S Walton Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to S Walton. Here they are! All 200 of them:

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It doesn't matter. I have books, new books, and I can bear anything as long as there are books.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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There's a sunrise and a sunset every single day, and they're absolutely free. Don't miss so many of them.
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Jo Walton
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Love makes us such fools.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Children betrayed their parents by becoming their own people.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Just because love don't look the way you think it should, don't mean you don't have it.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Libraries really are wonderful. They're better than bookshops, even. I mean bookshops make a profit on selling you books, but libraries just sit there lending you books quietly out of the goodness of their hearts.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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If you love books enough, books will love you back.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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I'll belong to libraries wherever I go. Maybe eventually I'll belong to libraries on other planets.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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Bibliotropic," Hugh said. "Like sunflowers are heliotropic, they naturally turn towards the sun. We naturally turn towards the bookshop.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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And that might just be the root of the problem: we're all afraid of each other, wings or no wings.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Love, as most know, follows its own timeline. Disregarding our intentions or well rehearsed plans.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Why would you be given wings if you weren't meant to fly?
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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She laughed for her wasted, difficult life that never had to be wasted or difficult in the first place.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Interlibrary loans are a wonder of the world and a glory of civilization.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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I found it ironic that I should be blessed with wings and yet feel so constrained, so trapped. It was because of my condition, I believe, that I noticed life's ironies a bit more often than the average person. I collected them: how love arrived when you least expected it, how someone who said he didn't want to hurt you eventually would.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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She spent her days trying to forget the sound of his voice, and her nights trying to remember.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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I loved you before, Ava. Let me love you still.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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I care more about the people in books than the people I see every day.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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There are some awful things in the world, it's true, but there are also some great books.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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To many, I was myth incarnate, the embodiment of a most superb legend, a fairy tale. Some considered me a monster, a mutation. To my great misfortune, I was once mistaken for an angel. To my mother, I was everything. To my father, nothing at all. To my grandmother, I was a daily reminder of loves long lost. But I knew the truthβ€”deep down, I always did. I was just a girl.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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One of the things I've always liked about science fiction is the way it makes you think about things, and look at things from angles you'd never have thought about before.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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Outstanding leaders go out of their way to boost the self esteem of their personnel. If people believe in themselves it s amazing what they can accomplish.
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Sam Walton
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Fate. As a child, that word was often my only companion. It whispered to me from dark corners during lonely nights. It was the song of the birds in spring and the call of the wind through bare branches on a cold winter afternoon. Fate. Both my anguish and my solace. My escort and my cage.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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And as we leave Donne and Walton on the shores of Metahemeralism, we wave a fond farewell to those famous chums of yore.
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Donna Tartt (The Secret History)
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By this point Viviane Lavender had loved Jack Griffith for twelve years, which was far more than half of her life. If she thought of her love as a commodity and were to, say, eat it, it would fill 4,745 cherry pies. If she were to preserve it, she would need 23,725 glass jars and labels and a basement spanning the length of Pinnacle Lane. If she were to drink it, she'd drown.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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That fact filled Gabe with so much hope that he grew another two inches just to have enough room to hold it all.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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To my mother, I was everything. To my father, nothing at all. To my grandmother, I was a daily reminder of loves long lost.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Those born under Pacific Northwest skies are like daffodils: they can achieve beauty only after a long, cold sulk in the rain.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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And that might just be the root of the problem: we’re all afraid of each other.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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She found that she did not mind losing the previous moment, for this one was just as lovely.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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The thing about Tolkien, about The Lord of the Rings, is that it's perfect. It's this whole world, this whole process of immersion, this journey. It's not, I'm pretty sure, actually true, but that makes it more amazing, that someone could make it all up. Reading it changes everything.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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Dangers lurk around every corner for the strange.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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The first of many autumn rains smelled smoky, like a doused campsite fire, as if the ground itself had been aflame during those hot summer months. It smelled like burnt piles of collected leaves, the cough of a newly revived chimney, roasted chestnuts, the scent of a man's hands after hours spent in a wood shop.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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I have traveled through continents, languages, and time trying to understand all that I am and all that has made me such.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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She struggled to distinguish between signs she received from the universe and those she conjured up in her head.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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She is the glorious reincarnation of every woman ever loved.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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It was the song of the birds in spring and the call of the wind through bare branches on a cold winter afternoon. Fate. Both my anguish and my solace. My escort and my cage.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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It's wrong for libraries to have limited budgets.
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Jo Walton
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She didn't see it because when it came to love, she saw what she wanted to see.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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I hate it when people imply that people only read because they have nothing better to do.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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If I were omnipotent and omnibenevolent I wouldn't be so damn ineffable.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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Class is entirely intangible, and the way it affects things isn't subject to scientific analysis, and it's not supposed to be real but it's pervasive and powerful. See; just like magic.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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Tolkien understood about the things that happen after the end. Because this is after the end, this is all the Scouring of the Shire, this is figuring out how to live in the time that wasn’t supposed to happen after the glorious last stand. I saved the world, or I think I did, and look, the world is still here, with sunsets and interlibrary loans. And it doesn’t care about me any more than the Shire cared about Frodo.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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I met someone.' And the leaves fell from the trees, landing to float in the calm black waters.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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To think Viviane was beautiful required a certain acquired taste. It was the kind of beauty perceived only through the eyes of love.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Most people are afraid of themselves, Adam. They carry that fear everywhere hoping no one will notice.
