Organizational Transformation Quotes

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[A] process was going on in which people were transformed into things, into pieces of reality which pure science can calculate and technical science can control. … [T]he safety which is guaranteed by well-functioning mechanisms for the technical control of nature, by the refined psychological control of the person, by the rapidly increasing organizational control of society – this safety is bought at a high price: man, for whom all this was invented as a means, becomes a means himself in the service of means.
Paul Tillich (The Courage to Be)
Arming employees with the tools, know-how, and mindset needed to successfully innovate on a continual basis will be paramount to organizational survival.
Kaihan Krippendorff
Innovation is a learned organizational capability. You must train people how to innovate and navigate organizational barriers that kill off good ideas before they can be tested.
Kaihan Krippendorff
By bringing together people who share interests, no matter their location or time zone, social media has the potential to transform the workplace into an environment where learning is as natural as it is powerful.
Marcia Conner (The New Social Learning: A Guide to Transforming Organizations Through Social Media)
Micromanagement is mismanagement. … [P]eople micromanage to assuage their anxieties about organizational performance: they feel better if they are continuously directing and controlling the actions of others—at heart, this reveals emotional insecurity on their part. It gives micromanagers the illusion of control (or usefulness). Another motive is lack of trust in the abilities of staff—micromanagers do not believe that their colleagues will successfully complete a task or discharge a responsibility even when they say they will.”108
Laszlo Bock (Work Rules!: Insights from Inside Google That Will Transform How You Live and Lead)
Getting your ego out of the way has an even deeper organizational impact.
Ken Jennings (The Serving Leader: Five Powerful Actions to Transform Your Team, Business, and Community)
We dubbed this goal—this state of emergent, adaptive organizational intelligence—shared consciousness, and it became the cornerstone of our transformation.
General S McChrystal (Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World)
The purpose of digitalization is to make a significant difference in the overall levels of business performance and organizational maturity.
Pearl Zhu (Digital Hybridity)
last frontier of competitive advantage will be the transformation of unhealthy organizations into healthy ones,
Patrick Lencioni (The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else In Business)
Just implementing technology alone does not produce a digital transformation. Changing an organization by taking advantage of the potential of technologies does.
Juan Pablo Rozas (La Transformación Digital No es Digital: La guía definitiva para navegar en un mar de tecnologías disruptivas y en los nuevos modelos de negocios digitales ... Estrategia Digital))
Doing scrum” is as meaningless (and impossible) as creating an instance of an abstract class. Scrum is a framework for surfacing organizational dysfunction. It is not a process and it is not prescriptive.
Tobias Mayer (The People's Scrum: Agile Ideas for Revolutionary Transformation)
The sustainable success of digital transformation comes from a carefully planned organisational change management process that meets two key objectives, one being the company culture, and the other one is empowering its employees
Enamul Haque
When it comes to transformation or deformation, organizational cultures are rarely neutral. For the most part cultural norms will support and catalyze or work against the process of spiritual transformation. Cultivating a culture
Ruth Haley Barton (Pursuing God's Will Together: A Discernment Practice for Leadership Groups (Transforming Resources))
term Lean was coined by John Krafcik in a 1988 article based on his master’s thesis at MIT Sloan School of Management1 and then popularized in The Machine that Changed the World and Lean Thinking. Lean Thinking summarized Womack and Jones’s findings from studying how Toyota operates, an approach that was spearheaded by Taiichi Ohno, codified by Shigeo Shingo, and strongly influenced by the work of W. Edwards Deming, Joseph Juran, Henry Ford, and U.S. grocery stores. Lean Thinking framed Toyota’s
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
People are typically more comfortable talking with others in their own environment; being asked to come to a conference room to help a leadership-heavy team evaluate work flow can evoke understandable anxiety and make them feel like they are on a witness stand. It is much more effective to go to them.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Three profoundly destabilizing scientific ideas ricochet through the twentieth century, trisecting it into three unequal parts: the atom, the byte, the gene. Each is foreshadowed by an earlier century, but dazzles into full prominence in the twentieth. Each begins its life as a rather abstract scientific concept, but grows to invade multiple human discourses-thereby transforming culture, society, politics, and language. But the most crucial parallel between the three ideas, by far, is conceptual: each represents the irreducible unit-the building block, the basic organizational unit-of a larger whole: the atom, of matter; the byte (or "bit"), of digitized information; the gene, of heredity and biological information.
Siddhartha Mukherjee (The Gene: An Intimate History)
In an organizational culture where respect and the dignity of individuals are held as the highest values, shame and blame don’t work as management styles. There is no leading by fear. Empathy is a valued asset, accountability is an expectation rather than an exception, and the primal human need for belonging is not used as leverage and social control. We can’t control the behavior of individuals; however, we can cultivate organizational cultures where behaviors are not tolerated and people are held accountable for protecting what matters most: human beings. We
Brené Brown (Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead)
I’m a bottom-up manager who subscribes to the concept of “servant leadership,” as articulated by the late Robert Greenleaf. He believed that organizations are at their most effective when leaders encourage collaboration, trust, foresight, listening, and empowerment. In any hierarchy, it’s clear that the ultimate boss (in my case, me) holds the most power. But a wonderful thing happens when you flip the traditional organizational chart upside down so that it looks like a V with the boss on the bottom. My job is to serve and support the next layer “above” me so that the people on that layer can then serve and support the next layer “above” them, and so on.
Danny Meyer (Setting the Table: The Transforming Power of Hospitality in Business)
The most significant transformational moment in my career was an act of elimination. It wasn’t my idea. I was in my late thirties and doing well flying around the country giving the same talk about organizational behavior to companies. I was on a lucrative treadmill of preserving, but I needed my mentor Paul Hersey to point out the downside. “You’re too good at what you’re doing,” Hersey told me. “You’re making too much money selling your day rate to companies.” When someone tells me I’m “too good” my brain shifts into neutral—and I bask in the praise. But Hersey wasn’t done with me. “You’re not investing in your future,” he said. “You’re not researching and writing and coming up with new things to say. You can continue doing what you’re doing for a long time. But you’ll never become the person you want to be.” For some reason, that last sentence triggered a profound emotion in me. I respected Paul tremendously. And I knew he was right. In Peter Drucker’s words, I was “sacrificing the future on the altar of today.” I could see my future and it had some dark empty holes in it. I was too busy maintaining a comfortable life. At some point, I’d grow bored or disaffected, but it might happen too late in the game for me to do something about it. Unless I eliminated some of the busywork, I would never create something new for myself. Despite the immediate cut in pay, that’s the moment I stopped chasing my tail for a day rate and decided to follow a different path. I have always been thankful for Paul’s advice.
