S Weinberg Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to S Weinberg. Here they are! All 200 of them:

With or without religion, good people can behave well and bad people can do evil; but for good people to do evil - that takes religion.
Steven Weinberg
Religion is an insult to human dignity. Without it you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things. But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion.
Steven Weinberg
All logical arguments can be defeated by the simple refusal to reason logically
Steven Weinberg (Dreams of a Final Theory: The Search for The Fundamental Laws of Nature)
The effort to understand the universe is one of the very few things that lifts human life a little above the level of farce, and gives it some of the grace of tragedy.
Steven Weinberg
Science doesn't make it impossible to believe in God, it just makes it possible not to believe in God
Steven Weinberg
The more the universe seems comprehensible, the more it also seems pointless
Steven Weinberg
Man created God in his image: intolerant, sexist, homophobic and violent.
George Weinberg
One of the great achievements of science has been, if not to make it impossible for intelligent people to be religious, then at least to make it possible for them not to be religious. We should not retreat from this accomplishment.
Steven Weinberg
It does not matter whether you win or lose, what matters is whether I win or lose!
Steven Weinberg
I don't need to argue here that the evil in the world proves that the universe is not designed, but only that there are no signs of benevolence that might have shown the hand of a designer.
Steven Weinberg
As the Nobel Prize-winning American physicist Steven Weinberg said, ‘Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without it, you’d have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things. But for good people to do evil things, it takes religion.
Richard Dawkins (The God Delusion)
Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without it, you'd have good people doing good things and evil people doing bad things, but for good people to do bad things, it takes religion.
Steven Weinberg
What you don't know may not hurt you, but what you don't remember always does.
Gerald M. Weinberg
PREFACE PROBLEM: Nobody reads prefaces. SOLUTION: Call the preface Chapter 1. NEW PROBLEM CREATED BY SOLUTION: Chapter 1 is boring. RESOLUTION: Throw away Chapter 1 and call Chapter 2 Chapter 1.
Gerald M. Weinberg
problem-solving leaders have one thing in common: a faith that there's always a better way.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
How can one capture genes that behave like ghosts," Weinberg wrote, "influencing cells from behind some dark curtain?
Siddhartha Mukherjee (The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer)
Hope never abandons you; you abandon it.
George Weinberg
Almost every failed startup has a product. What failed startups don’t have are enough customers.
Gabriel Weinberg (Traction: A Startup Guide to Getting Customers)
Frederick Douglass told in his Narrative how his condition as a slave became worse when his master underwent a religious conversion that allowed him to justify slavery as the punishment of the children of Ham. Mark Twain described his mother as a genuinely good person, whose soft heart pitied even Satan, but who had no doubt about the legitimacy of slavery, because in years of living in antebellum Missouri she had never heard any sermon opposing slavery, but only countless sermons preaching that slavery was God's will. With or without religion, good people can behave well and bad people can do evil; but for good people to do evil — that takes religion.
Steven Weinberg
the idea is to see how far one can go without supposing supernatural intervention.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
Many people do simply awful things out of sincere religious belief, not using religion as a cover the way that Saddam Hussein may have done, but really because they believe that this is what God wants them to do, going all the way back to Abraham being willing to sacrifice Issac because God told him to do that. Putting God ahead of humanity is a terrible thing.
Steven Weinberg
Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without religion, you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things. But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion
Steven Weinberg
the next darwin is more likely to be a data wonk than a naturalist wandering through an exotic landscape
David Weinberger (Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room)
If it's not broken, tinker with it till you find out how it works.
Bob Proctor
People don't become leaders because they never fail. They become leaders because of the way they respond to failure.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
فالسعى إلى رضا عن فهم الكون هو من الأشياء النادرة التى تسمو بالإنسان فوق مستوى الترهات ،وتنعم عليه بشىء من شرف المشاركة فى هذه المسرحية المأساوية .
Steven Weinberg (The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe)
Whatever the final laws of nature may be, there is no reason to suppose that they are designed to make physicists happy.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
We simply do not find anything in the laws of nature that in any way corresponds to ideas of goodness, justice, love, or strife,
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
I'm offended by the kind of smarmy religiosity that's all around us, perhaps more in America than in Europe, and not really that harmful because it's not really that intense or even that serious, but just... you know after a while you get tired of hearing clergymen giving the invocation at various public celebrations and you feel, haven't we outgrown all this? Do we have to listen to this?
Steven Weinberg
I have a friend — or had a friend, now dead — Abdus Salam, a very devout Muslim, who was trying to bring science into the universities in the Gulf states and he told me that he had a terrible time because, although they were very receptive to technology, they felt that science would be a corrosive to religious belief, and they were worried about it… and damn it, I think they were right. It is corrosive of religious belief, and it’s a good thing too.
Steven Weinberg
Poor distribution - not product - is the number one cause of failure.
Gabriel Weinberg (Traction: A Startup Guide to Getting Customers)
If you are a leader, the people are your work.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
The best computer programmers never write a new program when they can use an old one for a new job.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
Once you eliminate your number one problem, number two gets a promotion.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Secrets of Consulting: A Guide to Giving and Getting Advice Successfully)
There are those whose views about religion are not very different from my own, but who nevertheless feel that we should try to damp down the conflict, that we should compromise it. … I respect their views and I understand their motives, and I don't condemn them, but I'm not having it. To me, the conflict between science and religion is more important than these issues of science education or even environmentalism. I think the world needs to wake up from its long nightmare of religious belief; and anything that we scientists can do to weaken the hold of religion should be done, and may in fact be our greatest contribution to civilization.
Steven Weinberg
Leadership is familiar, but not well understood.
Gerald M. Weinberg
In this sense, science, as physicist Steven Weinberg has emphasized, does not make it impossible to believe in God, but rather makes it possible to not believe in God.
Lawrence M. Krauss (A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing)
Testing gathers information about a product; it does not fix things it finds that are wrong.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
One of the hardest choices for technical stars who become leaders is losing touch with the latest in technology.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
As is natural for an academic, when I want to learn about something, I volunteer to teach a course on the subject.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
scientific theories cannot be deduced by purely mathematical reasoning.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
religions of the Roman Empire “were all considered by the people, as equally true, by the philosopher, as equally false, and by the magistrate, as equally useful.”8
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
Many entrepreneurs who build great products simply don’t have a good distribution strategy.
