Sam Smith Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Sam Smith. Here they are! All 58 of them:

When you hit a wall – of your own imagined limitations – just kick it in.
Sam Shepard
When we got to the part where we had to improvise an argument in a poetic language, I got cold feet. "I can't do this," I said. "I don't know what to say." "Say anything," he said. "You can't make a mistake when you improvise." "What if I mess it up? What if I screw up the rhythm?" "You can't," he said. "It's like drumming. If you miss a beat, you create another." In this simple exchange, Sam taught me the secret of improvisation, one that I have accessed my whole life.
Patti Smith (Just Kids)
This is what I know - Sam is dead. My brother is dead. My mother is dead. My father is dead. My husband is dead. My cat is dead. My dog, who was dead in 1957, is still dead. Yet still I keep thinking that something wonderful is about to happen. Maybe tomorrow.
Patti Smith (Year of the Monkey)
If someone called me fat, that affects me way more than someone calling me a f----t. I think just because I've accepted that, if someone calls me a f----t, it's like, I am gay and I'm proud to be gay so there's no issues there. If something calls you fat, that's something I want to change.
Sam Smith
Whatever you're thinking, it's a bad idea.
Pittacus Lore (The Fate of Ten (Lorien Legacies, #6))
If you spend time wishing you had other players and scheming to get rid of them or not being loyal, either you end up hating them or they end up hating you, and that cannot be productive.
Sam Smith (The Jordan Rules: The Inside Story of One Turbulent Season with Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls)
Walker covers the mouthpiece of the phone and holds it out for me. “John, uh, I have the president on the line for you.” I stare at her. “What? Seriously?” Walker nods. “He’s apparently . . . um, changed his opinion on fully supporting the Loric. He wants you in Washington right away to discuss strategy.” [...] I’m about to talk to the president. I shake my head, eyeing Walker. “This isn’t some kind of trick, is it?” “No,” Walker says, shaking the phone at me. “He’s for real. It sounds nuts but, apparently, his older daughter just experienced some kind of . . . vision? Where you gave a speech?” Sam can’t hold back the laughter. “Get out!
Pittacus Lore (The Fate of Ten (Lorien Legacies, #6))
I finish every show with this song, because it means so much to my heart. It holds a lot of my soul within the lyrics, and always reminds me of a time when I once loved a boy… And for a few breaths, a few whispers, and a few moments, I think he loved me, too. Here’s Sam Smith’s ‘Life Support.
Brittainy C. Cherry (The Fire Between High & Lo (Elements, #2))
What is you, Sam?" I hesitated, trying to think about how I visualized myself. All I came up with was how other people visualized me. I was visualized as a daughter, a wife, a mother, a best friend by those people in my life, but I had no clue as to how I viewed myself as a person. I'd never bothered to carve out an identity for myself.
Andrea Smith (Diamond Girl (G-Man, #1))
I guess congratulations are in order, Sam.
Andrea Smith (Diamond Girl (G-Man, #1))
We didn’t have to talk then, and that is real friendship. Never uncomfortable with silence, which, in its welcome form, is yet an extension of conversation.
Patti Smith
I've been in love and you'll never know
Sam Smith
It’s hard playing on a team with Michael Jordan because you’re always the reason the team lost.
Sam Smith (The Jordan Rules: The Inside Story of One Turbulent Season with Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls)
Sam wandered through the dark corridor, keeping a hand on the wall to maintain his balance. The stone floor was uneven, and he caught his toe on a couple of rocks that were sticking up in his path. He was about to give up and turn around when he heard something up ahead. He stopped in his tracks, thinking about Patrick Henry’s ghost. He listened carefully and heard a man’s voice coming from around the bend.
Steven K. Smith (Mystery on Church Hill (The Virginia Mysteries #2))
I'm never gonna let you close to me Even though you mean the most to me 'Cause everytime I open up, it hurts So I'm never gonna get too close to you Even when I mean the most to you In case you go and leave me in the dirt
Sam Smith
We fool ourselves about our worldview, our ideology, our religion, the evidence of our senses, and the interpretation of the world that we use to construct our beliefs. All the evidence we notice and remember confirms our views. Everything else is ignored or forgotten—or, better, dismissed based on flaws in the analysis. A reader of mine, Sam Thomsen, said it very well: The Universe is full of dots. Connect the right ones and you can draw anything. The important question is not whether the dots you picked are really there, but why you chose to ignore all the others.
