Much Ado About Nothing Quotes

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Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever,- One foot in sea and one on shore, To one thing constant never.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I can see he's not in your good books,' said the messenger. 'No, and if he were I would burn my library.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow, than a man swear he loves me.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Let me be that I am and seek not to alter me.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I do love nothing in the world so well as you- is not that strange?
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
For which of my bad parts didst thou first fall in love with me?
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man. He that is more than a youth is not for me, and he that is less than a man, I am not for him.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
There was a star danced, and under that was I born.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I wish my horse had the speed of your tongue.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Why, what's the matter, That you have such a February face, So full of frost, of storm and cloudiness?
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Thou and I are too wise to woo peaceably.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Silence is the perfectest herault of joy. I were but little happy if I could say how much.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living? Beatrice: Is it possible disdain should die while she hath such meet food to feed it as Signior Benedick?
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Love me!... Why?
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I will live in thy heart, die in thy lap, and be buried in thy eyes—and moreover, I will go with thee to thy uncle’s.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
For it falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it, but being lacked and lost, Why, then we rack the value, then we find The virtue that possession would not show us While it was ours.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Then is courtesy a turncoat. But it is certain I am loved of all ladies, only you excepted: and I would I could find in my heart that I had not a hard heart; for, truly, I love none. Beatrice: A dear happiness to women: they would else have been troubled with a pernicious suitor. I thank God and my cold blood, I am of your humour for that: I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow than a man swear he loves me. -Much Ado About Nothing
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Tax not so bad a voice to slander music any more than once.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
A miracle. Here's our own hands against our hearts. Come, I will have thee, but by this light I take thee for pity. Beatrice: I would not deny you, but by this good day, I yield upon great persuasion, and partly to save your life, for I was told you were in a consumption. Benedick: Peace. I will stop your mouth.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
You are thought here to the most senseless and fit man for the job.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
For man is a giddy thing, and this is my conclusion.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Is it not strange that sheep's guts could hail souls out of men's bodies?
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
When you depart from me sorrow abides and happiness takes his leave.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Officers, what offence have these men done? DOGBERRY Marry, sir, they have committed false report; moreover, they have spoken untruths; secondarily, they are slanders; sixth and lastly, they have belied a lady; thirdly, they have verified unjust things; and, to conclude, they are lying knaves.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Suffer love! A good ephitet! I do suffer love indeed, for I love thee against my will.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
To be a well-favoured man is the gift of fortune; but to write and read comes by nature.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
The world must be peopled!
William Shakespeare
BEATRICE Against my will I am sent to bid you come in to dinner. BENEDICK Fair Beatrice, I thank you for your pains. BEATRICE I took no more pains for those thanks than you take pains to thank me: if it had been painful, I would not have come. BENEDICK You take pleasure then in the message? BEATRICE Yea, just so much as you may take upon a knife's point ... You have no stomach, signior: fare you well. Exit BENEDICK Ha! 'Against my will I am sent to bid you come in to dinner;' there's a double meaning in that...
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
And to be merry best becomes you; for, out of question, you were born in a merry hour. BEATRICE No, sure, my lord, my mother cried; but then there was a star danced, and under that was I born.
William Shakespeare
Ha. "Against my will I am sent to bid you come into dinner." There's a double meaning in that. -Benedick (Much Ado)
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
There's little of the melancholy element in her, my lord: she is never sad but when she sleeps; and not ever sad then; for I have heard my daughter say, she hath often dreamt of unhappiness, and waked herself with laughing.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Time goes on crutches till love have all his rites.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
If her breath were as terrible as her terminations, there were no living near her, she would infect to the north star!
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Silence is the perfectest herald of joy: I were but little happy, if I could say how much. Lady, as you are mine, I am yours: I give away myself for you and dote upon the exchange.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Well, every one can master a grief but he that has it.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Done to death by slanderous tongue
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Why, i' faith, methinks she's too low for a high praise, too brown for a fair praise and too little for a great praise: only this commendation I can afford her, that were she other than she is, she were unhandsome; and being no other but as she is, I do not like her. (Benedick, from Much Ado About Nothing)
William Shakespeare
LEONATO Well, niece, I hope to see you one day fitted with a husband. BEATRICE Not till God make men of some other metal than earth. Would it not grieve a woman to be overmastered with a pierce of valiant dust? to make an account of her life to a clod of wayward marl? No, uncle, I'll none: Adam's sons are my brethren; and, truly, I hold it a sin to match in my kindred.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Foul words is but foul wind, and foul wind is but foul breath, and foul breath is noisome; therefore I will depart unkissed.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
It was wonderful flirting with him, all the razor-edged literary banter, like Beatrice and Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing. A battle of wit, and a test, too.