Gabriel Weinberg (Traction: A Startup Guide to Getting Customers)
Maybe at the very bottom of it... I really don't like God. You know, it's silly to say I don't like God because I don't believe in God, but in the same sense that I don't like Iago, or the Reverend Slope or any of the other villains of literature, the god of traditional Judaism and Christianity and Islam seems to me a terrible character. He's a god who will... who obsessed the degree to which people worship him and anxious to punish with the most awful torments those who don't worship him in the right way. Now I realise that many people don't believe in that any more who call themselves Muslims or Jews or Christians, but that is the traditional God and he's a terrible character. I don't like him.
Steven Weinberg
Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg likens this multiple universe theory to radio. All around you, there are hundreds of different radio waves being broadcast from distant stations. At any given instant, your office or car or living room is full of these radio waves. However, if you turn on a radio, you can listen to only one frequency at a time; these other frequencies have decohered and are no longer in phase with each other. Each station has a different energy, a different frequency. As a result, your radio can only be turned to one broadcast at a time.Likewise, in our universe we are "tuned" into the frequency that corresponds to physical reality. But there are an infinite number of parallel realities coexisting with us in the same room, although we cannot "tune into" them. Although these worlds are very much alike, each has a different energy. And because each world consists of trillions upon trillions of atoms, this means that the energy difference can be quite large. Since the frequency of these waves is proportional to their energy (by Planck's law), this means that the waves of each world vibrate at different frequencies and cannot interact anymore. For all intents and purposes, the waves of these various worlds do not interact or influence each other.
Michio Kaku (Parallel Worlds: A Journey through Creation, Higher Dimensions, and the Future of the Cosmos)
If you don't have questions about a product's risks, then there's no reason to test. If you have at least one such question, then ask: Will these tests cost more to execute than their answers will be worth?
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
In this sense, science, as physicist Steven Weinberg has emphasized, does not make it impossible to believe in God, but rather makes it possible to not believe in God. Without science, everything is a miracle. With science, there remains the possibility that nothing is. Religious belief in this case becomes less and less necessary, and also less and less relevant.
Lawrence M. Krauss (A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing)
Many of the great world religions teach that God demands a particular faith and form of worship. It should not be surprising that SOME of the people who take these teachings seriously should sincerely regard these divine commands as incomparably more important than any merely secular virtues like tolerance or compassion or reason. Across Asia and Africa the forces of religious enthusiasm are gathering strength, and reasom and tolerance are not safe even in the secular states of the West. The historian Huge Trevor-Roper has said that it was the spread of the spirit of science in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries that finally ended the burning pf the witches in Europe. We may need to rely again on the influence of science to preserve a sane wolrd.It's not the certainty of the scientific knowledge that fits it for this role, but its UNCERTAINTY. Seeing scientists change their minds again and again about the matters that can be studied directly in laboratory experiments, how can one take seriously the claims of religious traditions or sacred writings to certain knowledge about matters beyond human experience
Steven Weinberg
It used to be obvious that the world was designed by some sort of intelligence. What else could account for fire and rain and lightning and earthquakes? Above all, the wonderful abilities of living things seemed to point to a creator who had a special interest in life. Today we understand most of these things in terms of physical forces acting under impersonal laws. We don't yet know the most fundamental laws, and we can't work out all the consequences of the laws we do know. The human mind remains extraordinarily difficult to understand, but so is the weather. We can't predict whether it will rain one month from today, but we do know the rules that govern the rain, even though we can't always calculate their consequences. I see nothing about the human mind any more than about the weather that stands out as beyond the hope of understanding as a consequence of impersonal laws acting over billions of years.
Steven Weinberg
o love is to battle, if two kiss the world changes, desires take flesh thoughts take flesh, wings sprout on the backs of the slave, the world is real and tangible, wine is wine, bread regains its savor, water is water, to love is to battle, to open doors, to cease to be a ghost with a number forever in chains, forever condemned by a faceless master; the world changes if two look at each other and see Piedra de Sol (The Sun Stone), translated by Eliot Weinberger
Octavio Paz
There are many technical workers who enjoy wandering so much that, like Alice in Wonderland, they don’t much care where they go, so long as they get somewhere.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
All theatre, by virtue of its being a cultural construct and therefore ideologically inscribed, is political.
Mark S. Weinberg
at its most fundamental level science is not undertaken for any practical reason.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
in the East al-Rashid and al-Mamun were delving into Greek and Persian philosophy,
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
If there is no point in the universe that we discover by the methods of science, there is a point that we can give the universe by the way we live, by loving each other, by discovering things about nature, by creating works of art. And that—in a way, although we are not the stars in a cosmic drama, if the only drama we're starring in is one that we are making up as we go along, it is not entirely ignoble that faced with this unloving, impersonal universe we make a little island of warmth and love and science and art for ourselves. That's not an entirely despicable role for us to play.
Steven Weinberg
The faster you run high quality experiments, the more likely you’ll find scalable, effective growth tactics. Determining the success of a customer acquisition idea is dependent on an effective tracking and reporting system, so don’t start testing until your tracking/reporting system has been implemented.
Gabriel Weinberg (Traction: A Startup Guide to Getting Customers)
Question: Which Mediterranean government shares all of Ronald Reagan's views on international terrorism, the present danger of Soviet advance, the hypocrisy of the United Nations, the unreliability of Europe, the perfidy of the Third World and the need for nuclear defense policy? Question: Which Mediterranean government is Ronald Reagan trying, with the help of George Shultz and Caspar Weinberger, to replace with a government led by a party which professes socialism and which contains extreme leftists? If you answered 'the government of Israel' to both of the above, you know more about political and international irony than the President does.
Christopher Hitchens
Good testing involves balancing the need to mitigate risk against the risk of trying to gather too much information.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
Good people will do good things, and bad people will do bad things. But for good people to do bad things—that takes religion. —Steven Weinberg, 1999
Daniel C. Dennett (Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon)
The progress of science has been largely a matter of discovering what questions should be asked.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
*No matter how strange it may look, most people are actually trying to be helpful.* That
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
you don’t have to be a boss to be a leader
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
problem-solving leaders have one thing in common: a faith that there’s always a better way
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
Unless and until all members of a team have a common understanding of the problem, attempts to solve the problem are just so much wasted energy.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
This is what we call the 50% rule: spend 50% of your time on product and 50% on traction.
Gabriel Weinberg (Traction: A Startup Guide to Getting Customers)
We sort of understood abstractly the idea that there are only two kinds of software projects: failures and future legacy horrors.