Marshall Goldsmith (Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts--Becoming the Person You Want to Be)
I frequently detect a hint of satisfaction in the accounts that manage to excavate moral and individual responsibility from the historical debris. Perhaps it is because of the unspoken belief that changing the people will change the outcome. 'No Hitler, no Holocaust.' If only a few individuals had resolved that it was unconscionable to be a bystander, then perhaps thousands would have been saved. I suppose there is some solace in recovering a history in which altering an isolated event transforms all that follows. But personalizing the story in this way can obscure how these were not isolated individuals operating on their own but rather were people situated in an organizational and historical context that profoundly shaped how they looked upon the world, what they believed they could do, and what they wanted to do. The UN staff and diplomats in New York, in the main, were highly decent, hard-working, and honorable individuals who believed that they were acting properly when they decided not to try to put an end to genocide. It is this history that stays with me.
Michael Barnett
The empowerment triangle turns drama upside-down, transforming the persecutor (or scapegoat) into a challenger, the rescuer into a coach, and the victim into a creator. The empowerment dynamic allows all the roles to be essential for growth. In the drama triangle, the persecutor works with issues of power, the rescuer works with issues of responsibility, and the victim works with area of vulnerability: The drama triangle is familiar to many of us. We all know this pattern inside ourselves. We get stuck in a situation that we want to escape, and it creates drama. By leaning into the dynamic and entering deeper into relationship, we can work the energy so that it becomes an enriching transformation. If you can work this in a group, then you’ve subdued the scapegoat archetype and turned it into something more life affirming. The most important thing about the drama triangle is to make people aware of it. When a group can understand and recognize how this is a kind of destructive pattern, it becomes empowered to change the pattern. Uncoupling drama from our organizational and personal lives is the key. The group as a whole can embody a role to create safety and make sense of the system. Transformation from the drama to the redeemed starts with a pause, then an inquiry of what’s happening here, then a recollection of the three roles and who is playing what role in this context. Once the system is self-aware, ask the questions: “what else is possible? How can I become so centered that something new can happen? How can a new perception take place?” With enough safety and connection, the group will be able to follow the healing energy into re-organization and re-integration of the parts. Claiming or remembering your own archetype can protect against falling into one.
Mukara Meredith (Matrixworks: A Life-Affirming Guide to Facilitation Mastery and Group Genius)
This discussion of war then lays the foundation for an understanding of change as a process and as an essential component of military affairs. Militaries must change to cope with the changing environment in which they function. The U.S. Army has a robust process to guide change in its combat developments community. Change is also present in the business world, as industry seeks a competitive advantage in order to survive and prosper. The present transformation initiatives in the U.S. Department of Defense seek to maintain the U.S. dominance in military capability in the world and to exploit the opportunities afforded by new technologies and concepts of organization and warfare that use those technologies. The future of military requirements remain a challenge to define. The transformation process tries to define that future and the capabilities needed in order to maintain the security of the United States. Yet enemies of the United States and its allies also seek to predict and mold this future to their advantage. The rise of Islamic fundamentalists or radicalism has changed the global security environment. Western nations must prepare to defeat this threat that is not really new but has risen to new levels of ferocity and lethality. Regardless of the changes in technology, organizational and operational concepts, and external or internal threats, people remain a constant as the crucial element in war. People make decisions to use military and other elements of national power to impose the will of a nation on another group or nations. People also comprise the military services and man the component systems within the services. Any study of war and warfare must address the impact that people make on the conduct of war and the effects of war on people. The political process always includes people. To paraphrase Carl von Clausewitz, war is a continuation of that political process. Leaders who make a decision to fight and those who lead those soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines into battle must not forget that people implement those decisions and are the object of any offense or defense. Protecting the citizens of the United States is why the nation maintains military forces.
John M. House (Why War? Why an Army?)
As Deming is commonly reported to have said, “If you can’t describe what you are doing as a process, you don’t know what you’re doing.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
If apostolic refounding is about anything, it is about a return to the sources. Organizational renewal therefore involves the discovery of an organization’s true identity and mission. The authority to bring transformation to the church does not rest in the person of the leader or group but in God’s calling. Therefore, the key to the revitalization of religious organizations is to reappropriate, or recover, their founding charism. When Dallas Willard, an influential theologian and thinker, urges younger leaders to “stir the primal coals of your movement, do what they did, say what they said,” he is wisely encouraging them to be radical traditionalists.
Alan Hirsch (The Permanent Revolution: Apostolic Imagination and Practice for the 21st Century Church (Jossey-Bass Leadership Network Series))
LEADERSHIP ABILITIES Some competencies are relevant (though not sufficient) when evaluating senior manager candidates. While each job and organization is different, the best leaders have, in some measure, eight abilities. 1 STRATEGIC ORIENTATION The capacity to engage in broad, complex analytical and conceptual thinking 2 MARKET INSIGHT A strong understanding of the market and how it affects the business 3 RESULTS ORIENTATION A commitment to demonstrably improving key business metrics 4 CUSTOMER IMPACT A passion for serving the customer 5 COLLABORATION AND INFLUENCE An ability to work effectively with peers or partners, including those not in the line of command 6 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT A drive to improve the company by attracting and developing top talent 7 TEAM LEADERSHIP Success in focusing, aligning, and building effective groups 8 CHANGE LEADERSHIP The capacity to transform and align an organization around a new goal You should assess these abilities through interviews and reference checks, in the same way you would evaluate potential, aiming to confirm that the candidate has displayed them in the past, under similar circumstances.
Anonymous
The use of KPIs is meant to improve and transform the organizational performance.
Pearl Zhu (Performance Master: Take a Holistic Approach to Unlock Digital Performance)
You cannot lead an organizational #DigitalTransformation, if you haven't disrupted yourself.
@rodrigolobos
Either disrupting or being disrupted, IT is at an inflection point to lead digital transformation at the organizational level.
Pearl Zhu (100 IT Charms: Running Versatile IT to get Digital Ready)
You cannot lead an organizational Digital Transformation if you haven't disrupted yourself.