Elizabeth Wein (Code Name Verity)
Sweet Beatrice, wouldst thou come when I called thee? BEATRICE Yea, signior, and depart when you bid me. BENEDICK O, stay but till then! BEATRICE 'Then' is spoken; fare you well now... (Much Ado About Nothing)
William Shakespeare
Speak low if you speak love.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
LEONATO Well, then, go you into hell? BEATRICE No, but to the gate; and there will the devil meet me, like an old cuckold, with horns on his head, and say 'Get you to heaven, Beatrice, get you to heaven; here's no place for you maids:' so deliver I up my apes, and away to Saint Peter for the heavens; he shows me where the bachelors sit, and there live we as merry as the day is long.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Yes, faith; it is my cousin's duty to make curtsy and say 'Father, as it please you.' But yet for all that, cousin, let him be a handsome fellow, or else make another curtsy and say 'Father, as it please me.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Beatrice: He that hath a beard is more than a youth,and he that hath no beard is less than a man; and he that is more than a youth is not for me; and he that is less than a man, I am not for him.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Friendship is constant in all other things Save in the office and affairs of love. Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues. Let every eye negotiate for itself, And trust no agent; for beauty is a witch Against whose charms faith melteth into blood.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
O God, that I were a man! I would eat his heart in the marketplace." ~~Beatrice
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Benedick By this hand, I love thee. Beatrice Use it for my love some other way than swearing by it.
William Shakespeare (MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (Illustrated, complete, and unabridged))
If [God] send me no husband, for the which blessing I am at him upon my knees every morning and evening ...
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
In time the savage bull doth bear the yoke.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I was born to speak all mirth and no matter.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
BEATRICE Is he not approved in the height a villain that hath slandered, scorned, dishonoured my kinswoman? O that I were a man! What, bear her in hand until they come to take hands, and then, with public accusation, uncovered slander, unmitigated rancour - O God, that I were a man! I would eat his heart in the market-place.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
DON PEDRO Come, lady, come; you have lost the heart of Signior Benedick. BEATRICE Indeed, my lord, he lent it me awhile; and I gave him use for it, a double heart for his single one: marry, once before he won it of me with false dice, therefore your grace may well say I have lost it. DON PEDRO You have put him down, lady, you have put him down. BEATRICE So I would not he should do me, my lord, lest I should prove the mother of fools.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
No, sure, my lord, my mother cried, but then there was a star danced, and under that was I born.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I may chance have some odd quirks and remnants of wit broken on me, because I have railed so long against marriage: but doth not the appetite alter? a man loves the meat in his youth that he cannot endure in his age. Shall quips and sentences and these paper bullets of the brain awe a man from the career of his humour? No, the world must be peopled. When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.
William Shakespeare
LEONATO Neighbours, you are tedious. DOGBERRY It pleases your worship to say so, but we are the poor duke's officers; but truly, for mine own part, if I were as tedious as a king, I could find it in my heart to bestow it all of your worship.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
...Having no recourse, I feel back on Shakespeare. Leif would recognize it and understand the context properly. With my remaining few seconds of consciousness, I quoted Benedick from Much Ado About Nothing, who spoke these words to his former friend: "you are a Villain: I jest not." and then I collapsed into a pool of my own blood.
Kevin Hearne (Tricked (The Iron Druid Chronicles, #4))
So you walk softly and look sweetly and say nothing. I am yours for the walk and especially when I walk away.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Sigh no more ladies, sigh no more, men were deceivers ever
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
There are no faces truer than those that are so washed. How much better is it to weep at joy than to joy at weeping!
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Dost thou not suspect my place? Dost thou not suspect my years? O that he were here to write me down an ass! But masters, remember that I am an ass. Though it be not written down, yet forget not that I am an ass. No, thou villain, thou art full of piety, as shall be proved upon thee by good witness. I am a wise fellow, and which is more, an officer, and which is more, a householder, and which is more, as pretty a piece of flesh as any is in Messina, and one that knows the law, go to . . . and one that hath two gowns, and everything handsome about him. Bring him away. O that I had been writ down an ass!
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Pause awhile, And let my counsel sway you.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I should think this a gull, but that the white-bearded fellow speaks it; knavery cannot, sure, hide himself in such reverence.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Men from children nothing differ.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
For thee I'll lock up all the gates of love And on my eyelids shall conjecture hang, To turn all beauty into thoughts of harm, And never shall it be more gracious.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I am gone, though I am here. There is no love in you. Nay, I pray you let me go.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
There is no measure in the occasion that breeds; therefore the sadness is without limit.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Don't make much ado about nothing.
Aesop (Aesop's Fables (Illustrated))
BENEDICK And now, tell me, for which of my bad qualities did you first fall in love with me?’ BEATRICE ‘All of them together,’ she said. ‘They maintained such a well organised state of evil that they wouldn’t allow any good quality to intermingle with them
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I don't purchase people with money, or hiss like a snake to attract their attention, all i do is to rest on my couch because i have the conviction that no human can progress with an exception without a power behind.
Michael Bassey Johnson
Wooing, wedding, and repenting is as a Scotch jig, a measure, and a cinque-pace: the first suit is hot and hasty like a Scotch jig--and full as fantastical; the wedding, mannerly modest, as a measure, full of state and ancientry; and then comes repentance and with his bad legs falls into the cinque-pace faster and faster, till he sink into his grave.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Much ado about nothing.
