Oscar Wilde Love Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Oscar Wilde Love. Here they are! All 200 of them:

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Never love anyone who treats you like you're ordinary.
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Oscar Wilde
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Women are meant to be loved, not to be understood.
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Oscar Wilde (Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories)
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Hearts are made to be broken.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
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You don't love someone for their looks, or their clothes, or for their fancy car, but because they sing a song only you can hear.
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Oscar Wilde
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The very essence of romance is uncertainty.
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Oscar Wilde (The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays)
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To love oneself is the beginning of a lifelong romance.
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
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Who, being loved, is poor?
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Oscar Wilde
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Children begin by loving their parents; as they grow older they judge them; sometimes they forgive them.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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When one is in love, one always begins by deceiving one's self, and one always ends by deceiving others. That is what the world calls a romance.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Yet each man kills the thing he loves By each let this be heard Some do it with a bitter look Some with a flattering word The coward does it with a kiss The brave man with a sword
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Oscar Wilde (The Ballad of Reading Gaol)
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What of Art? -It is a malady. --Love? -An Illusion. --Religion? -The fashionable substitute for Belief. --You are a sceptic. -Never! Scepticism is the beginning of Faith. --What are you? -To define is to limit.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Men always want to be a woman’s first love. That is their clumsy vanity. We women have a more subtle instinct about these things. What (women) like is to be a man’s last romance.
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Oscar Wilde
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I have grown to love secrecy. It seems to be the one thing that can make modern life mysterious or marvelous to us. The commonest thing is delightful if only one hides it.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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It takes great deal of courage to see the world in all its tainted glory, and still to love it.
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
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The mystery of love is greater than the mystery of death.
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Oscar Wilde (SalomΓ©)
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One should always be in love. That's the reason one should never marry.
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Oscar Wilde
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A man can be happy with any woman as long as he does not love her.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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I love acting. It is so much more real than life.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Keep love in your heart. A life without it is like a sunless garden when the flowers are dead. The consciousness of loving and being loved brings a warmth and a richness to life that nothing else can bring.
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Oscar Wilde
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We women, as some one says, love with our ears, just as you men love with your eyes...
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Between men and women there is no friendship possible. There is passion, enmity, worship, love, but no friendship.
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Oscar Wilde
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Friendship is far more tragic than love. It lasts longer.
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Oscar Wilde
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Yes, death. Death must be so beautiful. To lie in the soft brown earth, with the grasses waving above one's head, and listen to silence. To have no yesterday, and no to-morrow. To forget time, to forget life, to be at peace. You can help me. You can open for me the portals of death's house, for love is always with you, and love is stronger than death is.
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Oscar Wilde (The Canterville Ghost)
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She is all the great heroines of the world in one. She is more than an individual. I love her, and I must make her love me. I want to make Romeo jealous. I want the dead lovers of the world to hear our laughter, and grow sad. I want a breath of our passion to stir dust into consciousness, to wake their ashes into pain.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Hearts Live By Being Wounded
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Oscar Wilde
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I love to talk about nothing. It's the only thing I know anything about.
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Oscar Wilde
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It takes great courage to see the world in all its tainted glory, and still to love it. And even more courage to see it in the one you love
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
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There is always something ridiculous about the emotions of people whom one has ceased to love.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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When I like people immensely I never tell their names to anyone. It is like surrendering a part of them. I have grown to love secrecy.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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I see when men love women. They give them but a little of their lives. But women when they love give everything.
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Oscar Wilde
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You are more to me than any of them has any idea; you are the atmosphere of beauty through which I see life; you are the incarnation of all lovely things...I think of you day and night. ~ Letter to Lord Alfred 'Bosie' Douglas
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Oscar Wilde
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A kiss may ruin a human life
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Oscar Wilde
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Yet each man kills the thing he loves, By each let this be heard, Some do it with a bitter look, Some with a flattering word, The coward does it with a kiss, The brave man with a sword! Some kill their love when they are young, And some when they are old; Some strangle with the hands of Lust, Some with the hands of Gold: The kindest use a knife, because The dead so soon grow cold. Some love too little, some too long, Some sell, and others buy; Some do the deed with many tears, And some without a sigh: For each man kills the thing he loves, Yet each man does not die.
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Oscar Wilde
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Women love us for our defects. If we have enough of them, they will forgive us everything, even our intellects.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Each man kills the thing he loves.
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Oscar Wilde (The Ballad of Reading Gaol)
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I really don't see anything romantic in proposing. It is very romantic to be in love. But there is nothing romantic about a definite proposal. Why, one may be accepted. One usually is, I believe. Then the excitement is all over. The very essence of romance is uncertainty. If ever I get married, I'll certainly try to forget the fact.
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Oscar Wilde (The Importance of Being Earnest)
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Those who are faithful know only the trivial side of love: it is the faithless who know love's tragedies.
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Oscar Wilde
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When you really want love you will find it waiting for you.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
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I am sick of women who love one. Women who hate one are much more interesting.
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Oscar Wilde
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Life is one fool thing after another whereas love is two fool things after each other.
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Oscar Wilde (The Happy Prince and Other Tales)
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The gods are strange. It is not our vices only they make instruments to scourge us. They bring us to ruin through what in us is good, gentle, humane, loving.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
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Love is a gross exaggeration of the difference between one person and everybody else.
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Oscar Wilde
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My life-my whole life- take it, and do with it what you will. I love you-love you as I have never loved any living thing. From the moment I met you I loved you, loved you blindly, adoringly,madly! You didn't know it then-you know it now.
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Oscar Wilde (Lady Windermere's Fan)
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You have killed my love. You used to stir my imagination. Now you don't even stir my curiosity. You simply produce no effect. I loved you because you were marvelous, because you had genius and intellect, because you realized the dreams of great poets and gave shape and substance to the shadows of art. You have thrown it all away. You are shallow and stupid
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Every one is worthy of love, except him who thinks that he is. Love is a sacrament that should be taken kneeling.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
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Life is a question of nerves, and fibres, and slowly built-up cells in which thought hides itself and passion has its dreams. You may fancy yourself safe and think yourself strong. But a chance tone of colour in a room or a morning sky, a particular perfume that you had once loved and that brings subtle memories with it, a line from a forgotten poem that you had come across again, a cadence from a piece of music that you had ceased to play... I tell you, that it is on things like these that our lives depend.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Any place you love is the world to you.