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Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
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When you love somebody, you try to be better.
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Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
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There’s sickness, and there’s sadness. But the thing is, there’s love, too. I try never to forget that.
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Will Walton (Anything Could Happen)
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And there's no sex, hardly any love stuff at all, in Middle Earth, which always made me think, yes, the world would be better off without it.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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I don’t think I am like other people. I mean on some deep fundamental level. It’s not just being half a twin and reading a lot and seeing fairies. It’s not just being outside when they’re all inside. I used to be inside. I think there’s a way I stand aside and look backwards at things when they’re happening which isn’t normal.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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It's amazing how large the things are that it's possible to overlook.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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Real is subjective. There are a lot of things that aren't actually real to everyone. Pain, for example. It's only real to the one experiencing it. Everyone else has to take your word for it.
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Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
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I do not miss my toys. I wouldn't play with them anyway. I am fifteen. I miss my childhood.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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Years later the lights of the growing city would erase the stars from the sky, but back then they shone through the branches like jailed fireflies.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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For a very long time, Viviane and Jack lived in that world people inhabit before love. Some people called that place friendship; others called it confusing. Viviane found it a pleasant place with an altitude that only occasionally made her nauseous.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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The Griffith House was like nothing Viviane remembered, reminding her of how fast the world changed and of how insignificant she was in the grand scheme of things. She thought it unfair that her life should be both irrelevant and difficult. One or the other seemed quite enough.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Reading is awesome and flexible and fits around chores and earning money and building the future and whatever else I’m doing that day. My attitude towards reading is entirely Epicureanβ€”reading is pleasure and I pursue it purely because I like it.
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Jo Walton
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Death just seems to follow some of us, don't it? Death's been following me for years. It's easy to spot your own kind. That kind of sorrow you can't just wash away; it sticks to you. And people, they can tell. They can feel it.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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It’s lovely when writers I like like each other.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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Sam Walton: I had to pick myself up and get on with it, do it all over again, only even better this time.
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Sam Walton (Sam Walton: Made In America)
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Sometimes the things that happen aren't as important as the things you remember.
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Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
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Foreseeing the future, I would later learn, means nothing if there is nothing to be done to prevent it.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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I like libraries, if for no other reason than they give homeless people a place to hang out. There's something nice about the way you're never too old to go into one, but it still makes you feel the way it did when you were small.
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Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
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It's a very strange reality when you can't trust yourself. There's no foundation for anything. The faith I might have had in normal things like gravity or logic or love is gone because my mind might not be reading them correctly. You can't possibly know what it means to doubt everything. To walk into a room full of people and pretend that it's empty because you're not actually sure if it is or not. To never feel completely alone even when you are.
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Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
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If mother kept a list of the reasons she confined me to the house on the hill, she'd have a length of paper that could stretch all the way down Pinnacle Lane and trail into the waters of the Puget Sound. It could choke passing sea life. It could flap in the wind like a giant white flag of surrender atop our house's widow's walk.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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As no man is born an artist, so no man is born an angler.
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Izaak Walton (The Compleat Angler, or the Contemplative Man's Recreation)
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High expectations are the key to everything.
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Sam Walton
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She wore light dabs of face powder on her cheeks to hide the permanent track marks left by so many tears.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Great ideas come from everywhere if you just listen and look for them. You never know who’s going to have a great idea.
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Sam Walton (Sam Walton: Made In America)
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The most central truth to the creation account is that this world is a place for God's presence.
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John H. Walton (The Lost World of Genesis One: Ancient Cosmology and the Origins Debate)
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But while the thought of being dead seemed appealing, the actual act of dying did not.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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The important thing about being crazy is knowing that you're crazy. The knowing part makes you less crazy.
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Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
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You know, class is like magic. There's nothing there you can point to, it evaporates if you try to analyse it, but it's real and it affects how people behave and makes things happen.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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This time could be different. This time it could last. Maybe it would be a longer, deeper love: a real and solid entity that lived in the house, used the bathroom, ate their food, mussed up the linens in sleep. A love that pulled her close when she cried, that slept with its chest pressed against her back.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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She is the glorious reincarnation of every woman ever loved. It was her face that launched the Trojan War, her untimely demise that inspired the building of India's Taj Mahal. She is every angel in Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Being left alone - and I am being left alone - isn't quite as much what I wanted as I thought. Is this how people become evil? I don't want to be.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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it seemed there was no separating the girl from the wings. One could not survive without the other.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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I get it now. It's hard to let someone find you in all the dark and twisty places inside, but eventually, you have to hope that they do, because that's the beginning of everything.
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Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
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I love the train. Sitting here I feel connected to the last time I sat here, and the train to London too. It is in-between, suspended; and in rapid motion towards and away from, it is also poised between. There's a magic in that, not a magic you can work, a magic that's just there, giving a little colour and exhilaration to everything.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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Falling out of love was much harder than Gabe would have liked. Normally led through life by the heart attached to his sleeve, finding logic in love proved to be a bit like getting vaccinated for some dread disease: a good idea in the end, but the initial pain certainly wasn’t any fun. He came to appreciate that there were worse ways to live than to live without love. For instance, if he didn’t have arms, Gabe wouldn’t be able to hide in his work. Yes, a life without arms would be quite tragic, indeed.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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When I re-read, I know what I'm getting. It's like revisiting an old friend. An unread book holds wonderful unknown promise, but also threatens disappointment. A re-read is a known quantity.