@rodrigolobos
The critical path for any Digital Transformation is Digital Leadership and Culture, not technology.
@rodrigolobos
where network effects are present, the focus of organizational attention must shift from inside to outside. The firm inverts; it turns inside out. The management of human resources shifts from employees to crowds.18 Innovation shifts from in-house R & D to open innovation
Geoffrey G. Parker (Platform Revolution: How Networked Markets Are Transforming the Economy--and How to Make Them Work for You)
And remaining steadfast to the cause requires committed, executive leadership, motivation, organizational change management and above all, perseverance and resolve.
Jim Maholic (IT Strategy: A 3-Dimensional Framework to Plan Your Digital Transformation and Deliver Value to Your Enterprise)
Accountability is holding ourselves or someone else responsible for specific actions and their specific consequences. Blame, on the other hand, is simply a quick, broad-brush way to off-load anger, fear, shame, or discomfort. We think we’ll feel better after pointing a finger at someone or something, but nothing changes. Instead, blame kills relationships and organizational cultures. It’s toxic. It’s also a go-to reaction for many of us.
Brené Brown (Rising Strong: How the Ability to Reset Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead)
A hybrid organizational structure can bring greater awareness of intricacies and systemic value of organizational systems, processes, people dynamics, technology, and resource allocation, etc.
Pearl Zhu (Digital Hybridity)
You’ve now read the central elements to an optimistic climate, but what exactly does it look like? Here’s what it looks like when it takes root and positively transforms the work environment:37 1. People anticipate good things will come from their work. 2. Personal and professional goals are achieved. 3. Personal and professional worlds are integrated. 4. People make satisfying progress with their work. 5. Financial metrics are achieved. 6. People are viewed as significant and the heart of success. 7. Values-based leadership guides actions and decisions. 8. Partnership and collaboration replaces hierarchy-driven interactions. 9. Community building is encouraged. 10. Organizational and personal purpose guide decisions. 11. Strengths are maximized. Keep in mind that the vibe in your team is constantly changing. So the conditions listed above may not all be present at the same time. That’s okay. What you choose to focus on based on the needs of your team will influence heavily what emerges as important.
Shawn Murphy (The Optimistic Workplace: Creating an Environment That Energizes Everyone)
As Olivier Serrat of the Asian Development Bank wrote, “Micromanagement is mismanagement.… [P]eople micromanage to assuage their anxieties about organizational performance: they feel better if they are continuously directing and controlling the actions of others—at heart, this reveals emotional insecurity on their part. It gives micromanagers the illusion of control (or usefulness). Another motive is lack of trust in the abilities of staff—micromanagers do not believe that their colleagues will successfully complete a task or discharge a responsibility even when they say they will.
Laszlo Bock (Work Rules!: Insights from Inside Google That Will Transform How You Live and Lead)
one might make the case that managers have been coopted into the project of globalization and radical competition, which is supposedly brought about through constant change and innovation, as well as tighter and tighter scrutiny of the performance of staff measured against highly reductive metrics. This has affected both how managers are educated to do their jobs, their sense of professionalism and identity and what they find themselves involved in doing as managers. One of their principle roles is thought to be to champion innovation, by designing, implementing and supervising the necessary transformational changes that will guarantee competitive advantage.
Chris Mowles (Managing in Uncertainty: Complexity and the paradoxes of everyday organizational life)
This adaptive capacity is the crucial leadership element for a changing world (see fig. 7.1). While it is grounded on the professional credibility that comes from technical competence and the trust gained through relational congruence, adaptive capacity is also its own set of skills to be mastered. These skills include the capacity to calmly face the unknown to refuse quick fixes to engage others in the learning and transformation necessary to take on the challenge that is before them to seek new perspectives to ask questions that reveal competing values and gaps in values and actions to raise up the deeper issues at work in a community to explore and confront resistance and sabotage to learn and change without sacrificing personal or organizational fidelity to act politically and stay connected relationally to help the congregation make hard, often painful decisions to effectively fulfill their mission in a changing context This capacity building is more than just some techniques to master. It’s a set of deeply developed capabilities that are the result of ongoing transformation in the life of a leader.
Tod Bolsinger (Canoeing the Mountains: Christian Leadership in Uncharted Territory)
English exports, led by cotton textiles, doubled between 1780 and 1800. It was the growth in this sector that pulled ahead the whole economy. The combination of technological and organizational innovation provides the model for economic progress that transformed the economies of the world that became rich.
Daron Acemoğlu (Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty)
Managing the Neutral Zone: A Checklist Yes No   ___ ___ Have I done my best to normalize the neutral zone by explaining it as an uncomfortable time that (with careful attention) can be turned to everyone’s advantage? ___ ___ Have I redefined the neutral zone by choosing a new and more affirmative metaphor with which to describe it? ___ ___ Have I reinforced that metaphor with training programs, policy changes, and financial rewards for people to keep doing their jobs during the neutral zone? ___ ___ Am I protecting people adequately from inessential further changes? ___ ___ If I can’t protect them, am I clustering those changes meaningfully? ___ ___ Have I created the temporary policies and procedures that we need to get us through the neutral zone? ___ ___ Have I created the temporary roles, reporting relationships, and organizational groupings that we need to get us through the neutral zone? ___ ___ Have I set short-range goals and checkpoints? ___ ___ Have I set realistic output objectives? ___ ___ Have I found the special training programs we need to deal successfully with the neutral zone? ___ ___ Have I found ways to keep people feeling that they still belong to the organization and are valued by our part of it? And have I taken care that perks and other forms of “privilege” are not undermining the solidarity of the group? ___ ___ Have I set up one or more Transition Monitoring Teams to keep realistic feedback flowing upward during the time in the neutral zone? ___ ___ Are my people willing to experiment and take risks in intelligently conceived ventures—or are we punishing all failures? ___ ___ Have I stepped back and taken stock of how things are being done in my part of the organization? (This is worth doing both for its own sake and as a visible model for others’ similar efforts.) ___ ___ Have I provided others with opportunities to do the same thing? Have I provided them with the resources—facilitators, survey instruments, and so on—that will help them do that? ___ ___ Have I seen to it that people build their skills in creative thinking and innovation? ___ ___ Have I encouraged experimentation and seen to it that people are not punished for failing in intelligent efforts that do not pan out? ___ ___ Have I worked to transform the losses of our organization into opportunities to try doing things a new way? ___ ___ Have I set an example by brainstorming many answers to old problems—the ones that people say we just have to live with? Am I encouraging others to do the same? ___ ___ Am I regularly checking to see that I am not pushing for certainty and closure when it would be more conducive to creativity to live a little longer with uncertainty and questions? ___ ___ Am I using my time in the neutral zone as an opportunity to replace bucket brigades with integrated systems throughout the organization?