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Oscar Wilde (The Happy Prince)
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He made me see what Life is, and what Death signifies, and why Love is stronger than both.
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Oscar Wilde (The Canterville Ghost)
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The consciousness of loving and being loved brings a warmth and richness to life that nothing else can bring.
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Oscar Wilde
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Where there is no love there is no understanding.
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Oscar Wilde
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The only way to behave to a woman is to make love to her if she is pretty, and to someone else if she is plain.
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Oscar Wilde (The Importance of Being Earnest)
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Plain women are always jealous of their husbands. Beautiful women never are. They are always so occupied with being jealous of other women's husbands.
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Oscar Wilde
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Love is easily killed.
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Oscar Wilde (Lady Windermere's Fan)
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I love hearing my relations abused. It is the only thing that makes me put up with them at all. Relations are simply a tedious pack of people, who haven't got the remotest knowledge of how to live nor the smallest instinct about when to die.
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Oscar Wilde (The Importance of Being Earnest)
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Even before I met you I was far from indifferent to you.
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Oscar Wilde (The Importance of Being Earnest)
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Most people live for love and admiration. But it is by love and admiration that we should live.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
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Love is a sacrament that should be taken kneeling, and Domine non sum dignus should be on the lips and in the hearts of those who receive it.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
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I love scrapes. They are the only things that are never serious." "Oh, that's nonsense, Algy. You never talk anything but nonsense." "Nobody ever does.
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Oscar Wilde (The Importance of Being Earnest)
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Certainly the most destructive vice if you like, that a person can have. More than pride, which is supposedly the number one of the cardinal sins - is self pity. Self pity is the worst possible emotion anyone can have. And the most destructive. It is, to slightly paraphrase what Wilde said about hatred, and I think actually hatred's a subset of self pity and not the other way around - ' It destroys everything around it, except itself '. Self pity will destroy relationships, it'll destroy anything that's good, it will fulfill all the prophecies it makes and leave only itself. And it's so simple to imagine that one is hard done by, and that things are unfair, and that one is underappreciated, and that if only one had had a chance at this, only one had had a chance at that, things would have gone better, you would be happier if only this, that one is unlucky. All those things. And some of them may well even be true. But, to pity oneself as a result of them is to do oneself an enormous disservice. I think it's one of things we find unattractive about the american culture, a culture which I find mostly, extremely attractive, and I like americans and I love being in america. But, just occasionally there will be some example of the absolutely ravening self pity that they are capable of, and you see it in their talk shows. It's an appalling spectacle, and it's so self destructive. I almost once wanted to publish a self help book saying 'How To Be Happy by Stephen Fry : Guaranteed success'. And people buy this huge book and it's all blank pages, and the first page would just say - ' Stop Feeling Sorry For Yourself - And you will be happy '. Use the rest of the book to write down your interesting thoughts and drawings, and that's what the book would be, and it would be true. And it sounds like 'Oh that's so simple', because it's not simple to stop feeling sorry for yourself, it's bloody hard. Because we do feel sorry for ourselves, it's what Genesis is all about.
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Stephen Fry
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Love is not fashionable anymore; the poets have killed it.
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Oscar Wilde (The Complete Fairy Tales)
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A burnt child loves the fire.
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Oscar Wilde
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Men always want to be a woman's first love - women like to be a man's last romance.
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Oscar Wilde
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You can have your secret as long as I have your heart[.]
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Oscar Wilde (The Canterville Ghost)
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It is a sad truth, but we have lost the faculty of giving lovely names to things.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Ah, on what little things does happiness depend! I have read all that the wise men have written, and all the secrets of philosophy are mine, yet for want of a red rose is my life made wretched.
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Oscar Wilde (The Nightingale and the Rose)
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How long could you love a woman who didn't love you, Cecil? A woman who didn't love me? Oh, all my life!
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Oscar Wilde (Lady Windermere's Fan)
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My dear boy, the people who love only once in their lives are really the shallow people. What they call their loyalty, and their fidelity, I call either the lethargy of custom or their lack of imagination.. Faithfulness is to the emotional life what consistency is to the life of the intellect---simply a confession of failures. Faithfulness! I must analyse it some day. The passion for property is in it. There are many things that we would throw away if we were not afraid that others might pick them up. But I don't want to interrupt you. Go on with your story.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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My dear boy, the people who only love once in their lives are really the shallow people. What they call their loyalty, and their fidelity, I call either the lethargy of custom or their lack of imagination. Faithfulness is to the emotional life what consistency is to the life of the intellectβ€”simply a confession of failures.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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history only existed in the human mind, subject to endless revision. 'each man kills the thing he loves'-Oscar Wilde. You kill it before it kills you, but he was wrong. you killed it by accident. thinking you were doing something else. shattering, when all you wanted to do was keep it safe.
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Janet Fitch (Paint it Black)
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She was a curious woman, whose dresses always looked as if they had been designed in a rage and put on in a tempest. She was usually in love with somebody, and, as her passion was never returned, she had kept all her illusions. She tried to look picturesque, but only succeeded in being untidy.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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His sudden mad love for Sibyl Vane was a psychological phenomenon of no small interest. There was no doubt that curiosity had much to do with it, curiosity and the desire for new experiences; yet it was not a simple but rather a very complex passion.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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you will always love, and you will always be loved
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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I want to make Romeo jealous! I want the dead lovers of the world to hear our laughter, and grow sad. I want a breath of our passion to stir their dust into consciousness, to wake their ashes into pain.