Peter Weinberger
Once you eliminate your number one problem, number two gets a promotion. —GERALD WEINBERG,
Josh Kaufman (The Personal MBA: Master the Art of Business)
No matter how it looks at first, it’s always a people problem. Gerry Weinberg, The Second Law of Consulting
Sam Newman (Building Microservices)
In the seed model, Leadership is the process of creating an environment in which people become empowered.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
If you cannot think of three ways of abusing a tool, you do not understand how to use it. Faithful
Gerald M. Weinberg (An Introduction to General Systems Thinking)
It is not only in medicine that persons in authority will resist any investigation that might reduce their authority.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
once one invokes the supernatural, anything can be explained, and no explanation can be verified.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
It was essential for the discovery of science that religious ideas be divorced from the study of nature.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
Good customer support is so rare that, if you simply try to make your customers happy, they are likely to spread the news of your awesome product on that basis alone.
Gabriel Weinberg (Traction: How Any Startup Can Achieve Explosive Customer Growth)
The only essential thing is growth. Everything else we associate with startups follows from growth.
Gabriel Weinberg (Traction: A Startup Guide to Getting Customers)
Great poetry lives in a state of perpetual transformation, perpetual translation: the poem dies when it has no place to go.
Eliot Weinberger (19 Ways of Looking at Wang Wei)
Hear the wind and you will know the wind. Wind blows, and the generations are its leaves. There was no higher praise than what was said of Confucius: He knows where the wind comes from.
Eliot Weinberger (An Elemental Thing)
Fisher's Fundamental Theorem states—in terms appropriate to the present context—that the better adapted a system is to a particular environment, the less adaptable it is to new environments.
Gerald M. Weinberg (The Psychology of Computer Programming)
Linear models tend to define relationships in terms of roles rather than people: the boss rather than the person actually exerting influence. The organic model tends to define relationships in terms of one unique person to another unique person.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
The Babylonians had achieved great competence in arithmetic, using a number system based on 60 rather than 10. They had also developed some simple techniques of algebra, such as rules (though these were not expressed in symbols) for solving various quadratic equations.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
But if oxen (and horses) and lions had hands or could draw with hands and create works of art like those made by men, horses would draw pictures of gods like horses, and oxen of gods like oxen, and they would make the bodies [of their gods] in accordance with the form that each species itself possesses.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
You can bring tremendous value to your business, your customers, and yourself by becoming proficient at bringing in new business.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
Testing does not improve a product; the improving is done by people fixing the bugs that testing has uncovered.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
There's never an easy answer to the question "Should we do more testing?" because information can guide risk reduction, but doesn't necessarily do so.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
If you are a good leader, Who talks little, They will say, When your work is done, And your aim fulfilled, “We did it ourselves.” - Lao Tse
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
Within IBM at that time, growing a beard without getting fired was an indisputable mark of technical genius. In
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
Influence or affluence; take your choice.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Secrets of Consulting: A Guide to Giving and Getting Advice Successfully)
It isn't what we don't know that gives us trouble, it's what we know that ain't so. - Will Rogers The
Gerald M. Weinberg (An Introduction to General Systems Thinking)
*Effective help can only start with mutual agreement on a clear definition of the problem.* Interestingly
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
Repeatedly curing a system that can cure itself will eventually create a system that can't.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Secrets of Consulting: A Guide to Giving and Getting Advice Successfully)
High-stakes testing culture—be it for school examinations, job interviews, or professional licensing—creates perverse incentives to “teach to the test,” or worse, cheat.
Gabriel Weinberg (Super Thinking: The Big Book of Mental Models)
In fact, there is a mental model for this more specific situation, called the cobra effect, describing when an attempted solution actually makes the problem worse.
Gabriel Weinberg (Super Thinking: The Big Book of Mental Models)
If you do engage, another trap to watch out for is the observer effect, where there is an effect on something depending on how you observe it, or even who observes
Gabriel Weinberg (Super Thinking: The Big Book of Mental Models)
Effective leaders often have to act even when they don’t understand all possible factors
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
Q. How many psychiatrists does it take to change a light bulb? A. Only one, if the bulb really wants to change.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
In this business, it takes all the running you can do just to stay in the same place. The
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
The struggle in the seventh century between Roman missionaries and Irish monks for control over the English church was largely a conflict over the date of Easter.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
The name of a thing is not the thing.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Secrets of Consulting: A Guide to Giving and Getting Advice Successfully)
In the case of querymongo.com, RJMetrics built a tool that translates SQL queries to MongoDB syntax (two database technologies). This
Gabriel Weinberg (Traction: How Any Startup Can Achieve Explosive Customer Growth)
Science had been a type of publishing and now it is becoming a network.
David Weinberger (Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room is the Room)
Words are easy to change, but don't accomplish much.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Secrets of Consulting: A Guide to Giving and Getting Advice Successfully)
In the popular image, a problem-solving leader is a solitary genius, but the true leader prefers to produce a success.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
Books are no substitute for experience working with people, so now that you've read this book on leadership, go out and interact with people before you read any more.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
Einstein occasionally used “God” as a metaphor for the unknown fundamental laws of nature.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
No thing happens in vain, but everything for a reason and by necessity.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
Citizens are starting not to excuse political candidates who have web sites that do nothing but throw virtual confetti.
David Weinberger (Everything Is Miscellaneous: The Power of the New Digital Disorder)
I want to show how difficult was the discovery of modern science, how far from obvious are its practices and standards.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
Our task is to learn how to build smart rooms—that is, how to build networks that make us smarter, especially since, when done badly, networks can make us distressingly stupider.
David Weinberger (Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room is the Room)
Nothing about the practice of modern science is obvious to someone who has never seen it done.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
This also serves as a warning, that science may not yet be in its final form.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
Transform the medium by which we develop, preserve, and communicate knowledge, and we transform knowledge.
David Weinberger (Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room is the Room)
Be loving and kind to everyone.
Irene Weinberg (They Serve Bagels in Heaven: One couple's story of love, eternity, and the cosmic importance of everyday life)
The Weinberger Doctrine created a series of tests, in essence preconditions for any policy decision that might put American troops into harm’s way.
Andrew J. Bacevich (The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War)
There's nothing I love more than watching a river--one of the few places where you actually get to see time carving itself into the landscape. The past flowing into the future.
Kate Weinberg (The Truants)
The best illustrated histories of the assassination are Twenty Days by Dorothy Meserve Kunhardt and Philip B. Kunhardt Jr., and Lincoln’s Assassins: Their Trial and Execution by James L. Swanson and Daniel R. Weinberg. Twenty Days contains more than three hundred black-and-white photos of the people and places connected to the assassination and Lincoln’s funeral.