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
after you have chosen an approach, you don’t need to worry about getting the advantages of that design because it will come naturally. Where you need to provide management focus is on addressing the disadvantages of your organizational choice.
Gary Gruver (A Practical Approach to Large-Scale Agile Development: How HP Transformed LaserJet FutureSmart Firmware (Agile Software Development Series))
We have observed that, when you ask people to describe a specific process in a value stream, there are at least four different versions: how managers believe it operates, how it’s supposed to operate (i.e., the written procedure, if one exists), how it really operates, and how it could operate.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Transforming Culture It is easier to kill an organization than it is to change it. —Tom Peters Every gathering of people, every organization has a culture. Though a local church is much more than just an organization, every church has a culture. Some church cultures are healthy and some are unhealthy, but every church has a culture. Healthy church cultures are conducive for leadership development. They don’t merely say they value leadership development; they actually believe the Church is responsible to develop and deploy leaders, and they align their actions to this deeply held conviction. Culture ultimately begins with the actual beliefs and values that undergird all the actions and behavior. A church’s capacity for developing leaders relies on the collective worldview of the church and whether it is compatible with the ambition. A church’s culture has the power to significantly impede or empower its effectiveness in the Great Commission and the call to multiplication. Leaders create culture and culture shapes leaders and churches, even without recognizing it. Ministry leaders must understand the transformative power of culture if they want to have mature communities of faith.1 Organizational culture, and more pertinently church culture, is intensely potent. Church culture is a powerful force in the hands of those who shape a local church according to God’s design. If you are reading this book in any type of building, rebar is likely holding the building up and connecting the structure together. Glance up from the book and look for the rebar (short for reinforcing bar). You can’t see it, but it is impacting everything you see. You often can’t see culture, not in the same way you can see the doctrinal statement (the expressed convictions) or the leadership pipeline (the expressed constructs), but it holds everything in place. For better or worse, culture impacts your church more than you often realize. Building on the expert work of Edgar Schein, church culture can be seen in three layers, each layer building and depending on the layer below it.2 These layers move from actual beliefs to articulated beliefs, to the expression of those beliefs (called artifacts). All three layers make up the culture in a church. Actual beliefs are what the group collectively believes, not merely says they believe.
Eric Geiger (Designed to Lead: The Church and Leadership Development)
you might have to counter leaders’ objections to defining such a narrow scope for the current state map. But once you get through the future state design process, everyone will see that this is a highly effective approach to accomplishing the mission at hand.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Embracing value stream thinking is a mark of an organization that has successfully shifted from siloed thinking (what’s best for me and my team?) to holistic thinking (what’s best for the customer and the company?).
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Principle five behind the Startup Way philosophy is continuous transformation: All of this requires the development of a new organizational capability: the ability to rewrite the organization's DNA in response to new and diverse challenges. It would be a shame to transform only once. When a company has figured out how to transform, it can - and should - be prepared to do it many more times in the future.
Eric Ries
In many cases, simply getting the basics in place across an entire value stream—standardizing the work, building in quality at the source, and installing visual management—can yield significant results,
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
These undesirable outcomes and behaviors exist because there is a mission-killing divergence between what we say our church believes and what our church actually believes. When the theological statements and catchy slogans don’t match the theological convictions actually held by the people of the local church, the God-honoring hopes of that church will never become a reality. It is for this reason that many churches who want to engage in leadership development can’t seem to get the church to fall in line. The strategy of “program cut-and-paste” will not serve our local churches in creating the actual change needed. All three layers of culture must be continually considered. In order to become churches that embrace the call to produce leaders, we have to take a hard and thoughtful look at our church culture. Diagnosing Actual Beliefs Managing church culture is ultimately a pastoral function. This is not a tool for pragmatists or a skill set borrowed from business. Engaging in the fight for healthy church culture is fighting for faith for God’s people. Serving to cultivate healthy church culture in a local church is the regular work of uncovering disbelief or wrong belief among God’s people and working to commend true faith to God’s people. Church disbelief must be transformed. Is there such a thing as organizational or church disbelief? Can a whole group disbelieve? Yes! In the same way that some societies are riddled by disbelief in the gospel because of an intertwining of some false religion and the worldview of a people group, so also churches can have systemic false beliefs. In modern-day Turkey, for example, many converts to Christ will remark on the difficulty of believing the gospel as a Turk, largely because of the false belief that to be a Turk is to be a Muslim. For Turks, being a follower of Christ is inconsistent with the worldview of being a Turk. There are whole societies in the world, including churches, that have distinct errors in their thinking that are held by a majority of the people. The leaders of God’s Church must approach church culture as a doctor caring for the patient but wanting to remove the sickness from the body. God’s leaders must diagnose the widespread errors in belief that are harming the body from inside our church cultures. It is these widespread errors in worldview that often account for unhealthy culture in the local church. Leading culture in the local church is leading a whole church to purity in doctrine and in deed.