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Jo Walton (What Makes This Book So Great)
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All mankind is of one author, and is one volume; when one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language; and every chapter must be so translated... As therefore the bell that rings to a sermon, calls not upon the preacher only, but upon the congregation to come: so this bell calls us all... No man is an island, entire of itself... any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.
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John Donne (Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions and Death's Duel: With the Life of Dr. John Donne by Izaak Walton)
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This isn’t a nice story, and this isn’t an easy story. But it is a story about fairies, so feel free to think of it as a fairy story. It’s not like you’d believe it anyway.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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children betrayed their parents by becoming their own people
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Gabe pulled her closer. β€œYou just lean on me, Vivi. I’ll keep us both upright for a while.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Some sacrifices aren’t worth the cost. Even, or perhaps most especially, those made out of love.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Because once things turned out, good or bad, there’s nothing you can do about it. It just is. And Henry liked just is.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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I like how people only tell you not to worry about stuff when it's something they don't care about.
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Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
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I acknowledged Gabe and his attempts at flight the way a legless child might view a hopeful but misguided parent buying a house full of stairs. After a while, when Gabe offered me a morning greeting, it didn't feel like he was greeting me but rather a giant pair of wings; no girl, just feathers.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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I am reading The Lord of the Rings. I suddenly wanted to. I almost know it by heart, but I can still sink right into it. I know no other book that is so much like going on a journey. When I put it down to this, I feel as if I am also waiting with Pippin for the echoes of that stone down the well.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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I have always been driven to buck the system, to innovate, to take things beyond where they've been.
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Sam Walton
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You don’t get a lot of chance to talk to people about things that matter to you, do you?” she asked.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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I have to remind myself that love comes in all sorts of packages.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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There isn't an end point to excellence where you have it and you can stop. Being your best self means keeping on trying.
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Jo Walton (The Just City (Thessaly, #1))
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I suppose even monsters can be afraid of the dark.
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Leslye Walton (A Tyranny of Petticoats (A Tyranny of Petticoats, #1))
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Just because love don’t look the way you think it should don’t mean you don’t have it.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Respect your elders. When shouldn't it be... respect everyone?
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Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
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Know Thyself. It’s good advice. Know yourself. You are worth knowing. Examine your life. The unexamined life is not worth living. Be aware that other people have equal significance. Give them the space to make their own choices, and let their choices count as you want them to let your choices count. Remember that excellence has no stopping point and keep on pursuing it. Make art that can last and that says something nobody else can say. Live the best life you can, and become the best self you can. You cannot know which of your actions is the lever that will move worlds. Not even Necessity knows all ends. Know yourself.
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Jo Walton (The Just City (Thessaly, #1))
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I knew that in the second letter he misspelled the word existence, replacing the second e with an a; in the fourth he forgot to dot the i in believe. I slept with them not under my pillow but clutched in my hand, with the sweat from my dreams leaking from my palms and smudging the ink.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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His heart line was long and curved, and she traced it with her eyes over and over again. A person with a curved heart line was a person capable of great warmth and kindness, a person willing to give their whole selves to love, no matter the cost.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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But neither Emilienne nor Connor ever once stopped to ponder the miracles love might bring into their lives. Connor because he didn’t know such things existed, and Emilienne because she did.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Because what else was there for me - an aberration, an untouchable, an outsider? What could I say when I was alone at night and the shadows came? How else could I calm the thud of my beating heart but with the words: This is my fate.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Happiness had a pungent scent, like the sourest lime or lemon. Broken hearts smelled surprisingly sweet. Sadness filled the air with a salty, sea-like redolence; death smelled like sadness. People carried their own distinct personal fragrances.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Doing is doing. Does it mean that it doesn't matter if it's magic or not, anything you do has power and consequences and affects other people?
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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Am I shattered enough already, or am I shattering? (And when do I start to build?)
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Will Walton (I Felt a Funeral, In My Brain)
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She didn’t care if he brought her flowers. Or even an apology. She just needed him to be there. She needed him because that was the only thing that made sense.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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The first bout of warm spring rain caused normally respectable women to pull off their stockings and run through muddy puddles alongside their children.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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I just don't think you should let other people d-define you,' Rowe said quickly. 'I think you could be anything you wanted.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Let’s pursue excellence together. Let’s make art. Let’s build the future. Let’s be our best selves.
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Jo Walton (The Just City (Thessaly, #1))
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Rivers and the inhabitants of the watery elements are made for wise men to contemplate and for fools to pass by without consideration.
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Izaak Walton
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There is only one boss: the customer. And he can fire everybody in the company from the chairman on down, simply by spending his money somewhere else.
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Sam Walton
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You can almost always find chains of coincidence to disprove magic. That's because it doesn't happen the way it does in books. It makes those chains of coincidence. That's what it is.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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I sat on the bench by the willows and at my honey bun and read Triton. There are some awful things in the world, it’s true, but there are also some great books. When I grow up I would like to write something that someone could read sitting on a bench on a day that isn’t all that warm and they could sit reading it and totally forget where they were or what time it was so that they were more inside the book than inside their own head. I’d like to write like Delany or Heinlein or Le Guin.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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Emilienne wore Maman's wedding dress. Just after the ceremony, Emilienne glanced in the mirror. She saw not her own reflection but a tall empty vase.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Love, as most know, follows its own timeline, disregarding our intentions or well-rehearsed plans.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Because I'm your mother, that's why.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Time might heal all wounds, but what about the scars those wounds left behind?
