Or Death Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Or Death. Here they are! All 200 of them:

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The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference. The opposite of art is not ugliness, it's indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy, it's indifference. And the opposite of life is not death, it's indifference.
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Elie Wiesel
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Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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To the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter, #1))
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I'm not afraid of death; I just don't want to be there when it happens.
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Woody Allen
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Do not pity the dead, Harry. Pity the living, and, above all those who live without love.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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Dumbledore watched her fly away, and as her silvery glow faded he turned back to Snape, and his eyes were full of tears. "After all this time?" "Always," said Snape.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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Love never dies a natural death. It dies because we don't know how to replenish its source. It dies of blindness and errors and betrayals. It dies of illness and wounds; it dies of weariness, of witherings, of tarnishings.
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Anaรฏs Nin
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I'm the one that's got to die when it's time for me to die, so let me live my life the way I want to.
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Jimi Hendrix (Jimi Hendrix - Axis: Bold as Love)
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The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.
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Mark Twain
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I wish it need not have happened in my time," said Frodo. "So do I," said Gandalf, "and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
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J.R.R. Tolkien (The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, #1))
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We're all human, aren't we? Every human life is worth the same, and worth saving.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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Death ends a life, not a relationship.
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Mitch Albom (Tuesdays with Morrie)
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He can run faster than Severus Snape confronted with shampoo.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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Death's got an Invisibility Cloak?" Harry interrupted again. "So he can sneak up on people," said Ron. "Sometimes he gets bored of running at them, flapping his arms and shrieking...
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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It is the unknown we fear when we look upon death and darkness, nothing more.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Harry Potter, #6))
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A thing is not necessarily true because a man dies for it.
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Oscar Wilde
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Not my daughter, you bitch!
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.
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Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune Chronicles, #1))
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It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die. That is true, it's called Life.
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Terry Pratchett (The Last Continent (Discworld, #22; Rincewind #6))
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I believe that imagination is stronger than knowledge. That myth is more potent than history. That dreams are more powerful than facts. That hope always triumphs over experience. That laughter is the only cure for grief. And I believe that love is stronger than death.
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Robert Fulghum (All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten: Uncommon Thoughts On Common Things)
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I don't want to die without any scars.
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Chuck Palahniuk (Fight Club)
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I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience from it.
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Mark Twain
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Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends.
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J.R.R. Tolkien (The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, #1))
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When he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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Unbeing dead isn't being alive.
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E.E. Cummings
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He must have known I'd want to leave you." "No, he must have known you would always want to come back.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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It kills me sometimes, how people die.
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Markus Zusak (The Book Thief)
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Why are they all staring?" demanded Albus as he and Rose craned around to look at the other students. "Donโ€™t let it worry you," said Ron. "Itโ€™s me. Iโ€™m extremely famous.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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Life is for the living. Death is for the dead. Let life be like music. And death a note unsaid.
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Langston Hughes (The Collected Poems)
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Cinderella? Snow White? What's that? An illness?
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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Thatโ€™s part of what I like about the book in some ways. It portrays death truthfully. You die in the middle of your life, in the middle of a sentence
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John Green (The Fault in Our Stars)
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You'll stay with me?' Until the very end,' said James.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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Death must be so beautiful. To lie in the soft brown earth, with the grasses waving above one's head, and listen to silence. To have no yesterday, and no tomorrow. To forget time, to forgive life, to be at peace.
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Oscar Wilde (The Canterville Ghost)
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Holey? You have the the whole world of ear-related humor before you, you go for holey?
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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I go to seek a Great Perhaps.
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Franรงois Rabelais
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If you gave someone your heart and they died, did they take it with them? Did you spend the rest of forever with a hole inside you that couldn't be filled?
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Jodi Picoult (Nineteen Minutes)
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Things we lose have a way of coming back to us in the end, if not always in the way we expect.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5))
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Don't be afraid of death; be afraid of an unlived life. You don't have to live forever, you just have to live.
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Natalie Babbitt (Tuck Everlasting)
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Even death has a heart.
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Markus Zusak (The Book Thief)
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I could recognize him by touch alone, by smell; I would know him blind, by the way his breaths came and his feet struck the earth. I would know him in death, at the end of the world.
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Madeline Miller (The Song of Achilles)
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Don't feel bad, I'm usually about to die.
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Rick Riordan (The Battle of the Labyrinth (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, #4))
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Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!
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Hunter S. Thompson (The Proud Highway: Saga of a Desperate Southern Gentleman, 1955-1967)
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One can never have enough socks," said Dumbledore. "Another Christmas has come and gone and I didn't get a single pair. People will insist on giving me books.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter, #1))
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I DON'T CARE!" Harry yelled at them, snatching up a lunascope and throwing it into the fireplace. "I'VE HAD ENOUGH, I'VE SEEN ENOUGH, I WANT OUT, I WANT IT TO END, I DON'T CARE ANYMORE!" "You do care," said Dumbledore. He had not flinched or made a single move to stop Harry demolishing his office. His expression was calm, almost detached. "You care so much you feel as though you will bleed to death with the pain of it.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5))
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That was the thing. You never got used to it, the idea of someone being gone. Just when you think it's reconciled, accepted, someone points it out to you, and it just hits you all over again, that shocking.
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Sarah Dessen (The Truth About Forever)
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When people don't express themselves, they die one piece at a time.
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Laurie Halse Anderson (Speak)
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I meant," said Ipslore bitterly, "what is there in this world that truly makes living worthwhile?" Death thought about it. CATS, he said eventually. CATS ARE NICE.
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Terry Pratchett (Sourcery (Discworld, #5; Rincewind #3))
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Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it.
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Terry Pratchett (Reaper Man (Discworld, #11; Death, #2))
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Older men declare war. But it is youth that must fight and die.
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Herbert Hoover
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My dear, Find what you love and let it kill you. Let it drain you of your all. Let it cling onto your back and weigh you down into eventual nothingness. Let it kill you and let it devour your remains. For all things will kill you, both slowly and fastly, but itโ€™s much better to be killed by a lover. ~ Falsely yours
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Kinky Friedman
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DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, said Death. JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH.
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Terry Pratchett (Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch)
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To me, Fearless is not the absense of fear. It's not being completely unafraid. To me, Fearless is having fears. Fearless is having doubts. Lots of them. To me, Fearless is living in spite of those things that scare you to death.
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Taylor Swift
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The scar had not pained Harry for nineteen years. All was well.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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Albus Severus," Harry said quietly, so that nobody but Ginny could hear, and she was tactful enough to pretend to be waving to Rose, who was now on the train, "you were named for two headmasters of Hogwarts. One of them was a Slytherin and he was probably the bravest man I ever knew.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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If you have a sister and she dies, do you stop saying you have one? Or are you always a sister, even when the other half of the equation is gone?
