any use of the things which men know only mentally? After all, books are usually for us only crystallized stores of borrowed thoughts created by other men, and not always of use to us, since in all fields of literature they so frequently offer only fiction or near-fiction, which can hardly help an earnest seeker. Although the mind is only a secondary power in man, compared with the higher wisdom consciousness known in Samadhi, which is devoid of thoughts, faults in the structure of that mind are almost an absolute barrier impossible to over come in any study, and especially in the present one. Inadequate comprehension is the same as insufficient knowledge of a foreign alphabet for someone who wants to read in that particular language. It may happen that it is not merely an unquenchable thirst for reading which drives a man from one author to another, but the fact that he is not satisfied with any so far encountered. In such a case there is nothing more to say then: “Seek and ye shall find.
Mouni Sadhu (Concentration: A Guide to Mental Mastery)
I have been a seeker and I still am, but I stopped asking the books and the stars. I started listening to the teaching of my Soul.
Rumi
If a seeker arrives at the Oficina del Peregrino as part of the procession and expects a bequeathment of wisdom, matters of the heart, and bravery, he or she will be sorely disappointed. This is not the land of Oz. Unquestionably, these rewards and more are out there but must be dearly earned along the journey and beyond.
C.W. Lockhart (Blanket of Stars: Thru-Hiking the Camino de Santiago)
each adult would, at a time chosen by the wind, go out and walk the ice alone. The aim of such journeying was to find the kyzat, the perfect place, a spot that on all the ice had been ordained by the Gods in the Sky and in the Sea for that individual alone as the place where all the elements of their life find meaning, giving a vision of such clarity that the air itself becomes ice and the wisdom of Sky and Sea finds a place in the seeker’s heart, allowing them to endure the hardships of the years ahead. Quell had admitted to Yaz in a private moment that his own journey to find his kyzat, a walk that had lasted four days, had brought him to an ice spike at the juncture of three pressure ridges. Here he was visited by the epiphany that, having run out of his allotted ration of angel-fish, if he did not turn back he would lose first his toes then his fingers to the wind. Yaz had wondered if that wasn’t the wisdom that the ritual was designed to impart. That there is nothing but ice and more ice, and that if you are too stubborn to admit it and turn back, you will die and your malcontent will no longer burden your clan.
Mark Lawrence (The Girl and the Mountain (Book of the Ice #2))