P G Wodehouse Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to P G Wodehouse. Here they are! All 100 of them:

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There is no surer foundation for a beautiful friendship than a mutual taste in literature.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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And she's got brains enough for two, which is the exact quantity the girl who marries you will need.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Mostly Sally)
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The voice of Love seemed to call to me, but it was a wrong number.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Very Good, Jeeves! (Jeeves, #4))
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He had just about enough intelligence to open his mouth when he wanted to eat, but certainly no more.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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There are moments, Jeeves, when one asks oneself, 'Do trousers matter?'" "The mood will pass, sir.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Code of the Woosters (Jeeves, #7))
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It is a good rule in life never to apologize. The right sort of people do not want apologies, and the wrong sort take a mean advantage of them.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Man Upstairs and Other Stories)
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He had the look of one who had drunk the cup of life and found a dead beetle at the bottom.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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Red hair, sir, in my opinion, is dangerous.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Very Good, Jeeves! (Jeeves, #4))
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At the age of eleven or thereabouts women acquire a poise and an ability to handle difficult situations which a man, if he is lucky, manages to achieve somewhere in the later seventies.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Uneasy Money)
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I could see that, if not actually disgruntled, he was far from being gruntled.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Code of the Woosters (Jeeves, #7))
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Everything in life that’s any fun, as somebody wisely observed, is either immoral, illegal or fattening.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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She looked as if she had been poured into her clothes and had forgotten to say "when".
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I always advise people never to give advice.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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A melancholy-looking man, he had the appearance of one who has searched for the leak in life's gas-pipe with a lighted candle.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Man Upstairs and Other Stories)
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If there is one thing I dislike, it is the man who tries to air his grievances when I wish to air mine.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Love Among the Chickens (Ukridge, #1))
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I know I was writing stories when I was five. I don’t remember what I did before that. Just loafed, I suppose.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I'm not absolutely certain of the facts, but I rather fancy it's Shakespeare who says that it's always just when a fellow is feeling particularly braced with things in general that Fate sneaks up behind him with the bit of lead piping.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Jeeves and the Unbidden Guest)
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Unseen in the background, Fate was quietly slipping lead into the boxing-glove.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Very Good, Jeeves! (Jeeves, #4))
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Freddie experienced the sort of abysmal soul-sadness which afflicts one of Tolstoy's Russian peasants when, after putting in a heavy day's work strangling his father, beating his wife, and dropping the baby into the city's reservoir, he turns to the cupboards, only to find the vodka bottle empty.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Best of Wodehouse: An Anthology)
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Mike nodded. A sombre nod. The nod Napoleon might have given if somebody had met him in 1812 and said, "So, you're back from Moscow, eh?
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P.G. Wodehouse (Mike and Psmith (Psmith, #1))
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I am not always good and noble. I am the hero of this story, but I have my off moments.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Love Among the Chickens (Ukridge, #1))
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It was one of those parties where you cough twice before you speak and then decide not to say it after all.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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The fascination of shooting as a sport depends almost wholly on whether you are at the right or wrong end of the gun.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Adventures of Sally)
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Marriage is not a process for prolonging the life of love, sir. It merely mummifies its corpse.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Small Bachelor)
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You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves (Jeeves, #3))
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As we grow older and realize more clearly the limitations of human happiness, we come to see that the only real and abiding pleasure in life is to give pleasure to other people.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Something Fresh (Blandings Castle, #1))
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If he had a mind, there was something on it.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I just sit at my typewriter and curse a bit.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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In a series of events, all of which had been a bit thick, this, in his opinion, achieved the maximum of thickness.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I hadn't the heart to touch my breakfast. I told Jeeves to drink it himself.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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It is true of course, that I have a will of iron, but it can be switched off if the circumstances seem to demand it.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Jeeves in the Morning (Jeeves, #8))
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What's the use of a great city having temptations if fellows don't yield to them?