William Shakespeare
Ho! now you strike like the blind man; t'was the boy that stole your meat, and you'll beat the post.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
God help the noble Claudio! if he have caught the Benedick, it will cost him a thousand pound ere a’ be cured.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
BEATRICE: I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Love goes by haps, Some cupid kills with arrows, Some with traps
Much Ado About Nothing
I pray thee, cease thy counsel, Which falls into mine ears as profitless As water in a sieve: give not me counsel; Nor let no comforter delight mine ear But such a one whose wrongs do suit with mine: ... for, brother, men Can counsel and speak comfort to that grief Which they themselves not feel; but, tasting it, Their counsel turns to passion, which before Would give preceptial medicine to rage, Fetter strong madness in a silken thread, Charm ache with air and agony with words. No, no; 'tis all men's office to speak patience To those that wring under the load of sorrow, But no man's virtue nor sufficiency To be so moral when he shall endure The like himself. Therefore give me no counsel: My griefs cry louder than advertisement.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Don Pedro - (...)'In time the savage bull doth bear the yoke.' Benedick - The savage bull may, but if ever the sensible Benedick bear it, pluck off the bull's horns and set them in my forehead, and let me be vildly painted; and in such great letters as they writes, 'Here is good horse for hire', let them signify under my sign, 'Here you may see Benedick the married man.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
D. John.: I had rather be a canker in a hedge than a rose in his grace; and it better fits my blood to be disdained of all than to fashion a carriage to rob love from any: in this, though I cannot be said to be a flattering honest man, it must not be denied but I am a plain-dealing villain. I am trusted with a muzzle and enfranchised with a clog; therefore I have decreed not to sing in my cage. If I had my mouth, I would bite; if I had my liberty, I would do my liking: in the meantime, let me be that I am, and seek not to alter me.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I don't see anything other than pretensions and low mentality in women who make a man run after a hole that would soon be inhabited by termites and worms.
Michael Bassey Johnson
Prince, thou art sad. Get thee a wife, get thee a wife. There is no staff more reverend than one tipped with horn.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
do much wonder that one man, seeing how much another man is a fool when he dedicates his behaviors to love, will, after he hath laughed at such shallow follies in others, become the argument of his own scorn by falling in love:
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more. Men were deceivers ever, One foot in sea, and one on shore, To one thing constant never. Then sigh not so, but let them go, And be you blithe and bonny, Converting all your sounds of woe Into hey nonny, nonny. Sing no more ditties, sing no more Of dumps so dull and heavy. The fraud of men was ever so Since summer first was leafy. Then sigh not so, but let them go, And be you blithe and bonny, Converting all your sounds of woe Into hey, nonny, nonny.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Beatrice: I wonder that you will still be talking, Signior Benedick: nobody marks you. Benedick: What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living?
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat; it ever changes with the next block.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
O Hero, what a Hero hadst thou been.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Well, every one can master a grief, but he that has it.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
...the pleached bower, Where honeysuckles ripened by the sun Forbid the sun to enter, like favorites Made proud by princes, that advance their pride Against that power that bred it.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I know, the way the trees know they're rooted to the ground, that I'm rooted to you. That no matter your answer here this evening, I am yours until I'm nothing but dust in the wind. Maybe even then.
Samantha Young (Much Ado About You)
BENEDICK: That a woman conceived me, I thank her; that she brought me up, I likewise give her most humble thanks. But that I will have a recheat winded in my forehead or hang my bugle in an invisible baldrick, all women shall pardon me. Because I will not do them the wrong to mistrust any, I will do myself the right to trust none. And the fine is, for the which I may go the finer, I will live a bachelor.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Thou wilt be condemned in to everlasting redemption for this.
Much Ado About Nothing
BENEDICK Suffer love! A good epithet, I do suffer love indeed, for I love thee against my will.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I cannot be a man with wishing, therefore I will die a woman with grieving.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
She loves him with an enraged affection, it is past the infinite of thought.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
What need the bridge much broader than the flood? The fairest grant is the necessity.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
But, masters, remember that I am an ass; though it be not written down, yet forget not that I am an ass.
Dogberry
No man thinks there is much ado about nothing when the ado is about himself.
Anthony Trollope (The Bertrams)
Ilove you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest. - William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing
Zoe Blake (Sweet Cruelty (Sweet Savagery, #1))
If love tasted like pork, and you were allergic to Francis Bacon, could I be your Shakespeare? We could make love on a pizza and make much ado about nothing, everything, anything, something.
Jarod Kintz (This Book is Not for Sale)
BENEDICK I do love nothing in the world so well as you: is not that strange? BEATRICE As strange as the thing I know not. It were as possible for me to say I loved nothing so well as you: but believe me not; and yet I lie not; I confess nothing, nor I deny nothing. I am sorry for my cousin. BENEDICK By my sword, Beatrice, thou lovest me. BEATRICE Do not swear, and eat it. BENEDICK I will swear by it that you love me; and I will make him eat it that says I love not you. BEATRICE Will you not eat your word? BENEDICK With no sauce that can be devised to it. I protest I love thee. BEATRICE Why, then, God forgive me! BENEDICK What offence, sweet Beatrice? BEATRICE You have stayed me in a happy hour: I was about to protest I loved you. BENEDICK And do it with all thy heart. BEATRICE I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest. BENEDICK Come, bid me do any thing for thee.