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Jodi Picoult (My Sister's Keeper)
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Ah, my daughter,สบ he said. สบEighteen, and already youสนve been accused of murder, aided felons, and acquired a death count higher than most guardians will ever see.สบ He paused. สบI couldnสนt be prouder.
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Richelle Mead (Last Sacrifice (Vampire Academy, #6))
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For those who believe in God, most of the big questions are answered. But for those of us who can't readily accept the God formula, the big answers don't remain stone-written. We adjust to new conditions and discoveries. We are pliable. Love need not be a command nor faith a dictum. I am my own god. We are here to unlearn the teachings of the church, state, and our educational system. We are here to drink beer. We are here to kill war. We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that Death will tremble to take us.
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Charles Bukowski
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I could die for you. But I couldn't, and wouldn't, live for you.
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Ayn Rand (The Fountainhead)
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The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death.
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J.K. Rowling
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It is a curious thing, the death of a loved one. We all know that our time in this world is limited, and that eventually all of us will end up underneath some sheet, never to wake up. And yet it is always a surprise when it happens to someone we know. It is like walking up the stairs to your bedroom in the dark, and thinking there is one more stair than there is. Your foot falls down, through the air, and there is a sickly moment of dark surprise as you try and readjust the way you thought of things.
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Lemony Snicket (Horseradish)
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Ignore those that make you fearful and sad, that degrade you back towards disease and death.
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Rumi
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Um...is that thing tame?" Frank said. The horse whinnied angrily. "I don't think so," Percy guessed. "He just said, 'I will trample you to death, silly Chinese Canadian baby man'.
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Rick Riordan (The Son of Neptune (The Heroes of Olympus, #2))
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If death meant just leaving the stage long enough to change costume and come back as a new character...Would you slow down? Or speed up?
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Chuck Palahniuk (Invisible Monsters)
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You only live twice: Once when you are born And once when you look death in the face
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Ian Fleming (You Only Live Twice (James Bond, #12))
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You care so much you feel as though you will bleed to death with the pain of it.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5))
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Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, Will come when it will come.
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
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How do you feel, Georgie?" whispered Mrs. Weasley. George's fingers groped for the side of his head. "Saintlike," he murmured. "What's wrong with him?" croaked Fred, looking terrified. "Is his mind affected?" "Saintlike," repeated George, opening his eyes and looking up at his brother. "You see...I'm HOLEY, Fred, geddit?
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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A small but noteworthy note. I've seen so many young men over the years who think they're running at other young men. They are not. They are running at me.
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Markus Zusak (The Book Thief)
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It's not life or death, the labyrinth. Suffering. Doing wrong and having wrong things happen to you. That's the problem. Bolivar was talking about the pain, not about the living or dying. How do you get out of the labyrinth of suffering?
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John Green (Looking for Alaska)
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District 12: Where you can starve to death in safety.
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Suzanne Collins (The Hunger Games (The Hunger Games, #1))
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A girl calls and asks, "Does it hurt very much to die?" "Well, sweetheart," I tell her, "yes, but it hurts a lot more to keep living.
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Chuck Palahniuk (Survivor)
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What is an "instant" death anyway? How long is an instant? Is it one second? Ten? The pain of those seconds must have been awful as her heart burst and her lungs collapsed and there was no air and no blood to her brain and only raw panic. What the hell is instant? Nothing is instant. Instant rice takes five minutes, instant pudding an hour. I doubt that an instant of blinding pain feels particularly instantaneous.
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John Green (Looking for Alaska)
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I'm going to keep going until I succeed โ€” or die. Don't think I don't know how this might end. I've known it for years.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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It is nothing to die. It is frightful not to live.
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Victor Hugo (Les Misรฉrables)
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Five exclamation marks, the sure sign of an insane mind.
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Terry Pratchett (Reaper Man (Discworld, #11; Death, #2))
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Death is so terribly final, while life is full of possibilities.
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George R.R. Martin (A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1))
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When I look at my life and its secret colours, I feel like bursting into tears.
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Albert Camus (A Happy Death)
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Each night, when I go to sleep, I die. And the next morning, when I wake up, I am reborn.
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Mahatma Gandhi
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Every life has death and every light has shadow. Be content to stand in the light and let the shadow fall where it will.
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Mary Stewart (The Hollow Hills (Arthurian Saga, #2))
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It matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.
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William Ernest Henley (Echoes of Life and Death;)
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Sleep, those little slices of death โ€” how I loathe them.
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Edgar Allan Poe
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And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death.
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Charles Dickens (Our Mutual Friend)
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It is a curious thing, Harry, but perhaps those who are best suited to power are those who have never sought it. Those who, like you, have leadership thrust upon them, and take up the mantle because they must, and find to their own surprise that they wear it well.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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Does it hurt?" The childish question had escaped Harry's lips before he could stop it. "Dying? Not at all," said Sirius. "Quicker and easier than falling asleep.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
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Death is Peaceful, Life is Harder
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Stephenie Meyer (Twilight (Twilight, #1))
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The world isnโ€™t split into good people and Death Eaters.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Harry Potter, #5))
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And what would humans be without love?" RARE, said Death.
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Terry Pratchett (Sourcery (Discworld, #5; Rincewind #3))
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Much of what was said did not matter, and that much of what mattered could not be said.
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Katherine Boo (Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity)
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Life isn't fair, it's just fairer than death, that's all.
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William Goldman (The Princess Bride)
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ู„ุง ุฃุฎุงู ุงู„ู…ูˆุช ..ุฃุฎุงู ุฃู† ุฃู…ูˆุช ู‚ุจู„ ุฃู† ุฃุญูŠุง
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ุฃุญู…ุฏ ุฎุงู„ุฏ ุชูˆููŠู‚
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Love is how you stay alive, even after you are gone.
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Mitch Albom
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Death is not the opposite of life, but a part of it.
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Haruki Murakami (Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman: 24 Stories)
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You see, cuckoos are parasites. They lay their eggs in other birds' nests. When the egg hatches, the baby cuckoo pushes the other baby birds out of the nest. The poor parent birds work themselves to death trying to find enough food to feed the enormous cuckoo child who has murdered their babies and taken their places." "Enormous?" said Jace. "Did you just call me fat?" "It was an analogy." "I am not fat.
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Cassandra Clare (City of Ashes (The Mortal Instruments, #2))
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Real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time.
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Terry Pratchett (Hogfather (Discworld, #20; Death, #4))
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Iโ€™m here. I love you. I donโ€™t care if you need to stay up crying all night long, I will stay with you. If you need the medication again, go ahead and take itโ€”I will love you through that, as well. If you donโ€™t need the medication, I will love you, too. Thereโ€™s nothing you can ever do to lose my love. I will protect you until you die, and after your death I will still protect you. I am stronger than Depression and I am braver than Loneliness and nothing will ever exhaust me.