Eric Geiger (Designed to Lead: The Church and Leadership Development)
A common behavior is to feel compelled to start improving the value stream at the micro level and focus on reducing process time. However, an interesting phenomenon occurs when teams maintain a macro perspective: process time reductions become a by-product of addressing the IT systems and barriers to flow at a macro level. The facilitator may frequently need to redirect the team to help them stay focused on the macro and eliminate the easy-to-see waste within the value stream. Going into the weeds (process-level analysis) comes later as you execute the transformation plan and define and document standard work via smaller PDSA cycles.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Companies that have the greatest success with sustained Lean transformation make an up-front commitment that eliminating work won’t result in eliminating people. It’s the work that’s non-value-adding, not the people.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
If you use freed capacity to lay off staff, it’s a sign of disrespect. You can be assured that employee interest in further improvement activities will plummet and you will be unable to experience successful value stream improvement efforts in the future.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
In those rare circumstances where layoffs are the only way for a business to survive (e.g., extreme market conditions), the organization should perform the reduction in force before embarking on a transformation journey that relies on creating a safe environment for the workforce to make innovative decisions.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
key Lean maxim that should guide your mapping team’s every step is “maximum results through minimum effort.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
it’s critical that an organization approach the freed capacity that is realized through process time reductions in a way that enables growth rather than viewing it as a labor reduction exercise that leads to layoffs.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
What to Do with Freed Capacity Freeing capacity is a vital way for labor-intensive organizations to increase the proportion of revenue to labor. The effort, though, should not result in layoffs. Rather, freeing capacity enables an organization to accomplish one or more of the following outcomes: Absorb additional work without increasing staff Reduce paid overtime Reduce temporary or contract staffing In-source work that’s currently outsourced Create better work/life balance by reducing hours worked Slow down and think Slow down and perform higher-quality work with less stress and higher safety Innovate; create new revenue streams Conduct continuous improvement activities Get to know your customers better (What do they really value?) Build stronger supplier relationships Coach staff to improve their critical thinking and problem-solving skills Mentor staff to create career growth opportunities Provide cross-training to create greater organizational flexibility and enhance job satisfaction Do the things you haven’t been able to get to; get caught up Build stronger interdepartmental and interdivisional relationships to improve collaboration Reduce payroll through natural attrition
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Every value stream needs two to five key performance indicators (KPIs) that are tracked on a regular basis.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
If there are no metrics in place, how can you know how well the value stream is performing, let alone if it is getting better or worse?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Establishing KPIs that are actively managed is a fundamental requirement for achieving operational excellence. The key phrase is “actively managed.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
No matter how urgently improvement is needed, how skilled the facilitator is, or how well-intentioned the mapping team is, it’s unrealistic to expect work systems that have existed for years or even decades to be completely transformed in a matter of months. Any consultant who tells you that it’s likely, or even possible, should be shown the door. Change takes time.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
the purpose of value stream mapping is to design a strategic improvement plan that will be executed over a period of time; it’s not designed to address problems at a detailed level.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
The purpose of value stream mapping is to make strategic decisions about the future state.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
In most cases, the kaizen bursts should describe the improvement generally (what), not specifically (how). Remember, value stream mapping is a strategic leadership activity that is part of a macro PDSA cycle. Designing and making specific improvements requires a series of micro PDSA cycles and heavy involvement from the front lines. You want those closest to the work designing tactical-level improvements rather than leaders who are too far from the work to determine exactly what should be done to reach a target condition.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
I use the word overcome because to grow a relationship or raise a family or create an organizational culture or run a school or nurture a faith community, all in a way that is fundamentally opposite to the cultural norms driven by scarcity, it takes awareness, commitment, and work…every single day.
Brené Brown (Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead)
The governor of Illinois feared that armed Mormon retaliation could escalate into a civil war. He urged Smith’s successor, Brigham Young, and his followers to leave the state. Soon the urging became more insistent: leave or be forcibly expelled. Young agreed to go. Young now faced a serious organizational challenge. How do you plan an exodus? How should you move thousands of families and their horses, mules, oxen, cows, sheep, pigs, chickens, dogs, cats, geese, and goats, all while searching for a permanent home? Young stewed on the problem, debated with his advisors, and finally, on January 14, 1847, announced that the Lord had spoken to him. The Church should divide into small companies, each led by a single captain, and head west.
Safi Bahcall (Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries)
one advantage of working backward is that the reverse perspective can sometimes reveal opportunities and problem-solving strategies that taking the usual course may not uncover.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
When the team members have achieved a deep understanding of the current state and they are mapping on consecutive days, designing the future state often occurs organically- as long as people are open to challenging their existing silo-centric paradigms about how and where work should be performed
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
You want those closet to the work designing tactical-level improvements rather than leaders who are too far from the work to determine exactly what should be done to reach a target condition.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Depending on the organization, designing an improved state can also require thick skin, intestinal fortitude, and a hefty dose of courage.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Rather than viewing value stream mapping as just a toll to reduce operational waste, the broader use of value stream mapping as a methodology to transform leadership thinking, define strategy and priorities, and assure that customers are receiving high levels of value is where value stream mapping earns its brightest stripes.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
The primary type of value stream is one in which a good or service is requested by and delivered to an external customer. Other value streams support the delivery of value; we refer to these as value-enabling or supporting value streams.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
The inclination to jump into the weeds and design micro-level improvements before the entire work system - the macro picture- is fully understood, is a key contributor to suboptimization.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Suboptimization occurs when you make an improvement to one component of a system while ignoring the effects of that change on the other components. A seemingly important improvement could cause the overall work system to perform more poorly.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Transformation requires fundamental changes in an organization's DNA; done well, value stream mapping can be instrumental in facilitating the necessary shifts in mindsets and behaviors.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
The visual nature of value stream maps enables consensus-building conversations across the organization, from the front lines to senior leaders.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
a value stream is a series of processes that connect together and transform a customer request into a good or service that's delivered to the customer, which completes the request-to-delivery cycle
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
the value stream map looks at the high level activities that transform a request into some sort of deliverable . . . the purpose of value stream mapping is to design a strategic improvement plan that will be executed over a period of time; it's not designed to address problems at a detailed level
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
To aid in targeting the right level of information, we aim for 5 to 15 serial process blocks
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
The purpose of the second value stream walk is for the team to gain a deeper understanding about how the value stream currently performs and identify significant barriers to flow.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
We use three metrics to evaluate the current state of 98 percent of the office and service value streams we've encountered: process time, lead time, and percent complete and accurate.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
stay balanced and beware: don't let the team succumb to analysis paralysis
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Remember that the lead time for a process block begins when the work is available to be worked on, not when an employee begins working on it, so identifying the trigger will help the team obtain a more accurate lead time.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Next, the team will summarize the metrics across the full value stream. We recommend, at a minimum, ... four ... summary metrics: Total Lead Time...Total Process Time ... Activity Ratio ... Rolled Percent Complete and Accurate
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Freed capacity is the result of process time reduction through the elimination of wasteful activities and/or optimizing work.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
While the current state briefing is often sobering, it's a helpful psychological space from which to accept the need for change and generate innovative future state thinking
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
designing the ability to operate with fewer customer complaints, less firefighting, and reduced interdepartmental tension brings tremendous hope to leaders and their staffs who may be feeling the pressure from an underperforming value stream.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
the facilitator's role shifts from a coach who helps a team uncover and analyze "What is"-a left-brain activity-to a coach who inspires a team to innovate and design "what could be"-a right-brain activity.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Embracing value stream thinking is a mark of an organization that has successfully shifted from siloed thinking (what's best for me and my team?) to holistic thinking (what's best for the customer and the company?)