James L. Swanson (Manhunt: The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln's Killer)
Why is it that we reward programmers who work all night to remove the errors they put into their programs, or managers who make drastic organizational changes to resolve the crises their poor management has created? Why not reward the programmers who design so well that they don’t have dramatic errors, and managers whose organizations stay out of crisis mode? Organizing
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
The general model for this impact comes from economics and is called path dependence, meaning that the set of decisions, or paths, available to you now is dependent on your past decisions.
Gabriel Weinberg (Super Thinking: The Big Book of Mental Models)
Mathematics is the means by which we deduce the consequences of physical principles. More than that, it is the indispensable language in which the principles of physical science are expressed.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
Though resident much of his life in the city of Cnidus on the coast of Asia Minor, Eudoxus was a student at Plato’s Academy, and returned later to teach there. No writings of Eudoxus survive, but he is credited with solving a great number of difficult mathematical problems, such as showing that the volume of a cone is one-third the volume of the cylinder with the same base and height. (I have no idea how Eudoxus could have done this without calculus.) But his greatest contribution to mathematics was the introduction of a rigorous style, in which theorems are deduced from clearly stated axioms.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
By making the time tradeoff explicit and by indicating a willingness to contribute time now, I make it clear that it is a problem of limited time, not a problem of limited respect for the other person.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Secrets of Consulting: A Guide to Giving and Getting Advice Successfully)
There is a spooky quality about the ability of mathematicians to get there ahead of physicists. It's as if when Neil Armstrong first landed on the moon he found in the lunar dust the footsteps of Jules Verne.
Steven Weinberg
The Internet’s abundant capacity has removed the old artificial constraints on publishing—including getting our content checked and verified. The new strategy of publishing everything we find out thus results in an immense cloud of data, free of theory, published before verified, and available to anyone with an Internet connection. And this is changing the role that facts have played as the foundation of knowledge.
David Weinberger (Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room is the Room)
When is the 'look out the windshield phase' of driving? Pretty much all driving is looking out the windshield! It's not a phase. Saying 'testing takes too long' is a bit like saying 'safe driving takes too long.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
Không văn bản nào là không thể dịch; chỉ có những văn bản chưa tìm được dịch giả của mình. Bản dịch không thấp kém so với nguyên bản; nó chỉ thấp kém so với những bản dịch khác, đã thành văn hoặc chưa thành văn. Không có bản dịch cuối cùng nào do một bản dịch luôn xuất hiện trong bối cảnh của nền văn học đương đại của nó. […] Mọi thứ đáng dịch đều nên được dịch nhiều lần nhất có thể, ngay cả bởi cùng một dịch giả, bởi vì ta không thể bước hai lần vào cùng một nguyên bản. Thơ là thứ đáng dịch, và dịch là thứ giữ cho văn học tồn tại. Dịch là thay đổi và chuyển động; văn học chết khi nó giậm chân tại chỗ, khi nó không còn nơi nào để đi.
Eliot Weinberger
One of my clients told me the story of the optimist and the pessimist who were arguing about philosophy. The optimist declares,"This is the best of all possible worlds." The pessimist sighs and says, "You're right.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Secrets of Consulting: A Guide to Giving and Getting Advice Successfully)
When people who are driven by a vision see something wrong, they might say to their teammates, “I feel bad because we’re not building the kind of system we can be proud of. What shall we do so we don’t feel this way?” On
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
The implication is that when people realized they were being watched by their governments, some of them stopped reading articles that they thought could get them into trouble. The name for this concept is chilling effect.
Gabriel Weinberg (Super Thinking: The Big Book of Mental Models)
Fine Structure Constant: Fundamental numerical constant of atomic physics and quantum electrodynamics, defined as the square of the charge of the electron divided by the product of Planck's constant and the speed of light.
Steven Weinberg (The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe)
If by 'God' you have something definite in mind - a being that is loving, or jealous, or whatever - then you're faced with the question of why God's that way and not another way. And if you don't have anything very definite in mind when you talk about 'God' being behind the existence of the universe, then why even use the word? So I think religion doesn't help. It's part of the human tragedy: we're faced with a mystery we can't understand - Steven Weinberg
Jim Holt (Why Does the World Exist?: An Existential Detective Story)
Often when managers say, "Testing takes too long," what they should be saying is, "Fixing the bugs in the product takes too long"—a different cost category. Make sure you're accounting for effort and time under the correct cost category.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
Dịch giả thường được đề nghị nói về quan hệ của họ với tác giả họ dịch, và họ có xu hướng trả lời bằng những giai thoại đôi khi hài hước trong tác phẩm. Tuy nhiên, tác giả không bao giờ nói về dịch giả của họ, ngoài một vài than phiền thoáng qua. Điều này là do quan hệ giữa tác giả và dịch giả không có cốt truyện. Hay đúng hơn, câu chuyện chỉ có một nhân vật thực sự: tác giả. Dịch giả, trong vai trò dịch giả, không phải là một con người hoàn chỉnh; dịch giả, trong sự tương đồng quen thuộc, là diễn viên đóng vai tác giả. Đôi khi độc giả chúng ta nhận thức được diễn viên 'diễn' xuất sắc hoặc kém, đôi khi chúng ta quên mất anh ta là diễn viên (chính là 'sự vô hình' thường được coi như một lý tưởng dịch, nhất là trong văn xuôi).
Eliot Weinberger
Before history there was science, of a sort. At any moment nature presents us with a variety of puzzling phenomena: fire, thunderstorms, plagues, planetary motion, light, tides, and so on. Observation of the world led to useful generalizations: fires are hot; thunder presages rain; tides are highest when the Moon is full or new, and so on. These became part of the common sense of mankind. But here and there, some people wanted more than just a collection of facts. They wanted to explain the world.
Steven Weinberg (To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science)
Testing may convincingly demonstrate the presence of bugs, but can never demonstrate their absence."- Edsger W. Dijkstra, Computing Pioneer (1930–2002), "Programming as a discipline of mathematical nature," Am. Math. Monthly, 81 (1974), No. 6, pp. 608–12.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
What is WIND and what is BONE have never been conclusively determined by the generations of Chinese critics, but what is certain, according to Liu Hsieh, is that the perfect combination or balance of WIND and BONE, the metaphor for the ideal poem, is a bird.