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P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves (Jeeves, #3))
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She looked away. Her attitude seemed to suggest that she had finished with him, and would be obliged if somebody would come and sweep him up.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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Some minds are like soup in a poor restaurantβ€”better left unstirred.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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Hell, it is well known, has no fury like a woman who wants her tea and can't get it.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Very Good, Jeeves! (Jeeves, #4))
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It is no use telling me there are bad aunts and good aunts. At the core, they are all alike. Sooner or later, out pops the cloven hoof.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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An apple a day, if well aimed, keeps the doctor away.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I pressed down the mental accelerator. The old lemon throbbed fiercely. I got an idea.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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She fitted into my biggest arm-chair as if it had been built round her by someone who knew they were wearing arm-chairs tight about the hips that season
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P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves (Jeeves, #3))
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It was one of the dullest speeches I ever heard. The Agee woman told us for three quarters of an hour how she came to write her beastly book, when a simple apology was all that was required.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Girl in Blue)
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We Woosters do not lightly forget. At least, we do - some things - appointments, and people's birthdays, and letters to post, and all that - but not an absolutely bally insult like the above.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Inimitable Jeeves (Jeeves, #2))
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Love is a delicate plant that needs constant tending and nurturing, and this cannot be done by snorting at the adored object like a gas explosion and calling her friends lice.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit (Jeeves, #11))
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Whenever I get that sad, depressed feeling, I go out and kill a policeman.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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It was one of those cases where you approve the broad, general principle of an idea but can't help being in a bit of a twitter at the prospect of putting it into practical effect. I explained this to Jeeves, and he said much the same thing had bothered Hamlet.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Jeeves in the Morning (Jeeves, #8))
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Gussie, a glutton for punishment, stared at himself in the mirror.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Right Ho, Jeeves (Jeeves, #6))
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-'What do ties matter, Jeeves, at a time like this?' There is no time, sir, at which ties do not matter
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P.G. Wodehouse
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Well, you know, there are limits to the sacred claims of friendship.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves (Jeeves, #3))
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She had more curves than a scenic railway
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P.G. Wodehouse
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The drowsy stillness of the afternoon was shattered by what sounded to his strained senses like G.K. Chesterton falling on a sheet of tin.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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He felt like a man who, chasing rainbows, has had one of them suddenly turn and bite him in the leg.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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Into the face of the young man who sat on the terrace of the Hotel Magnifique at Cannes there had crept a look of furtive shame, the shifty hangdog look which announces that an Englishman is about to speak French.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Luck of the Bodkins)
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You're one of those guys who can make a party just by leaving it. It's a great gift.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Girl in Blue)
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Oh, Jeeves,' I said; 'about that check suit.' Yes, sir?' Is it really a frost?' A trifle too bizarre, sir, in my opinion.' But lots of fellows have asked me who my tailor is.' Doubtless in order to avoid him, sir.' He's supposed to be one of the best men in London.' I am saying nothing against his moral character, sir.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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A man's subconscious self is not the ideal companion. It lurks for the greater part of his life in some dark den of its own, hidden away, and emerges only to taunt and deride and increase the misery of a miserable hour.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Adventures of Sally)
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One of the Georges - I forget which - once said that a certain number of hours' sleep each night - I cannot recall at the moment how many - made a man something which for the time being has slipped my memory.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Mike and Psmith (Psmith, #1))
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Employers are like horses β€” they require management.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves (Jeeves, #3))
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Intoxicated? The word did not express it by a mile. He was oiled, boiled, fried, plastered, whiffled, sozzled, and blotto.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Meet Mr. Mulliner)
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Chumps always make the best husbands. When you marry, Sally, grab a chump. Tap his head first, and if it rings solid, don't hesitate. All the unhappy marriages come from husbands having brains. What good are brains to a man? They only unsettle him.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Doctor Sally)
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A certain critic -- for such men, I regret to say, do exist -- made the nasty remark about my last novel that it contained 'all the old Wodehouse characters under different names.' He has probably by now been eaten by bears, like the children who made mock of the prophet Elisha: but if he still survives he will not be able to make a similar charge against Summer Lightning. With my superior intelligence, I have out-generalled the man this time by putting in all the old Wodehouse characters under the same names. Pretty silly it will make him feel, I rather fancy.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Summer Moonshine)
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I am Psmith," said the old Etonian reverently. "There is a preliminary P before the name. This, however, is silent. Like the tomb. Compare such words as ptarmigan, psalm, and phthisis.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Psmith, Journalist (Psmith, #3))
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I suppose half the time Shakespeare just shoved down anything that came into his head.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I am strongly of the opinion that, after the age of twenty-one, a man ought not to be out of bed and awake at four in the morning. The hour breeds thought. At twenty-one, life being all future, it may be examined with impunity. But, at thirty, having become an uncomfortable mixture of future and past, it is a thing to be looked at only when the sun is high and the world full of warmth and optimism.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I mean, if you're asking a fellow to come out of a room so that you can dismember him with a carving knife, it's absurd to tack a 'sir' on to every sentence. The two things don't go together.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Thank You, Jeeves (Jeeves, #5))
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Cheer up, Crips, and keep smiling. That’s the thing to do. If you go through life with a smile on your face, you’ll be amazed how many people will come up to you and say β€˜What the hell are you grinning about? What’s so funny?’ Make you a lot of new friends.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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You can't be a successful Dictator and design women's underclothing.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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When a girl uses six derogatory adjectives in her attempt to paint the portrait of the loved one, it means something. One may indicate a merely temporary tiff. Six is big stuff.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Jeeves in the Morning (Jeeves, #8))
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I mean, imagine how some unfortunate Master Criminal would feel, on coming down to do a murder at the old Grange, if he found that not only was Sherlock Holmes putting in the weekend there, but Hercule Poirot, as well." ~ Bertram "Bertie" Wooster
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Code of the Woosters (Jeeves, #7))
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Warm-hearted! I should think he has to wear asbestos vests!