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Leslye Walton (The Price Guide to the Occult)
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I knew what death meant now. It was conversations cut off.
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Jo Walton (The Philosopher Kings (Thessaly, #2))
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There's a way that money is freedom, but it isn't money, it's that money stands for having a choice.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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What we guard against around here is people saying, β€˜Let’s think about it.’ We make a decision. Then we act on it.
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Sam Walton (Sam Walton: Made In America)
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I'm not sure I ever want to get married. I'm neither messing around while waiting nor looking for some "real thing." What I want is much more complicated. I want somebody I can talk to about books, who would be my friend, and why couldn't we have sex as well if we wanted to? (And used contraception.) I'm not looking for romance. Lord Peter and Harriet would seem a pretty good model to me.
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Jo Walton (Among Others)
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When American soil could be seen from the ship, the passengers breathed a collective sigh of relief so strong, it caused a change of direction in the winds, which added a day to their trip, but no matter.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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The world looks very different to me now at twenty. I have outgrown my early opinions and ideals with my short dresses, just as Mrs. Walton said we would. Now the critics can say 'Thou waitest till thy woman's fingers wrought the best that lay within thy woman's heart.
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Annie Fellows Johnston
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Outstanding leaders go out of their way to boost the self-esteem of their personnel. If people believe in themselves, it’s amazing what they can accomplish.
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Sam Walton
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And then, in shocked disappointment, and stunned horror, I’m sure, Connor Lavender realized he was dead.
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Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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In reality, while we aim for excellence, we're always living on somebody's dunghill.
”
”
Jo Walton (The Philosopher Kings (Thessaly, #2))
β€œ
the knowledge that change can be frightening, that responsibility can, but that the answer to that is not refusing to change or to accept responsibility.
”
”
Jo Walton (What Makes This Book So Great)
β€œ
The truth is, everyone is confused by quantum physics.
”
”
David Walton (Superposition (Superposition, #1))
β€œ
Things need to be worth doing for themselves, not just for practice for some future time.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
You don’t have to carry it by yourself.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
The nice thing about life," said Miss Etta, "is you never know when there's going to be a party.
”
”
Earl Hamner Jr. (The Homecoming)
β€œ
She’d never understood how other parents just lost it. Now she did; children betrayed their parents by becoming their own people.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
You lose your secrets when you let people get too close.
”
”
Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
β€œ
I had said that Le Guin's worlds were real because her people were so real, and he said yes, but the people were so real because they were the people the worlds would have produced. If you put Ged to grow up on Anarres or Shevek in Earthsea, they would be the same people, the backgrounds made the people, which of course you see all the time in mainstream fiction, but it's rare in SF.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
Yet I felt he was innocent in a way I was not, that I knew more about evil than he ever could, because he had parents who loved him and wanted the best for him, while I had grown up with Mummy.
”
”
Jo Walton (Farthing (Small Change, #1))
β€œ
It’s . . . dangerous for someone like me to be out in the open.' As if in response, my wings started to flutter beneath their shroud. I gave the cloak a good yank. 'Someone like you? Someone different, you mean?' I shrugged. 'Yes,' I answered quietly, suddenly shy. 'So, is it dangerous for us or for you?' 'What do you mean?' 'I mean, are you the threat, or are we?
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
I'm so glad I have my own copy. I can read them again and again. I can read them again and again on trains, all my life, and every time I do I'll remember today and it will connect up. (Is that magic?)
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
Gabe was unusually tall, so he had to be careful where he stood, for if he blocked the sun, his shadow could cause flowers to wither and old women to send their grandchildren inside to fetch their sweaters. Because of his height, many thought Gabe to be much older than he was. This was both a blessing and a curse.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
I would rather have Sign of the Unicorn than all the boys in the valleys.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
The days she was finally brought out of the house would later be remembered as a day when shadows seemed blacker, as if something more lingered in those darkened spaces.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
Our myths, our legends, aren't necessarily true, but they are truly necessary. They have to do with the way we interpret the world and our place in it.
”
”
Jo Walton (What Makes This Book So Great)
β€œ
The smell of glazed sugar and folded pride still lingered on her clothes.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
They want me to do something, and I'll do it, or I won't do it, and it'll work or not, and I'll survive or not.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
books as objects are not what books are, it's not what's important about them
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
How foolish it was to love someone who didn’t love you back.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
But she also knew that she would never marry. What use did the heart have for jewelry anyway?
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
That kind of sorrow you can’t just wash away; it sticks to you.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
They died with empty bellies, their eyes vacant of both dreams and expression.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
You can’t trust everything that ass Plato wrote,” Sokrates said.
”
”
Jo Walton (The Just City (Thessaly, #1))
β€œ
There will always be some who see excellence and envy it instead of striving to emulate it.
”
”
Jo Walton (The Just City (Thessaly, #1))
β€œ
I am small, but sometimes I am a small part of great things.
”
”
Jo Walton (Necessity (Thessaly, #3))
β€œ
I will laugh about this one day, I told myself. I will laugh about it with people so clever and sophisticated I can't imagine them properly now.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
There is only one boss: the customer. And he can fire everybody in the company from the chairman on down, simply by spending his money somewhere else. β€”SAM WALTON, FOUNDER OF WALMART A
”
”
Josh Kaufman (The Personal MBA: Master the Art of Business)
β€œ
My ideal relationship with a book is that I will read it for the first time entirely unspoiled. I won’t know anything whatsoever about it, it will be wonderful, it will be exciting and layered and complex and I will be excited by it, and I will re-read it every year or so for the rest of my life, discovering more about it every time, and every time remembering the circumstances in which I first read it.