William Shakespeare
DON PEDRO Hath she made her affection known to Benedick? LEONATO No, and swears she never will; that's her torment. CLAUDIO 'Tis true, indeed, so your daughter says. 'Shall I,' says she, 'that have so oft encountered him with scorn, write to him that I love him?
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Benedick Scott was on his way to freedom or profound failure or, if the usual order of things held up, both. Two chests, strapped closed and marked for delivery to an apartment in Manhattan, sat at the end of his bed. On his person he needed only his typewriter, slung over his shoulder in a battered case. He'd stuffed the case with socks to cushion any dinging, along with his shaving kit, a worn copy of Middlemarch, and thirty-four pages of typed future.
McKelle George (Speak Easy, Speak Love)
Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more; Men were deceivers ever; One foot in sea and one on shore, To one thing constant never; Then sigh not so, But let them go, And be you blithe and bonny; Converting all your sounds of woe Into. Hey nonny, nonny. Sing no more ditties, sing no mo, Or dumps so dull and heavy; The fraud of men was ever so, Since summer first was leavy. Then sigh not so, But let them go, And be you blithe and bonny, Converting all your sounds of woe Into. Hey, nonny, nonny.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Well, every one can master a grief but he that has it
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Well, everyone con master a grief but he that has it.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
في وسع كل إنسان أن يتغلب على الألم إلا من يعانيه.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I will in the interim undertake one of Hercules' labours...
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
LEONATO: A victory is twice itself when the achiever brings home full numbers.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
He is now as valiant as Hercules that only tells a lie and swears it.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
There’s no face more sincere than one washed in tears.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
All this I see; and see that the fashion wears out more apparel than the man.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
The Prince’s fool! Ha, it may be I go under that title because I am merry. Yea, but so I am apt to do myself wrong.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing (The Modern Shakespeare: The Original Play with a Modern Translation))
How much better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping!
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
For there was never yet philosopher That could endure the toothache patiently,
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing (The Modern Shakespeare: The Original Play with a Modern Translation))
I will not be sworn but love may transform me to an oyster, but I’ll take my oath on it, till he have made an oyster of me, he shall never make me such a fool. One woman is fair, yet I am well; another is wise, yet I am well; another virtuous, yet I am well; but till all graces be in one woman, one woman shall not come in my grace. Rich she shall be, that’s certain; wise, or I’ll none; virtuous, or I’ll never cheapen her; fair, or I’ll ever look on her; mild, or come not near me; noble, or not I for an angel; of good discourse, an excellent musician, and her hair shall be of what color it please God. Ha! The Prince and Monsieur Love! I will hide me in the arbor.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
I have marked A thousand blushing apparitions To start into her face, a thousand innocent shames In angel whiteness beat away those blushes; And in her eye there hath appeared a fire, To burn the errors that these Princes hold Against her Maiden truth.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
الناس يا أخي ينصحون ويواسون في الخطوب التي لا يشعرون هم بها. فإذا ذاقوا من صابها انقلبوا ثائرين، وكانوا من قبل يقدمون الحكم والمواعظ علاجا من كربتها. وما مثلهم في هذا إلا كمثل من يقيد المجنون الهائج بخيوط من حرير.ويزيل الألم بالنفخ فيه، ويعالج العذاب الأليم باللفظ.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
LEONATO O, she tore the letter into a thousand half-pence; railed at herself, that she should be so immodest to write to one that she knew would flout her. 'I measure him,' says she, 'by my own spirit; for I should flout him, if he writ to me; yea, though I love him, I should.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Ma la virilità si è tutta smammolata in coccolette; il coraggio svaporato in complimenti, e gli uomini sono diventati tutti lingua, come dei pappagalli ammaestrati. Oggi è più valente di un Ercole chi sa meglio mentire e spergiurare. Non posso diventare uomo di mia volontà, e allora morirò donna per disperazione.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
The outsider may indeed wonder at this seeming much ado about nothing. What a tempest in a tea-cup! he will say. But when we consider how small after all the cup of human enjoyment is, how soon overflowed with tears, how easily drained to the dregs in our quenchless thirst for infinity, we shall not blame ourselves for making so much of the tea-cup. Mankind has done worse. In the worship of Bacchus, we have sacrificed too freely; and we have even transfigured the gory image of Mars. Why not consecrate ourselves to the queen of the Camelias, and revel in the warm stream of sympathy that flows from her altar? In the liquid amber within the ivory-porcelain, the initiated may touch the sweet reticence of Confucius, the piquancy of Laotse, and the ethereal aroma of Sakyamuni himself.