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Elizabeth Gilbert (Eat, Pray, Love)
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To die, to sleep - To sleep, perchance to dream - ay, there's the rub, For in this sleep of death what dreams may come...
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It's the transition that's troublesome.
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Isaac Asimov
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My mate. Death incarnate. Night triumphant.
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Sarah J. Maas (A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #2))
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Death is no more than passing from one room into another. But there's a difference for me, you know. Because in that other room I shall be able to see.
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Helen Keller
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No one really knows why they are alive until they know what they'd die for.
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Martin Luther King Jr.
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Life before Death. Strength before Weakness. Journey before Destination.
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Brandon Sanderson (The Way of Kings (The Stormlight Archive, #1))
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If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.
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Will Rogers
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I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.
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S.G. Tallentyre (The Friends of Voltaire)
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Sex is kicking death in the ass while singing.
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Charles Bukowski
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Someone who thinks death is the scariest thing doesn't know a thing about life.
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Sue Monk Kidd (The Secret Life of Bees)
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When he died, all things soft and beautiful and bright would be buried with him.
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Madeline Miller (The Song of Achilles)
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The truth is, once you learn how to die, you learn how to live.
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Mitch Albom (Tuesdays with Morrie)
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People living deeply have no fear of death.
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Anaรฏs Nin
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Solitude gives birth to the original in us, to beauty unfamiliar and perilous - to poetry. But also, it gives birth to the opposite: to the perverse, the illicit, the absurd.
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Thomas Mann (Death in Venice and Other Tales)
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It was, he thought, the difference between being dragged into the arena to face a battle to the death and walking into the arena with your head held high. Some people, perhaps, would say that there was little to choose between the two ways, but Dumbledore knew - and so do I, thought Harry, with a rush of fierce pride, and so did my parents - that there was all the difference in the world.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Harry Potter, #6))
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At the temple there is a poem called "Loss" carved into the stone. It has three words, but the poet has scratched them out. You cannot read loss, only feel it.
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Arthur Golden (Memoirs of a Geisha)
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Drink today, and drown all sorrow; You shall perhaps not do it tomorrow; Best, while you have it, use your breath; There is no drinking after death.
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Ben Jonson
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Every man's life ends the same way. It is only the details of how he lived and how he died that distinguish one man from another.
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Ernest Hemingway
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The consequence of this is that I'm always finding humans at their best and worst. I see their ugly and their beauty, and I wonder how the same thing can be both. (Death)
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Markus Zusak (The Book Thief)
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A man who won't die for something is not fit to live.
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Martin Luther King Jr. (The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr.)
โ€œ
It takes courage to love, but pain through love is the purifying fire which those who love generously know. We all know people who are so much afraid of pain that they shut themselves up like clams in a shell and, giving out nothing, receive nothing and therefore shrink until life is a mere living death.
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โ€
Eleanor Roosevelt
โ€œ
One lives in the hope of becoming a memory.
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Antonio Porchia
โ€œ
A man with outward courage dares to die; a man with inner courage dares to live.
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Lao Tzu (Tao Te Ching)
โ€œ
there is a place in the heart that will never be filled a space and even during the best moments and the greatest times times we will know it we will know it more than ever there is a place in the heart that will never be filled and we will wait and wait in that space.
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โ€
Charles Bukowski
โ€œ
The dead can survive as part of the lives of those that still live.
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Kenzaburล ลŒe (Hiroshima Notes)
โ€œ
We did it, we bashed them wee Potter's the one, and Voldy's gone moldy, so now let's have fun!
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โ€
J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
โ€œ
After all this time?" "Always...
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
โ€œ
Dying Is an art, like everything else. I do it exceptionally well. I do it so it feels like hell. I do it so it feels real. I guess you could say I have a call.
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โ€
Sylvia Plath (Ariel)
โ€œ
Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement.
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J.R.R. Tolkien (The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, #1))
โ€œ
We are all alone, born alone, die alone, andโ€”in spite of True Romance magazinesโ€”we shall all someday look back on our lives and see that, in spite of our company, we were alone the whole way. I do not say lonelyโ€”at least, not all the timeโ€”but essentially, and finally, alone. This is what makes your self-respect so important, and I don't see how you can respect yourself if you must look in the hearts and minds of others for your happiness.
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Hunter S. Thompson (The Proud Highway: Saga of a Desperate Southern Gentleman, 1955-1967)
โ€œ
and he suddenly knew that if she killed herself, he would die. Maybe not immediately, maybe not with the same blinding rush of pain, but it would happen. You couldn't live for very long without a heart.
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โ€
Jodi Picoult
โ€œ
It would seem that you have no useful skill or talent whatsoever," he said. "Have you thought of going into teaching?
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โ€
Terry Pratchett (Mort (Discworld, #4; Death, #1))
โ€œ
I just want to break that song into pieces and love them all to death.
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โ€
Rainbow Rowell (Eleanor & Park)
โ€œ
That's what literature is. It's the people who went before us, tapping out messages from the past, from beyond the grave, trying to tell us about life and death! Listen to them!
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โ€
Connie Willis (Passage)
โ€œ
I am so far from being a pessimist...on the contrary, in spite of my scars, I am tickled to death at life.
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โ€
Eugene O'Neill
โ€œ
Death is not the greatest loss in life. The greatest loss is what dies inside while still alive. Never surrender.
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โ€
Tupac Shakur
โ€œ
The meaning of life is that it stops.
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โ€
Franz Kafka
โ€œ
The only person I really wanted to talk to about Augustus Water's death with was Augustus Waters.
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โ€
John Green (The Fault in Our Stars)
โ€œ
Here lies Dobby, a free elf.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
โ€œ
Many people die at twenty five and aren't buried until they are seventy five.
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โ€
Benjamin Franklin
โ€œ
I donโ€™t want to fade away, I want to flame away - I want my death to be an attraction, a spectacle, a mystery. A work of art.
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Jennifer Egan (A Visit from the Goon Squad)
โ€œ
Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
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โ€
Dylan Thomas (Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night)
โ€œ
Every second he breathed, the smell of the grass, the cool air on his face, was so precious: To think that people had years and years, time to waste, so much time it dragged, and he was clinging to each second.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
โ€œ
I have been made to protect you. Only in death will I be kept from this oath.
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โ€
Leigh Bardugo (Six of Crows (Six of Crows, #1))
โ€œ
There are so many worse things than death. Not to be loved or not to be able to love: that is worse.