”
”
Jo Walton (What Makes This Book So Great)
β€œ
Outside the drizzling rain had begun again. It pattered around the house, and on the roofs and eaves, like a million, tiny, stealthy feet: softly, as though the night were teeming with a host of minute, dark beings.
”
”
Evangeline Walton (Witch House)
β€œ
Every time Wal-Mart spends one dollar foolishly, it comes right out of our customers’ pockets. Every time we save them a dollar, that puts us one more step ahead of the competitionβ€”which is where we always plan to be.
”
”
Sam Walton (Sam Walton: Made In America)
β€œ
I love you, you know.” Viviane let the words hang in the air between them for a moment, like a sweet pink cloud. Then she inhaled the words in whole, turned them over in her mouth, relished their solidity on her tongue.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
I think; therefore, I am above average.
”
”
Michael Walton
β€œ
Death is the one friend who never fails any man.
”
”
Evangeline Walton (Prince of Annwn (Mabinogion Tetralogy #1))
β€œ
And at year's end they broke the stable door. The man and his horse, together, gallop yet, Beyond the sunset's end, the pounding hooves, Both harmony and beat for their duet.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
Rowe shrugged. You. Just β€” you.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
They hang people for murder, and while I didn't exactly like Mummy, she was my mother after all. Though do they hang Viscountesses?
”
”
Jo Walton (Farthing (Small Change, #1))
β€œ
The thing with dying, well, with death really, is that there's a difference between being someone who knows they can really die at any time and someone who doesn't.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
The whole world had given up on love anyway and clung instead to its malformed cousins: lust, narcissism, self-interest.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
What was interesting was seeing how much of it could work, how much it really would maximize justice, and how it was going to fail. We could learn a lot from that.
”
”
Jo Walton (The Just City (Thessaly, #1))
β€œ
A rose, with the motto Dum spiro spero, which actually I rather likeβ€”while I breathe I shall hope.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
Mon cœur entier pendant ma vie entière. My whole heart for my entire life.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
He wept every time one of them died. Gabe was discharged with fatigue after just a year in the service–it proved too exhausting to mourn so many lives.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
This is it. This is the reason not to love. If I didn’t love, then whatever I find, no matter how awful, wouldn’t hurt.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
When Henry heard a word he didn’t like, he had to lie facedown on the floor until the bad feeling stopped. Humming sometimes worked too.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
But the truth was that he didn't really love us. When you love somebody, you try to be better.
”
”
Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
β€œ
Anyway, while most people can't see fairies anyway because they don't believe in them, seeing them isn't a bad thing. Some of the most beautiful things I've ever seen have been fairies.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
As he rose to leave, Jack was crushed by the realization that while his father considered himself to be a great man, in his father’s eyes the best Jack could ever hope to be was useful.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
Harriet! I've never met anyone called Harriet in real life. I had a brief fantasy about her being Harriet Vane, because she'd be about the right age for that, except that Harriet Vane would be addressed as Lady Peter, and anyway she's fictional. I can tell the difference, really I can.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
Sometimes I'm jealous of people with regular problems. At school I see the self-conscious girls worrying about their hair or if their legs look fat, and I just want to scream. Someone should tell them their problems are stupid. I get that I'm not supposed to say that. Everyone you meet is fighting a harder battle, right? But what if they're not? What if the biggest thing they have to worry about is homework and whether they get into a good college? Even if they've lost a family member or their parents are getting a divorce or they're missing someone far away. That is not worse than having to take medication to be in control of your own mind. It's just not.
”
”
Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
β€œ
You can almost always find chains of coincidence to disprove magic. That's because it doesn't happen the way it does in books. It makes those chains of coincidence. That's what it is. It's like if you snapped your fingers and produced a rose but it was because someone on an aeroplane had dropped a rose at just the right time for it to land in your hand. There was a real person and a real aeroplane and a real rose, but that doesn't mean the reason you have the rose in your hand isn't because you did the magic.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
The m-moment I open mine, everyone immediately p-p-pities me.” I winced. β€œI’m sorry.” Rowe shrugged. β€œThe point is, if I cared what everyone else th-thought, I’d see myself as p-pitiful, but I don’t.” He smiled. β€œI think I’m pretty cool.” I laughed. β€œI just don’t think you should let other people d-define you,” Rowe said quickly. β€œI think you could be anything you wanted.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
There's a thing - I've noticed it often. When I first say something, it's as if people don't hear me, they can't believe I'm saying it. Then they start to actually pay attention, they stop noticing that a teenage girl is talking and start to believe that it's worth listening to what I'm saying.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
Cancer Kid has the Make-A-Wish Foundation because Cancer Kid will eventually die, and that's sad. Schizophrenia Kid will also eventually die, but before he does, he will be overmedicated with a plethora of drugs, he will alienate everyone he's ever really cared about, and he will most likely wind up on the street, living with a cat that will eat him when he dies. That is also sad, but nobody gives him a wish, because he isn't actively dying. It is abundantly clear that we only care about sick people who are dying tragic, time-sensitive deaths.