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Oscar Wilde
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When I like people immensely I never tell their names to anyone. It is like surrendering a part of them. I have grown to love secrecy. It seems to be the one thing that can make modern life mysterious or marvelous to us. The commonest thing is delightful if one only hides it. When I leave town now I never tell my people where I am going. If I did, I would lose all my pleasure. It is a silly habit, I daresay, but somehow it seems to bring a great deal of romance into one's life.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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All sins, except a sin against itself, Love should forgive. All lives, save loveless lives, true Love should pardon.
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
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As happens with people who love a thing too much, it destroys them. Oscar Wilde said, 'You destroy the thing that you love.' It's the other way around. What you love destroys you.
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George Plimpton
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I don't know how to talk. Oh! talk to every woman as if you loved her, and to every man as if he bored you, and at the end of your first season you will have the reputation of possessing the most perfect social tact.
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Oscar Wilde (A Woman of No Importance)
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Be happy, cried the Nightingale, be happy; you shall have your red rose. I will build it out of music by moonlight, and stain it with my own heart's-blood. All that I ask of you in return is that you will be a true lover, for Love is wiser than Philosophy, though she is wise, and mightier than Power, though he is mighty. Flame-coloured are his wings, and coloured like flame is his body. His lips are sweet as honey, and his breath is like frankincense.
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Oscar Wilde (The Nightingale and the Rose)
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The curves of your lips rewrite history.
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Oscar Wilde
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The error all women commit. Why can’t you women love us, faults and all? Why do you place us on monstrous pedestals? We have all feet of clay, women as well as men; but when we men love women, we love them knowing their weaknesses, their follies, their imperfections, love them all the more, it may be, for that reason. It is not the perfect, but the imperfect, who have need of love. It is when we are wounded by our own hands, or by the hands of others, that love should come to cure us – else what use is love at all? All sins, except a sin against itself, Love should forgive. All lives, save loveless lives, true Love should pardon. A man’s love is like that. It is wider, larger, more human than a woman’s. Women think that they are making ideals of men. What they are making of us are false idols merely. You made your false idol of me, and I had not the courage to come down, show you my wounds, tell you my weaknesses. I was afraid that I might lose your love, as I have lost it now.
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
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Fashion is what one wears oneself. What is unfashionable is what other people wear. Just as vulgarity is simply the conduct of other people. And falsehoods the truths of other people. Other people are quite dreadful. The only possible society is oneself. To love oneself is the beginning of a life-long romance.
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
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Surely Love is a wonderful thing. It is more precious than emeralds, and dearer than fine opals. Pearls and pomegranates cannot buy it, nor is it set forth in the marketplace. It may not be purchased of the merchants, for can it be weighed out in the balance for gold.
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Oscar Wilde (The Happy Prince)
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You love the beauty that you can see and touch and handle, the beauty that you can destroy, and do destroy, but of the unseen beauty of life, of the unseen beauty of a higher life, you know nothing.
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Oscar Wilde (A Woman of No Importance)
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sorrow...is a wound that bleeds when any hand but that of love touches it
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
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Love does not traffic in a marketplace, nor use a huckster's scales. Its joy, like the joy of the intellect, is to feel itself alive. The aim of Love is to love: no more, and no less. You were my enemy: such an enemy as no man ever had. I had given you all my life, and to gratify the lowest and most contemptible of all human passions, hatred and vanity and greed, you had thrown it away. In less than three years you had entirely ruined me in every point of view. For my own sake there was nothing for me to do but to love you.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
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You, who know all the secrets of life, tell me how to charm Sibyl Vane to love me! I want to make Romeo jealous, I want the dead lovers of the world to hear our laughter, and grow sad. I want a breath of our passion to stir their dust into consciousness, to wake their ashes into pain.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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It is not the perfect, but the imperfect, who have need of love. It is when we are wounded by our own hands that love should come to cure us. Else what use is love at all?
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
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The aim of Love is to love: no more, and no less.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
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What a silly thing love is! It is not half as useful as logic, for it does not prove anything and it is always telling one things that are not going to happen, and making one believe things that are not true.
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Oscar Wilde
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I am afraid that woman appreciate cruelty, downright cruelty, more than anything else. They have wonderfully primitive instincts. We have emancipated them, but they remain slaves looking for their masters, all the same. They love being dominated.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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It is sweet to dance to violins When love and life are fair: To dance to flutes, to dance to lutes Is delicate and rare: But it is not sweet with nimble feet To dance upon the air!
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Oscar Wilde
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It seems to me that we all look at Nature too much, and live with her too little. I discern great sanity in the Greek attitude. They never chattered about sunsets, or discussed whether the shadows on the grass were really mauve or not. But they saw that the sea was for the swimmer, and the sand for the feet of the runner. They loved the trees for the shadow that they cast, and the forest for its silence at noon.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
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It was you I thought of all the time, I gave to them the love you did not need: lavished on them a love that was not theirs.
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Oscar Wilde (A Woman of No Importance)
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I was wrong. God's law is only Love.
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Oscar Wilde (A Woman of No Importance)
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The artistic life is a long, lovely suicide.
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Oscar Wilde
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Oh, I don’t care about Jack. I don’t care for anybody in the whole world but you. I love you, Cecily. You will marry me, won’t you? You silly boy! Of course. Why, we have been engaged for the last three months. For the last three months?
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Oscar Wilde (The Importance of Being Earnest)
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What a fuss people make about fidelity!" exclaimed Lord Henry. "Why, even in love it is purely a question for physiology. It has nothing to do with our own will. Young men want to be faithful, and are not; old men want to be faithless, and cannot: that is all one can say.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Love! What is love? It's nothing. It's just a word. It doesn't exist. Only pleasure is important.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Only love can keep anyone alive...
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Oscar Wilde (A Woman of No Importance)
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LORD ILLINGWORTH What do you think she'd do if I kissed her? MRS ALLONBY Either marry you, or strike you across the face with her glove. What would you do if she struck you across the face with her glove? LORD ILLINGWORTH Fall in love with her, probably.