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โ€
Cassandra Clare (Clockwork Princess (The Infernal Devices, #3))
โ€œ
I believe in the power of the imagination to remake the world, to release the truth within us, to hold back the night, to transcend death, to charm motorways, to ingratiate ourselves with birds, to enlist the confidences of madmen.
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โ€
J.G. Ballard
โ€œ
Seventeen, eh!" said Hagrid as he accepted a bucket-sized glass of wine from Fred. "Six years to the day we met, Harry, dโ€™yeh remember it?" "Vaguely," said Harry, grinning up at him. "Didnโ€™t you smash down the front door, give Dudley a pigโ€™s tail, and tell me I was a wizard?" "I forgeโ€™ the details," Hagrid chortled.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
โ€œ
Clary felt suddenly annoyed. "When the self-congratulatory part of the evening is over, maybe we could get back to saving my best friend from being exsanguinated to death?" "Exsanguinated," said Jace, impressed. "That's a big word." "And you're a big-" "Tsk tsk," he interupted. "No swearing in church.
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Cassandra Clare (City of Bones (The Mortal Instruments, #1))
โ€œ
Snape's patronus was a doe,' said Harry, 'the same as my mother's because he loved her for nearly all of his life, from when they were children.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
โ€œ
It is not death that a man should fear, but he should fear never beginning to live.
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Marcus Aurelius (Meditations)
โ€œ
I gave him my heart, and he took and pinched it to death; and flung it back to me. People feel with their hearts, Ellen, and since he has destroyed mine, I have not power to feel for him.
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Emily Brontรซ (Wuthering Heights)
โ€œ
To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die.
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โ€
Thomas Campbell
โ€œ
I'm completely in favor of the separation of Church and State. ... These two institutions screw us up enough on their own, so both of them together is certain death.
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โ€
George Carlin
โ€œ
I may not agree with you, but I will defend to the death your right to make an ass of yourself.
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โ€
Oscar Wilde
โ€œ
Death: "THERE ARE BETTER THINGS IN THE WORLD THAN ALCOHOL, ALBERT." Albert: "Oh, yes, sir. But alcohol sort of compensates for not getting them.
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โ€
Terry Pratchett
โ€œ
It's better to burn out than to fade away.
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โ€
Neil Young
โ€œ
Kill me. If youโ€™ve ever been my friend, kill me.
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James Dashner (The Death Cure (Maze Runner, #3))
โ€œ
Books are finite, sexual encounters are finite, but the desire to read and to fuck is infinite; it surpasses our own deaths, our fears, our hopes for peace.
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Roberto Bolaรฑo
โ€œ
Together, they would watch everything that was so carefully planned collapse, and they would smile at the beauty of destruction.
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Markus Zusak (The Book Thief)
โ€œ
I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story. From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked. One fig was a husband and a happy home and children, and another fig was a famous poet and another fig was a brilliant professor, and another fig was Ee Gee, the amazing editor, and another fig was Europe and Africa and South America, and another fig was Constantin and Socrates and Attila and a pack of other lovers with queer names and offbeat professions, and another fig was an Olympic lady crew champion, and beyond and above these figs were many more figs I couldn't quite make out. I saw myself sitting in the crotch of this fig tree, starving to death, just because I couldn't make up my mind which of the figs I would choose. I wanted each and every one of them, but choosing one meant losing all the rest, and, as I sat there, unable to decide, the figs began to wrinkle and go black, and, one by one, they plopped to the ground at my feet.
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Sylvia Plath (The Bell Jar)
โ€œ
Monkey bar," Annabeth said. "I'm great at these." She leaped onto to the first rung and start swinging her way across. She was scared of tiny spiders, but not of plummeting to her death from a set of monkey bars. Go figure.
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Rick Riordan (The Battle of the Labyrinth (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, #4))
โ€œ
To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time; And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player, That struts and frets his hour upon the stage, And then is heard no more. It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.
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โ€
William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
โ€œ
Your mother died to save you. If there is one thing Voldemort cannot understand, it is love. Love as powerful as your mother's for you leaves it's own mark. To have been loved so deeply, even though the person who loved us is gone, will give us some protection forever.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter, #1))
โ€œ
I found myself thinking about President William McKinley, the third American president to be assassinated. He lived for several days after he was shot, and towards the end, his wife started crying and screaming, "I want to go too! I want to go too!" And with his last measure of strength, McKinley turned to her and spoke his last words: "We are all going.
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โ€
John Green (Looking for Alaska)
โ€œ
Look...at...me..." he whispered. The green eyes found the black, but after a second, something in the depths of the dark pair seemed to vanish, leaving them fixed, blank, and empty. The hand holding Harry thudded to the floor, and Snape moved no more.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
โ€œ
Be like the sun for grace and mercy. Be like the night to cover others' faults. Be like running water for generosity. Be like death for rage and anger. Be like the Earth for modesty. Appear as you are. Be as you appear.
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Rumi
โ€œ
His soul sat up. It met me. Those kinds of souls always do - the best ones. The ones who rise up and say "I know who you are and I am ready. Not that I want to go, of course, but I will come." Those souls are always light because more of them have been put out. More of them have already found their way to other places.
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Markus Zusak (The Book Thief)
โ€œ
When you're dead, they really fix you up. I hope to hell when I do die somebody has sense enough to just dump me in the river or something. Anything except sticking me in a goddam cemetery. People coming and putting a bunch of flowers on your stomach on Sunday, and all that crap. Who wants flowers when you're dead? Nobody.
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J.D. Salinger (The Catcher in the Rye)
โ€œ
No sight so sad as that of a naughty child," he began, "especially a naughty little girl. Do you know where the wicked go after death?" "They go to hell," was my ready and orthodox answer. "And what is hell? Can you tell me that?" "A pit full of fire." "And should you like to fall into that pit, and to be burning there for ever?" "No, sir." "What must you do to avoid it?" I deliberated a moment: my answer, when it did come was objectionable: "I must keep in good health and not die.
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โ€
Charlotte Brontรซ (Jane Eyre)
โ€œ
If I die, I will wait for you, do you understand? No matter how long. I will watch from beyond to make sure you live every year you have to its fullest, and then weโ€™ll have so much to talk about when I see you againโ€ฆ (Bones)
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โ€
Jeaniene Frost
โ€œ
Youโ€™ll get over itโ€ฆโ€ Itโ€™s the clichรฉs that cause the trouble. To lose someone you love is to alter your life for ever. You donโ€™t get over it because โ€˜itโ€ is the person you loved. The pain stops, there are new people, but the gap never closes. How could it? The particularness of someone who mattered enough to grieve over is not made anodyne by death. This hole in my heart is in the shape of you and no-one else can fit it. Why would I want them to?
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Jeanette Winterson (Written on the Body)
โ€œ
Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves. Heres Tom with the Weather.