”
”
Julia Walton (Words on Bathroom Walls)
β€œ
I did not buy a book called Lord Foul's Bane by Stephen Donaldson, which has the temerity to compare itself, on the front cover, to 'Tolkien at his best.' The back cover attributes the quote to the Washington Post, a newspaper whose quotations will always damn a book for me from now on. How dare they? And how dare the publishers? It isn't a comparison anyone could make, except to say 'Compared to Tolkien at his best, this is dross.' I mean you could say that even about really brilliant books like A Wizard of Earthsea. I expect Lord Foul's Bane (horrible title, sounds like a Conan book) is more like Tolkien at his worst, which would be the beginning of The Simarillion. The thing about Tolkien, about The Lord of the Rings, is that it's perfect.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
People tell you to write what you know, but I've found that writing what you know is much harder than making it up. It's easier to research a historical period than your own life, and it's much easier to deal with things that have a little less emotional weight and where you have a little more detachment. It's terrible advice! So this is why you'll find there's no such place as the Welsh valleys, no coal under them, and no red buses running up and down them; there never was such a year as 1979, no such age as fifteen, and no such planet as Earth. The fairies are real, though.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
Summer rain smelled like newly clipped grass, like mouths stained red with berry juice - blueberries, raspberries, blackberries. It smelled like late nights spent pointing constellations out from their starry guises, freshly washed laundry drying outside on the line, like barbecues and stolen kisses in a 1932 Ford Coupe
”
”
Leslye Walton
β€œ
Also another time she had wakened in dead of night, thinking that something touched her, and when she looked she saw that a black scaly tail, tufted with flame at the end, like a fiend's, had switched across her and lay there burning the covers. And when she turned shrieking, to see what manner of thing lay beside her in the bed, she was at first reassured by sight of her husband's face, then saw, to her horror, that horns had risen, black and pointed, from his forehead. After that she screamed again and remembered nothing until Joseph was shaking her awake, and there were neither horns nor tail to be seen. Nor were the bedclothes scorched.
”
”
Evangeline Walton (Witch House)
β€œ
Dancing is spiritual. Dancing is personal. Some people look at a dancing person and say, What a total show-off. They only notice the body of the dancing person. They look at the way the elbows jut out, the way the hips shake and the neck bends. They criticize all of these things, saying, This dancing person shouldn't be dancing. This dancing person has no rhythm. But the dancer is immune to all of this.
”
”
Will Walton (Anything Could Happen)
β€œ
A re-read is more leisurely than a first read. I know the plot, after all, I know what happens. I may still cry (embarrassingly, on the train) when re-reading, but I won’t be surprised. Because I know what’s coming, because I’m familiar with the characters and the world of the story, I have more time to pay attention to them. I can immerse myself in details and connections I rushed past the first time and delight in how they are put together. I can relax into the book. I can trust it completely. I really like that.
”
”
Jo Walton (What Makes This Book So Great)
β€œ
There has been no actual loss of power for the white elite, who have always controlled our institutions and continue to do so by a very wide margin. Of the fifty richest people on earth, twenty-nine are American. Of these twenty-nine, all are white, and all but two are men (Lauren Jobs inherited her husband’s wealth, and Alice Walton her father’s).
”
”
Robin DiAngelo (White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism)
β€œ
To put it simply, my mother worried. She worried about our neighbors’ reactions. Would they break me with their disparaging glances, their cruel intolerance? She worried I was just like every other teenage girl, all tender heart and fragile ego. She worried I was more myth and figment than flesh and blood. She worried about my calcium levels, my protein levels, even my reading levels. She worried she couldn’t protect me from all of the things that had hurt her: loss and fear, pain and love. Most especially from love.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
Happy smiles were shared between the bride and groom, but it was the cake their guests remembered - the vanilla custard filling, the buttercream finish, the slight taste of raspberries that had surely been added to the batter. No one brought home any slices of leftover cake to place under their pillow, hoping to dream of their future mate; instead, the guests… ate the whole cake and then had dreams of eating it again. After this wedding unmarried women woke in the night with tears in their eyes, not because they were alone, but because there wasn't any cake left.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
β€œ
I thank you, Walton," he said, "for your kind intentions towards to miserable a wretch; but when you speak of new ties and fresh affections think you that any can replace those who are gone? Can any man be to me as Clerval was, or any woman another Elizabeth? Even where the affections are not strongly moved by any superior excellence, the companions of our childhood always possess a certain power over our minds which hardly any later friend can obtain. They know our infantine dispositions, which, however they may be afterwards modified, are never eradicated; and they can judge of our actions with more certain conclusions as to the integrity of our motives." -- Victor Frankenstein; Frankenstein
”
”
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
β€œ
There are two kinds of people in the world, those who re-read and those who don’t. No, don’t be silly, there are far more than two kinds of people in the world. There are even people who don’t read at all. (What do they think about on buses?) But there are two kinds of readers in the world, though, those who re-read and those who don’t. Sometimes people who don’t re-read look at me oddly when I mention that I do. β€œThere are so many books,” they say, β€œand so little time. If I live to be a mere Methuselah of 800, and read a book a week for 800 years, I will only have the chance to read 40,000 books, and my readpile is already 90,000 and starting to topple! If I re-read, why, I’ll never get through the new ones.” This is in fact true, they never will. And my readpile is also, well, let’s just say it’s pretty large, and that’s just the pile of unread books in my house, not the list of books I’d theoretically like to read someday, many of which have not even been written yet.