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Value stream improvement requires strong team-player mindsets and mapping team members who are comfortable designing for the greater good.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Removing work effort may require the team to eliminate not merely the work activities, but also the need for that effort.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
A common behavior is to feel compelled to start improving the value stream at the micro level and focus on reducing process time. .. redirect the team to help them stay focused on the macro and eliminate the easy-to-see waste within the value stream
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
It's difficult to experience high levels of success if people fear losing a paycheck due to continuous improvement.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Until holistic thinking begins to replace siloed thinking, improving the value stream will prove more challenging.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
The team should be bold in its thinking and keep only those processes that are truly value-adding or absolutely necessary for the business to function.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
before an improvement team can eliminate batching or reduce batch sizes, it needs to understand and eliminate the reason (root cause) for the batching
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Ideally, the team designs a future state the results in lower lead time, lower process time, and higher percent complete and accurate for every process block.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
ways to achieve flow . . . include shifting previously consecutive processes to parallel activities, combining tasks to reduce handoffs (which may require cross-training, resequencing, or repatterning work so that downstream recipients can so more effective work), resequencing work, and creating service-level agreements between internal suppliers and customers, to name a few.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
You need to choose wisely: what are the two to five metrics that provide the best reflection of overall value stream performance?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
The problem is that most organizations have established neither value streams KPIs more process-level KPIs. This is the primary reason why organizations continue to fight fires, don't capture greater market share, don't generate as much profit as they could, have burned-out workforces, and create self-inflicted chaos that they could otherwise avoid.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Process mapping teams often get stalled by excessive focus on variation and differences within processes, whereas value stream maps reveal macro-level similarities.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
it's unrealistic to expect work systems that have existed for years or even decades to be completely transformed in a matter of months. Any consultant who tells you that it's likely, or even possible, should be shown the door
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Following this scientific process assures that everyone involved in making improvements is thinking critically and breaking old habits of prematurely leaping to solutions or rushing through execution for the sake of meeting a deadline.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
We cannot empathize this enough: sustaining improvements begins with proper planning, followed by proper execution and management.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Once you've successfully realized the iterated future state, you must have two things firmly in place to sustain it: (1) someone formally designated to monitor value stream performance to assess how it's performing, facilitate problem solving when issues arise, and lead ongoing improvement to raise the performance bar, and (2) key performance indicators to tell whether performance is on track or not (value stream management)
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
In mature continuous improvement organizations, value stream managers are sometimes given responsibility for profit and loss across the value stream
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
We're often asked how frequently a value stream should be improved. The answer is continuously. We understand that's a tall order for many organizations, but continuous improvement is your only way out of a culture of reactive firefighting, which prevents your organization from excelling on all levels.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Learning to see and manage work from a value stream perspective is a powerful way to instill new ways of thinking into the DNA of your organization and achieve higher levels of performance.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
It represents how work flows, who does the work, and how the value stream is performing on the day the map is created.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
going the gemba is an effective way to involve those who best understand what is actually happening within the value stream: the workers themselves.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
seeing the value stream in action a second time allows the team to learn more deeply. Team members nearly always make additional discoveries during the second walk.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
There are several advantages to walking the value stream in the reverse order from how work typically flows.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
a value stream is a series of processes that connect together and transform a customer request into a good or service that's delivered to the customer, which completes the request-to-delivery cycle
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
the most powerful metric we've seen for analyzing processes in office, service, and knowledge work environments: percent complete and accurate (%C&A)
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Failure to involve leadership, employ cross-functional teams, and include relevant metrics, for example, often results in subpar future state designs that collect dust.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
significant time and money is wasted when organizations attempt to make improvements without a clearly defined, externally focused improvement strategy that places the customer in the center.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Value stream mapping provides a clear line of sight to the customer and the holistic means to clearly see how traditionally disparate parts of the organization are interconnected, which can serve as the catalyst for reorganizing according to value streams.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Very few things are unmanageable once they are distilled to their basic components.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
It's the process of value stream mapping rather than the maps themselves that carries the greatest power by installing transformational mindsets and behaviors into the DNA of an organization.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
a typical value stream map has three key components: information flow, work flow, and a timeline.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Companies that reorganize without understanding their value streams may experience short-term improvement, but longer-term gains are far more likely by using value stream thinking to shape the reorganization.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Effective planning is a significant contributor in elevating value stream mapping from a tool to a management practice that produces long-lasting transformation
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Value stream mapping often demonstrates that, at a macro level, there isn't as much variation as it "feels" like there is
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
You're a step ahead when you conclude the mapping activity with leaders from across the organization, show them how the team intends to make process, and obtain their public commitment to support the plan.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Organizations that skip this vital step of socializing the charter with leadership ... often have to navigate through and around obstacles that would otherwise not exist
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Top down mandates from an executive sponsor or leader over a specific functional area are the antithesis of the type of consensus building that accelerates improvement.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
How can you improve workflow if you don't understand how the work is being performed today?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
There's a big difference between needing to change a plan because new data or new conditions warrant it and deviating from a plan because an avoidable distraction has taken away the focus of an improvement team
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
experiencing fewer problems and frustrations in their day-to-day work, the work force will become even more engaged in the improvement process
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
By comparing the defined target with actual results, the team can determine if its hypothesis was proven and make appropriate adjustments if it wasn't
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
we use the term countermeasure instead of solution, to aid in creating a continuous improvement culture, which begins with how people think and speak. The word solution smacks of an over-the-wall, permanent-fix mindset, which discounts the ever-changing world we work and live in.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
In practice, all ideas need to be viewed as merely hypotheses; testing and evaluation of the test results must precede across-the-board adoption.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Improvements are temporary countermeasures, not permanent solutions.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Beware leaders that want to negotiate for shorter time frames than the team feels is prudent. Most leaders have been away from the front lines for a long time and have grown out of touch with how long it takes to plan and execute well-thought-out improvements.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
In terms of overall transformation plan ownership, we recommend a sole accountable party.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
It bears repeating: in our experience, the plan review meetings are a key success factor in value stream transformation.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
We find a direct link between results and the degree to which the executive sponsor remains visibly engaged.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Executing and sustaining change requires a different set of organizational behaviors than those required for planning.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Whereas clarity and ingenuity are required for creating current and future state maps, focus and discipline are essential for successfully executing and sustaining improvement.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
You need to talk about it. Explain it. Let people ask questions.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
In the spirit of respect for people, and as a means to facilitate plan execution, workers who are part of the process or those who will be affected by the improvements must also be aware of the mapping activity and the plan for transformation.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
When we ask leaders and improvement professionals what the most difficult aspect to making change is, they nearly always say, "Sustaining.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
During the three-day mapping activity, the team had numerous discussions about the role of software testing, customer involvement and responsibility, striking the right balance of iterations, and how "minimal" a minimally viable product should be.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation: Using Lean Business Practices to Transform Office and Service Environments)
Alongside the general fetishism of the state that manifests in the Venezuelan context as a fetishization of Chavez the man, there stands as well an equal and opposite fetish of what has been called “horizontalism,” the fetish of refusing or ignoring the state a priori as in Holloway’s insistence that ‘the world cannot be changed through the state.” To fetishize means to worship something human as though it were divine, and I hope that the literal fetishism of both positions is clear: the first refuses to see the state (and Chavez) as produced by human hands and therefore subject to radical transformation; the second—in its denial of human organizational capacities, of organic leadership through struggle. and of the delegation of power—sees such transformation as utterly impossible and futile. For both, in other words, the state is a superhuman entity to be either worshipped or feared but never transformed.