Kakuzō Okakura (The Book of Tea)
You may light on a husband that hath no beard. BEATRICE What should I do with him? Dress him in my apparel and make him my waiting gentlewoman? He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man; and he that is more than a youth is not for me, and he that is less than a man, I am not for him. Therefore I will even take sixpence in earnest of the bearherd, and lead his apes into hell.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing (The Modern Shakespeare: The Original Play with a Modern Translation))
How did you find me, anyway?” “We went to your office, and your butler told us you had left to come here.” She laughed, remembering it. “Max said, ‘What, already?’ and Mr. Shaw said, rather loftily, that you could ‘wait for no man’s leisure’ and ‘tend on no man’s business.’ I gather that the man is as fond of Much Ado about Nothing as we are.” “Oh, he likes them all,” Dom said dryly. “Too many years spent as a bit player in the theater, I’m afraid. He keeps hoping that if he memorizes every play in existence, he will advance to a lead role.” He fastened his trousers. “But how did you even get away from your uncle and Blakeborough? They just let you ride off after me with Max and Lisette?” “Well, Blakeborough had no choice since I had just jilted him.” She sighed. “Oh, Lord. I have once again jilted a fiancé, haven’t I? I’m forever going to be known as the woman who jilted two men.” She made a face. “I should have calling cards made--‘Jane the Jilt,’ to go along with ‘Dom the Almighty.’” “I will never carry a card with the appellation ‘Dom the Almighty,’ so just put that right out of your head,” he said irritably. “In any case, since you’re marrying me, I’m no longer jilted.” He paused a moment to shoot her a wary glance. “You are marrying me, aren’t you?” That was even closer to asking. “Say ‘please,’” she teased. Though he eyed her askance, he pulled her close for a long, lingering kiss, then said, “Please, Jane, will you marry me?” She beamed at him. “I do believe I will.
Sabrina Jeffries (If the Viscount Falls (The Duke's Men, #4))
He strode forward, heedless of the murmuring that began among the women when they saw him. Then Sara turned, and her gaze met his. Instantly a guilty blush spread over her cheeks that told him all he needed to know about her intent. “Good afternoon, ladies,” he said in steely tones. “Class is over for today. Why don’t you all go up on deck and get a little fresh air?” When the women looked at Sara, she folded her hands primly in front of her and stared at him. “You have no right to dismiss my class, Captain Horn. Besides, we aren’t finished yet. I was telling them a story—” “I know. You were recounting Lysistrata.” Surprise flickered briefly in her eyes, but then turned smug and looked down her aristocratic little nose at him. “Yes, Lysistrata,” she said in a sweet voice that didn’t fool him for one minute. “Surely you have no objection to my educating the women on the great works of literature, Captain Horn.” “None at all.” He set his hands on his hips. “But I question your choice of material. Don’t you think Aristophanes is a bit beyond the abilities of your pupils?” He took great pleasure in the shock that passed over Sara’s face before she caught herself. Ignoring the rustle of whispers among the women, she stood a little straighter. “As if you know anything at all about Aristophanes.” “I don’t have to be an English lordling to know literature, Sara. I know all the blasted writers you English make so much of. Any one of them would have been a better choice for your charges than Aristophanes.” As she continued to glower at him unconvinced, he scoured his memory, searching through the hundreds of verse passages his English father had literally pounded into him. “You might have chosen Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, for example—‘fie, fie! Unknit that threatening unkind brow. / And dart not scornful glances from those eyes / to wound thy lord, thy king, thy governor.’” It had been a long time since he’d recited his father’s favorite passages of Shakespeare, but the words were as fresh as if he’d learned them only yesterday. And if anyone knew how to use literature as a weapon, he did. His father had delighted in tormenting him with quotes about unrepentant children. Sara gaped at him as the other women looked from him to her in confusion. “How . . . I mean . . . when could you possibly—” “Never mind that. The point us, you’re telling them the tale of Lysistrata when what you should be telling them is ‘thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper. /thy head, thy sovereign; one that cares for thee / and for thy maintenance commits his body / to painful labour by both sea and land.’” Her surprise at this knowledge of Shakespeare seemed to vanish as she recognized the passage he was quoting—the scene where Katherine accepts Petruchio as her lord and master before all her father’s guests. Sara’s eyes glittered as she stepped from among the women and came nearer to him. “We are not your wives yet. And Shakespeare also said ‘sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more / men were deceivers ever / one foot on sea and one on shore / to one thing constant never.’” “Ah, yes. Much Ado About Nothing. But even Beatrice changes her tune in the end, doesn’t she? I believe it’s Beatrice who says, ‘contempt, farewell! And maiden pride, adieu! / no glory lives behind the back of such./ and Benedick, love on, I will requite thee, / taming my wild heart to thy loving hand.’” “She was tricked into saying that! She was forced to acknowledge him as surely as you are forcing us!” “Forcing you?” he shouted. “You don’t know the meaning of force! I swear, if you—” He broke off when he realized that the women were staring at him with eyes round and fearful. Sara was twisting his words to make him sound like a monster. And succeeding, too, confound her.
