Orphan Train Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Orphan Train. Here they are! All 200 of them:

I've come to think that's what heaven is- a place in the memory of others where our best selves live on.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I like the assumption that everyone is trying his best, and we should all just be kind to each other.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Life is not easy. We all have problems-even tragedies-to deal with, and luck has nothing to do with it. Bad luck is only the superstitious excuse for those who don't have the wit to deal with the problems of life.
Joan Lowery Nixon (In the Face of Danger (Orphan Train Adventures, #3))
Time constricts and flattens, you know. It's not evenly weighted. Certain moments linger in the mind and others disappear.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
So is it just human nature to believe that things happen for a reason - to find some shred of meaning even in the worst experiences?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I learned long ago that loss is not only probable but inevitable. I know what it means to lose everything, to let go of one life and find another. And now I feel, with a strange, deep certainty, that it must be my lot in life to be taught that lesson over and over again.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
And so it is that you learn how to pass, if you're lucky, to look like everyone else, even though you're broken inside.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
My entire life has felt like chance. Random moments of loss and connection. This is the first one that feels, instead, like fate.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
There's more to getting to where you're going then just knowing there's a road.
Joan Lowery Nixon (In the Face of Danger (Orphan Train Adventures, #3))
It is good to test your limits now and then, learn what the body is capable of, what you can endure.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
people who matter in our lives stay with us, haunting our most ordinary moments. They’re with us in the grocery store, as we turn a corner, chat with a friend. They rise up through the pavement; we absorb them through our soles.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
You got to learn to take what people are willing to give.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
you are only as interesting as you are useful to someone
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I am not glad she is dead, but I am not sorry she is gone.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
She knows too well what it's like to tamp down your natural inclinations, to force a smile when you feel numb. [...] The expression of emotion does not come naturally, so you learn to fake it. To pretend. To display an empathy you don't really feel. And so it is that you learn to pass, if you're lucky, to look like everyone else, even though you're broken inside.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Turtles carry their homes on their backs.” Running her finger over the tattoo, she tells him what her dad told her: “They’re exposed and hidden at the same time. They’re a symbol of strength and perseverance.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Do you believe in spirits? Or ghosts?...Yes, I do. I believe in ghosts....They're the ones who haunt us. The ones who have left us behind." "Vivian has come back to the idea that the people who matter in our lives stay with us, haunting our ordinary moments. They're with us in the grocery store, as we turn the corner, chat with a friend. They rise up through the pavement; we absorb them through our soles." "The things that matter stay with you, seep into your skin.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Upright and do right make all right.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
And they all pretend they're Orphans And their memory's like a train You can see it getting smaller as it pulls away And the things you can't remember Tell the things you can't forget that History puts a saint in every dream
Tom Waits
You can't find peace until you fin fall the pieces.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Having a baby is part of a woman's life, and it is surely a great waste to be afraid of life.
Joan Lowery Nixon (In the Face of Danger (Orphan Train Adventures, #3))
you can’t find peace until you find all the pieces. She wants to help Vivian find some kind of peace, elusive and fleeting as it may be.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
easier to assume that people have it out for you than to be disappointed when they don’t come through.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
He reaches over and touches my necklace. "You still have it. That gives me faith." "Faith in what?" "God, I suppose. No, I don't know. Survival.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
So I am learning to pretend, to smile and nod, to display empathy I do not feel. I am learning to pass, to look like everyone else, even though I feel broken inside.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Then the train resumed its journey, leaving in its wake, in a snowy field in Poland, hundreds of naked orphans without a tomb.
Elie Wiesel (Night (The Night Trilogy, #1))
So is it just human nature to believe that things happen for a reason — to find some shred of meaning even in the worst experiences?" Molly asks when Vivian reads some of these stories aloud. "It certainly helps," Vivian says.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I love you," he writes again and again. "I can't bear to live without you. I'm counting the minutes until I see you." The words he uses are the idioms of popular songs and poems in the newspaper. And mine to him are no less cliched. I puzzle over the onionskin, trying to spill my heart onto the page. But I can only come up with the same words, in the same order, and hope the depth of feeling beneath them gives them weight and substance. I love you. I miss you. Be careful. Be safe.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I learned long ago that loss is not only probably but inevitable.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I did love him. But I did not love him like I loved Dutchy: beyond reason. Maybe you only get one of those in a lifetime, I don't know. But it was all right. It was enough.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I have come to think that's where Heaven is, a place in the memories of other where our best selves live
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Molly learned long ago that a lot of the heartbreak and betrayal that other people fear their entire lives, she has already faced. Father dead. Mother off the deep end. Shuttled around and rejected time and time again. And still she breathes and sleeps and grows taller. She wakes up every morning and puts on clothes. So when she says it's okay, what she means is that she knows she can survive just about anything.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
To my way of thinking, the slavery issue is just an excuse to allow some people to do hateful things and feel righteous about it.