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Inimitable Jeeves (Jeeves, #2))
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This was not Aunt Dahlia, my good and kindly aunt, but my Aunt Agatha, the one who chews broken bottles and kills rats with her teeth.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I expect I shall feel better after tea.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves (Jeeves, #3))
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[I'm] as broke as the ten commandments.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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To find a man's true character, play golf with him.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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Has anybody ever seen a drama critic in the daytime? Of course not. They come out after dark, up to no good.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I'm not absolutely certain of my facts, but I rather fancy it's Shakespeare -- or, if not, it's some equally brainy lad -- who says that it's always just when a chappie is feeling particularly top-hole, and more than usually braced with things in general that Fate sneaks up behind him with a bit of lead piping.
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P.G. Wodehouse (My Man Jeeves (Jeeves, #1))
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Oh, I don't know, you know, don't you know?
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I don't know if you know it, J.B., but you're the sort of fellow who causes hundreds to fall under suspicion when he's found stabbed in his library with a paper-knife of Oriental design.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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[A]lways get to the dialogue as soon as possible. I always feel the thing to go for is speed. Nothing puts the reader off more than a big slab of prose at the start." (Interview, The Paris Review, Issue 64, Winter 1975)
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I can detach myself from the world. If there is a better world to detach oneself from than the one functioning at the moment I have yet to hear of it.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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Jeeves, you really are a specific dream-rabbit." "Thank you, miss. I am glad to have given satisfaction.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Code of the Woosters (Jeeves, #7))
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It is the bungled crime that brings remorse.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Love Among the Chickens (Ukridge, #1))
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It's a funny thing about looking for things. If you hunt for a needle in a haystack you don't find it. If you don't give a darn whether you ever see the needle or not it runs into you the first time you lean against the stack.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Man With Two Left Feet and Other Stories (Jeeves, #0.5))
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It isn't often that Aunt Dahlia lets her angry passions rise, but when she does, strong men climb trees and pull them up after them.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Right Ho, Jeeves (Jeeves, #6))
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What a queer thing Life is! So unlike anything else, don't you know, if you see what I mean.
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P.G. Wodehouse (My Man Jeeves (Jeeves, #1))
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I marmaladed a slice of toast with something of a flourish and I don't suppose I have ever come much closer to saying 'Tra la la' as I did the lathering for I was feeling in mid season form this morning.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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everything is relative. you, for instance, are my relative.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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Why do dachshunds wear their ears inside out?
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P.G. Wodehouse
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When you have been just told that the girl you love is definitely betrothed to another, you begin to understand how Anarchists must feel when the bomb goes off too soon.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Summer Lightning (Blandings Castle, #4))
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She looked like something that might have occured to Ibsen in one of his less frivolous moments.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Summer Lightning (Blandings Castle, #4))
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The cup of tea on arrival at a country house is a thing which, as a rule, I particularly enjoy. I like the crackling logs, the shaded lights, the scent of buttered toast, the general atmosphere of leisured cosiness.