Eliot Weinberger (An Elemental Thing)
Through the works of Weinberg, Glashow, and Salam on the electroweak theory and the elegant framework developed by the physicists David Gross, David Politzer, and Frank Wilczek for quantum chromodynamics, the characteristic group of the standard model has been identified with a product of three Lie groups denoted by U(1), SU(2), and SU(3). In some sense, therefore, the road toward the ultimate unification of the forces of nature has to go through the discovery of the most suitable Lie group that contains the product U(1) X SU(2) x SU(3).
Mario Livio (The Equation That Couldn't Be Solved: How Mathematical Genius Discovered the Language of Symmetry)
Jane easily shifts among activities—testing for discovery, pinpointing, locating, determining significance, repairing, troubleshooting, and testing to learn. As long as she continues to serve her customers, it doesn't really matter which task she performs at any given time.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
Avrà magari ragione il professor Weinberger a sperare che <> finisca per essere più intelligente di noi, ma la storia ideologica del XX secolo è purtroppo piena di esempi in cui individui e teorie <> hanno poi innescato conformismi, deprimenti in democrazia, tragici nei sistemi totalitari.
Gianni Riotta (Il web ci rende liberi? Politica e vita quotidiana nel mondo digitale)
The Weinberg–Salam theory exhibits a property known as spontaneous symmetry breaking. This means that what appear to be a number of completely different particles at low energies are in fact found to be all the same type of particle, only in different states. At high energies all these particles behave similarly. The effect is rather like the behavior of a roulette ball on a roulette wheel. At high energies (when the wheel is spun quickly) the ball behaves in essentially only one way – it rolls round and round. But as the wheel slows, the energy of the ball decreases, and eventually the ball drops into one of the thirty-seven slots in the wheel. In other words, at low energies there are thirty-seven different states in which the ball can exist. If, for some reason, we could only observe the ball at low energies, we would then think that there were thirty-seven different types of ball!
Stephen Hawking (A Brief History of Time)
Max Weinberg, Garry Tallent, Steve Van Zandt, Danny Federici, Roy Bittan, Clarence Clemons. This was the core of the group that over the next forty years would evolve into the hard-rockin’, history-makin’, earth-shakin’, booty-quakin’, lovemakin’ and, yes, eventually, Viagra-takin’ legendary E Street Band.
Bruce Springsteen (Born to Run)
My mother's death changed the alchemy of food. Holidays run together now like ungrooved rivers. I forget what they are for. I buy bakery goods. They look dead under the blue lights. I don't do anything the way she taught me but I get fat. I don't look like her and I don't sound like her, but I stand like her.
Florence Weinberger
Avoid succumbing to the gambler’s fallacy or the base rate fallacy. Anecdotal evidence and correlations you see in data are good hypothesis generators, but correlation does not imply causation—you still need to rely on well-designed experiments to draw strong conclusions. Look for tried-and-true experimental designs, such as randomized controlled experiments or A/B testing, that show statistical significance. The normal distribution is particularly useful in experimental analysis due to the central limit theorem. Recall that in a normal distribution, about 68 percent of values fall within one standard deviation, and 95 percent within two. Any isolated experiment can result in a false positive or a false negative and can also be biased by myriad factors, most commonly selection bias, response bias, and survivorship bias. Replication increases confidence in results, so start by looking for a systematic review and/or meta-analysis when researching an area.
Gabriel Weinberg (Super Thinking: The Big Book of Mental Models)
Rabbi Moshe Weinberger of Mesivta Beis Shraga related how his father used to say that on Purim, the handle of the gragger (noisemaker) we spin is beneath the gragger itself, while on Chanukah the handle of the dreidel (four-sided top) we spin is on top. Purim, he expounded, represents human initiative, an "awakening from below," while Chanukah represents Divine intervention, an "awakening from above." On Purim, we stir ourselves with drink, joy, a hearty meal and other activities. On Chanukah, we light a candle that we are not allowed to use for any purpose other than to gaze at its flame. We just sit back and look. We let Hashem take over. We remind ourselves that Hashem is running the show.
Yaakov Astor (The Hidden Hand: Uncovering Divine Providence in Major Events of the 20th Century)
Sayre’s law, named after political scientist Wallace Sayre, offers that in any dispute the intensity of feeling is inversely proportional to the value of the issues at stake. A related concept is Parkinson’s law of triviality, named after naval historian Cyril Parkinson, which states that organizations tend to give disproportionate weight to trivial issues.
Gabriel Weinberg (Super Thinking: The Big Book of Mental Models)
Campbell’s law) in his 1979 study, “Assessing the Impact of Planned Social Change.” He explains the concept a bit more precisely: “The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision-making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it is intended to monitor.
Gabriel Weinberg (Super Thinking: The Big Book of Mental Models)
Testing gathers information about a product; it does not fix things it finds that are wrong. Testing does not improve a product; the improving is done by people fixing the bugs that testing has uncovered. Often when managers say, "Testing takes too long," what they should be saying is, "Fixing the bugs in the product takes too long"—a different cost category.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
If your whole team consists of novice programmers, your expertise will give you considerable power; but if the other team members are also experts, they will attach less importance to your technical expertise. In that case, they’ll pay more attention to organizational power, like the power to acquire extra hardware, to extend the schedule, or to capture a more interesting assignment.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach)
For Dawkins, atheism is a necessary consequence of evolution. He has argued that the religious impulse is simply an evolutionary mistake, a ‘misfiring of something useful’, it is a kind if virus, parasitic on cognitive systems naturally selected because they had enabled a species to survive. Dawkins is an extreme exponent of the scientific naturalism, originally formulated by d’Holbach, that has now become a major worldview among intellectuals. More moderate versions of this “scientism” have been articulated by Carl Sagan, Steven Weinberg, and Daniel Dennett, who have all claimed that one has to choose between science and faith. For Dennett, theology has been rendered superfluous, because biology can provide a better explanation of why people are religious. But for Dawkins, like the other “new atheists” – Sam Harris, the young American philosopher and student of neuroscience, and Christopher Hitchens, critic and journalist – religion is the cause of the problems of our world; it is the source of absolute evil and “poisons everything.” They see themselves in the vanguard of a scientific/rational movement that will eventually expunge the idea of God from human consciousness. But other atheists and scientists are wary of this approach. The American zoologist Stephen Jay Gould (1941-2002) followed Monod in his discussion of the implications of evolution. Everything in the natural world could indeed be explained by natural selection, but Gould insisted that science was not competent to decide whether God did or did not exist, because it could only work with natural explanations. Gould had no religious axe to grind; he described himself as an atheistically inclined agnostic, but pointed out that Darwin himself had denied he was an atheist and that other eminent Darwinians - Asa Gray, Charles D. Walcott, G. G. Simpson, and Theodosius Dobzhansky - had been either practicing Christians or agnostics. Atheism did not, therefore, seem to be a necessary consequence of accepting evolutionary theory, and Darwinians who held forth dogmatically on the subject were stepping beyond the limitations that were proper to science.