Joan Lowery Nixon (A Dangerous Promise (Orphan Train Adventures, #5))
Forgive me if I'm wrong. But are you-were you-did you come here on a train from New York about ten years ago?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
A lady wants to feel pretty, no matter how much money she has.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
And I know, with the newfuond clarity of being in a relationship myself, that my own parents were never happy together, and probably never would have been, whatever the circumstances
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
She has never tried to find out what happened to her family — her mother or her relatives in Ireland. But over and over, Molly begins to understand as she listens to the tapes, Vivian has come back to the idea that the people who matter in our lives stay with us, haunting our most ordinary moments. They're with us in the grocery store, as we turn a corner, chat with a friend. They rise up through the pavement; we absorb them through our soles.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Remember: eye contact," he says. "And be sure to smile." "You are such a mom." "You know what your problem is?" "That my boyfriend is acting like a mom?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
We are headed toward the unknown, and we have no choice but to sit quietly in our hard seats and let ourselves be taken there.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
And so your personality is shaped. You know too much, and this knowledge makes you wary. You grow fearful and mistrustful. The expression of emotion does not come naturally, so you learn to fake it. To pretend. To display an empathy you don’t actually feel. And so it is that you learn how to pass, if you’re lucky, to look like everyone else, even though you’re broken inside.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
As with Dutchy and Carmine on the train, this little cluster of women has become a kind of family to me. Like an abandoned foal that nestles against cows in the barnyard, maybe I just need to feel the warmth of belonging. And if I'm not going to find that with the Byrnes, I will find it, however partial and illusory, with the women in the sewing room.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
If you’re disorganized, you risk losing everything.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
We're human. We break things. It's what we do with the brokenness that counts.
Jody Hedlund (Searching for You (Orphan Train, #3))
Sumire was a hopeless romantic, a bit set in her ways - innocent of the ways of the world, to put a nice spin on it. Start her talking and she'd go on nonstop, but if she was with someone she didn't get along with - most people in the world, in other words - she barely opened her mouth. She smoked too much, and you could count on her to lose her ticket every time she took the train. She'd get so engrossed in her thoughts at times she'd forget to eat, and she was as thin as one of those war orphans in an old Italian film - like a stick with eyes. I'd love to show you a photo of her but I don't have any. She hated having her photograph taken - no desire to leave behind for posterity a Portrait of the Artist as a Young (Wo)Man.
Haruki Murakami (Sputnik Sweetheart)
Time constricts and flattens, you know. It’s not evenly weighted. Certain moments linger in the mind and others disappear. The first twenty-three years of my life are the ones that shaped me, and the fact that I’ve lived almost seven decades since then is irrelevant.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
In Kinvara, poor as we were, and unstable, we at least had family nearby, people who knew us. We shared traditions and a way of looking at the world. We didn’t know until we left how much we took those things for granted.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
An unknown place in some distant land can’t undo the tragedies of the past. If it could, we’d all be travelers, spending our natural lives on steamer ships and trains.
Mimi Matthews (A Modest Independence (Parish Orphans of Devon, #2))
Nothing encumbered movement more than fear, which was often the most difficult burden to surrender.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
people who matter in our lives stay with us, haunting our most ordinary moments.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I'll play your fucking game. But I don't have to play by your rules.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
...that the quickest relief will come in forgetting.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
If you want trouble, find yourself a redhead.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
That you are only as interesting as you are useful to someone.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
And as the train whistled its imminent departure, a small girl wearing neat plaits and someone else's shoes climbed its iron stairs. Smoke filled the platform, people waved and hollered, a stray dog ran barking through the crowds. Nobody noticed as the little girl stepped over the shadowed threshold; not even Aunt Ada, who some might've expected to be sheperherding her orphaned niece towards her uncertain future. And so, when the essence of light and life that had been Vivien Longmeyer contracted itself for safekeeping and disappeared deep inside her, the world kept moving and nobody saw it happen.
Kate Morton (The Secret Keeper)
Mrs. Scatcherd raps Dutchy's knuckles several times with a long wooden ruler, though it seems to me a halfhearted penalty. He barely winces, then shakes his hands twice in the air and winks at me. Truly , there isn't much more she can do. Stripped of family and identity, fed meager rations, consigned to hard wooden seats until we are to be, as Slobbery Jack suggested, sold into slavery — our mere existence is punishment enough.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
VIII O when so much has been and gone behind you—grief, to say the least— expect no help from anyone. Board a train, get to the coast. It’s wider and it’s deeper. This superiority’s not a thing of joy especially. Mind you, if one has to feel as orphans do, better in places where the view stirs somehow and cannot sting.
Joseph Brodsky (Collected Poems in English)
I have seen people at their worst, at their most desperate and selfish, and this knowledge makes me wary. So I’m learning to pretend, to smile and nod, to display empathy I do not feel. I am learning to pass, to look like everyone else, even though I feel broken inside.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I'm not a heroine, I just play heroines. Also psychotics, vamps, orphans, hookers, housewives, and ”on one memorable occasionâ ”a singing rutabaga. It was never my ambition to utilize my extensive dramatic training by playing a musical vegetable. However, as my agent is so fond of pointing out, there are more actors in New York than there are people in most other cities. Translation: Beggars can't be choosers.
Laura Resnick (Disappearing Nightly (Esther Diamond, #1))
I have been so alone on this journey, cut off from my past. However hard I try, I will always feel alien and strange. And now I've stumbled on a fellow outsider, one who speaks my language without saying a word.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
In portaging from one river to another, Wabanakis had to carry their canoes and all other possessions. Everyone knew the value of traveling light and understood that it required leaving some things behind. Nothing encumbered movement more than fear, which was often the most difficult burden to surrender.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
the people who matter in our lives stay with us, haunting our most ordinary moments. They’re with us in the grocery store, as we turn a corner, chat with a friend. They rise up through the pavement; we absorb them through our soles.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
She should be grateful. Without Vivian she'd be sliding down a dark path toward nowhere good . But it kind of feels nice to nurture her resentment, to foster it. It's something she can savor and control, this feeling of having been wronged by the world. That she has fulfilled her role as a thieving member of the underclass, now indentured to this genteel midwestern white lady, is too perfect for words.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Options. She can sleep with the door open, wander around freely, come and go without someone watching her every move. She hadn’t realized how much of a toll the years of judgment and criticism, implied and expressed, have taken on her. It’s as if she’s been walking on a wire, trying to keep her balance, and now, for the first time, she is on solid ground.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Let’s make a promise,” he says. “To find each other.” “How can we? We’ll probably end up in different places.” “I know.” “And my name will be changed.” “Mine too, maybe. But we can try.” Carmine flops over, tucking his legs beneath him and stretching his arms, and both of us shift to accommodate him. “Do you believe in fate?” I ask. “What’s that again?” “That everything is decided. You’re just—you know—living it out.” “God has it all planned in advance.” I nod. “I dunno. I don’t like the plan much so far.” “Me either.” We both laugh.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
mixed together—because Dina refuses to acknowledge
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Test your limits. Learn what you can endure.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Her bare feet whispered across the floor as she approached him with the sort of stealth that only small children and trained killers possess.