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Oscar Wilde (A Woman of No Importance)
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I am not laughing, Dorian; at least I am not laughing at you. But you should not say the greatest romance of your life. You should say the first romance of your life. You will always be loved, and you will always be in love with love. A grande passion is the privilege of people who have nothing to do. That is the one use of the idle classes of a country. Don't be afraid. There are exquisite things in store for you. This is merely the beginning.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Oh, I love London Society! It has immensely improved. It is entirely composed now of beautiful idiots and brilliant lunatics. Just what Society should be.
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
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Those whom the gods love grow young.
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Oscar Wilde
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It is very romantic to be in love. But there is nothing romantic about a definite proposal. Why, one may be accepted. One usually is, I believe. Then the excitement is all over. The very essence of romance is uncertainty. (Algernon in The Importance of Being Ernest)
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Oscar Wilde
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You know I have loved him always. But we are very poor. Who, being loved, is poor? Oh, no one. I hate my riches. They are a burden...
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Oscar Wilde (A Woman of No Importance)
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What nonsense people talk about happy marriages!" exclaimed Lord Henry. " A man can be happy with any woman, as long as he does not love her.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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I love talking about nothing, father. It is the only thing I know anything about.
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
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Everyone is worthy of love, except him who thinks that he is. Love is a sacrament that should be taken kneeling.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
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tone of colour in a room or a morning sky, a particular perfume that you had once loved and that brings subtle memories with it, a line from a forgotten poem that you had come across again, a cadence from a piece of music that you had ceased to playβ€” I tell you, Dorian, that it is on things like these that our lives depend.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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You may fancy yourself safe and think yourself strong. But a chance tone of color in a room or a morning sky, a particular perfume that you had once loved and that brings subtle memories with it, a line from a forgotten poem that you had come across again, a cadence from a piece of music that you had ceased to play. I tell you Dorian, that it is on things like these that our lives depend.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Never love anybody who treats you like you're ordinary.
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Oscar Wilde
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love is not fashionable any more, the poets have killed it.Β 
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Oscar Wilde (The Happy Prince and Other Tales)
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Life is not governed by will or intention. Life is a question of nerves, and fibres, and slowly built-up cells in which thought hides itself and passion has its dreams. You may fancy yourself safe, and think yourself strong. But a chance tone of colour in a room or a morning sky, a particular perfume that you had once loved and that brings sublte memories with it, a line from a piece of music that you had ceased to play--I tell you Dorian, that it is on things like these that our lives depend.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray and Other Writings)
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Love is fed by the imagination, by which we become wiser than we know, better than we feel, nobler than we are: by which we can see life as a whole, by which and by which alone we can understand others in their real and their ideal relation. Only what is fine, and finely conceived can feed love. But anything will feed hate.
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Oscar Wilde
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If a woman cannot make her mistakes charming, she is only a female.
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Oscar Wilde (Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories)
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With subtle and finely-wrought temperaments it is always so. Their strong passions must either bruise or bend. They either slay the man, or themselves die. Shallow sorrows and shallow loves live on. The loves and the sorrows that are great are destroyed by their own plenitude.
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Oscar Wilde
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Each time that one loves is the only time one has ever loved. Difference of object does not alter singleness of passion. It merely intensifies it. We can have but one great experience at best, and the secret of life is to reproduce that experience as often as possible.
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Oscar Wilde
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The birds that were singing in the dew-drenched garden seemed to be telling the flowers about her.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Oh I can't explain. When I like people immensely I never tell their names to any one. It is like surrendering a part of them. I have grown to love secrecy. It seems to be the one thing that can make modern life mysterious or marvellous to us. The commonest thing is delightful if one only hides it.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
He had that curious love of green, which in individuals is always the sign of a subtle artistic temperament, and in nations is said to denote a laxity, if not a decadence of morals.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
the Garden of Death" "Yes, death. Death must be so beautiful. To lie in the soft brown earth, with the grasses waving above one's head, and listen to silence. To have no yesterday, and no to-morrow. To forget time, to forget life, to be at peace. You can help me. You can open for me the portals of death's house, for love is always with you, and love is stronger than death is.
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Oscar Wilde (The Canterville Ghost)
β€œ
To be popular one must be a mediocrity." "Not with Women," said the duchess, shaking her head; "and women rule the world. I assure you we can't bear mediocrities. We women, as someone says, love with our ears, just as you men love with your eyes, if you ever love at all." "It seems to me that we never do anything else," murmered Dorian.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
You don't love someone for their looks, or their clothes, or their fancy car, but because they sing a song only you can hear.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
He is fairer than the morning star, and whiter than the moon. For his body I would give my soul, and for his love I would surrender heaven.
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Oscar Wilde (The Fisherman & His Soul & Other Fairy Tales)
β€œ
I didn’t say I liked it. I said it fascinated me. There is a great difference.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
But don't you think one can be happy when on is married? Perfectly happy. But the happiness of a married man, my dear Gerald, depends on the people he has not married. But if one is in love? One should always be in love. That is the reason one should never marry.
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Oscar Wilde (A Woman of No Importance)
β€œ
Some love too little, some too long, Some sell, and others buy; Some do the deed with many tears, And some without a sigh: For each man kills the thing he loves, Yet each man does not die. He
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Oscar Wilde (Ballad of Reading Gaol)
β€œ
Nobody is worthy to be loved. The fact that God loves man shows us that in the divine order of ideal things it is written that eternal love is to be given to what is eternally unworthy. Or if that phrase seems to be a bitter one to bear, let us say that everybody is worthy of love, except him who thinks he is.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
β€œ
There is one thing infinitely more pathetic than to have lost the woman one is in love with, and that is to have won her and found out how shallow she is!
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
Even if I had not been waiting but had shut the doors against you, you should have remembered that no one can possibly shut the doors against love forever.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
β€œ
We wish we could have been there for you. We didn't have many role models of our own--we latched on to the foolish love of Oscar Wilde and the well-versed longing of Walt Whitman because nobody else was there to show us an untortured path. We were going to be your role models. We were going to give you art and music and confidence and shelter and a much better world. Those who survived lived to do this. But we haven't been there for you. We've been here. Watching as you become the role models.