Karen Armstrong
A related model to watch out for is the hydra effect, named after the Lernaean Hydra, a beast from Greek mythology that grows two heads for each one that is cut off. When you arrest one drug dealer, they are quickly replaced by another who steps in to meet the demand. When you shut down an internet site where people share illegal movies or music, more pop up in its place. Regime change in a country can result in an even worse regime.
Gabriel Weinberg (Super Thinking: The Big Book of Mental Models)
When salespeople lead with their product or service, it is impossible to be perceived as consultants or trusted advisors. It makes it as clear as day that the salesperson believes the relationship and sale are centered on his offering, not the customer and its needs. It’s as if the salesperson is begging the customer to put his offering’s features and price on a spreadsheet to be compared against every competitors’ features and price.
Mike Weinberg (Sales Management. Simplified.: The Straight Truth About Getting Exceptional Results from Your Sales Team)
What is it about an unsolved mystery...that captures us so. that makes us lean forward. looking for an answer? Is it just the challenge of cracking it ourselves or do we rather hope that it will never be solved? Because in solving something, in pinning it down,in reducing it to one reality, something of the magic is lost. Don't we all hope, even the fiercest realists among us, that there is another answer that transcends our understanding? A heaven above us, after all.
Kate Weinberg (The Truants)
Denise: "So your present project is ready to pass to the testing people?" Ralph: "Absolutely." Denise: "Okay, since you're so sure it's adequately tested, I'm going to make you the following generous offer: If fewer than three bugs turn up in your component during testing, I will give you a raise. But if three or more bugs turn up during testing, you won't earn a raise this year." Ralph: "Um . . ." Denise: "Um what?" "Could I just have the component back for a few little tests I want to do?
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
Although technology often leads science in discovery, the philosophy of technology is usually drawn from the scientific philosophy of its time. In our time, the technology of machines has drawn its inspiration from mechanics, dealing with complexity by reducing the number of relevant parts. The technology of government, on the other hand, has drawn upon statistical mechanics, creating simplicity by dealing only with people in the structureless mass, as interchangeable units, and taking averages.
Gerald M. Weinberg (An Introduction to General Systems Thinking)
Much of the ability to help other people arises from personal power, but it would be naive to assert that nothing else is required. In large organizations, there are many resources available to a leader—money to pay for training, support staff, office space, tools to make work more efficient, access to helpful people. Such resources are not evenly distributed, and one of the requirements for becoming a problem-solving leader is to acquire organizational power so as to obtain resources for other innovators. Most
Gerald M. Weinberg (Becoming a Technical Leader)
Or, suppose you want to motivate your managers to ship products on time, so you conspicuously promote each manager whose product goes out the door on schedule. All goes as planned until the situation arises in which one of your managers has a project where the testers are reporting numerous problems. Because managers who have shipped products on time have been promoted, this manager thinks, I want that promotion so I need to ship this on time, but those bug reports are getting in the way. I know what I'll do! I'll put the testers on another project until the developers have a chance to catch up.
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
You want the truth? Whether you’re the senior executive or the sales manager or play both roles, hear me clearly as if I was shouting this while turning red with veins bulging from my neck: When you’re blasted with over 200 emails per day; trapped in meetings that keep you from your primary job; constantly handed (or grabbing for) the fire hose to deal with crises; buried either writing, reading, or scrambling for reports; and have almost zero control of your calendar, you are not leading anyone anywhere. Furthermore, you have exactly the sales culture you deserve—the one you’ve created, whether by design or neglect.
Mike Weinberg (Sales Management. Simplified.: The Straight Truth About Getting Exceptional Results from Your Sales Team)
The reason for this is that the universe bends, in a way we can’t adequately imagine, in conformance with Einstein’s theory of relativity (which we will get to in due course). For the moment it is enough to know that we are not adrift in some large, ever-expanding bubble. Rather, space curves, in a way that allows it to be boundless but finite. Space cannot even properly be said to be expanding because, as the physicist and Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg notes, “solar systems and galaxies are not expanding, and space itself is not expanding.” Rather, the galaxies are rushing apart. It is all something of a challenge to intuition. Or as the biologist J. B. S. Haldane once famously observed: “The universe is not only queerer than we suppose; it is queerer than we can suppose.” The analogy that is usually given for explaining the curvature of space is to try to imagine someone from a universe of flat surfaces, who had never seen a sphere, being brought to Earth. No matter how far he roamed across the planet’s surface, he would never find an edge. He might eventually return to the spot where he had started, and would of course be utterly confounded to explain how that had happened. Well, we are in the same position in space as our puzzled flatlander, only we are flummoxed by a higher dimension.
Bill Bryson (A Short History of Nearly Everything)
• Do you think the outcome of testing will make your decisions for you? Business decisions cannot be made from a purely technical perspective. Certainly use information from testing to color your business decisions, but don't substitute testing for business decisions. For example, it can be a good business decision to ship a system that fails one or more tests. Conversely, it can be a bad business decision to ship a system that passes all your tests. Management has to consider other factors in addition to test results. • Conversely, is there any possible test outcome that would make you change your decisions? If not, why would you want to know the outcome, let alone pay for it?
Gerald M. Weinberg (Perfect Software: And Other Illusions About Testing)
In fact, the average programming manager would prefer that a project be estimated at twelve months and take twelve than that the same project be estimated at six months and take nine. This is an area where some psychological study could be rewarding, but there are indications from other situations that it is not the mean length of estimated time that annoys people but, rather, the standard deviation in the actual time taken. Thus, most people would prefer to wait a fixed ten minutes for the bus each morning than to wait one minute on four days and twenty-six minutes once a week-. Even though the average wait is six minutes in the second case, the derangement caused by one long and unexpected delay more than compensates for this disadvantage. If
Gerald M. Weinberg (The Psychology of Computer Programming)
employment attorney review your severance letter of agreement before you sign it. “Even if you decide not to negotiate your financial package, you may want to negotiate other things, like health insurance and references for your next job,” she explains. Go in with the expectation that you won’t get everything you ask for, but you will get more than what they originally offered. Weinberg recommends an often-used formula to calculate severance: number of years at the company multiplied by two weeks’ pay = severance total. Request back pay for unused vacation days, plus a portion of the bonus you were expected to receive at the end of the year. Request a written letter of recommendation and assurance that it will be upheld if a prospective employer calls for references, and ask for a written agreement that any noncompete clause in your original offer is at this point null and void.