Obie Williams (The Crimes of Orphans)
A lady wants to feel pretty, no matter how much money she has.” Ever
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
And anyway, how do you talk about losing everything?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Richard knows a bar that's open until two and they go off in search of it, the two girls tottering on their heels and swaying against the men, who seem all too happy to support them.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Girls from my graduating class come into the store brandishing solitaire diamonds like Legion of Honor medals, as if they’ve accomplished something significant—which I guess they think they have, though all I can see is a future of washing some man’s clothes stretching ahead of them.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
And even if she loses the charms, she thinks, they’ll always be a part of her. The things that matter stay with you, seep into your skin. People get tattoos to have a permanent reminder of things they love or believe or fear, but though she’ll never regret the turtle, she has no need to ink her flesh again to remember the past. She had not known the markings would be etched so deep.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I learned long ago that loss is not only probable but inevitable. I know what it means to lose everything, to let go of one life and find another. And now I feel, with a strange, deep certainty, that it must be my lot in life to be taught that lesson over and over again. Lying in that hospital bed I feel all of it: the terrible weight of sorrow, the crumbling of my dreams. I sob uncontrollably for all that I've lost - the love of my life, my family, a future I'd dared to envision. And in that moment I make a decision. I can't go through this again. I can't give myself to someone completely only to lose them. I don't want, ever again to experience the loss of someone I love beyond reason.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I feel myself retreating to someplace deep inside. It is a pitiful kind of childhood, to know that no one loves you or is taking care of you, to always be on the outside looking in. I feel a decade older than my years. I know too much; I have seen people at their worst, at their most desperate and selfish, and this knowledge makes me wary. So I am learning to pretend, to smile and nod, to display empathy I do not feel. I am learning to pass, to look like everyone else, even though I feel broken inside.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
As I'm sure you know, whenever you are examine someone else's belongings, you are bound to learn many interesting things about the person of which you were not previously aware. You might examine some letters you sister received recently, for instance, and learn that she was planning on running away with an archduke. You might examine the suitcase of another passenger on a train you are taking, and learn that he had been secretly photographing you for the past six months. I recently looked in the refrigerator of one of my enemies and learned she was a vegetarian, or at least pretending to be one, or had a vegetarian visiting her for a few days. And as the Baudelaire orphans examined some of the objets in Olaf's trunk, they learned a great deal of unpleasant things.
Lemony Snicket (The Carnivorous Carnival (A Series of Unfortunate Events, #9))
Other signs of the apocalypse proliferate. After a pop-up ad appears on her screen, Vivian announces that she plans to sign up for Netflix. She buys a digital camera on Amazon with one click. She asks Molly if she's ever seen the sneezing baby panda video on YouTube. She even joins Facebook.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Jack would laugh if he knew, but she's been in he system long enough to understand that it all comes down to documentation. Get your papers in order, with the right signatures and record keeping, and the charges will be dropped, money released, whatever. If you're disorganized, you risk losing everything.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Time constricts and flattens, you know. It’s not evenly weighted. Certain moments linger in the mind and others disappear. The first twenty-three years of my life are the ones that shaped me, and the fact that I’ve lived almost seven decades since then is irrelevant. Those years have nothing to do with the questions you ask.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
When Vivian describes how it felt to be at the mercy of strangers, Molly nods. She knows full well what it’s like to tamp down your natural inclinations, to force a smile when you feel numb. After a while you don’t know what your own needs are anymore. You’re grateful for the slightest hint of kindness, and then, as you get older, suspicious. Why would anyone do anything for you without expecting something in return? And anyway—most of the time they don’t. More often than not, you see the worst of people. You learn that most adults lie. That most people only look out for themselves. That you are only as interesting as you are useful to someone. And so your personality is shaped. You know too much, and this knowledge makes you wary. You grow fearful and mistrustful. The expression of emotion does not come naturally, so you learn to fake it. To pretend. To display an empathy you don’t actually feel. And so it is that you learn how to pass, if you’re lucky, to look like everyone else, even though you’re broken inside.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
The ‘c’ sounds like
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I’ve come to think that’s what heaven is—a place in the memory of others where our best selves live on. Maybe
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
she knows from experience that tough and weird is preferable to pathetic and vulnerable, and she wears her Goth persona like armor.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Want to read my most favorites books? They are Wildflowers, Bridie's Daughter, and Secrets! You'll be glad you did!
Robert Noonan
He squints at me. “Except for the red hair and freckles, you look okay. You’ll be fine and dandy sitting at the table with a napkin on your lap.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
How strange, I think—that I am in a place my parents have never been and will never see. How strange that I am here and they are gone.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
The first twenty-three years of my life are the ones that shaped me, and the fact
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
The stark gray sky and bare tree limbs feel more suited to her than the uncomplicated promise of sunny spring days.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
...tough and weird is preferable to pathetic and vulnerable...