George Ciccariello-Maher (We Created Chávez: A People’s History of the Venezuelan Revolution)
Goethe asserted, “Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
The organizational digital transformation journey is where the juice is in the organization, not just the destination.
Pearl Zhu (100 Digital Rules)
But moving from enabling the business to being the business is challenging work. It means changing governance models, organizational structures, delivery methodologies and hiring practices. It means transforming IT people from technologists to strategists, from constructing hard lines around IT to creating an environment devoid of organizational boundaries, and from clamping down on employees attempts to develop their own technology to embracing end-user innovation. It also means driving change in the most difficult of all arenas: the mindset, the psyche, the most deeply held ways that we understand our jobs, our success, and our professional identity.
Martha Heller (Be the Business: CIOs in the New Eras of IT)
The QMO, worked closely with the PMO throughout the Kanban transformation, but we never tried to change them. Our stance was to help them understand what was different about how projects were governed with the new Agile practices so they could decide what to change.
Jason Little (Lean Change Management: Innovative practices for managing organizational change)
General Questions What are the business issues (service quality, product quality, speed, capacity, cost, morale, competitive landscape, impending regulations, etc.) we wish to address? What does the customer want? What measurable target condition(s) are we aiming for? Which process blocks add value or are necessary non-value-adding? How can we reduce delays between processes? How can we improve the quality of incoming work at each process? How can we reduce work effort and other expenses across the value stream? How can we create a more effective value stream (greater value to customers, better supplier relationships, higher sales conversion rates, better estimates-to-actuals, lower legal and compliance risk, etc.)? How will we monitor value stream performance?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Touch Points Are there redundant or unnecessary processes that can be eliminated (e.g., excessive approvals)? Are there redundant or unnecessary handoffs that can be eliminated or combined (e.g., work that can be done by a single department)? Are there processes or handoffs that need to be added?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Delays Is work being processed frequently enough? Can we reduce batch sizes or eliminate batching completely? Do we have adequate coverage and available resources to accommodate existing and expected future workloads? How can we create more capacity or reduce the load at the bottleneck?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Sequencing and Pacing Is the work sequenced and synchronized properly? Are processes being performed too early or too late in the value stream? Are key stakeholders being engaged at the proper time? Can processes be performed concurrently (in parallel)? Would staggered starts improve flow? How can we balance the workload to achieve greater flow (via combining or dividing processes)? Do we need to consider segmenting the work by work type to achieve greater flow (with rotating but designated resources for defined periods of time)?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Variation Management Is there internally produced variation (e.g., end-of-quarter sales incentives)? How can we level incoming workload along the value stream to reduce variation and achieve greater flow? Can we reduce variation in customer or internal requirements? How can necessary variation be addressed most effectively? Are there common prioritization rules in place throughout the value stream?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Technology Is redundant or unnecessary technology involved? Is the available technology fully utilized? Are the systems interconnected to optimize data movement?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Quality How can higher-quality input be received by each process in the value stream (to improve the %C&A metric)? Is there an opportunity to standardize and error proof work?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Labor Effort How can we eliminate unnecessary non-value-adding work? How can we reduce the labor effort in necessary non-value-adding work? How can we optimize value-adding work?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Value Stream Management Do policies need to be changed to enable improved performance? Are there organization departmental reporting structures that can be changed to reduce conflicting goals or align resources? Do existing performance metrics (if any) encourage desired behaviors and discourage dysfunctional behavior? What key performance indicators (KPIs) will we use to monitor value stream performance? Who will monitor the KPIs? How frequently? Who else will results be communicated to? What visual systems can be created to aid in managing and monitoring the value stream? Are the key processes within the value stream clearly defined with their own KPIs, standardized appropriately, and measured and improved regularly?
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Such tensions might partly explain why the Gallup organization repeatedly finds just 13 percent of the world’s workforce likes going to work, despite the rise of popular books and research on employee engagement, organizational culture, and motivation.
Zach Mercurio (The Invisible Leader: Transform Your Life, Work, and Organization with the Power of Authentic Purpose)
Finally, a common purpose answers the question, “Why us?” Why this group of people? Why right now? Why are we coming together as individuals to organize, solve this problem, and deliver this purpose? This is perhaps the most overlooked yet most powerful purpose to state. A common purpose answers the questions, Can every person see his or her own personal purpose in the organizational purpose? Is the purpose shared?
Zach Mercurio (The Invisible Leader: Transform Your Life, Work, and Organization with the Power of Authentic Purpose)
where network effects are present, industries operate by different rules.17 One reason is that it is far easier to scale network effects outside a firm than inside it—since there are always many more people outside a firm than inside it. Thus, where network effects are present, the focus of organizational attention must shift from inside to outside. The firm inverts; it turns inside out. The management of human resources shifts from employees to crowds.18 Innovation shifts from in-house R & D to open innovation.