Russ Roberts (How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life: An Unexpected Guide to Human Nature and Happiness)
I was once present at a lecture that Eugene Smith gave to some students at a school of photography. At the end, they protested because he had made no mention of photography, but had spoken the whole time about music. He calmed them by saying that what was valid for one was valid for another. —Henri Cartier-Bresson
Sam Stephenson (Gene Smith's Sink: A Wide-Angle View)
I stared at the little white agates in my hand, delicate as moon drops. The mystery of God's love as I understand it is that God loves the man who was being mean to his dog just as much as he loves babies; God loves Susan Smith, who drowned her two sons, as much as he loves Desmond Tutu. And he loved her just as much when she was releasing the handbrake of her car that sent her boys into the river as he did when she first nursed them. So of course, he loves old ordinary me, even or especially at my most scared and petty and mean and obsessive. Loves me; chooses me. Remembering this helped, but here is what in fact saved me: Sam came over to see what I held in my palm, glared contemptuously at my small white pebbles, and then without missing a beat slapped the bottom of my hand so that the agates scattered. He ran off down the beach, laughing with glee. It surprised me so, this small meanness, that it made me catch my breath. Boy, I thought, is he going to be hard to place. When I was young I would have felt, What’s the point of trying to be good if the people who aren’t even trying get to be equally loved? Now I just picked up my pace and tried to catch up with that rotten Sam, because I don’t know much of anything for sure. Only that I am loved – as is
Anne Lamott (Traveling Mercies: Some Thoughts on Faith)
Disney archivist Dave Smith said, "Disneyland's true appeal, we admit now, is to adults. Children don't need it. Their imaginations are enough. For them, Disneyland is only another kind of reality, somewhat less marvelous than their own fantasies.
Sam Gennawey (The Disneyland Story: The Unofficial Guide to the Evolution of Walt Disney's Dream)
The Lord saves not with sword and spear. For the battle is the Lord’s. (1 Sam. 17:47)
Scotty Smith (Everyday Prayers: 365 Days to a Gospel-Centered Faith)
If we were on Friends, who do you think 'd be?" I wonder aloud. "I think you'd be Phoebe because you're quirky and creative," Chloe tells me. "Really? I think I'd be Monica because I'm crazy and neurotic," I say. "Jo, who do you think I am? Phoebe or Monica?" "Neither," Joni answers. "You're Ross." "What?!" Call me dramatic, but I've never been more offended in my life. "How am I Ross?" "Because you've had the same pathetic crush on the same blond ditz your entire life. And you like dinosaurs." "Everyone likes dinosaurs," I argue. Then I realize what else she's insinuating. "Wait a minute. Are you saying that Sam is Rachel?" Joni shrugs. "If the designer shoe fits." Oh my God.
Jacqueline E. Smith (Spotlight (Boy Band #4))
People need kindness as much as they need food to eat. Maybe more.
Andrew Smith (The Size of the Truth (Sam Abernathy #1))
You’re officially twenty-one," Sam observes. "I won’t be twenty-one for another few months. That makes you older than me.” “Yes. Birthdays are tricky that way,” I reply, wondering where he’s going with this. “Melissa Parker, you’re a cougar!” Sam exclaims, sounding absolutely giddy. I can feel my jaw drop. “I am not!” “You’re an older woman dating a younger man. That is the definition of a cougar!” “No, it is not!” “It is. Look it up.