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I feel a joy so strong it’s almost painful—a knife’s edge of joy.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
It's as if she assumes everything will go right, and when it doesn't - which, of course, is pretty often - she is surprised and affronted.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I am learning to pretend, to smile and nod, to display empathy I do not feel. I am learning to pass, to look like everyone else, even though I feel broken inside.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Jeez Louise, this is why
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Time constricts and flattens, you know. It’s not evenly weighted. Certain moments linger in the mind and others disappear.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I learned long ago that loss is not only probable but inevitable.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I think she'd prefer pancakes. Do you think she'd like blueberry pancakes? Who doesn't like blueberry pancakes?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Whether your journey is long or short, He will help you as long as you place your trust in Him.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Actually, I did it because when we lived on Indian Island we had this turtle named Shelly.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
When I shut my eyes in the warm bath, I feel as if I’m floating inside a cloud.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Do you believe in fate?” I ask. “What’s that again?” “That everything is decided. You’re just—you know—living it out.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
The child you select is yours for free,” he adds, “on a ninety-day trial. At which point, if you so choose, you may send him back.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I've come to think that's what heaven is - a place in the memory of others where our best selves live on." ,
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
But it kind of feels nice to nurture her resentment, to foster it. It’s something she can savor and control, this feeling of having been wronged by the world.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
What’s the best thing that happened to you in the past ten years?” I ask. “Seeing you again.” Smiling, I push back against his chest. “Besides that.” “Meeting you the first time.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Know what a symbol is?...Shit that stands for shit.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I know all too well how it is when the beautiful visions you’ve been fed don’t match up with reality.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I am ninety-one years old, and almost everyone who was once in my life is now a ghost. Sometimes these
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Molly is suddenly struck by the fact that Vivian wrote these words on this sheet of paper more than eighty years ago. Upright and do right make all right.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
So you're saying that sometimes it takes courage to stop living in the shadows and move into the sunshine?' His question was genuine and warm. She exhaled her relief. 'Yes.
Jody Hedlund (Together Forever (Orphan Train, #2))
His training had consisted of learning a little bit about everything from people who knew everything about something.
Gregg Andrew Hurwitz (The Nowhere Man (Orphan X, #2))
The things that matter stay with you, seep into your skin.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
If you going to steal a book thought, you should at least take the nicest one, otherwise what's the point?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I think the mission of the Society is a noble one and I'm glad of the small part I can play in giving children a wholesome life away from the vices of the city.
Jody Hedlund (Together Forever (Orphan Train, #2))
I get the sense that my abandonment, and the circumstances that brought me to them, matter little to them, compared to the need I might fill in their lives. - (Niamh/Dorothy)
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Always remember, our responsibility is to God for these children. We bear in mind One died for them as for the children of the rich and happy.
Jody Hedlund (Together Forever (Orphan Train, #2))
You must also keep your faith in God to guide you forward if the way is not clear. Whether the journey is long or short, He will help you as long as you place your trust in Him.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
wanted to be like an orphan who had bummed around the country on trains and just arrived out of nowhere,
Walter Isaacson (Steve Jobs)
She is so white-hot furious she can barely see. She stokes the fire of her hatred, feeding it tidbits about bigoted Dina and spineless mushmouth Ralph, because she knows that just beyond the rage is a sorrow so enervating it could render her immobile. She needs to keep moving, flickering around the room. She needs o fill her bags and get the hell out of here.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Dusk softens the sharp points of trees outside my window; the sky slowly darkens, then blackens around an orb of moon. Hours later, a faint blue tinge yields to the soft pastels of dawn, and soon enough sun is streaming in, the stop-start rhythm of the train making it all feel like still photography, thousands of images that taken together create a scene in motion.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I didn’t want anyone to know I had parents. I wanted to be like an orphan who had bummed around the country on trains and just arrived out of nowhere, with no roots, no connections, no background.
Walter Isaacson (Steve Jobs)
Maybe it doesn’t matter how much gets done. Maybe the value is in the process—in touching each item, in naming and identifying, in acknowledging the significance of a cardigan, a pair of children’s boots. “It’s
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
No substitute for the living, perhaps, but I wasn’t given a choice. I could take solace in their presence or I could fall down in a heap, lamenting what I’d lost. The ghosts whispered to me, telling me to go on.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
See the interlaced strands?' She touched the raised pattern with a knobby finger. 'These trace a never-ending path, leading away from home and circling back. When you wear this, you'll never be far from the place you started.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
If I am honest...I will say that I simply need a warm, dry place to live. I want enough food to eat, clothes, and shoes that will protect me from the cold. I want calmness and order. More than anything, I want to feel safe in my bed.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
She has learned that she can control her emotions by thinking of her chest cavity as an enormous box with a chain lock. She opens the box and stuffs in any stray unmanageable feelings, any wayward sadness or regret, and clamps it shut.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I’m one of few children on the train who can read. Mam taught me all my letters years ago, in Ireland, then taught me how to spell. When we got to New York, she’d make me read to her, anything with words on it—crates and bottles I found in the street.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
When Vivian describes how it felt to be at the mercy of strangers, Molly nods. She knows full well what it’s like to tamp down your natural inclinations, to force a smile when you feel numb. After a while you don’t know what your own needs are anymore.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
The bitterness and alcohol and depression are stripped away from these phantom incarnations, and they console and protect me in death as they never did in life. I’ve come to think that’s what heaven is—a place in the memory of others where our best selves live on.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Vivian has come back to the idea that the people who matter in our lives stay with us, haunting our most ordinary moments. They're with us in the grocery store, as we turn a corner, chat with a friend. They rise up through the pavement; we absorb them through our soles.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Vivian has come back to the idea that the people who matter in our lives stay with us, haunting our most ordinary moments. They’re with us in the grocery store, as we turn a corner, chat with a friend. They rise up through the pavement; we absorb them through our soles.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I learned long ago that loss is not only probable but inevitable. I know what it means to lose everything, to let go of one life and find another. And now I feel, with a strange, deep certainty, that it must be my lot in life to be taught that lesson over and over again.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
She was every Cora she'd ever been: Cora X, Cora Kaufmann, Cora Carlisle. She was an orphan on a roof, a lucky girl on a train, a dearly loved daughter by chance. She was a blushing bride of seventeen, a sad and stoic wife, a loving mother, an embittered chaperone, and a daughter pushed away. She was a lover and a lewd cohabitator, a liar and a cherished friend, and aunt and a kindly grandmother, a champion of the fallen, and a late-in-coming fighter for reason over fear. Even in those final hours, quiet and rocking, arriving and departing, she knew who she was.