Geoffrey G. Parker (Platform Revolution: How Networked Markets Are Transforming the Economy--and How to Make Them Work for You)
How and why is this happening? Let’s break it down. In the world of platforms, the Internet no longer acts merely as a distribution channel (a pipeline). It also acts as a creation infrastructure and a coordination mechanism. Platforms are leveraging this new capability to create entirely new business models. In addition, the physical and the digital are rapidly converging, enabling the Internet to connect and coordinate objects in the real world—for example, through smartphone apps that allow you to control your home appliances at long distance. Simultaneously, organizational boundaries are being redefined as platform companies leverage external ecosystems to create value in new ways.7 In this new stage of disruption, platforms enjoy two significant economic advantages over pipelines. One of these advantages is superior marginal economics of production and distribution.
Geoffrey G. Parker (Platform Revolution: How Networked Markets Are Transforming the Economy--and How to Make Them Work for You)
Tell the story of why you exist, often. Talk about why before what in meetings. Reward why before what, and train people by first engaging them in your story. Create shared dramatic experiences. People need to feel your purpose. How do your people know when organizational purpose has been delivered? How do they hear about it? Do they see it? Do they feel it? More important, do they experience it together?
Zach Mercurio (The Invisible Leader: Transform Your Life, Work, and Organization with the Power of Authentic Purpose)
The digital transformation won’t happen overnight, the organizational structure optimization takes planning, experimenting, and scaling up.
Pearl Zhu (Digital Maturity: Take a Journey of a Thousand Miles from Functioning to Delight)
The organizational digitalization is surely a transformation journey, as it has to permeate into business vision, strategy, culture, communication, and processes, etc.
Pearl Zhu (Digital Maturity: Take a Journey of a Thousand Miles from Functioning to Delight)
blame kills relationships and organizational cultures. It’s toxic.
Brené Brown (Rising Strong: How the Ability to Reset Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead)
projects deploy assets to accelerate organizational transformation, and priority management ensures that day-to-day activities are focused on reaching Desired Outcomes.
David Goldsmith (Paid to Think: A Leader's Toolkit for Redefining Your Future)
The ability to visualize non-visible work is an essential first step in gaining clarity about and consensus around how work gets done.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.
Karen Martin (Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation)
Sir Michael Howard suggested, in “width, depth, and context.”3 Leader development and education should promote an organizational culture in which higher-level commanders are comfortable with relinquishing control and authority to junior commanders while setting conditions for effective decentralized operations consistent with the doctrine of mission command. Junior leaders must possess a bias toward action and accept necessary risks associated with leading and fighting in complex and uncertain environments against determined and adaptive enemies.
Eitan Shamir (Transforming Command: The Pursuit of Mission Command in the U.S., British, and Israeli Armies)
Being a transformational leader increases productivity and bottom line results whether people decide to stay or go because the motivation to succeed is internally based on individual growth not externally based on organizational goals.
Marcia Reynolds (The Discomfort Zone: How Leaders Turn Difficult Conversations Into Breakthroughs)
Digital transformation requires changes to processes and thinking—changes that span your internal organizational silos. The clear delineation between technical skills and leadership skills is blurring fast.
George Westerman (Leading Digital: Turning Technology into Business Transformation)
An organizational norm that says, “We value practice over theory but we value theory-informed practice over ad-hoc practice” helps to restore some respect for theory. We
Sriram Narayan (Agile IT Organization Design: For Digital Transformation and Continuous Delivery)
Organizational maturity is not just about technical excellence or process efficiency, but also about business effectiveness, agility, innovation intelligence, and people-centricity.
Pearl Zhu (Change Insight: Change as an Ongoing Capability to Fuel Digital Transformation)
The organizational fit is the good balance of the fitting attitude and misfit thinking.
Pearl Zhu (Change Insight: Change as an Ongoing Capability to Fuel Digital Transformation)
In reality, true military innovation is less about technology than about operational and organizational transformation.
Christian Brose (The Kill Chain: Defending America in the Future of High-Tech Warfare)
Transformational leadership means leaders inspiring and motivating followers to achieve higher performance by appealing to their values and sense of purpose, facilitating wide-scale organizational change. Such leaders encourage their teams to work toward a common goal through their vision, values, communication, example-setting, and their evident caring about their followers’ personal needs.
Nicole Forsgren (Accelerate: The Science of Lean Software and DevOps: Building and Scaling High Performing Technology Organizations)
A large distance between business and technology, both organizationally and commercially, leads to strained collaboration between technology departments and traditional commercial departments such as sales and marketing.
Joakim Jansson (Leading Digital Transformation: You can't stop the waves but you can learn to surf)
The Five Initiatives 1.​Growth (via customer service, globalization, and technology) 2.​Productivity (went hand-in-hand with growth) 3.​Cash (improve working capital and have high-quality earnings) 4.​People (keep the best talent, organized the right way and motivated) 5.​Organizational enablers (including Six Sigma, Honeywell Operating System, and Functional Transformation)
David Cote (Winning Now, Winning Later: How Companies Can Succeed in the Short Term While Investing for the Long Term)
And so, when I tell stories today about digital transformation and organizational agility and customer centricity, I use a vocabulary that is very consistent and very refined. It is one of the tools I have available to tell my story effectively. I talk about assumptions. I talk about hypotheses. I talk about outcomes as a measure of customer success. I talk about outcomes as a measurable change in customer behavior. I talk about outcomes over outputs, experimentation, continuous learning, and ship, sense, and respond. The more you tell your story, the more you can refine your language into your trademark or brand—what you’re most known for. For example, baseball great Yogi Berra was famous for his Yogi-isms—sayings like “You can observe a lot by watching” and “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.” It’s not just a hook or catchphrase, it helps tell the story as well. For Lean Startup, a best-selling book on corporate innovation written by Eric Ries, the words were “build,” “measure,” “learn.” Jeff Patton, a colleague of mine, uses the phrase “the differences that make a difference.” And he talks about bets as a way of testing confidence levels. He’ll ask, “What will you bet me that your idea is good? Will you bet me lunch? A day’s pay? Your 401(k)?” These words are not only their vocabulary. They are their brand. That’s one of the benefits of storytelling and telling those stories continuously. As you refine your language, the people who are beginning to pay attention to you start adopting that language, and then that becomes your thing.
Jeff Gothelf (Forever Employable: How to Stop Looking for Work and Let Your Next Job Find You)