Ivanka Trump (Women Who Work: Rewriting the Rules for Success)
In sum, the fruition of 50 years of research, and several hundred million dollars in government funds, has given us the following picture of sub-atomic matter. All matter consists of quarks and leptons, which interact by exchanging different types of quanta, described by the Maxwell and Yang-Mills fields. In one sentence, we have captured the essence of the past century of frustrating investigation into the subatomic realm, From this simple picture one can derive, from pure mathematics alone, all the myriad and baffling properties of matter. (Although it all seems so easy now, Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg, one of the creators of the Standard Model, once reflected on how tortuous the 50-year journey to discover the model had been. He wrote, "There's a long tradition of theoretical physics, which by no means affected everyone but certainly affected me, that said the strong interactions [were] too complicated for the human mind.")
Michio Kaku (Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the Tenth Dimension)
In learning general relativity, and then in teaching it to classes at Berkeley and MIT, I became dissatisfied with what seemed to be the usual approach to the subject. I found that in most textbooks geometric ideas were given a starring role, so that a student...would come away with an impression that this had something to do with the fact that space-time is a Riemannian [curved] manifold. Of course, this was Einstein's point of view, and his preeminent genius necessarily shapes our understanding of the theory he created. However, I believe that the geometrical approach has driven a wedge between general relativity and [Quantum Field Theory]. As long as it could be hoped, as Einstein did hope, that matter would eventually be understood in geometrical terms, it made sense to give Riemannian geometry a primary role in describing the theory of gravitation. But now the passage of time has taught us not to expect that the strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions can be understood in geometrical terms, and too great an emphasis on geometry can only obscuret he deep connections between gravitation and the rest of physics...[My] book sets out the theory of gravitation according to what I think is its inner logic as a branch of physics, and not according to its historical development. It is certainly a historical fact that when Albert Einstein was working out general relativity, there was at hand a preexisting mathematical formalism, that of Riemannian geometry, that he could and did take over whole. However, this historical fact does not mean that the essence of general relativity necessarily consists in the application of Riemannian geometry to physical space and time. In my view, it is much more useful to regard general relativity above all as a theory of gravitation, whose connection with geometry arises from the peculiar empirical properties of gravitation.
Steven Weinberg (Gravitation and Cosmology: Principles and Applications of the General Theory of Relativity)
Separation of function is not to be despised, but neither should it be exalted. Separation is not an unbreakable law, but a convenience for overcoming inadequate human abilities, whether in science or engineering. As D'Arcy Thompson, one of the spiritual fathers of the general systems movement, said: As we analyze a thing into its parts or into its properties, we tend to magnify these, to exaggerate their apparent independence, and to hide from ourselves (at least for a time) the essential integrity and individuality of the composite whole. We divided the body into its organs, the skeleton into its bones, as in very much the same fashion we make a subjective analysis of the mind, according to the teaching of psychology, into component factors: but we know very well that judgement and knowledge, courage or gentleness, love or fear, have no separate existence, but are somehow mere manifestations, or imaginary coefficients, of a most complex integral.10 The
Gerald M. Weinberg (An Introduction to General Systems Thinking)
In the late 1960's, physicists Steven Weinberg, Abdus Salam, and Sheldon Glashow conquered the next unification frontier. In a phenomenal piece of scientific work they showed that the electromagnetic and weak nuclear forces are nothing but different aspects of the same force, subsequently dubbed the electroweak force. The predictions of the new theory were dramatic. The electromagnetic force is produced when electrically charged particles exchange between them bundles of energy called photons. The photon is therefore the messenger of electromagnetism. The electroweak theory predicted the existence of close siblings to the photon, which play the messenger role for the weak force. These never-before-seen particles were prefigured to be about ninety times more massive than the proton and to come in both an electrically charged (called W) and a neutral (called Z) variety. Experiments performed at the European consortium for nuclear research in Geneva (known as CERN for Conseil Europeen pour la Recherche Nucleaire) discovered the W and Z particles in 1983 and 1984 respectively.
Mario Livio (The Equation That Couldn't Be Solved: How Mathematical Genius Discovered the Language of Symmetry)
The successful individual sales producer wins by being as selfish as possible with her time. The more often the salesperson stays away from team members and distractions, puts her phone on Do Not Disturb (DND), closes her door, or chooses to work for a few hours from the local Panera Bread café, the more productive she’ll likely be. In general, top producers in sales tend to exhibit a characteristic I’ve come to describe as being selfishly productive. The seller who best blocks out the rest of the world, who maintains obsessive control of her calendar, who masters focusing solely on her own highest-value revenue-producing activities, who isn’t known for being a “team player,” and who is not interested in playing good corporate citizen or helping everyone around her, is typically a highly effective seller who ends up on top of the sales rankings. Contrary to popular opinion, being selfish is not bad at all. In fact, for an individual contributor salesperson, it is a highly desirable trait and a survival skill, particularly in today’s crazed corporate environment where everyone is looking to put meetings on your calendar and take you away from your primary responsibilities! Now let’s switch gears and look at the sales manager’s role and responsibilities. How well would it work to have a sales manager who kept her office phone on DND and declined almost every incoming call to her mobile phone? Do we want a sales manager who closes her office door, is concerned only about herself, and is for the most part inaccessible? No, of course not. The successful sales manager doesn’t win on her own; she wins through her people by helping them succeed. Think about other key sales management responsibilities: Leading team meetings. Developing talent. Encouraging hearts. Removing obstacles. Coaching others. Challenging data, false assumptions, wrong attitudes, and complacency. Pushing for more. Putting the needs of your team members ahead of your own. Hmmm. Just reading that list again reminds me why it is often so difficult to transition from being a top producer in sales into a sales management role. Aside from the word sales, there is truly almost nothing similar about the positions. And that doesn’t even begin to touch on corporate responsibilities like participating on the executive committee, dealing with human resources compliance issues, expense management, recruiting, and all the other burdens placed on the sales manager. Again,
Mike Weinberg (Sales Management. Simplified.: The Straight Truth About Getting Exceptional Results from Your Sales Team)
The black hole solution of Einstein's equations is also a work of art. The black hole is not as majestic as Godel's proof, but it has the essential features of a work of art: uniqueness, beauty, and unexpectedness. Oppenheimer and Snyder built out of Einstein's equations a structure that Einstein had never imagined. The idea of matter in permanent free fall was hidden in the equations, but nobody saw it until it was revealed in the Oppenheimer-Snyder solution. On a much more humble level, my own activities as a theoretical physicist have a similar quality. When I am working, I feel myself to be practicing a craft rather than following a method. When I did my most important piece of work as a young man, putting together the ideas of Sin-Itiro Tomonaga, Julian Schwinger, and Richard Feynman to obtain a simplified version of quantum electrodynamics, I had consciously in mind a metaphor to describe what I was doing. The metaphor was bridge-building. Tomonaga and Schwinger had built solid foundations on the other side, and my job was to design and build the cantilevers reaching out over the water until they met in the middle. The metaphor was a good one. The bridge that I built is still serviceable and still carrying traffic forty years later. The same metaphor describes well the greater work of unification achieved by Stephen Weinberg and Abdus Salam when they bridged the gap between electrodynamics and the weak interactions. In each case, after the work of unification is done, the whole stands higher than the parts.