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โ€
Bill Hicks
โ€œ
Life is so beautiful that death has fallen in love with it, a jealous, possessive love that grabs at what it can. But life leaps over oblivion lightly, losing only a thing or two of no importance, and gloom is but the passing shadow of a cloud...
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Yann Martel (Life of Pi)
โ€œ
For instance, this new idea that You-Know-Who can kill with a single glance from his eyes. Thatโ€™s a basilisk, listeners. One simple test: Check whether the thing thatโ€™s glaring at you has got legs. If it has, itโ€™s safe to look into its eyes, although if it really is You-Know-Who, thatโ€™s still likely to be the last thing you ever do.
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
โ€œ
I am fundamentally an optimist. Whether that comes from nature or nurture, I cannot say. Part of being optimistic is keeping one's head pointed toward the sun, one's feet moving forward. There were many dark moments when my faith in humanity was sorely tested, but I would not and could not give myself up to despair. That way lays defeat and death.
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Nelson Mandela (Long Walk to Freedom: Autobiography of Nelson Mandela)
โ€œ
When someone you love dies, and you're not expecting it, you don't lose her all at once; you lose her in pieces over a long timeโ€”the way the mail stops coming, and her scent fades from the pillows and even from the clothes in her closet and drawers. Gradually, you accumulate the parts of her that are gone. Just when the day comesโ€”when there's a particular missing part that overwhelms you with the feeling that she's gone, foreverโ€”there comes another day, and another specifically missing part.
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John Irving (A Prayer for Owen Meany)
โ€œ
I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound or stab us. If the book we're reading doesn't wake us up with a blow to the head, what are we reading for? So that it will make us happy, as you write? Good Lord, we would be happy precisely if we had no books, and the kind of books that make us happy are the kind we could write ourselves if we had to. But we need books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea within us. That is my belief.
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โ€
Franz Kafka
โ€œ
The so-called โ€˜psychotically depressedโ€™ person who tries to kill herself doesnโ€™t do so out of quote โ€˜hopelessnessโ€™ or any abstract conviction that lifeโ€™s assets and debits do not square. And surely not because death seems suddenly appealing. The person in whom Its invisible agony reaches a certain unendurable level will kill herself the same way a trapped person will eventually jump from the window of a burning high-rise. Make no mistake about people who leap from burning windows. Their terror of falling from a great height is still just as great as it would be for you or me standing speculatively at the same window just checking out the view; i.e. the fear of falling remains a constant. The variable here is the other terror, the fireโ€™s flames: when the flames get close enough, falling to death becomes the slightly less terrible of two terrors. Itโ€™s not desiring the fall; itโ€™s terror of the flames. And yet nobody down on the sidewalk, looking up and yelling โ€˜Donโ€™t!โ€™ and โ€˜Hang on!โ€™, can understand the jump. Not really. Youโ€™d have to have personally been trapped and felt flames to really understand a terror way beyond falling.
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โ€
David Foster Wallace
โ€œ
Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of other's opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.
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โ€
Steve Jobs
โ€œ
There was a clatter as the basilisk fangs cascaded out of Hermione's arms. Running at Ron, she flung them around his neck and kissed him full on the mouth. Ron threw away the fangs and broomstick he was holding and responded with such enthusiasm that he lifted Hermione off her feet. "Is this the moment?" Harry asked weakly, and when nothing happened except that Ron and Hermione gripped each other still more firmly and swayed on the spot, he raised his voice. "OI! There's a war going on here!" Ron and Hermione broke apart, their arms still around each other. "I know, mate," said Ron, who looked as though he had recently been hit on the back of the head with a Bludger, "so it's now or never, isn't it?" "Never mind that, what about the Horcrux?" Harry shouted. "D'you think you could just --- just hold it in, until we've got the diadem?" "Yeah --- right --- sorry ---" said Ron, and he and Hermione set about gathering up fangs, both pink in the face.
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โ€
J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Harry Potter, #7))
โ€œ
People, I thought, wanted security. They couldn't bear the idea of death being a big black nothing, couldn't bear the thought of their loved ones not existing, and couldn't even imagine themselves not existing. I finally decided that people believed in an afterlife because they couldn't bear not to.
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โ€
John Green (Looking for Alaska)
โ€œ
My sister will die over and over again for the rest of my life. Grief is forever. It doesn't go away; it becomes a part of you, step for step, breath for breath. I will never stop grieving Bailey because I will never stop loving her. That's just how it is. Grief and love are conjoined, you don't get one without the other. All I can do is love her, and love the world, emulate her by living with daring and spirit and joy.
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โ€
Jandy Nelson (The Sky Is Everywhere)
โ€œ
Sometimes fate is like a small sandstorm that keeps changing directions. You change direction but the sandstorm chases you. You turn again, but the storm adjusts. Over and over you play this out, like some ominous dance with death just before dawn. Why? Because this storm isn't something that blew in from far away, something that has nothing to do with you. This storm is you. Something inside of you. So all you can do is give in to it, step right inside the storm, closing your eyes and plugging up your ears so the sand doesn't get in, and walk through it, step by step. There's no sun there, no moon, no direction, no sense of time. Just fine white sand swirling up into the sky like pulverized bones. That's the kind of sandstorm you need to imagine. And you really will have to make it through that violent, metaphysical, symbolic storm. No matter how metaphysical or symbolic it might be, make no mistake about it: it will cut through flesh like a thousand razor blades. People will bleed there, and you will bleed too. Hot, red blood. You'll catch that blood in your hands, your own blood and the blood of others. And once the storm is over you won't remember how you made it through, how you managed to survive. You won't even be sure, in fact, whether the storm is really over. But one thing is certain. When you come out of the storm you won't be the same person who walked in. That's what this storm's all about.
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โ€
Haruki Murakami (Kafka on the Shore)
โ€œ
I think I fell in love with her, a little bit. Isn't that dumb? But it was like I knew her. Like she was my oldest, dearest friend. The kind of person you can tell anything to, no matter how bad, and they'll still love you, because they know you. I wanted to go with her. I wanted her to notice me. And then she stopped walking. Under the moon, she stopped. And looked at us. She looked at me. Maybe she was trying to tell me something; I don't know. She probably didn't even know I was there. But I'll always love her. All my life.
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โ€
Neil Gaiman (Worlds' End (The Sandman, #8))
โ€œ
I carried [Rudy] softly through the broken street...with him I tried a little harder [at comforting]. I watched the contents of his soul for a moment and saw a black-painted boy calling the name Jesse Owens as he ran through an imaginary tape. I saw him hip-deep in some icy water, chasing a book, and I saw a boy lying in bed, imagining how a kiss would taste from his glorious next-door neighbor. He does something to me, that boy. Every time. It's his only detriment. He steps on my heart. He makes me cry.