Laura Moriarty (The Chaperone)
I know too much; I have seen people at their worst, at their most desperate and selfish, and this knowledge makes me wary. So I am learning to pretend, to smile and nod, to display empathy I do not feel. I am learning to pass, to look like everyone else, even though I feel broken inside.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Wandering among the cardboard boxes, Vivian trails her fingertips across the tops of them, peering at their cryptic labels: The store, 1960–. The Nielsens. Valuables. “I suppose this is why people have children, isn’t it?” she muses. “So somebody will care about the stuff they leave behind.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Molly touches Vivian’s shoulder, frail and bony under her thin silk cardigan. She half turns, half smiles, her eyes brimming with tears. Her hand flutters to her clavicle, to the silver chain around her neck, the claddagh charm—those tiny hands clasping a crowned heart: love, loyalty, friendship—a never-ending path that leads away from home and circles back. What a journey Vivian and this necklace have taken, Molly thinks: from a cobblestoned village on the coast of Ireland to a tenement in New York to a train filled with children, steaming westward through farmland, to a lifetime in Minnesota. And now to this moment, nearly a hundred years after it all began, on the porch of an old house in Maine
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
agents shall be recruited from orphans. They shall be trained in the following techniques: interpretation of signs and marks, palmistry and similar techniques of interpreting body marks, magic and illusions, the duties of the ashramas, the stages of life, and the science of omens and augury. Alternatively, they can be trained in physiology and sociology, the art of men and society.
Tarquin Hall (The Case of the Missing Servant (Vish Puri, #1))
When the train arrived, the sisters put the children on board, obviously never to return, but they kept Paul who was there simply help with the baggage and who had a great deal of difficulty speaking and expressing himself. The transfer of orphans from this institute was a regular occurrence. Paul remembers two women with dark skin who came to categorize the children. One of them, with short nappy hair spoke to Paul, telling him that she had seen him elsewhere (at La Miséricorde Home), and that he was separated from the other children because of a fractured skull that he experienced at the age of 2. Paul stayed at the Chaumont Institute for 3 years. He noticed a great turnover of children – these were transferred to the Chaumont Institute, and then sent on to the United States.
Rod Vienneau (Collusion : The dark history of the Duplessis Orphans.)
Sometime in the second week it becomes clear to Molly that “cleaning out the attic” means taking things out, fretting over them for a few minutes, and putting them back where they were, in a slightly neater stack. Out of the two dozen boxes she and Vivian have been through so far, only a short pile of musty books and some yellowed linen have been deemed too ruined to keep. “I don’t think I’m helping you much,” Molly says. “Well, that’s true,” Vivian says. “But I’m helping you, aren’t I?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Despite the landlord’s disapproval, the sweltering heat, the gloomy rooms, and the cacophony of strange noises, so unfamiliar to my country ears, I felt another swell of hope. As I looked around our four rooms, it did seem that we were off to a fresh start, having left behind the many hardships of life in Kinvara: the damp that sank into our bones, the miserable, cramped hut, our father’s drinking—did I mention that?—that threw every small gain into peril. Here, our da had the promise of a job. We could pull a chain for light; the twist of a knob brought running water. Just outside the door, in a dry hallway, a toilet and bathtub. However modest, this was a chance for a new beginning.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
If Paul brought the first generation of Christians the useful skills of a trained theologian, Origen was the first great philosopher to rethink the new religion from first principles. As his philosophical enemy, the anti-Christian Porphyry, summed it up, he 'introduced Greek ideas to foreign fables' -- that is, gave a barbarous eastern religion the intellectual respectability of a philosophical defense. Origen was also a phenomenon. As Eusebius put it admiringly, 'even the facts from his cradle are worth mentioning'. Origen came from Alexandria, the second city of the empire and then it's intellectual centre; his father's martyrdom left him an orphan at seventeen with six younger brothers. He was a hard working prodigy, at eighteen head of the Catechetical School, and already trained as a literary scholar and teacher. But at this point, probably in 203, he became a religious fanatic and remained one for the next fifty years. He gave up his job and sold his books to concentrate on religion. he slept on the floor, ate no meat, drank no wine, had only one coat and no shoes. He almost certainly castrated himself, in obedience to the notorious text, Matthew 19:12, 'there are some who have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven's sake.' Origen's learning was massive and it was of a highly original kind: he always went back to the sources and thought through the whole process himself. This he learned Hebrew and, according to Eusebius, 'got into his possession the original writings extant among the Jews in the actual Hebrew character'. These included the discovery of lost texts; in the case of the psalms, Origen collected not only the four known texts but three others unearthed, including 'one he found at Jericho in a jar'. The result was an enormous tome, the Hexapla, which probably existed in only one manuscript now lost, setting out the seven alternative texts in parallel columns. He applied the same principles of original research to every aspect of Christianity and sacred literature. He seems to have worked all day and though most of the night, and was a compulsive writer. Even the hardy Jerome later complained: 'Has anyone read everything Origen wrote?'