”
”
Jo Walton (What Makes This Book So Great)
β€œ
1. God is (by definition) a being than which no greater being can be thought. 2. Greatness includes greatness of virtue. 3. Therefore, God is a being than which no being could be more virtuous. 4. But virtue involves overcoming pains and dangers. 5. Indeed, a being can only be properly said to be virtuous if it can suffer pain or be destroyed. 6. A God that can suffer pain or is destructible is not one than which no greater being can be thought. 7.For you can think of a greater being, that is, one that is nonsuffering and indestructible. 8. Therefore, God does not exist.
”
”
Douglas N. Walton
β€œ
At home I walked through a haze of belongings that knew, at least vaguely, who they belonged to. Grampar’s chair resented anyone else sitting on it as much as he did himself. Gramma’s shirts and jumpers adjusted themselves to hide her missing breast. My mother’s shoes positively vibrated with consciousness. Our toys looked out for us. There was a potato knife in the kitchen that Gramma couldn’t use. It was an ordinary enough brown-handled thing, but she’d cut herself with it once, and ever after it wanted more of her blood. If I rummaged through the kitchen drawer, I could feel it brooding. After she died, that faded. Then there were the coffee spoons, rarely used, tiny, a wedding present. They were made of silver, and they knew themselves superior to everything else and special. None of these things did anything. The coffee spoons didn’t stir the coffee without being held or anything. They didn’t have conversations with the sugar tongs about who was the most cherished. I suppose what they really did was physiological. They confirmed the past, they connected everything, they were threads in a tapestry.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
The trouble with mimetic fiction isn’t that you can tell what’s going to happen (I defy anyone to guess what’s going to happen in Middlemarch, even from halfway through) but that you can tell what’s not going to happen. There isn’t going to be an evil wizard. The world isn’t going to be destroyed in Cultural Fugue and leave the protagonist as the only survivor. There aren’t going to be any people who happen to have one mind shared between five bodies. There are unlikely to be shape-changers. In science fiction you can have any kind of storyβ€”a romance or a mystery or a reflection of human nature, or anything at all. But as well as that, you have infinite possibility. You can tell different stories about human nature when you can compare it to android nature, or alien nature. You can examine it in different ways when you can write about people living for two hundred years, or being relativistically separated, or under a curse. You have more colours for your palette, more lights to illuminate your scene.
”
”
Jo Walton (What Makes This Book So Great)
β€œ
Imagine, a First World country founded on egalitarian principles in which the top 20 per cent of households have 84 per cent of the wealth, while the bottom 40 per cent have 0.3 per cent; and one family, the Waltons, owns more than the bottom 40 per cent of US families combined; and the ratio of CEO salary to unskilled worker is 354 to 1 (fifty years ago it was 20 to 1). A minimum wage of $7.25 per hour, which is 34 per cent less than workers on the minimum were getting in 1968. More than 20 per cent of children in the United States live in poverty, more than twice the rate of any European country. With a quarter of totalitarian China’s population, democratic America has about the same number of people in jail.
”
”
Don Watson (Quarterly Essay 63 Enemy Within: American Politics in the Time of Trump)
β€œ
It wasn't that we didn't know history. Even if you only count the real world, we knew more history than most people. We'd been taught about cavemen and Normans and Tudors. We knew about Greeks and Romans. We knew masses of personal stories about World War II. We even knew quite a lot of family history. It just didn't connect to the landscape. And it was the landscape that formed us, that made us who we were as we grew in it, that affected everything. We thought we were living in a fantasy landscape when actually we were living in a science fictional one. In ignorance, we played our way through what the elves and giants had left us, taking the fairies' possession for ownership. I named the dramroads after places in The Lord of the Rings when I should have recognized that they were from The Chrysalids.
”
”
Jo Walton (Among Others)
β€œ
When Jesus talks about the Sabbath, he makes statements that seem unrelated to rest if we think of it in terms of relaxation. In Matthew 12:8, he is the Lord of the Sabbath. When we realize that the Sabbath has to do with participating in God’s ordered system (rather than promoting our own activities as those that bring us order), we can understand how Jesus is Lord of the Sabbath. Throughout his controversies with the Pharisees, Jesus insisted that it was never a violation of the Sabbath to do the work of God on that day. Indeed, he noted that God is continually working (Jn 5:17). The Sabbath is most truly honored when we participate in the work of God (see Is 58:13-14). The work we desist from is that which represents our own attempts to bring our own order to our lives.2 It is to resist our self-interest, our self-sufficiency and our sense of self-reliance.
”
”
John H. Walton (The Lost World of Adam and Eve: Genesis 2-3 and the Human Origins Debate)
β€œ
Shakespeare was not even able to perform a function that we consider today as perfectly normal and ordinary a function as reading itself. He could not, as the saying goes, β€œlook something up.” Indeed the very phraseβ€”when it is used in the sense of β€œsearching for something in a dictionary or encyclopedia or other book of reference”—simply did not exist. It does not appear in the English language, in fact, until as late as 1692, when an Oxford historian named Anthony Wood used it. Since there was no such phrase until the late seventeenth century, it follows that there was essentially no such concept either, certainly not at the time when Shakespeare was writingβ€”a time when writers were writing furiously, and thinkers thinking as they rarely had before. Despite all the intellectual activity of the time there was in print no guide to the tongue, no linguistic vade mecum, no single book that Shakespeare or Martin Frobisher, Francis Drake, Walter Raleigh, Francis Bacon, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Nash, John Donne, Ben Jonson, Izaak Walton, or any of their other learned contemporaries could consult.