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โ€
Markus Zusak (The Book Thief)
โ€œ
You live like this, sheltered, in a delicate world, and you believe you are living. Then you read a bookโ€ฆ or you take a tripโ€ฆ and you discover that you are not living, that you are hibernating. The symptoms of hibernating are easily detectable: first, restlessness. The second symptom (when hibernating becomes dangerous and might degenerate into death): absence of pleasure. That is all. It appears like an innocuous illness. Monotony, boredom, death. Millions live like this (or die like this) without knowing it. They work in offices. They drive a car. They picnic with their families. They raise children. And then some shock treatment takes place, a person, a book, a song, and it awakens them and saves them from death. Some never awaken.
โ€
โ€
Anaรฏs Nin (The Diary of Anaรฏs Nin, Vol. 1: 1931-1934)
โ€œ
I can believe things that are true and things that aren't true and I can believe things where nobody knows if they're true or not. I can believe in Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny and the Beatles and Marilyn Monroe and Elvis and Mister Ed. Listen - I believe that people are perfectable, that knowledge is infinite, that the world is run by secret banking cartels and is visited by aliens on a regular basis, nice ones that look like wrinkled lemurs and bad ones who mutilate cattle and want our water and our women. I believe that the future sucks and I believe that the future rocks and I believe that one day White Buffalo Woman is going to come back and kick everyone's ass. I believe that all men are just overgrown boys with deep problems communicating and that the decline in good sex in America is coincident with the decline in drive-in movie theaters from state to state. I believe that all politicians are unprincipled crooks and I still believe that they are better than the alternative. I believe that California is going to sink into the sea when the big one comes, while Florida is going to dissolve into madness and alligators and toxic waste. I believe that antibacterial soap is destroying our resistance to dirt and disease so that one day we'll all be wiped out by the common cold like martians in War of the Worlds. I believe that the greatest poets of the last century were Edith Sitwell and Don Marquis, that jade is dried dragon sperm, and that thousands of years ago in a former life I was a one-armed Siberian shaman. I believe that mankind's destiny lies in the stars. I believe that candy really did taste better when I was a kid, that it's aerodynamically impossible for a bumble bee to fly, that light is a wave and a particle, that there's a cat in a box somewhere who's alive and dead at the same time (although if they don't ever open the box to feed it it'll eventually just be two different kinds of dead), and that there are stars in the universe billions of years older than the universe itself. I believe in a personal god who cares about me and worries and oversees everything I do. I believe in an impersonal god who set the universe in motion and went off to hang with her girlfriends and doesn't even know that I'm alive. I believe in an empty and godless universe of causal chaos, background noise, and sheer blind luck. I believe that anyone who says sex is overrated just hasn't done it properly. I believe that anyone who claims to know what's going on will lie about the little things too. I believe in absolute honesty and sensible social lies. I believe in a woman's right to choose, a baby's right to live, that while all human life is sacred there's nothing wrong with the death penalty if you can trust the legal system implicitly, and that no one but a moron would ever trust the legal system. I believe that life is a game, that life is a cruel joke, and that life is what happens when you're alive and that you might as well lie back and enjoy it.
โ€
โ€
Neil Gaiman (American Gods (American Gods, #1))
โ€œ
I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever. I offer myself to you again with a heart even more your own than when you almost broke it, eight years and a half ago. Dare not say that man forgets sooner than woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you. Unjust I may have been, weak and resentful I have been, but never inconstant. You alone have brought me to Bath. For you alone, I think and plan. Have you not seen this? Can you fail to have understood my wishes? I had not waited even these ten days, could I have read your feelings, as I think you must have penetrated mine. I can hardly write. I am every instant hearing something which overpowers me. You sink your voice, but I can distinguish the tones of that voice when they would be lost on others. Too good, too excellent creature! You do us justice, indeed. You do believe that there is true attachment and constancy among men. Believe it to be most fervent, most undeviating, in F. W. I must go, uncertain of my fate; but I shall return hither, or follow your party, as soon as possible. A word, a look, will be enough to decide whether I enter your father's house this evening or never.
โ€
โ€
Jane Austen (Persuasion)
โ€œ
Perhaps the greatest faculty our minds possess is the ability to cope with pain. Classic thinking teaches us of the four doors of the mind, which everyone moves through according to their need. First is the door of sleep. Sleep offers us a retreat from the world and all its pain. Sleep marks passing time, giving us distance from the things that have hurt us. When a person is wounded they will often fall unconscious. Similarly, someone who hears traumatic news will often swoon or faint. This is the mind's way of protecting itself from pain by stepping through the first door. Second is the door of forgetting. Some wounds are too deep to heal, or too deep to heal quickly. In addition, many memories are simply painful, and there is no healing to be done. The saying 'time heals all wounds' is false. Time heals most wounds. The rest are hidden behind this door. Third is the door of madness. There are times when the mind is dealt such a blow it hides itself in insanity. While this may not seem beneficial, it is. There are times when reality is nothing but pain, and to escape that pain the mind must leave reality behind. Last is the door of death. The final resort. Nothing can hurt us after we are dead, or so we have been told.
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Patrick Rothfuss (The Name of the Wind (The Kingkiller Chronicle, #1))
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All right," said Susan. "I'm not stupid. You're saying humans need... fantasies to make life bearable." REALLY? AS IF IT WAS SOME KIND OF PINK PILL? NO. HUMANS NEED FANTASY TO BE HUMAN. TO BE THE PLACE WHERE THE FALLING ANGEL MEETS THE RISING APE. "Tooth fairies? Hogfathers? Littleโ€”" YES. AS PRACTICE. YOU HAVE TO START OUT LEARNING TO BELIEVE THE LITTLE LIES. "So we can believe the big ones?" YES. JUSTICE. MERCY. DUTY. THAT SORT OF THING. "They're not the same at all!" YOU THINK SO? THEN TAKE THE UNIVERSE AND GRIND IT DOWN TO THE FINEST POWDER AND SIEVE IT THROUGH THE FINEST SIEVE AND THEN SHOW ME ONE ATOM OF JUSTICE, ONE MOLECULE OF MERCY. AND YETโ€”Death waved a hand. AND YET YOU ACT AS IF THERE IS SOME IDEAL ORDER IN THE WORLD, AS IF THERE IS SOME...SOME RIGHTNESS IN THE UNIVERSE BY WHICH IT MAY BE JUDGED. "Yes, but people have got to believe that, or what's the pointโ€”" MY POINT EXACTLY.