Jacqueline E. Smith (Backstage (Boy Band #2))
Today’s Children, The Woman in White, and The Guiding Light crossed over and interchanged in respective storylines.) June 2, 1947–June 29, 1956, CBS. 15m weekdays at 1:45. Procter & Gamble’s Duz Detergent. CAST: 1937 to mid-1940s: Arthur Peterson as the Rev. John Ruthledge of Five Points, the serial’s first protagonist. Mercedes McCambridge as Mary Ruthledge, his daughter; Sarajane Wells later as Mary. Ed Prentiss as Ned Holden, who was abandoned by his mother as a child and taken in by the Ruthledges; Ned LeFevre and John Hodiak also as Ned. Ruth Bailey as Rose Kransky; Charlotte Manson also as Rose. Mignon Schrieber as Mrs. Kransky. Seymour Young as Jacob Kransky, Rose’s brother. Sam Wanamaker as Ellis Smith, the enigmatic “Nobody from Nowhere”; Phil Dakin and Raymond Edward Johnson also as Ellis. Henrietta Tedro as Ellen, the housekeeper. Margaret Fuller and Muriel Bremner as Fredrika Lang. Gladys Heen as Torchy Reynolds. Bill Bouchey as Charles Cunningham. Lesley Woods and Carolyn McKay as Celeste, his wife. Laurette Fillbrandt as Nancy Stewart. Frank Behrens as the Rev. Tom Bannion, Ruthledge’s assistant. The Greenman family, early characters: Eloise Kummer as Norma; Reese Taylor and Ken Griffin as Ed; Norma Jean Ross as Ronnie, their daughter. Transition from clergy to medical background, mid-1940s: John Barclay as Dr. Richard Gaylord. Jane Webb as Peggy Gaylord. Hugh Studebaker as Dr. Charles Matthews. Willard Waterman as Roger Barton (alias Ray Brandon). Betty Lou Gerson as Charlotte Wilson. Ned LeFevre as Ned Holden. Tom Holland as Eddie Bingham. Mary Lansing as Julie Collins. 1950s: Jone Allison as Meta Bauer. Lyle Sudrow as Bill Bauer. Charita Bauer as Bert, Bill’s wife, a role she would carry into television and play for three decades. Laurette Fillbrandt as Trudy Bauer. Glenn Walken as little Michael. Theo Goetz as Papa Bauer. James Lipton as Dr. Dick Grant. Lynn Rogers as Marie Wallace, the artist.
John Dunning (On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio)
You don't set out to build a wall. You don't say: 'I'm going to build the biggest, baddest, greatest wall that's ever been built.' You say, "I'm going to lay this brick as perfectly as a brick can be laid. You do that every single day. And soon you have the greatest wall that's ever been built." - Will Smith
Sam Thomas Davies (Unhooked: How to Break Bad Habits and Form Good Ones That Stick)
It was only when I started to be myself that the music started to flow and people started to listen.
Sam Smith
My goal was not simply to do well, or hold my own. It was to make a mark at St. Mark’s. I did it for Poetry. I did it for Rimbaud, and I did it for Gregory. I wanted to infuse the written word with the immediacy and frontal attack of rock and roll. Todd suggested that I be aggressive, and he gave me a pair of black snakeskin boots to wear. Sam suggested I add music. I thought about all the musicians who had come through the Chelsea, but then I remembered Lenny Kaye had said he played electric guitar. I went to see him. “You play guitar, right?” “Yeah, I like to play guitar.” “Well, could you play a car crash with an electric guitar?” “Yeah, I could do that,” he said without hesitation, and agreed to accompany me.
Patti Smith (Just Kids)
Unfolding according to the contemplative logic of their lyrical orbits, Astral Weeks’s songs unhooked themselves from pop’s dependence on verse/chorus structure, coasting on idling rhythms, raging and subsiding with the ebb and flow of Morrison’s soulful scat. The soundworld – a loose-limbed acoustic tapestry of guitar, double bass, flute, vibraphone and dampened percussion – was unmistakably attributable to the calibre of the musicians convened for the session: Richard Davis, whose formidable bass talents had shadowed Eric Dolphy on the mercurial Blue Note classic Out to Lunch; guitarist Jay Berliner had previous form with Charles Mingus; Connie Kay was drummer with The Modern Jazz Quartet; percussionist/vibesman Warren Smith’s sessionography included Miles Davis, Aretha Franklin, Nat King Cole, Sam Rivers and American folk mystics Pearls Before Swine. Morrison reputedly barely exchanged a word with the personnel, retreating to a sealed sound booth to record his parts and leaving it to their seasoned expertise to fill out the space. It is a music quite literally snatched out of the air.