Paul Johnson (A History of Christianity)
My dad gave me these charms, and each one represents something different. The raven protects against black magic. The bear inspires courage. The fish signifies a refusal to recognize other people’s magic.” “I never knew those charms had meaning.” Absently, Vivian reaches up and touches her own necklace. Looking closely at the pewter pendant for the first time, Molly asks, “Is your necklace—significant?” “Well, it is to me. But it doesn’t have any magical qualities.” She smiles. “Maybe it does,” Molly says. “I think of these qualities as metaphorical, you know? So black magic is whatever leads people to the dark side—their own greed or insecurity that makes them do destructive things. And the warrior spirit of the bear protects us not only from others who might hurt us but our own internal demons. And I think other people’s magic is what we’re vulnerable to—how we’re led astray. So . . . my first question for you is kind of a weird one. I guess you could think of it as metaphorical, too.” She glances at the tape recorder once more and takes a deep breath. “Okay, here goes. Do you believe in spirits? Or ghosts?” “My, that is quite a question.” Clasping her frail, veined hands in her lap, Vivian gazes out the window. For a moment Molly thinks she isn’t going to answer. And then, so quietly that she has to lean forward in her chair to hear, Vivian says, “Yes, I do. I believe in ghosts.” “Do you think they’re . . . present in our lives?” Vivian fixes her hazel eyes on Molly and nods. “They’re the ones who haunt us,” she says. “The ones who have left us behind.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Her pretty mouth curled into the beginning of a smile. He’d learned that she doled out smiles sparingly, and so he gave himself permission to study her face, her dainty chin and nose and the slenderness of her lips. If he were to kiss her, he would have to do so tenderly, otherwise he might crush her. Her smile faded. “Reverend?” Miss Pendleton’s voice wavered with uncertainty. When he finally turned his attention and thoughts away from her mouth, he realized he’d made a complete fool of himself by staring at her like a schoolboy daydreaming about his first kiss. From the way she was twisting at her reticule, and the slight pink in her cheeks, he could see that he’d embarrassed her. He prayed she hadn’t been able to read his thoughts. Why in all that was righteous had he been thinking about kissing her anyway? What had overcome him?
Jody Hedlund (An Awakened Heart (Orphan Train, #0.5))
In the strange, shadowed lighting of my small room Dutchy takes off his belt and dress shirt and hangs them over the only chair. He stretches out on the bed in his undershirt and trousers, his back against the wall, and I lean against him, feeling his body curve around mine. His warm breath is on my neck, his arm on my waist. I wonder for a moment if he'll kiss me. I want him to. "How can this be?" he murmurs. "It isn't possible. I've dreamed of it. Have you?" I don't know what to say. I never dared to imagine that I'd see him again. In my experience, when you lose somebody you care about, they stay gone. "What's the best thing that happened to you in the past ten years?" I ask. "Seeing you again," Smiling, I push back against his chest. "Besides that" "Meeting you the first time." We both laugh. "Besides that." "Hmm, besides that," he muses, his lips on my shoulder. "Is there anything besides that?" he pulls me close, his hand cupping my hip bone. And though I've never done anything like this before - have barely ever been alone with a man, certainly not a man in his undershirt - I'm not nervous. When he kisses me, my whole body hums.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
As I became older, I was given many masks to wear. I could be a laborer laying railroad tracks across the continent, with long hair in a queue to be pulled by pranksters; a gardener trimming the shrubs while secretly planting a bomb; a saboteur before the day of infamy at Pearl Harbor, signaling the Imperial Fleet; a kamikaze pilot donning his headband somberly, screaming 'Banzai' on my way to my death; a peasant with a broad-brimmed straw hat in a rice paddy on the other side of the world, stooped over to toil in the water; an obedient servant in the parlor, a houseboy too dignified for my own good; a washerman in the basement laundry, removing stains using an ancient secret; a tyrant intent on imposing my despotism on the democratic world, opposed by the free and the brave; a party cadre alongside many others, all of us clad in coordinated Mao jackets; a sniper camouflaged in the trees of the jungle, training my gunsights on G.I. Joe; a child running with a body burning from napalm, captured in an unforgettable photo; an enemy shot in the head or slaughtered by the villageful; one of the grooms in a mass wedding of couples, having met my mate the day before through our cult leader; an orphan in the last airlift out of a collapsed capital, ready to be adopted into the good life; a black belt martial artist breaking cinderblocks with his head, in an advertisement for Ginsu brand knives with the slogan 'but wait--there's more' as the commercial segued to show another free gift; a chef serving up dog stew, a trick on the unsuspecting diner; a bad driver swerving into the next lane, exactly as could be expected; a horny exchange student here for a year, eager to date the blonde cheerleader; a tourist visiting, clicking away with his camera, posing my family in front of the monuments and statues; a ping pong champion, wearing white tube socks pulled up too high and batting the ball with a wicked spin; a violin prodigy impressing the audience at Carnegie Hall, before taking a polite bow; a teen computer scientist, ready to make millions on an initial public offering before the company stock crashes; a gangster in sunglasses and a tight suit, embroiled in a turf war with the Sicilian mob; an urban greengrocer selling lunch by the pound, rudely returning change over the counter to the black patrons; a businessman with a briefcase of cash bribing a congressman, a corrupting influence on the electoral process; a salaryman on my way to work, crammed into the commuter train and loyal to the company; a shady doctor, trained in a foreign tradition with anatomical diagrams of the human body mapping the flow of life energy through a multitude of colored points; a calculus graduate student with thick glasses and a bad haircut, serving as a teaching assistant with an incomprehensible accent, scribbling on the chalkboard; an automobile enthusiast who customizes an imported car with a supercharged engine and Japanese decals in the rear window, cruising the boulevard looking for a drag race; a illegal alien crowded into the cargo hold of a smuggler's ship, defying death only to crowd into a New York City tenement and work as a slave in a sweatshop. My mother and my girl cousins were Madame Butterfly from the mail order bride catalog, dying in their service to the masculinity of the West, and the dragon lady in a kimono, taking vengeance for her sisters. They became the television newscaster, look-alikes with their flawlessly permed hair. Through these indelible images, I grew up. But when I looked in the mirror, I could not believe my own reflection because it was not like what I saw around me. Over the years, the world opened up. It has become a dizzying kaleidoscope of cultural fragments, arranged and rearranged without plan or order.