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David Levithan (Two Boys Kissing)
β€œ
The people who love only once in their lives are really the shallow people. What they call their loyalty, and their fidelity, I call either the lethargy of custom or their lack of imagination. Faithfulness is to the emotional life what consistency is to the life of the intellect - simply a confession of failure.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
Romance lives by repetition, and repetition converts an appetite into an art. Besides, each time that one loves is the only time one has ever loved. Difference of object does not alter singleness of passion. It merely intensifies it. We can have in life but one great experience at best, and the secret of life is to reproduce that experience as often as possible
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
Poor? What does that matter? When poverty creeps in at the door, love flies in through the window.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
To be in love is to surpass one's self.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
But a chance tone of colour in a room or a morning sky, a particular perfume that you had once loved and that brings subtle memories with it, a line from a forgotten poem that you had come across again, a cadence from a piece of music that you had ceased to playβ€” I tell you, Dorian, that it is on things like these that our lives depend.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
but love is not fashionable anymore, the poets have killed it. They wrote so much about it that nobody believed them, and I am not surprised. True love suffers, and is silent. I remember myself once-but no matter now. Romance is a thing of the past.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
And all men kill the thing they love, By all let this be heard, Some do it with a bitter look, Some with a flattering word, The coward does it with a kiss, The brave man with a sword!” Ballad of Reading Gaol, 1898
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
I don’t think that you should tell me that you love me wildly, passionately, devotedly, hopelessly.Β  Hopelessly doesn’t seem to make much sense, does it?
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Oscar Wilde (The Importance of Being Earnest)
β€œ
shallow sorrows and shallow loves live on. the loves and sorrows that are great are destroyed by their own plenitude
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
I will love you always, because you will always be worthy of love.
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
β€œ
Requiescat Tread lightly, she is near Under the snow, Speak gently, she can hear The daisies grow. All her bright golden hair Tarnished with rust, She that was young and fair Fallen to dust. Lily-like, white as snow, She hardly knew She was a woman, so Sweetly she grew. Coffin-board, heavy stone, Lie on her breast, I vex my heart alone She is at rest. Peace, Peace, she cannot hear Lyre or sonnet, All my life’s buried here, Heap earth upon it.
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Oscar Wilde (Complete Works of Oscar Wilde)
β€œ
What a silly thing Love is. It is not as useful as Logic, for it does not prove anything, and it is always telling one of things that are not going to happen, and making one believe things that are not true. In fact, it is quite unpractical, and, as in this age to be practical is everything, I shall go back to Philosophy and study Metaphysics.
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Oscar Wilde (The Nightingale and the Rose)
β€œ
The proper basis for marriage is mutual misunderstanding. The happiness of a married man depends on the people he has not married. One should always be in love - that's the reason one should never marry.
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Oscar Wilde (Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories)
β€œ
I have been right, Basil, haven’t I, to take my love out of poetry, and to find my wife in Shakespeare’s plays? Lips that Shakespeare taught to speak have whispered their secret in my ear. I have had the arms of Rosalind around me, and kissed Juliet on the mouth.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
What a silly thing love is!' said the student as he walked away. 'It is not half as useful as logic, for it does not prove anything, and it is always telling one of things that are not going to happen, and making one believe things that are not true. In fact, it is quite unpractical, and, as in this age to be practical is everything, I shall go back to philosophy and study metaphysics.' So he returned to his room and pulled out a great dusty book, and began to read.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
It is quite true that I have worshipped you with far more romance of feeling than a man usually gives to a friend. Somehow, I had never loved a woman. I suppose I never had time. Perhaps, as Harry says, a really grande passion is the privilege of those who have nothing to do, and that is the use of the idle classes in a country
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
Death is a great price to pay for a red rose,” cried the Nightingale, β€œand Life is very dear to all.Β  It is pleasant to sit in the green wood, and to watch the Sun in his chariot of gold, and the Moon in her chariot of pearl.Β  Sweet is the scent of the hawthorn, and sweet are the bluebells that hide in the valley, and the heather that blows on the hill.Β  Yet Love is better than Life, and what is the heart of a bird compared to the heart of a man?
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Oscar Wilde (The Happy Prince and Other Tales)
β€œ
some kill their love when they are young, and some when they are old; some strangle with the hands of lust, some with the hands of gold: THE KINDEST USE A KNIFE, because THE DEAD SO SOON GROW COLD.
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Oscar Wilde (The Ballad of Reading Gaol and Other Poems)
β€œ
I did not think I should be ever loved: do you indeed Love me so much as now you say you do? Ask of the sea-bird if it loves the sea, Ask of the roses if they love the rain, Ask of the little lark, that will not sing Till day break, if it loves to see the day: And yet, these are but empty images, Mere shadows of my love, which is a fire So great that all the waters of the main Can not avail to quench it.
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Oscar Wilde (The Duchess of Padua)
β€œ
Love - well, not love at first sight, but love at the end of the season, which is so much more satisfactory.
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Oscar Wilde (Lady Windermere's Fan)
β€œ
Keep love in your heart. A life without it is like a sunless garden when the flowers are dead.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
They say that love hath a bitter taste.... But what matter? What matter? I have kissed thy mouth.
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Oscar Wilde (SalomΓ©)
β€œ
We women love with our ears just as you men love with your eyes, if you ever love at all.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
LORD GORING: ... All I do know is that life cannot be understood without much charity, cannot be lived without much charity. It is love, and not German philosophy, that is the true explanation of this world, whatever may.
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
β€œ
Death is a great price to pay for a red roseβ€œ, cried the Nightingale, "and Life is very dear to all. β€œ It is pleasant to sit in the green wood, and watch the Sun in his chariot of gold, and the Moon in her chariot of pearl. Sweet is the scent oft he hawthorn, and sweet are the bluebells that hide in the valley, and the heather that blows on the hill. Yet Love is better than Life, and what is the heart of a bird compared to the heart of a man?