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P.G. Wodehouse (The Code of the Woosters (Jeeves, #7))
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...it has been well said that it is precisely these moments when we are feeling that ours is the world and everything that's in it that Fate selects for sneaking up on us with the rock in the stocking.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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The ideas of debtor and creditor as to what constitutes a good time never coincide.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Love Among the Chickens (Ukridge, #1))
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You would be miserable if you had to go through life with a human doormat with 'Welcome' written on him. You want some one made of sterner stuff. You want, as it were, a sparring-partner, some one with whom you can quarrel happily with the certain knowledge that he will not curl up in a ball for you to kick, but will be there with the return wallop.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Piccadilly Jim)
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It has been well said that an author who expects results from a first novel is in a position similar to that of a man who drops a rose petal down the Grand Canyon of Arizona and listens for the echo.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Cocktail Time (Collector's Wodehouse))
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I don't want to wrong anybody, so I won't go so far as to say that she actually wrote poetry, but her conversation, to my mind, was of a nature calculated to excite the liveliest of suspicions. Well, I mean to say, when a girl suddenly asks you out of a blue sky if you don't sometimes feel that the stars are God's daisy-chain, you begin to think a bit.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Right Ho, Jeeves (Jeeves, #6))
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Unlike the male codfish which, suddenly finding itself the parent of three million five hundred thousand little codfish, cheerfully resolves to love them all, the British aristocracy is apt to look with a somewhat jaundiced eye on its younger sons.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I flung open the door. I got a momentary flash of about a hundred and fifteen cats of all sizes and colours scrapping in the middle of the room, and then they all shot past me with a rush and out of the front door; and all that was left of the mobscene was the head of a whacking big fish, lying on the carpet and staring up at me in a rather austere sort of way, as if it wanted a written explanation and apology.
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P.G. Wodehouse (A Wodehouse Bestiary)
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From my earliest years I had always wanted to be a writer. It was not that I had any particular message for humanity. I am still plugging away and not the ghost of one so far, so it begins to look as though, unless I suddenly hit mid-season form in my eighties, humanity will remain a message short.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Wodehouse On Wodehouse)
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Mr Beach was too well bred to be inquisitive, but his eyebrows here not. 'Ah!' he said. '?', cried the eyebrows. '? ? ?' Ashe ignored the eyebrows. ... Mr Beach's eyebrows were still mutely urging him to reveal all, but Ashe directed his gaze at that portion of the room which Mr Beach did not fill. He was hanged if he was going to let himself be hypnotized by a pair of eyebrows into incriminating himself.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Something Fresh (Blandings Castle, #1))
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How anybody can compose a story by word of mouth face to face with a bored-looking secretary with a notebook is more than I can imagine. Yet many authors think nothing of saying, 'Ready, Miss Spelvin? Take dictation. Quote no comma Sir Jasper Murgatroyd comma close quotes comma said no better make it hissed Evangeline comma quote I would not marry you if you were the last person on earth period close quotes Quote well comma I'm not so the point does not arise comma close quotes replied Sir Jasper twirling his moustache cynically period And so the long day wore on period End of chapter.' If I had to do that sort of thing I should be feeling all the time that the girl was saying to herself as she took it down, 'Well comma this beats me period How comma with homes for the feebleminded touting for custom on every side comma has a man like this succeeded in remaining at large mark of interrogation.
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P.G. Wodehouse
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I suppose the fundamental distinction between Shakespeare and myself is one of treatment. We get our effects differently. Take the familiar farcical situation of someone who suddenly discovers that something unpleasant is standing behind them. Here is how Shakespeare handles it in "The Winter's Tale," Act 3, Scene 3: ANTIGONUS: Farewell! A lullaby too rough. I never saw the heavens so dim by day. A savage clamour! Well may I get aboard! This is the chase: I am gone for ever. And then comes literature's most famous stage direction, "Exit pursued by a bear." All well and good, but here's the way I would handle it: BERTIE: Touch of indigestion, Jeeves? JEEVES: No, Sir. BERTIE: Then why is your tummy rumbling? JEEVES: Pardon me, Sir, the noise to which you allude does not emanate from my interior but from that of that animal that has just joined us. BERTIE: Animal? What animal? JEEVES: A bear, Sir. If you will turn your head, you will observe that a bear is standing in your immediate rear inspecting you in a somewhat menacing manner. BERTIE (as narrator): I pivoted the loaf. The honest fellow was perfectly correct. It was a bear. And not a small bear, either. One of the large economy size. Its eye was bleak and it gnashed a tooth or two, and I could see at a g. that it was going to be difficult for me to find a formula. "Advise me, Jeeves," I yipped. "What do I do for the best?" JEEVES: I fancy it might be judicious if you were to make an exit, Sir. BERTIE (narrator): No sooner s. than d. I streaked for the horizon, closely followed across country by the dumb chum. And that, boys and girls, is how your grandfather clipped six seconds off Roger Bannister's mile. Who can say which method is superior?" (As reproduced in Plum, Shakespeare and the Cat Chap )
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P.G. Wodehouse (Over Seventy: An Autobiography with Digressions)