Rob Young (Electric Eden: Unearthing Britain's Visionary Music)
I did not ask the sign how my husband fared in whatever space was allotted to him in the universe. I did not ask the fate of Sandy. Or Sam. Those things are forbidden, as entreating the angels with prayer. I know that very well, one cannot ask for a life, or two lives. One can only warrant the hope of an increasing potency in each man’s heart.
Patti Smith (Year of the Monkey)
I've never admitted this to Sam or to anyone else, but sometimes I wonder what life would have been like if Sam hadn't become one of the hottest pop stars in the world. Would we have stayed friends throughout college? Would we still have gotten together? I like to think we would have. Maybe we would be hanging out on a second-hand futon with our friends, binge-watching Netflix on a laptop, and wearing jeans and free t-shirts from Freshman Orientation. He'd casually drape his arm around my shoulders while we ate popcorn straight out of the bag and absolutely no one would care. He wouldn't be rich or famous or well-dressed, but he would still be Sam. The same Sam I've known and loved my entire life.
Jacqueline E. Smith (Worldwide (Boy Band #3))
The city of Los Angeles lights up my window and I can feel Sam gently playing with the diamond necklace he gave me for Valentine's Day just days ago. As unbelievable and extraordinary as it may seem at times, this is still the world we live in. This bizarre, bright shining world of fame and fortune, glitz and glamour, where there is no such thing as privacy, only the crazed masses and blinding flash of the limelight.
Jacqueline E. Smith (Worldwide (Boy Band #3))
If we were on Friends, who do you think I'd be?" I wonder aloud. "I think you'd be Phoebe because you're quirky and creative," Chloe tells me. "Really? I think I'd be Monica because I'm crazy and neurotic," I say. "Jo, who do you think I am? Phoebe or Monica?" "Neither," Joni answers. "You're Ross." "What?!" Call me dramatic, but I've never been more offended in my life. "How am I Ross?" "Because you've had the same pathetic crush on the same blond ditz your entire life. And you like dinosaurs." "Everyone likes dinosaurs," I argue. Then I realize what else she's insinuating. "Wait a minute. Are you saying that Sam is Rachel?" Joni shrugs. "If the designer shoe fits." Oh my God.
Jacqueline E. Smith (Spotlight (Boy Band #4))
whatever you decide to believe is your own opinion and exactly that, an opinion. It doesn’t have any real weight except to yourself,” Sam said. “That is a very good reply, Constable Smith. Are you sure you are only an apprentice?
Guy Antibes (An Apprentice Without Magic (Magic Missing Book 2))
In a depressed era when most young adults grasped for any foothold they could find, the nineteen-year-old Smith had already given up a major university scholarship and challenged a prominent magazine’s editorial boundaries until he was fired. He wouldn’t follow his father’s burdened, suit-and-tie path to an early death; he might kill himself, but in a different way.
Sam Stephenson (Gene Smith's Sink: A Wide-Angle View)
For the next seven decades the story of Smith attending these sixty-three consecutive shows has been repeated often, including by me. The trouble is, Mexicana was performed only thirty-five times.
Sam Stephenson (Gene Smith's Sink: A Wide-Angle View)
could be an antidote to clinical depression. Smith fed off risk and nerves for the rest of his life, noticeable early with his cavalier photo work in combat zones in the Pacific theater of World War II, and he fell into deep depressions when the urgency wasn’t there.
Sam Stephenson (Gene Smith's Sink: A Wide-Angle View)
these entries we can see Smith focusing on the human landscape and the tension he felt between isolation and the teeming churn of collectives, a tension he never reconciled, and many themes of home—creating or finding a home, leaving and returning home.