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
In love, one always begins in deceiving oneself, and one always ends in deceiving others.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
And each man kills the thing he loves.
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Oscar Wilde (The Ballad of Reading Gaol and Other Poems)
β€œ
But I loved Narcissus because as he lay on my banks and looked down at me, in the mirror of his eyes I saw ever my own beauty mirrored.
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Oscar Wilde (Complete Shorter Fiction)
β€œ
From your silken hair to your delicate feet you are perfection to me. Pleasure hides love from us, but pain reveals it in its essence.
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Oscar Wilde (The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde)
β€œ
Never love anybody that treats you like you're ordinary. - Oscar Wilde
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Tricia O'Malley (Wild Irish Roots (Mystic Cove, #0.5))
β€œ
When he [Christ] says 'Forgive your enemies', it is not for the sake of the enemy but for one's own sake that he says so, and because Love is more beautiful than Hate.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
β€œ
Let those who have not walked as we have done, In the red fire of passion, those whose lives Are dull and colourless, in a word let those, If any such there be, who have not loved, Cast stones against you
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Oscar Wilde (The Duchess of Padua)
β€œ
Any place you love is the world to you”, explained the pensive Catherine Wheel, who had been attached to an old deal box in early life, and prided herself on her broken heart; β€œbut love is not fashionable any more, the poets have killed it. They wrote so much about that nobody believed them, and I am not surprised. True love suffers, and is silent. I remember myself once- But it is no matter now. Romance is a thing of the past.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
Ah! ah! wherefore didst thou not look at me? If thou hadst looked at me thou hadst loved me. Well I know that thou wouldst have loved me, and the mystery of Love is greater than the mystery of Death.
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Oscar Wilde (SalomΓ©)
β€œ
Out of the sea will rise Behemoth and Leviathan, and sail 'round the high-pooped galleys... Dragons will wander about the waste places, and the phoenix will soar from her nest of fire into the air. We shall lay our hands upon the basilisk, and see the jewel in the toad's head. Champing his gilded oats, the Hippogriff will stand in our stalls, and over our heads will float the Blue Bird singing of beautiful and impossible things, of things that are lovely and that never happen, of things that are not and that should be.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
I have grown to love secrecy. It seems to be the one thing that can make modern life mysterious or marvellous to us. The commonest thing is delightful if one only hides it. When I leave town now I never tell my people where I am going. If I did, I would lose all my pleasure. It is a silly habit, I dare say, but somehow it seems to bring a great deal of romance into one's life.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
The loves and sorrows that are great are destroyed by their own plentitude.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
Yet the roses are not less lovely for all that
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
She was usually in love with somebody, and, as her passion was never returned, she had kept all her illusions.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
it is a marvel that those red-roseleaf lips of yours should be made no less for the madness of music and song than for the madness of kissing.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
Now it seems to me that love of some kind is the only possible explanation of the extraordinary amount of suffering that there is in the world. I cannot conceive of any other explanation. I am convinced that there is no other, and that if the world has indeed, as I have said, been built of sorrow, it has been built by the hands of love, because in no other way could the soul of man, for whom the world was made, reach the full stature of its perfection. Pleasure for the beautiful body, but pain for the beautiful soul.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
The Love that dare not speak its name" in this century is such a great affection of an elder for a younger man as there was between David and Jonathan, such as Plato made the very basis of his philosophy, and such as you find in the sonnets of Michelangelo and Shakespeare. It is that deep, spiritual affection that is as pure as it is perfect. It dictates and pervades great works of art like those of Shakespeare and Michelangelo, and those two letters of mine, such as they are. It is in this century misunderstood, so much misunderstood that it may be described as the "Love that dare not speak its name," and on account of it I am placed where I am now. It is beautiful, it is fine, it is the noblest form of affection. There is nothing unnatural about it. It is intellectual, and it repeatedly exists between an elder and a younger man, when the elder man has intellect, and the younger man has all the joy, hope and glamour of life before him. That it should be so, the world does not understand. The world mocks at it and sometimes puts one in the pillory for it.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
Love is a wonderful thing. It is more precious than emeralds and dearer than fine opals. pearls and pomegranates cannot buy it, nor is it set forth in the market-place. It may not be purchased of the merchants, nor can it be weighted out in the balance for gold.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
Yes,’ he cried, β€˜you have killed my love! You used to stir my imagination. Now you don’t even stir my curiosity. You simply produce no effect. I loved you because you were marvelous, because you had genius and intellect, because you realized the dreams of great poets and gave shape and substance to the shadows of art. You have thrown it all away. You are shallow and stupid. My God! how mad I was to love you! What a fool I have been! You are nothing to me now. I will never see you again. I will never think of you. I will never mention your name. You can’t know what you were to me, once. Why, once… Oh, I can’t bear to think of it! I wish I had never laid eyes upon you! You have spoiled the romance of my life. How little you can know of love if you say it mars your art! Without your art you are nothing. I would have made you famous, splendid, magnificent. The world would have worshiped you, and you would have borne my name. What are you now? A third-rate actress with a pretty face.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
The worst of it is that I am perpetually being punished for nothing; this governor loves to punish, and he punishes by taking my books away from me. It's perfectly awful to let the mind grind itself away between the upper and nether millstones of regret and remorse without respite; with books my life would be livable -- any life.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
MRS ALLONBY You have your looking-glass LORD ILLINGWORTH It is unkind. I merely shows me my wrinkles. MRS ALLONBY Mine is better behaved. It never tells me the truth. LORD ILLINGWORTH Then it is in love with you.
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Oscar Wilde (A Woman of No Importance)
β€œ
- Oscar Wilde said that we always destroy the thing we love the most. And it is true. The simple possibility of achieving that which we desire causes the soul of the common man to be filled with guilt. He looks around, and sees many others who have not succeeded, and so he thinks he does not deserve it. He forgets everything he overcame, all he suffered, everything he had to renounce in order to come this far. I know many people who, when they are within reach of their Personal Legend, make a series of silly mistakes and do not attain their objective - when it was just one step away.