Sabrina Jeffries (The Pirate Lord)
I must confess that I am not at all partial to the fabrication of Weltanschauungen. Such activities may be left to philosophers, who avowedly find it impossible to make their journey through life without a Baedeker of that kind to give them information on every subject. Let us humbly accept the contempt with which they look down on us from the vatnage-ground of their superior needs. But since we cannot forgot our narcissistic pride either, we will draw comfort from the reflection that such 'Handbooks to Life' soon grow out of date and that it is precisely our short-sighted, narrow, and finicky work which obliges them to appear in new editions, and that even the most up-to-date of them are nothing but attempts to find a substitute for the ancient, useful and all-sufficient Church Catechism. We know well enough how little light science has so far been able to throw on the problems that surround us. But however much ado the philosophers may make, they cannot alter the situation. Only patient, persevering research, in which everything is subordinated to the one requirement of certainty, can gradually bring about a change. The benighted traveller may sing aloud in the dark to deny his own fears; but, for all that, he will not see an inch further beyond his nose.
Sigmund Freud
I am now in great haste, as it may appear unto you.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
he hath borne himself beyond the promise of his age; doing, in the figure of a lamb, the feats of a lion:
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
for beauty is a witch, Against whose charms faith melteth into blood.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
exceeds her as much in beauty as the first of May doth the last of December.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
What need the bridge much broader than the flood?
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
La beauté est une enchanteresse, et la bonne foi qui s’expose à ses charmes se dissout en sang,” he says. “It’s from Much Ado About Nothing
Gayle Forman (Just One Day (Just One Day, #1))
some of the Bard’s feistiest and most loquacious heroines, including Beatrice in Much Ado about Nothing, ceased to have any lines after their dramatically conclusive marriage alliances.
Rebecca Traister (All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation)
1595, Richard Field, fellow-alumnus of the King Edward grammar school in Stratford-upon-Avon, printed The lives of the noble Grecians and Romanes, compared together by that grave learned philosopher and historiographer, Plutarke of Chaeronea: translated out of Greeke into French by James Amiot, abbot of Bellozane, Bishop of Auxerre, one of the Kings privie counsell, and great Amner of France, and out of French into English, by Thomas North. This was the book that got Shakespeare thinking seriously about politics: monarchy versus republicanism versus empire; the choices we make and their tragic consequences; the conflict between public duty and private desire. He absorbed classical thought, but was not enslaved to it. Shakespeare was a thinker who always made it new, adapted his source materials, and put his own spin on them. In the case of Plutarch, he feminized the very masculine Roman world. Brutus and Caesar are seen through the prism of their wives, Portia and Calpurnia; Coriolanus through his mother, Volumnia; Mark Antony through his lover, Cleopatra. Roman women were traditionally silent, confined to the domestic sphere. Cleopatra is the very antithesis of such a woman, while Volumnia is given the full force of that supreme Ciceronian skill, a persuasive rhetorical voice.40 Timon of Athens is alone and unhappy precisely because his obsession with money has cut him off from the love of, and for, women (the only females in Timon’s strange play are two prostitutes). Paradoxically, the very masculinity of Plutarch’s version of ancient history stimulated Shakespeare into demonstrating that women are more than the equal of men. Where most thinkers among his contemporaries took the traditional view of female inferiority, he again and again wrote comedies in which the girls are smarter than the boys—Beatrice in Much Ado about Nothing, Rosalind in As You Like It, Portia in The Merchant of Venice—and tragedies in which women exercise forceful authority for good or ill (Tamora, Cleopatra, Volumnia, and Cymbeline’s Queen in his imagined antiquity, but also Queen Margaret in his rendition of the Wars of the Roses).41
Jonathan Bate (How the Classics Made Shakespeare (E. H. Gombrich Lecture Series Book 3))
I didn't want to waste my time. I didn't want someone who wouldn't understand when I reference Tony Stark, Mal Reynolds, and Alexander Hamilton in the same breath―all handsome rogues, obviously. I wanted someone who didn't need me to backtrack and explain everything. Someone who would escort me to midnight showings but never ask me to dress up to attend. Someone who knew that I always, always, always wanted a Slurpee, but especially when it was snowing.
Lily Anderson
You left so fast, I didn't even get to tell you that you look beautiful. In the alternate time line, I would have monologued about that." I averted my eyes, my face warming in tandem with his. "I'm wearing makeup. It's performance enhancer for my face." "I see you every day. It's not the makeup." He reached over tentatively and lifted my chin. His fingers shook, just a little. "Your eyes really are gray, aren't they? I thought they were blue, but they're almost silver." "Very low melanin levels," I said, faltering. "You gorgeous mutant.
Lily Anderson
Scrambling, outfacing, fashion-mongring boys,That lye, and cog, and flout, deprave, and slander,Go antickly, and shew an outward hideousness,And speak of half a dozen dangerous words.Shakesp.Much ado about Nothing.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
- Wilt thou use thy wit? - It is in my scabbard; shall I draw it? - Dost thou wear thy wit by thy side?
Much Ado About Nothing
Don't be stereotypical or you'll be punished.
LC
And when Nina inevitably asked what he thought of the day’s debate, he was going to reply that it was positively Shakespearean. Shakespearean, that is, in the manner of Dogberry in Much Ado About Nothing. Much ado about nothing, indeed.