Sam Stephenson (Gene Smith's Sink: A Wide-Angle View)
Why do you say money​ when do you need someone to hold
Sam Smith
Derek crouched down and studied the dirt again under the lantern light. “Something’s in there,” he whispered. “How do you know?” asked Nathan, hesitation filling his voice. “I can sense it,” answered Derek. Sam groaned, then did something surprising. Maybe he was sick of Derek always telling him what to do. Maybe it was because his feet hurt. Maybe he was tired of always getting scared for no reason. “This is stupid,” he yelled, grabbing the lantern. He pushed past Derek and Nathan. “There’s nothing out there. It’s just the shadows playing tricks on us. You probably didn’t even see the alligator come down here. We need to get the heck out of here before we get lost.” He stepped around the corner. “See!” he proclaimed, holding the lantern up high in front of him. Light streamed into an enormous, open room. It seemed to stretch on forever, like some hidden underground cavern. Water dripped from open cracks above them. Pillars of rock hung down from the ceiling. Derek’s mouth dropped open. “Oh my gosh...” Sam’s arm turned to stone, the lantern dangling from his hand like a light post. He couldn’t move a muscle, except for his eyes, which darted around the deep room of shadows. A wide pool of water lay in the middle of the space as if it had been filled by a hundred years of rainwater working its way underground. Lying all around the pool were alligators. Dozens of them.
Steven K. Smith (Secret of the Staircase (The Virginia Mysteries #4))
Please pass the sugar cubes.” Sam rolled his eyes as he handed the crystal bowl of white and brown sugar cubes to Caitlin. He refused to look over at his mom at the next table. She was in a deep conversation with Anita, seemingly not concerned about subjecting him to a tea party. This was terrible. What was ‘high tea’ anyhow? He looked across at Caitlin. She seemed to be enjoying herself. She was really excited about being in this fancy old hotel. “Isn’t
Steven K. Smith (Secret of the Staircase (The Virginia Mysteries #4))
kind of gross, but at this point Sam was so hungry, he’d eat just about anything. Grrrowwllll his stomach cried out again. He glanced up the line at Caitlin Murphy to see if she noticed. She had a smirk on her face like she knew something, but that was how she always looked, so he couldn’t tell if it was because of him. “Is that organic broccoli?” Caitlin asked one of the lunch ladies through a cloud of steam
Steven K. Smith (Mystery on Church Hill (The Virginia Mysteries #2))
July hit Virginia that summer like a furnace. The temperature rose higher and higher, eclipsing one hundred degrees. The ancient air conditioning system in the boys’ house groaned from constant use, and the grass around the yard was slowly turning a crispy brown. It was too hot to play outside, so Sam and Derek spent hours plotting out their search for the missing treasure.
Steven K. Smith (Summer of the Woods (The Virginia Mysteries #1))
Of course, there can be clear indications that a teacher is not worth paying attention to. A history as a fabulist or a con artist should be considered fatal; thus, the spiritual opinions of Joseph Smith, Gurdjieff, and L. Ron Hubbard can be safely ignored. A fetish for numbers is also an ominous sign. Math is magical, but math approached like magic is just superstition—and numerology is where the intellect goes to die. Prophecy is also a very strong indication of chicanery or madness on the part of a teacher, and of stupidity among his students. One can extrapolate from scientific data or technological trends (climate models, Moore’s law), but most detailed predictions about the future lead to embarrassment right on schedule.
Sam Harris (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality without Religion)
SAM OWEN always fished by night.
Guy N. Smith (Night of the Crabs (Crabs, #1))
Back on the floor, I fill another cup with cherries and settle in to people watch. We have the modern equivalent to a jukebox in the corner that can be fed off debit cards, and someone’s clearly coming off a bad break because a second loop of Demi Lovato’s “Sorry Not Sorry” has started. I skim the club for the culprit. My money’s on the black-haired beauty with Cover Girl’s Matte #5 stained on her one, two, three straws. “Get it, girl,” I mumble under my breath. Demi is a perfectly respectable breakup diva. See also: Sam Smith and Ray LaMontagne.
Erin Hahn (More Than Maybe)
Sam Smith
Josie Eccles (The Boyfriend Bet)
In a paper evaluating the case for trophic cascades in the Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, Peterson, Vucetich, and Douglas Smith, who trained on Isle Royale and now is a project leader for the Wolf Restoration Project at Yellowstone, argue that ecosystems are too complex to trace neat relationships, particularly in Yellowstone where grizzly bears, black bears, cougars, and wolves eat bison, deer, and elk. They also point out that, when you follow the threads of prey fluctuations, you often find at the source not wild-animal predators but human beings.