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Paulo Coelho (Warrior of the Light)
β€œ
the people who love only once in their lives are really the shallow people. What they call their loyalty, and their fidelity, I call either the lethargy of custom or their lack of imagination. Faithfulness is to the emotional life what consistency is to the life of the intellect - simply a confession of failure. a
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
In war," answered the weaver, "the strong make slaves of the weak, and in peace the rich make slaves of the poor. We must work to live, and they give us such mean wages that we die. We toil for them all day long, and they heap up gold in their coffers, and our children fade away before their time, and the faces of those we love become hard and evil. We tread out the grapes, another drinks the wine. We sow the corn, and our own board is empty. We have chains, though no eye beholds them; and are slaves, though men call us free.
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Oscar Wilde (Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde: The Young King/The Remarkable Rocket (Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde, #2))
β€œ
People are afraid of themselves, nowadays. They have forgotten the highest of all duties, the duty that one owes to one's self. Of course, they are charitable. They feed the hungry and clothe the beggar. But their own souls starve, and are naked. Courage has gone out of our race. Perhaps we never really had it. The terror of society, which is the basis of morals, the terror of God, which is the secret of religionβ€”these are the two things that govern us. And yetβ€”
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
In the square below,’ said the Happy Prince, β€˜there stands a little match-girl. She has let her matches fall in the gutter, and they are all spoiled. Her father will beat her if she does not bring home some money, and she is crying. She has no shoes or stockings, and her little head is bare. Pluck out my other eye, and give it to her, and her father will not beat her.’ β€˜I will stay with you one night longer,’ said the Swallow, β€˜but I cannot pluck out your eye. You would be quite blind then.’ β€˜Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow,’ said the Prince, β€˜do as I command you.’ So he plucked out the Prince’s other eye, and darted down with it. He swooped past the match-girl, and slipped the jewel into the palm of her hand. β€˜What a lovely bit of glass,’ cried the little girl; and she ran home, laughing. Then the Swallow came back to the Prince. β€˜You are blind now,’ he said, β€˜so I will stay with you always.
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Oscar Wilde (The Happy Prince)
β€œ
I think Oscar Wilde wrote a poem about a robin who loved a white rose. He loved it so much that he pierced his breast and let his heart's blood turn the white rose red. Maybe this sounds very sentimental, but for anybody who has loved a career as much as I've loved mine, there can be no short cuts.
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Mary Pickford
β€œ
What are the unreal things, but the passions that once burned one like fire? What are the incredible things, but the things that one has faithfully believed? What are the improbable things? The things that one has done oneself. No, Ernest; life cheats us with shadows, like a puppet- master. We ask it for pleasure. It gives it to us, with bitterness and disappointment in its train. We come across some noble grief that we think will lend the purple dignity of tragedy to our days, but it passes away from us, and things less noble take its place, and on some grey windy dawn, or odorous eve of silence and of silver, we find ourselves looking with callous wonder, or dull heart of stone, at the tress of gold-flecked hair that we had once so wildly worshipped and so madly kissed.
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Oscar Wilde (The Critic as Artist)
β€œ
But you don’t really mean to say that you couldn’t love me if my name wasn’t Ernest? GWENDOLEN: But your name is Ernest. JACK: Yes, I know it is. But supposing it was something else? Do you mean to say you couldn’t love me then? GWENDOLEN (glibly): Ah! that is clearly a metaphysical speculation, and like most metaphysical speculations has very little reference at all to the actual facts of real life, as we know them.
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Oscar Wilde (The Importance of Being Earnest)
β€œ
people who only love once in their lives are really shallow people. What they call their loyalty, and their fidelity, I call either the lethargy of custom or the lack of imagination. Faithlessness is to the emotional life what consistency is to the intellectual life,β€”simply a confession of failure.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
Oscar Wilde said: 'Each man kills the thing he loves.' And it's true. The mere possibility of getting what we want fills the soul of the ordinary person with guilt. We look around at all those who have failed to get what they want and feel that we do not deserve to get what we want either. We forget about all the obstacles we overcame, all the suffering we endured, all the things we had to give up in order to get this far. I have known a lot of people who, when their personal calling was within their grasp, went on to commit a series of stupid mistakes and never reached their goal - when it was only a step away. This is the most dangerous of the obstacles because it has a kind of saintly aura about it. Renouncing joy and conquest. But if you believe yourself worthy of the thing you fought so hard to get, then you become an instrument of God, you help the Soul of the World, and you understand why you are here.
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Paulo Coelho (The Alchemist)
β€œ
Yes, the wildness was in me, yes it kept my heart beating fast all the long day, yes it danced around me while I walked down the street, yes it let me look boys straight in the face when they stared at me, yes it turned my laugh from a cough into a long wild fever, but I was still scared. How could I not be? I was my mother's daughter. Her hold on me stronger than love.
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Junot DΓ­az (The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao)
β€œ
Most people live for love and admiration. But it is by love and admiration that one should live. If any love is shown us we should recognize that we are quite unworthy of it. Nobody is worthy to be loved... or if that phrase is a bitter one to bear, let us say that everyone is worthy of love, except him who thinks he is. Love is a sacrament that should be taken kneeling..
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis)
β€œ
For each man kills the thing he loves yet each man does not die he does not die a death of shame on a day of dark disgrace nor have a noose about his neck, nor a cloth upon his face nor drop feet foremost through the floor into an empty space He does not sit with silent men who watch him night and day Who watch him when he tries to weep and when he tries to pray Who watch him lest himself should rob the prison of its prey
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Oscar Wilde (The Ballad of Reading Gaol)
β€œ
My sweet rose, my delicate flower, my lily of lilies, it is perhaps in prison that I am going to test the power of love. I am going to see if I cannot make the bitter warders sweet by the intensity of the love I bear you. I have had moments when I thought it would be wise to separate. Ah! Moments of weakness and madness! Now I see that would have mutilated my life, ruined my art, broken the musical chords which make a perfect soul. Even covered with mud I shall praise you, from the deepest abysses I shall cry to you. In my solitude you will be with me.