Frank H. Wu (Yellow: Race in America Beyond Black and White)
I am learning to pretend, to smile and nod, to display
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
it?” “Friday, April fourth, ma’am.” She coughs. Then she doubles over and coughs
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
All those children sent on trains to the Midwest—collected off the streets of New York like refuse, garbage on a barge, to be sent as far away as possible, out of sight.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Regret?” Vivian raises her shoulders in a shrug. “I’m not sure what good it is to regret.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I am the only one of my siblings with red hair. When I asked my da where I got it, he joked that there must’ve been rust in the pipes. His own hair was dark—“cured,” he said, through years of toil—but when he was young it was more like auburn. Nothing like yours, he said. Your hair is as vivid as a Kinvara sunset, autumn leaves, the Koi goldfish in the window of that hotel in Galway. Mr. Grote doesn’t
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
The reading part of her feels private, between her and the characters in a book.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Margolin was raised in New Orleans, in the Jewish Orphans’ Home, which entitled her to a first-class education at the Isidore Newman Manual Training School. Together these two institutions—both founded upon a bedrock of Hebrew benevolence and social justice—
Marlene Trestman (Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin (Southern Biography Series))
We both start laughing - at the absurdity of our shared experience, the relief of recognition. We cling to each other like survivors of a shipwreck, astonished that neither of us drowned.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I can’t imagine why you didn’t memorize this route on the
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
The deputy made one phone call,
Johnny Gunn (Jack Slater: Orphan Train to Cattle Baron)
Sometimes you don’t look for perfect. Sometimes enough is the most you can hope for.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train Girl)
Many years ago she'd trained to be a nurse to help the sick, but nowadays it seemed all she could do was keep them company as they died
Marion Kummerow (The Orphan's Mother)
Gerald Junior’s
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
am learning to pretend, to smile and nod, to display empathy I do not feel. I am learning to pass, to look like everyone else, even though I feel broken inside.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I don’t think I’ve missed much.” “Wireless Internet, digital photographs, smartphones, Facebook, YouTube . . .” Molly taps the fingers of one hand. “The entire world has changed in the past decade.” “Not my world.” “But you’re missing out on so much.” Vivian laughs. “I hardly think FaceTube—whatever that is—would improve my quality of life.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Father, I can’t do that,” Lydia protested. “I don’t even know the man. How do you know that he will be good to me? You haven’t seen Mr. Byron in years. How do
Zoe Matthews (Orphan Train Romance Series (Orphan Train #1-5))
Sycophantic . . . As a newcomer Molly
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
After a while you don’t know what your own needs are anymore.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
It was pouring earlier, great sheets of rain, and now the clouds outside the window are crystal tipped like mountain peaks in the sky, rays emanating downward like an illustration in a children's bible.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Turtles carry their homes on their backs.” Running her finger over the tattoo, she tells him what her dad told her: “They’re exposed and hidden at the same time. They’re a symbol of strength and perseverance.” “That’s very deep.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Sometimes these spirits have been more real to me than people, more real than God. They fill silence with their weight, dense and warm, like bread dough rising under cloth.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
She feels like a circus clown who wakes up one morning and no longer wants to glue on the red rubber nose.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
woman she pays to take care of her, she is as alone as a person can be. She has never tried to
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Other resources I relied on during my orphan train research were the Children’s Aid Society; the New York Foundling (I attended their 140th homecoming in 2009 and met a number of train riders there); the New York Tenement Museum;
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
ORPHAN TRAIN is a specifically American story of mobility and rootlessness, highlighting a little-known but historically significant moment in our country’s past. Between 1854 and 1929, so-called orphan trains transported more than two hundred thousand orphaned, abandoned, and homeless children—many
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
RR:
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
there were over thirty thousand Wabanakis living on the East Coast in 1600 and that 90 percent of them had died by 1620, almost entirely a result of contact with settlers, who brought foreign diseases and alcohol, drained resources, and fought with the tribes for control of the land.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Ltd.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Ga thought about reminding the Dear Leader that they lived in a land where people had been trained to accept any reality presented to them.