”
”
Simon Winchester (The Professor & the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity & the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary)
β€œ
I don’t think any other retail company in the world could do what I’m going to propose to you. It’s simple. It won’t cost us anything. And I believe it would just work magic, absolute magic on our customers, and our sales would escalate, and I think we’d just shoot past our Kmart friends in a year or two and probably Sears as well. I want you to take a pledge with me. I want you to promise that whenever you come within ten feet of a customer, you will look him in the eye, greet him, and ask him if you can help him. Now I know some of you are just naturally shy, and maybe don’t want to bother folks. But if you’ll go along with me on this, it would, I’m sure, help you become a leader. It would help your personality develop, you would become more outgoing, and in time you might become manager of that store, you might become a department manager, you might become a district manager, or whatever you choose to be in the company. It will do wonders for you. I guarantee it. Now, I want you to raise your right handβ€”and remember what we say at Wal-Mart, that a promise we make is a promise we keepβ€”and I want you to repeat after me: From this day forward, I solemnly promise and declare that every time a customer comes within ten feet of me, I will smile, look him in the eye, and greet him. So help me Sam.
”
”
Sam Walton (Sam Walton: Made In America)
β€œ
THOSE BORN UNDER Pacific Northwest skies are like daffodils: they can achieve beauty only after a long, cold sulk in the rain. Henry, our mother, and I were Pacific Northwest babies. At the first patter of raindrops on the roof, a comfortable melancholy settled over the house. The three of us spent dark, wet days wrapped in old quilts, sitting and sighing at the watery sky. Viviane, with her acute gift for smell, could close her eyes and know the season just by the smell of the rain. Summer rain smelled like newly clipped grass, like mouths stained red with berry juice β€” blueberries, raspberries, blackberries. It smelled like late nights spent pointing constellations out from their starry guises, freshly washed laundry drying outside on the line, like barbecues and stolen kisses in a 1932 Ford Coupe. The first of the many autumn rains smelled smoky, like a doused campsite fire, as if the ground itself had been aflame during those hot summer months. It smelled like burnt piles of collected leaves, the cough of a newly revived chimney, roasted chestnuts, the scent of a man’s hands after hours spent in a woodshop. Fall rain was not Viviane’s favorite. Rain in the winter smelled simply like ice, the cold air burning the tips of ears, cheeks, and eyelashes. Winter rain was for hiding in quilts and blankets, for tying woolen scarves around noses and mouths β€” the moisture of rasping breaths stinging chapped lips. The first bout of warm spring rain caused normally respectable women to pull off their stockings and run through muddy puddles alongside their children. Viviane was convinced it was due to the way the rain smelled: like the earth, tulip bulbs, and dahlia roots. It smelled like the mud along a riverbed, like if she opened her mouth wide enough, she could taste the minerals in the air. Viviane could feel the heat of the rain against her fingers when she pressed her hand to the ground after a storm. But in 1959, the year Henry and I turned fifteen, those warm spring rains never arrived. March came and went without a single drop falling from the sky. The air that month smelled dry and flat. Viviane would wake up in the morning unsure of where she was or what she should be doing. Did the wash need to be hung on the line? Was there firewood to be brought in from the woodshed and stacked on the back porch? Even nature seemed confused. When the rains didn’t appear, the daffodil bulbs dried to dust in their beds of mulch and soil. The trees remained leafless, and the squirrels, without acorns to feed on and with nests to build, ran in confused circles below the bare limbs. The only person who seemed unfazed by the disappearance of the rain was my grandmother. Emilienne was not a Pacific Northwest baby nor a daffodil. Emilienne was more like a petunia. She needed the water but could do without the puddles and wet feet. She didn’t have any desire to ponder the gray skies. She found all the rain to be a bit of an inconvenience, to be honest.
”
”
Leslye Walton (The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender)
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Are these black cats like the hare?" "No. They're smaller; they only want me to play with them. Fly away with them to a place on the other side of the moon. There's a garden there, all silvery-gold, and the cats and hares dance and jump round and round. They can jump so much farther than they can on earth; it's like flying, and they love it so. Sometimes I've felt as if I'd like to dance and jump through the air too, they looked so happy, and I've thought maybe if I did I wouldn't be afraid any more, but when I look they're all dancing round a Figure that sits still in the middle of the garden. A big black Figure with a hood on. And It hasn't got any face. Its face is so awful that It keeps it covered. And then I get so terribly afraid. And everything stops." "And you see all that in the picture?" "I don't know." She hesitated again. "I think it's partly dreams. After I've thought they were at the windows - the cats and the big hare. They sit there and watch, you see, after I've gone to sleep. But they don't come often. I don't usually know what's there." She came closer and whispered, her blue eyes earnest and weird, "I don't think it's an animal hare. I think it's Aunt Sarai's hare, that maybe it came from hell. It isn't swearing to say that word just as the name of a place, is it? That's why people used to be so scared of witches' black cats, isn't it, because they thought they weren't earth-cats, they were from the devil? Mother says there isn't any hell or any witches. But Aunt Sarai was a witch; that's why she can come back. I think they've all been witches here; the house is mad because mother wouldn't be; that's why it wants me now." Carew said, "It was all dreams, Betty. There is no hell. There is no garden on the other side of the moon. It's a dead world, full of volcanic craters, with no air for anything to grow in or breathe. A hare frightened you and, being nervous, you've had nightmares about it - pictures that fear paints on your mind just as an artist would on canvas, with paints and brushes. "Every dream is now a movie we make for ourselves in our sleep...
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Evangeline Walton (Witch House)