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Oscar Wilde (The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde)
β€œ
I love you, I love you, my heart is a rose which your love has brought to bloom, my life is a desert fanned by the delicious breeze of your breath, and whose cool spring are your eyes; the imprint of your little feet makes valleys of shade for me, the odour of your hair is like myrrh, and wherever you go you exhale the perfumes of the cassia tree. Love me always, love me always. You have been the supreme, the perfect love of my life; there can be no other...
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Oscar Wilde (The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde)
β€œ
It is possible, of course, that I may exaggerate about them. I certainly hope that I do; for where there is no exaggeration there is no love, and where there is no love there is no understanding. It is only about things that do not interest one, that one can give a really unbiassed opinion; and this is no doubt the reason why an unbiassed opinion is always valueless.
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Oscar Wilde (A Critic In Pall Mall: Being Extracts From Reviews And Miscellanies (1919))
β€œ
Oh, I can't explain. When I like people immensely, I never tell their names to any one. It is like surrendering a part of them. I have grown to love secrecy. It seems to be the one thing that can make modern life mysterious or marvellous to us. The commonest thing is delightful if one only hides it. When I leave town now I never tell my people where I am going. If I did, I would lose all my pleasure. It is a silly habit, I dare say, but somehow it seems to bring a great deal of romance into one's life. I suppose you think me awfully foolish about it?
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
Well, eighteen, then. And I saw you with him the other night at the opera." She laughed nervously as she spoke, and watched him with her vague forget-me-not eyes. She was a curious woman, whose dresses always looked as if they had been designed in a rage and put on in a tempest. She was usually in love with somebody, and, as her passion was never returned, she had kept all her illusions. She tried to look picturesque, but only succeeded in being untidy. Her name was Victoria, and she had a perfect mania for going to church.
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Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
β€œ
I understand what you mean, and I believe in this girl. Anyone you love must be marvellous, and any girl that has the effect you describe must be fine and noble. To spiritualise one's age--that is something worth doing. If this girl can give a soul to those who have lived without one, if she can create the sense of beauty in people whose lives have been sordid and ugly, if she can strip them of their selfishness and lend them tears for sorrows that are not their own, she is worthy of all your adoration, worthy of the adoration of the world.
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Oscar Wilde
β€œ
I am quite scandalous, you see. I come packaged with unpredictable moments, brutal honesty, calamitous outbursts, the ghastly need for love, a fiendish lack of filter, the horrific need to question everything, nauseating affection, offensive kindness, indecent spirituality, obscene beauty, monstrous creativity, barbaric embellishments, contemptuous passion, sinful childhood traumas, unscrupulous hobbies, vexatious caring, abominable sensitivity, reprehensible humor, hideous sarcasm, displeasing feelings, unpalatable confidence, offensive compassion, villainous inspiration and a devilish wit. I am quite grotesque in my imperfectness and I am not ashamed to admit it.
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Shannon L. Alder
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Do you want to kill his love for you? What sort of existence will he have if you rob him of the fruits of his ambition, if you take him from the splendour of a great political career, if you close the doors of public life against him, if you condemn him to sterile failure, he who was made for triumph and success? Women are not meant to judge us but to forgive us when we need forgiveness. Pardon, not punishment, is their mission. Why should you scourge him with rods for a sin done in his youth, before he knew you, before he knew himself? A man's life is of more value than a woman's. It has larger issues, wider scope, greater ambitions. A women's life revolves around curves of emotions. It is upon lines of intellect that man's life progresses. Don't make any terrible mistake, Lady Chiltern. A woman who can keep a man's love, and love him in return, has done all the world wants of women, or should want of them.
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Oscar Wilde (An Ideal Husband)
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We caught the tread of dancing feet, We loitered down the moonlit street, And stopped beneath the harlot's house. Inside, above the din and fray, We heard the loud musicians play The 'Treues Liebes Herz' of Strauss. Like strange mechanical grotesques, Making fantastic arabesques, The shadows raced across the blind. We watched the ghostly dancers spin To sound of horn and violin, Like black leaves wheeling in the wind. Like wire-pulled automatons, Slim silhouetted skeletons Went sidling through the slow quadrille, Then took each other by the hand, And danced a stately saraband; Their laughter echoed thin and shrill. Sometimes a clockwork puppet pressed A phantom lover to her breast, Sometimes they seemed to try to sing. Sometimes a horrible marionette Came out, and smoked its cigarette Upon the steps like a live thing. Then, turning to my love, I said, 'The dead are dancing with the dead, The dust is whirling with the dust.' But she--she heard the violin, And left my side, and entered in: Love passed into the house of lust. Then suddenly the tune went false, The dancers wearied of the waltz, The shadows ceased to wheel and whirl. And down the long and silent street, The dawn, with silver-sandalled feet, Crept like a frightened girl.
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Oscar Wilde
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Of course to one so modern as I am, `Enfant de mon siΓ¨cle,’ merely to look at the world will be always lovely. I tremble with pleasure when I think that on the very day of my leaving prison both the laburnum and the lilac will be blooming in the gardens, and that I shall see the wind stir into restless beauty the swaying gold of the one, and make the other toss the pale purple of its plumes, so that all the air shall be Arabia for me. Linnaeus fell on his knees and wept for joy when he saw for the first time the long heath of some English upland made yellow with the tawny aromatic brooms of the common furze; and I know that for me, to whom flowers are part of desire, there are tears waiting in the petals of some rose. It has always been so with me from my boyhood. There is not a single colour hidden away in the chalice of a flower, or the curve of a shell, to which, by some subtle sympathy with the very soul of things, my nature does not answer. Like Gautier, I have always been one of those β€˜pour qui le monde visible existe.
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Oscar Wilde (De Profundis and Other Writings)