Adam Johnson (The Orphan Master's Son)
indentured
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
sine
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
as a week. She’s been spanked with a spatula, slapped across
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
servants, men in top hats and morning coats, shop girls in
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
New York is gray and slushy and miserable for months. But
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
story. (And anyway, Lori doesn’t ask “why” questions. She’s only
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
We don't talk about the danger -- but what I imagine is a cartoon version, bullets flying and each boy a super hero, running, invincible, through a spray of gunfire.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
We took away their country and their means of support. It was for this and against this that they made war. Could anyone expect less?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
We
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
I’ve come to think that’s what heaven is—a place in the memory of others where our best selves live on.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Irish lace, hanging in the windows, filters the afternoon light, softening the lines on her face.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
an
Marilyn Coffey (Mail-Order Kid: An Orphan Train Rider's Story)
I am the only child in a room full of women and am immediately at ease.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
...one who speaks my language without saying a word.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
What do you choose to take with you? What did you leave behind? What insights did you gain?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
What’s your natural color, if you don’t mind my asking?” “I don’t mind,” Molly says. “It’s dark brown.” “Well, my natural color is red.” It takes Molly a moment to realize she’s making a little joke about being gray. “I like what you’ve done with it,” she parries. “It suits you.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Well,” she says, “I’m a Penobscot Indian on my father’s side. When I was young, we lived on a reservation near Old Town.” “Ah. Hence the black hair and tribal makeup.” Molly is startled. She’s never thought to make that connection—is it true?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Mr. Grote doesn’t believe in government telling him what to do. Tell the truth, he doesn’t believe in government at all. He has never been to school a day in his life and doesn’t see the point. But he’ll send me to school if that’s what it takes to keep the authorities out of his hair.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
When Miss Larsen talks to me, she bends down and looks me in the eye. When she asks questions, she waits for my answer. She smells of lemons and vanilla. And she treats me like I’m smart. After I take a test to determine my reading
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
The date was in your paperwork.” Miss Larsen smiles, handing me a slice of currant bread. “My landlady made this.” I look at her, not sure I understand. “For me?” “I mentioned that we had a new girl, and that your birthday was coming up. She likes to bake.” The bread, dense and moist, tastes like Ireland. One bite and I am back in Gram’s cottage, in front of her warm Stanley range.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Unwrapping the leftover currant bread at the Grotes’ that evening, I tell them about my party. Mr. Grote snorts. “How ridiculous, celebrating a birth date. I don’t even know the day I was born, and I sure can’t remember any of theirs,” he says, swinging his hand toward his kids. “But let’s have that cake.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
Looking closely at Molly’s file, Lori the social worker settles on a stool. “So you’ll be aging out of foster care in . . . let’s see . . . you turned seventeen in January, so nine months. Have you thought about what you’re going to do then?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
She learned about Indian words that have been incorporated into American English, like moose and pecan and squash, and Penobscot words like kwai kwai, a friendly greeting, and woliwoni, thank you.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
And though they were called savages, even a prominent English general, Philip Sheridan, had to admit, “We took away their country and their means of support. It was for this and against this that they made war. Could anyone expect less?
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
In Mr. Reed’s classroom there’s a photo of Molly Molasses taken near the end of her life. In it she sits ramrod straight, wearing a beaded, peaked headdress and two large silver brooches around her neck. Her face is dark and wrinkled and her expression is fierce. Sitting in the empty classroom after school one day, Molly stares at that face for a long time, looking for answers to questions she doesn’t know how to ask.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
And even if she loses the charms, she thinks, they’ll always be a part of her. The things that matter stay with you, seep into your skin.
Christina Baker Kline (Orphan Train)
From what I could see, he already wants to cooperate with you.” Her ready response stalled. She wasn’t sure if she’d heard Ridley correctly, but at the ensuing sparkle in his eyes, she shook her head and stepped inside hoping her friend couldn’t see the flush that was surely creeping into her cheeks. “He’s a widower and completely devoted to his work. That’s all.” She tugged at the fingertips of her gloves. “I suppose that’s why he decided to have you accompany him rather than assigning you to another group?” She slipped off the glove heedless of the fact that two fingers were rolled in. She dropped it onto the silver tray that graced the pedestal table, then began to pluck at the other glove. “I’m sure he meant nothing by his actions.” Ridley was silent as she finished divesting her fingers of the tight leather and carefully began to remove her hatpins and drop them in the silver tray with a clink. She could feel him watching her, waiting. Finally, after she had her hat off and couldn’t avoid him any longer, she turned and met his gaze. “You are not giving yourself enough credit,” he said gently. “You’re a delightful young woman.” “I’m old and unappealing.” “Thirty isn’t old. And you’re very pretty.” “Of course you would say so.” “I may be ancient and slightly biased,” Ridley said with a return smile, “but my eyesight is still quite proficient. And I had no trouble seeing that Reverend Bedell had a hard time keeping his attention off of you.” Christine shook her head in disbelief. “Thank you for attempting to cheer me with your nonsense. But I’ve had many years to resign myself to my singleness and have no interest in entertaining thoughts of heartache.
Jody Hedlund (An Awakened Heart (Orphan Train, #0.5))
You really are amazing,” he said again, not caring that his voice was low and perhaps a little too intimate. At his words, she sucked in a sharp breath that made her chest rise. She mumbled an excuse about needing to discuss something with the piano tuner. Guy stood unmoving at the pulpit and watched her walk gracefully away and speak kindly to the tuner still at the piano. Guy couldn’t stop himself from staring, even though he was flustered at the thought that he was acting like an untried youth rather than the experienced once-married man he was. “God help me,” he whispered, finally tearing his attention away from Miss Pendleton to focus once more on his sermon notes. He liked her. Much more than he should.
Jody Hedlund (An Awakened Heart (Orphan Train, #0.5))