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Terry Pratchett (Hogfather (Discworld, #20; Death, #4))
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Tess, Tess, Tessa. Was there ever a more beautiful sound than your name? To speak it aloud makes my heart ring like a bell. Strange to imagine that, isnโ€™t it โ€“ a heart ringing โ€“ but when you touch me that is what it is like: as if my heart is ringing in my chest and the sound shivers down my veins and splinters my bones with joy. Why have I written these words in this book? Because of you. You taught me to love this book where I had scorned it. When I read it for the second time, with an open mind and heart, I felt the most complete despair and envy of Sydney Carton. Yes, Sydney, for even if he had no hope that the woman he loved would love him, at least he could tell her of his love. At least he could do something to prove his passion, even if that thing was to die. I would have chosen death for a chance to tell you the truth, Tessa, if I could have been assured that death would be my own. And that is why I envied Sydney, for he was free. And now at last I am free, and I can finally tell you, without fear of danger to you, all that I feel in my heart. You are not the last dream of my soul. You are the first dream, the only dream I ever was unable to stop myself from dreaming. You are the first dream of my soul, and from that dream I hope will come all other dreams, a lifetimeโ€™s worth. With hope at least, Will Herondale
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Cassandra Clare (Clockwork Prince (The Infernal Devices, #2))
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To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep; No more; and by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause: there's the respect That makes calamity of so long life; For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all; And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pith and moment With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action.--Soft you now! The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons Be all my sins remember'd!
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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The most unfair thing about life is the way it ends. I mean, life is tough. It takes up a lot of your time. What do you get at the end of it? A Death! Whatโ€™s that, a bonus? I think the life cycle is all backwards. You should die first, get it out of the way. Then you live in an old age home. You get kicked out when youโ€™re too young, you get a gold watch, you go to work. You work forty years until youโ€™re young enough to enjoy your retirement. You do drugs, alcohol, you party, you get ready for high school. You go to grade school, you become a kid, you play, you have no responsibilities, you become a little baby, you go back into the womb, you spend your last nine months floating โ€ฆand you finish off as an orgasm.
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George Carlin
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We are going to die, and that makes us the lucky ones. Most people are never going to die because they are never going to be born. The potential people who could have been here in my place but who will in fact never see the light of day outnumber the sand grains of Arabia. Certainly those unborn ghosts include greater poets than Keats, scientists greater than Newton. We know this because the set of possible people allowed by our DNA so massively exceeds the set of actual people. In the teeth of these stupefying odds it is you and I, in our ordinariness, that are here.We privileged few, who won the lottery of birth against all odds, how dare we whine at our inevitable return to that prior state from which the vast majority have never stirred?
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Richard Dawkins (Unweaving the Rainbow: Science, Delusion and the Appetite for Wonder)
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There's nothing to mourn about death any more than there is to mourn about the growing of a flower. What is terrible is not death but the lives people live or don't live up until their death. They don't honor their own lives, they piss on their lives. They shit them away. Dumb fuckers. They concentrate too much on fucking, movies, money, family, fucking. Their minds are full of cotton. They swallow God without thinking, they swallow country without thinking. Soon they forget how to think, they let others think for them. Their brains are stuffed with cotton. They look ugly, they talk ugly, they walk ugly. Play them the great music of the centuries and they can't hear it. Most people's deaths are a sham. There's nothing left to die.
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Charles Bukowski
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Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometimes too hot the eye of heaven shines, And too often is his gold complexion dimm'd: And every fair from fair sometimes declines, By chance or natures changing course untrimm'd; By thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee.
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William Shakespeare (Shakespeare's Sonnets)
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Stop fighting me!" he said, trying to pull on the arm he held. He was in a precarious position himself, straddling the rail as he tried to lean over far enough to get me and actually hold onto me. โ€œLet go of me!โ€ I yelled back. But he was too strong and managed to haul most of me over the rail, enough so that I wasnโ€™t in total danger of falling again. See, hereโ€™s the thing. In that moment before I let go, I really had been contemplating my death. Iโ€™d come to terms with it and accepted it. I also, however, had known Dimitri might do something exactly like this. He was just that fast and that good. That was why I was holding my stake in the hand that was dangling free. I looked him in the eye. "I will always love you." Then I plunged the stake into his chest. It wasnโ€™t as precise a blow as I would have liked, not with the skilled way he was dodging. I struggled to get the stake in deep enough to his heart, unsure if I could do it from this angle. Then, his struggles stopped. His eyes stared at me, stunned, and his lips parted, almost into a smile, albeit a grisly and pained one. "Thatโ€™s what I was supposed to say. . .โ€ he gasped out. Those were his last words.
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Richelle Mead (Blood Promise (Vampire Academy, #4))
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I don't like ass kissers, flag wavers or team players. I like people who buck the system. Individualists. I often warn people: "Somewhere along the way, someone is going to tell you, 'There is no "I" in team.' What you should tell them is, 'Maybe not. But there is an "I" in independence, individuality and integrity.'" Avoid teams at all cost. Keep your circle small. Never join a group that has a name. If they say, "We're the So-and-Sos," take a walk. And if, somehow, you must join, if it's unavoidable, such as a union or a trade association, go ahead and join. But don't participate; it will be your death. And if they tell you you're not a team player, congratulate them on being observant.
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George Carlin
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Ginny, listen...I can't be involved with you anymore. We've got to stop seeing each other. We can't be together." "It's for some stupid noble reason isn't it?" "It's been like...like something out of someone else's life these last few weeks with you. But I can't...we can't...I've got to do things alone now. Voldemort uses people his enemies are close to. He's already used you as bait once, and that was just because you were my best friend's sister. Think how much danger you'll be in if we keep this up. He'll know, he'll find out. He'll try and get me through you." "What if I don't care?" "I care. How do you think I'd feel if this was your funeral...and it was my fault...
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J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Harry Potter, #6))
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Do you want a cookie? - What? - A cookie. Like an Oreo. Do you want one? - No. - How can you not want a cookie? - I just don't. - Okay, fine,let's say you did want a cookie. Let's say you were dying for a cookie, and there were cookies in the cupboard. What would you do? - I'd eat a cookie? - Exactly. That's all I'm saying. - What are you saying? - That if people want cookies, they should get a cookie. It's what people do. - Let me guess. Dad won't let you have a cookie? - No. Even though I'm practically starving to death, he won't even consider it. He says I have to have a sandwich first. - And you don't think that's fair. - You just said you'd get a cookie if you wanted one. So why can't I? I'm not a little kid. I can make my own decisions. - Hmm. I can see why this bothers you so much. - It's not fair. If he wants a cookie, he can have one. If you want a cookie, you can have one. But if I want a cookie, the rules don't count. Like you said, it's not fair. - So what are you going to do? - I'm going to eat a sandwich. Because I have to. Because the world isn't fair to ten-year-olds.