Freeman Dyson (The Scientist as Rebel)
Michael J. Wildes is an American immigration lawyer and senior partner of Wildes and Weinberg PC. He is a former Federal Prosecutor for the Eastern District of New York,, and a former Mayor of Englewood, New Jersey. He is recognized as an authority on Immigration Law, and has been referred to as the “Attorney to the stars,” on issues of immigration.
Michael Wildes Esq
The Nobel Prize-winning physicist (and atheist) Steven Weinberg made the point as well as anybody, in Dreams of a Final Theory:   Some people have views of God that are so broad and flexible that it is inevitable that they will find God wherever they look for him. One hears it said that ‘God is the ultimate’ or ‘God is our better nature’ or ‘God is the universe.’ Of course, like any other word, the word ‘God’ can be given any meaning we like. If you want to say that ‘God is energy,’ then you can find God in a lump of coal.
Richard Dawkins (The God Delusion)
A startup is a company designed to grow fast. Being newly founded does not in itself make a company a startup. Nor is it necessary for a startup to work on technology, or take venture funding, or have some sort of ‘exit.
Gabriel Weinberg (Traction: A Startup Guide to Getting Customers)
Stop talking about yourself and your company and begin leading with the issues, pains, problems, opportunities, and results that are important to your prospect.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
We can always scale our way back down the ladder, but it’s very dangerous going over the head of people who believe they had the right and authority to tell us no.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
Waiting is a key ingredient in the recipe for new business failure.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
The Emperor of All Maladies by Siddhartha Mukherjee. I am also indebted to The Biology of Cancer by Robert A. Weinberg, and to Josh Sundquist, Marshall Urist, and Jonneke Hollanders,
Anonymous
My practice keeps me engaged with salespeople in a wide variety of businesses and I’m increasingly concerned by a disturbing trend: It seems fewer and fewer people who make a living in sales have a working knowledge of how to prospect for new business.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
there is dire shortage of those who can create new opportunities through their own proactive sales effort. Many veteran salespeople are victims of their own past success and easier times, when they could make their numbers while operating in a reactive mode. Others were carried along by their company’s momentum and favorable economic conditions that created strong demand for their products or services. They never had to go out and find business.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
Salespeople do not operate in a vacuum; there are often cultural and environmental issues beyond their control that severely hamper the opportunity to acquire new pieces of business.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
Sales is simple. Those who attempt to make it sound complicated are either confused themselves or trying to confuse others by creating a smokescreen to hide their lame effort and poor results.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
We’ll identify and select strategic target accounts that give us the best chance of winning. Then we’ll invest heavily in building the arsenal of sales weapons needed to successfully carry out the attack against our chosen targets. The three weapons most worthy of attention—the sales story, proactive telephone call, and the face-to-face sales call—are
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
presenting is not the same thing as selling.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
The best intentions, target account lists, and powerful sales weapons are useless if we never launch the attack.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
We must take back control of our calendars, stop allowing others to put work on our desks, and selfishly guard our selling time.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
Sales is simple.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
People and companies have needs. Those of us with sales responsibility represent businesses with potential solutions to those needs. Sometimes those people or companies with needs are already customers. There’s also an entire universe of prospective customers with whom we’ve never done business. These “prospects” have needs, too.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
connect with these customers and prospective customers to determine if our solutions will meet their needs.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
used an industry directory to identify additional prospects
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
I put together a sales plan to go out and attack the market.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
It was 1993. I had a midsize company car, a legal pad, some manila folders, and a calling card for pay phones. No Internet, no Google, no LinkedIn, no CRM, no e-mail, no mobile phone, and no fear.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
Undeterred, I set out to conquer the world.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
I visited with every customer it made sense to see. I sought to discover what they liked and disliked about their current situation and suppliers, and tried to position my company as a better partner that was easier to work with, more flexible, and more eager to meet their needs. I asked lots of questions, toured their facilities, and talked about improvements to our product and ways we were willing to customize our service. It didn’t take long to learn that it was a lot more fun calling on business owners and senior executives than purchasing agents,
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
When planning sales trips to see current customers, I dedicated time to call and visit with prospects
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
bring value and help solve business issues,
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
I strategically selected about thirty key prospects and went to work. Telephone. Mailings. Samples. More telephone. Meetings with engineers, designers, plant managers.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
decide which target prospects to pursue and build a book of business from scratch.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
I learned what business issues and hot-button topics would earn an initial meeting with prospects and dedicated blocks of time to proactively call my strategically selected targets.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
Most people employed in sales positions today have never truly had to “hunt” for new accounts or new business.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
big chunks of their sales careers to date have been during long seasons of economic prosperity.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
Many people in sales are struggling as inbound demand for their services has declined, and those without a reliable process to develop new business are in a world of hurt.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
experience shows that the most successful new business salespeople tend to be the most active salespeople.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
Let me address one more significant factor detracting from new business development success today: a severe shortage of sales mentors.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
What we are missing are sales mentors, those wise old vets who take young pups and newbies under their tutelage and impart years of wisdom and experience to their protégé.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)
Sales managers would willingly work with and mentor their people, and consider it part of their responsibility to coach their teams on selling skills.
Mike Weinberg (New Sales. Simplified.: The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development)