Amor Towles (A Gentleman in Moscow)
The world is a school; experience is teacher, but religion built the worst classrooms. The teacher is sluggish just for its eternity. School is so rough and dirty with its baffling human administration. Look at some classroom blocks, falling on one another with their students making much ado about nothing. Are we merely not crazy
Ejezie Maxwell Chinedu
I must confess that I am not at all partial to the fabrication of Weltanschauungen. Such activities may be left to philosophers, who avowedly find it impossible to make their journey through life without a Baedeker of that kind to give them information on every subject. Let us humbly accept the contempt with which they look down on us from the vantage-ground of their superior needs. But since we cannot forgo our narcissistic pride either, we will draw comfort from the reflection that such ‘Handbooks to Life’ soon grow out of date and that it is precisely our short-sighted, narrow and finicky work which obliges them to appear in new editions, and that even the most up-to-date of them are nothing but attempts to find a substitute for the ancient, useful and all-sufficient Church Catechism. We know well enough how little light science has so far been able to throw on the problems that surround us. But however much ado the philosophers may make, they cannot alter the situation. Only patient, persevering research, in which everything is subordinated to the one requirement of certainty, can gradually bring about a change. The benighted traveller may sing aloud in the dark to deny his own fears; but, for all that, he will not see an inch further beyond his nose.
Sigmund Freud (Inhibitions, Symptoms and Anxiety)
each Shakespearean reference is taken from a specific Shakespearean character. These are the characters I paired together: Cady: Miranda in The Tempest. Miranda is an ingenue who has lived most of her life secluded with her father in a remote wilderness, not unlike Cady. (I broke this pairing once, when Cady uses lines borrowed from Hero in Much Ado About Nothing. The quote from Hero was so perfect for the moment that I had to use it. Can you find it?) Janis: Beatrice in Much Ado About Nothing. Beatrice has a caustic, biting wit and a fierce loyalty to her friends. Regina: Kate in Taming of the Shrew. Kate, the titular shrew, starts off the play as a harsh woman with a sharp tongue. Gretchen: Viola in Twelfth Night. Viola, dressing as a man, serves as a constant go-between and wears a different face with each character. Karen: Juliet in Romeo and Juliet. Juliet is the youngest of Shakespeare’s heroines. She is innocent and hopeful. Mrs. Heron: Cleopatra in Antony and Cleopatra. Cleopatra is the regal, intelligent woman who has come from Africa. Mrs. George: Lady Macbeth in Macbeth. Lady Macbeth is one of Shakespeare’s cruelest, most cunning villains. Yes, this is unfair to Amy Poehler’s portrayal of Mrs. George, who is nothing but positive and fun. My thought was that anyone who could raise Regina must be a piece of work. Ms. Norbury: Titania in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. There’s little textual connection here—I just love Tina Fey so much that I thought, “Who could represent her except a majestic fairy queen?
Ian Doescher (William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Mean Girls (Pop Shakespeare Book 1))
When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Which is the villain? let me see his eyes, That, when I note another man like him, I may avoid him: which of these is he?
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
. . .I was not born under a rhyming planet. . . .
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
One doth not know / How much an ill word may empoison liking.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
BEATRICE. Princes and Counties! Surely, a princely testimony, a goodly Count Comfect; a sweet gallant, surely! O! that I were a man for his sake, or that I had any friend would be a man for my sake! But manhood is melted into curtsies, valour into compliment, and men are only turned into tongue, and trim ones too: he is now as valiant as Hercules, that only tells a lie and swears it. I cannot be a man with wishing, therefore I will die a woman with grieving.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
And also, the watch heard them talk of one Deformed: they say he wears a key in his ear and a lock hanging by it, and borrows money in God’s name, the which he hath used so long and never paid, that now men grow hard-hearted, and will lend nothing for God’s sake.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
And, I pray thee now, tell me for which of my bad parts didst thou first fall in love with me? — William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing
Anonymous
Benedick sat down on a bench. He would write a love poem to Beatrice. The god of love… He made up a melody for his first line and hummed it. That sits above… He tried to develop the tune. And knows me… Hmmm. And knows me… How pitiful I deserve… He laughed to himself and gave up. How pitiful he deserved in singing, he meant. As for loving, well… Leander, who swam the Hellispont for love, Troilus, who used a go-between, and all the other famous lovers who fill the pages of poetry, were never as smitten by love as he had been. No, he couldn’t express it in verse. He had tried, but he couldn’t find a word that rhymed with ‘lady’, except ‘baby’, which was a silly rhyme. For ‘scorn’, ‘horn’. He laughed. That was a hard rhyme! For ‘school’, ‘fool’: that was a nonsense rhyme. Very bad rhyming. No, he wasn’t born under a rhyming star. He couldn’t woo with poetry.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
If a man do not erect in this age his own tomb ere he dies, he shall live no longer in monument than the bell rings and the widow weeps
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
It were a better death than die with mocks, Which is as bad as die with tickling.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