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Nicholas Sparks (The Last Song)
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If Jem dies, I cannot be with Tessa,โ€ said Will. โ€œBecause it will be as if I were waiting for him to die, or took some joy in his death, if it let me have her. And I will not be that person. I will not profit from his death. So he must live.โ€ He lowered his arm, his sleeve bloody. โ€œIt is the only way any of this can ever mean anything. Otherwise it is only โ€”โ€ โ€œPointless, needless suffering and pain? I donโ€™t suppose it would help if I told you that was the way life is. The good suffer, the evil flourish, and all that is mortal passes away,โ€ Magnus said. โ€œI want more than that,โ€ said Will. โ€œYou made me want more than that. You showed me I was only ever cursed because I had chosen to believe myself so. You told me there was possibility, meaning. And now you would turn your back on what you created.
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Cassandra Clare (Clockwork Princess (The Infernal Devices, #3))
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You teach me now how cruel you've been - cruel and false. Why did you despise me? Why did you betray your own heart, Cathy? I have not one word of comfort. You deserve this. You have killed yourself. Yes, you may kiss me, and cry; and wring out my kisses and tears: they'll blight you - they'll damn you. You loved me - what right had you to leave me? What right - answer me - for the poor fancy you felt for Linton? Because misery, and degradation, and death, and nothing that God or Satan could inflict would have parted us, you, of your own will did it. I have no broken your heart - you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine. So much the worse for me that I am strong. Do I want to live? What kind of living will it be when you - Oh, God! would you like to lie with your soul in the grave?
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Emily Brontรซ (Wuthering Heights)
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To me, โ€œFEARLESSโ€ is not the absence of fear. Itโ€™s not being completely unafraid. To me, FEARLESS is having fears. FEARLESS is having doubts. Lots of them. To me, FEARLESS is living in spite of those things that scare you to death. FEARLESS is falling madly in love again, even though youโ€™ve been hurt before. FEARLESS is walking into your freshmen year of high school at fifteen. FEARLESS is getting back up and fighting for what you want over and over againโ€ฆ even though every time youโ€™ve tried before, youโ€™ve lost. Itโ€™s FEARLESS to have faith that someday things will change. FEARLESS is having the courage to say goodbye to someone who only hurts you, even if you canโ€™t breathe without them. I think itโ€™s FEARLESS to fall for your best friend, even though heโ€™s in love with someone else. And when someone apologizes to you enough times for things theyโ€™ll never stop doing, I think itโ€™s FEARLESS to stop believing them. Itโ€™s FEARLESS to say โ€œyouโ€™re NOT sorryโ€, and walk away. I think loving someone despite what people think is FEARLESS. I think allowing yourself to cry on the bathroom floor is FEARLESS. Letting go is FEARLESS. Then, moving on and being alrightโ€ฆThatโ€™sFEARLESS too. But no matter what love throws at you, you have to believe in it. You have to believe in love stories and prince charmings and happily ever after. Thatโ€™s why I write these songs. Because I think love is FEARLESS.
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Taylor Swift
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For me, trees have always been the most penetrating preachers. I revere them when they live in tribes and families, in forests and groves. And even more I revere them when they stand alone. They are like lonely persons. Not like hermits who have stolen away out of some weakness, but like great, solitary men, like Beethoven and Nietzsche. In their highest boughs the world rustles, their roots rest in infinity; but they do not lose themselves there, they struggle with all the force of their lives for one thing only: to fulfil themselves according to their own laws, to build up their own form, to represent themselves. Nothing is holier, nothing is more exemplary than a beautiful, strong tree. When a tree is cut down and reveals its naked death-wound to the sun, one can read its whole history in the luminous, inscribed disk of its trunk: in the rings of its years, its scars, all the struggle, all the suffering, all the sickness, all the happiness and prosperity stand truly written, the narrow years and the luxurious years, the attacks withstood, the storms endured. And every young farmboy knows that the hardest and noblest wood has the narrowest rings, that high on the mountains and in continuing danger the most indestructible, the strongest, the ideal trees grow. Trees are sanctuaries. Whoever knows how to speak to them, whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth. They do not preach learning and precepts, they preach, undeterred by particulars, the ancient law of life. A tree says: A kernel is hidden in me, a spark, a thought, I am life from eternal life. The attempt and the risk that the eternal mother took with me is unique, unique the form and veins of my skin, unique the smallest play of leaves in my branches and the smallest scar on my bark. I was made to form and reveal the eternal in my smallest special detail. A tree says: My strength is trust. I know nothing about my fathers, I know nothing about the thousand children that every year spring out of me. I live out the secret of my seed to the very end, and I care for nothing else. I trust that God is in me. I trust that my labor is holy. Out of this trust I live. When we are stricken and cannot bear our lives any longer, then a tree has something to say to us: Be still! Be still! Look at me! Life is not easy, life is not difficult. Those are childish thoughts. Let God speak within you, and your thoughts will grow silent. You are anxious because your path leads away from mother and home. But every step and every day lead you back again to the mother. Home is neither here nor there. Home is within you, or home is nowhere at all. A longing to wander tears my heart when I hear trees rustling in the wind at evening. If one listens to them silently for a long time, this longing reveals its kernel, its meaning. It is not so much a matter of escaping from one's suffering, though it may seem to be so. It is a longing for home, for a memory of the mother, for new metaphors for life. It leads home. Every path leads homeward, every step is birth, every step is death, every grave is mother. So the tree rustles in the evening, when we stand uneasy before our own childish thoughts: Trees have long thoughts, long-breathing and restful, just as they have longer lives than ours. They are wiser than we are, as long as we do not listen to them. But when we have learned how to listen to trees, then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy. Whoever has learned how to listen to trees no longer wants to be a tree. He wants to be nothing except what he is. That is home. That is happiness.
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Hermann Hesse (Bรคume. Betrachtungen und Gedichte)
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Grief can destroy you --or focus you. You can decide a relationship was all for nothing if it had to end in death, and you alone. OR you can realize that every moment of it had more meaning than you dared to recognize at the time, so much meaning it scared you, so you just lived, just took for granted the love and laughter of each day, and didn't allow yourself to consider the sacredness of it. But when it's over and you're alone, you begin to see that it wasn't just a movie and a dinner together, not just watching sunsets together, not just scrubbing a floor or washing dishes together or worrying over a high electric bill. It was everything, it was the why of life, every event and precious moment of it. The answer to the mystery of existence is the love you shared sometimes so imperfectly, and when the loss wakes you to the deeper beauty of it, to the sanctity of it, you can't get off your knees for a long time, you're driven to your knees not by the weight of the loss but by gratitude for what preceded the loss. And the ache is always there, but one day not the emptiness, because to nurture the emptiness, to take solace in it, is to disrespect the gift of life.
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Dean Koontz (Odd Hours (Odd Thomas, #4))