Sam Kean (The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2018)
Seventy wins don’t mean a thing without the ring.’ So it became a topic of discussion.
Sam Smith (There Is No Next: NBA Legends on the Legacy of Michael Jordan)
There’s no ‘I’ in the word team,” Winter would say to Jordan. “There is in the word win,” Jordan would respond.
Sam Smith (There Is No Next: NBA Legends on the Legacy of Michael Jordan)
So that’s when he leaned over to me [in the timeout] and said, ‘Stockton is probably going to double team, so be ready.’ [Stockton did double, leaving Kerr open].
Sam Smith (There Is No Next: NBA Legends on the Legacy of Michael Jordan)
So that’s when he leaned over to me [in the timeout] and said, ‘Stockton is probably going to double team, so be ready.’ [Stockton did double, leaving Kerr open]. At some point, for a lot of players, you do have to get over that hump and the only way to do it is to kind of say, ‘Screw it. I’m just gonna, repercussions be damned, whatever happens, happens. I’m just gonna trust myself.’ It’s easier said than done. But I do remember walking on the floor and saying, ‘Fuck it. If I touch the ball, I’m gonna shoot it.’ And so it all played out exactly as Michael planned.
Sam Smith (There Is No Next: NBA Legends on the Legacy of Michael Jordan)
You know, Phil, I don’t feel real comfortable in these situations. Maybe we ought to go in another direction.’ Then Scottie came in and said, ‘You know, Phil, Michael said in his commercial that he’s been asked to do this twenty-six times and he’s failed. Why don’t we go to Steve?’ So I thought to myself, ‘I guess I have to bail Michael out again. I’ve been carrying him all year, so what’s one more time?’ Anyway, the shot went in, that’s my story and I’m sticking to it.
Sam Smith (There Is No Next: NBA Legends on the Legacy of Michael Jordan)
In the 1989–90 season, he and New York’s Mark Jackson were fined for saying they had bet on which of them would make the winning shot in a close Knicks-76ers game. Barkley would be called in by the commissioner for a slap on the wrist and lecture, only to say, when asked if he were going to be fined, “Wanna bet?
Sam Smith (The Jordan Rules: The Inside Story of One Turbulent Season with Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls)
Nothing can stop the man with the right attitude from achieving his goal,” Jackson wrote, “but nothing on earth can help the man with the wrong attitude.
Sam Smith (The Jordan Rules: The Inside Story of One Turbulent Season with Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls)
I’ve missed more than nine thousand shots in my career. I’ve lost almost three hundred games. Twenty-six times I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.
Sam Smith (There Is No Next: NBA Legends on the Legacy of Michael Jordan)
What I love about Michael is that he was not the best at anything. He was not the biggest, he was not the strongest, he was not the highest jumper. But he was incredibly, incredibly smart. And incredibly disciplined and focused and driven.
Sam Smith (There Is No Next: NBA Legends on the Legacy of Michael Jordan)
Dr. Smith suggested that we have Louie put down tomorrow,” he said gently. I expected my brothers to get angry, to yell that nobody would ever do that to Louie, but they all began to cry instead. David Michael cried noisily. Sam and Charlie tried to hide the fact that they were crying, but I know they were. Then a lump that had been filling up my throat all afternoon, dissolved, and I began to cry, too, which made Andrew and Karen burst into tears. It didn’t matter. Even Watson was crying.
Ann M. Martin (Kristy and the Snobs (The Baby-Sitters Club, #11))
book Research Design: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches (J. W. Cresswell, 1994), or his work Designing and Conducting Mixed Methods Research co-authored with Ann Carroll Klassen, Vicki Plano Clark, and Katherine Clegg Smith (2007), or his short paper focusing on health research specifically (J. Cresswell, Klassen, Plano Clark, & Clegg Smith, 2011).
Sam Ladner (Mixed Methods: A short guide to applied mixed methods research)