Hero, who had not failed to notice Miss Milborne's roses, and George's haggard appearance, took the earliest opportunity that offered of following him to his retreat. Her tender heart ached for the pain she knew him to be suffering. It was a pain she was not quite a stranger to, and her own susceptibility made it seem the more imperative to offer such comfort as she could to George. She found him sitting moodily on a small sofa, a glass of brandy in his hand. He looked up, with a challenging expression in his eyes, but when he saw who had come in his brow cleared, and he rose, setting down his glass, and managing to conjure of the travesty of a smile. Hero clasped his hand between both hers, saying: 'Dear George, do not heed it! Indeed, she could not have carried violets with that gown!' 'She is wearing Severn's roses,' he replied. 'Oh no! You cannot know that!' 'Mrs. Milborne told Lady Cowper so within my hearing.' Hero looked dismayed, but rallied. 'It can only be because they were more suited to that gown. Sit down, George! I am persuaded you refine too much upon it.' He allowed himself to be pulled down on to the sofa beside her, but gave a groan. 'I told her that if she wore my violets I shouldn't know what to think. I have had my answer, and may as well go and blow my brains out without more ado.' 'Oh, do not say so! You know, George, I think you should not have sent that message. Perhaps she may not have quite liked it. Have you spoken with her?' He shook his head. 'I could not trust myself. Besides, if I came within reach of that curst fellow, Severn, I should very likely find a means of picking a quarrel with him.' 'No, no, don't do that! Should you like it if I were to try if I can discover Isabella's feelings upon this occasion?' 'Thank you! I have observed her to be in excellent spirits!' he said bitterly. 'That one so fair should be so heartless!' 'Indeed, I am sure she is no such thing! She has a little reserve, perhaps, and she does not confide in one, but I feel quite certain Severn has not engaged her affections.' He was silent for a moment, pleating and repleating the handkerchief he held, his attention apparently absorbed in this foolish task. His lip quivered; he said in a hard voice: 'She will marry him for his possessions, and his rank. It is plain enough.' 'Oh, no! You are unjust, George!She has more heart than you believe.' 'Once I believed-' He stopped, and dropped his head in his hands, with a groan. 'It don't signify! I beg your pardon! I should not be boring on about my affairs. But you cannot know the anguish of having one's love scorned, indeed, I dare say hardly regarded!' 'Dear George, do not say so!' Hero besought him, putting up her hand to smooth his unruly locks. 'I know- oh, I know! But do not allow yourself to think there is no hope of her affections animating towards you! It cannot be but that if one truly loves-' Her voice became suspended; she was obliged to wipe a tear from her cheek. He put his arm round her, in a brotherly way, and gave her a slight hug. 'Yes, yes, where there is a heart to be won, of course you are right, Kitten! But in "my" case-! There, do not let us dwell upon it any longer! I am the greatest brute alive: I have made you cry, and I would not do so for the world!' She gave a shaky laugh. 'Only for your sake, dear George! Indeed, I am the happiest creature imaginable, in- in general!' He turned her face up. 'Are you? I hope you may be, for you deserve to be.' She smiled mistily, and because it seemed a natural thing to do under the circumstances, he bent his head, and kissed her. There was nothing at all passionate in this embrace, and Hero had no hesitation in receiving it in the spirit in which it was clearly meant.
Georgette Heyer (Friday's Child)
God vs. no God: much ado about nothing.
Marty Rubin
The irony is that we make up the eight worldly dharmas. We make them up in reaction to what happens to us in this world. They are nothing concrete in themselves. Even more strange is that we are not all that solid either. We have a concept of ourselves that we reconstruct moment by moment and reflexively try to protect. But this concept that we are protecting is questionable. It’s all “much ado about nothing”—like pushing and pulling a vanishing illusion.
Pema Chödrön (When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times (Shambhala Classics))
Unfortunately, victimization convinces men and women who should be looking for a Savior to search for a scapegoat. After all, if I am not to blame for what I do, the Cross is much ado about nothing. How hopelessly out of date the old spiritual sounds to us. “Not my mother or my father, but it’s me, O Lord, standing in the need of prayer.” Victims do not need God, just a sympathetic therapist or a good lawyer.41
D.A. Carson (The Gagging of God: Christianity Confronts Pluralism)
. . . I will not be sworn, but love may trans- form me to an oyster, but, I’ll take my oath on it, till he have made an oyster of me, he shall never make me such a fool.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
A woman in the English Department at Fudan University walked with a cane as a result of criticism by Red Guards-she was kicked and beaten for advocating the reading of the Bourgeois feudalist William Shakespeare. But times had changed. This same woman had just been a faculty adviser on a student production of Much Ado About Nothing at the Shanghai Shakespeare Festival in the spring of 1986.
Paul Theroux (Riding the Iron Rooster)
I will not be sworn but love may transform me to an oyster; but I'll take my oath on it, till he have made an oyster of me, he shall never make me such a fool.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
There's a skirmish of wit between them.
William Shakespeare
Well, everyone can master a grief but he that has it.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
With anger, with sickness, or with hunger, my lord, not with love. Prove that ever I lose more blood with love than I will get again with drinking, pick out mine eyes with a ballad-maker’s pen and hang me up at the door of a brothel house for the sign of blind Cupid.
William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)