Much Ado About Nothing Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Much Ado About Nothing. Here they are! All 100 of them:

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I can see he's not in your good books,' said the messenger. 'No, and if he were I would burn my library.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow, than a man swear he loves me.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Let me be that I am and seek not to alter me.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I do love nothing in the world so well as you- is not that strange?
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more. Men were deceivers ever, One foot in sea, and one on shore, To one thing constant never. Then sigh not so, but let them go, And be you blithe and bonny, Converting all your sounds of woe Into hey nonny, nonny. Sing no more ditties, sing no more Of dumps so dull and heavy. The fraud of men was ever so Since summer first was leafy. Then sigh not so, but let them go, And be you blithe and bonny, Converting all your sounds of woe Into hey, nonny, nonny.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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For which of my bad parts didst thou first fall in love with me?
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man. He that is more than a youth is not for me, and he that is less than a man, I am not for him.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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There was a star danced, and under that was I born.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Why, what's the matter, That you have such a February face, So full of frost, of storm and cloudiness?
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I wish my horse had the speed of your tongue.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Thou and I are too wise to woo peaceably.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living? Beatrice: Is it possible disdain should die while she hath such meet food to feed it as Signior Benedick?
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Silence is the perfectest herald of joy: I were but little happy, if I could say how much. Lady, as you are mine, I am yours: I give away myself for you and dote upon the exchange.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I will live in thy heart, die in thy lap, and be buried in thy eyesβ€”and moreover, I will go with thee to thy uncle’s.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Love me!... Why?
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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For it falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it, but being lacked and lost, Why, then we rack the value, then we find The virtue that possession would not show us While it was ours.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Tax not so bad a voice to slander music any more than once.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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A miracle. Here's our own hands against our hearts. Come, I will have thee, but by this light I take thee for pity. Beatrice: I would not deny you, but by this good day, I yield upon great persuasion, and partly to save your life, for I was told you were in a consumption. Benedick: Peace. I will stop your mouth.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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For man is a giddy thing, and this is my conclusion.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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You are thought here to the most senseless and fit man for the job.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Suffer love! A good ephitet! I do suffer love indeed, for I love thee against my will.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Is it not strange that sheep's guts could hail souls out of men's bodies?
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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When you depart from me sorrow abides and happiness takes his leave.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Officers, what offence have these men done? DOGBERRY Marry, sir, they have committed false report; moreover, they have spoken untruths; secondarily, they are slanders; sixth and lastly, they have belied a lady; thirdly, they have verified unjust things; and, to conclude, they are lying knaves.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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To be a well-favoured man is the gift of fortune; but to write and read comes by nature.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Ha. "Against my will I am sent to bid you come into dinner." There's a double meaning in that.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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O God, that I were a man! I would eat his heart in the marketplace.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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The world must be peopled!
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William Shakespeare
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And to be merry best becomes you; for, out of question, you were born in a merry hour. No, sure, my lord, my mother cried; but then there was a star danced, and under that was I born.
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William Shakespeare
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Against my will I am sent to bid you come in to dinner. BENEDICK Fair Beatrice, I thank you for your pains. BEATRICE I took no more pains for those thanks than you take pains to thank me: if it had been painful, I would not have come. BENEDICK You take pleasure then in the message? BEATRICE Yea, just so much as you may take upon a knife's point ... You have no stomach, signior: fare you well. Exit BENEDICK Ha! 'Against my will I am sent to bid you come in to dinner;' there's a double meaning in that...
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Well, every one can master a grief but he that has it.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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There's little of the melancholy element in her, my lord: she is never sad but when she sleeps; and not ever sad then; for I have heard my daughter say, she hath often dreamt of unhappiness, and waked herself with laughing.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Then is courtesy a turncoat. But it is certain I am loved of all ladies, only you excepted: and I would I could find in my heart that I had not a hard heart; for, truly, I love none. A dear happiness to women: they would else have been troubled with a pernicious suitor. I thank God and my cold blood, I am of your humour for that: I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow than a man swear he loves me.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Time goes on crutches till love have all his rites.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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If her breath were as terrible as her terminations, there were no living near her, she would infect to the north star!
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Well, niece, I hope to see you one day fitted with a husband. BEATRICE Not till God make men of some other metal than earth. Would it not grieve a woman to be overmastered with a pierce of valiant dust? to make an account of her life to a clod of wayward marl? No, uncle, I'll none: Adam's sons are my brethren; and, truly, I hold it a sin to match in my kindred.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Foul words is but foul wind, and foul wind is but foul breath, and foul breath is noisome; therefore I will depart unkissed.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Done to death by slanderous tongue
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Why, i' faith, methinks she's too low for a high praise, too brown for a fair praise and too little for a great praise: only this commendation I can afford her, that were she other than she is, she were unhandsome; and being no other but as she is, I do not like her. (Benedick, from Much Ado About Nothing)
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William Shakespeare
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Speak low if you speak love.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Yes, faith; it is my cousin's duty to make curtsy and say 'Father, as it please you.' But yet for all that, cousin, let him be a handsome fellow, or else make another curtsy and say 'Father, as it please me.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Well, then, go you into hell? BEATRICE No, but to the gate; and there will the devil meet me, like an old cuckold, with horns on his head, and say 'Get you to heaven, Beatrice, get you to heaven; here's no place for you maids:' so deliver I up my apes, and away to Saint Peter for the heavens; he shows me where the bachelors sit, and there live we as merry as the day is long.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Sweet Beatrice, wouldst thou come when I called thee? BEATRICE Yea, signior, and depart when you bid me. BENEDICK O, stay but till then! BEATRICE 'Then' is spoken; fare you well now... (Much Ado About Nothing)
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William Shakespeare
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It was wonderful flirting with him, all the razor-edged literary banter, like Beatrice and Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing. A battle of wit, and a test, too.
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Elizabeth Wein (Code Name Verity)
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I was born to speak all mirth and no matter.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Friendship is constant in all other things Save in the office and affairs of love. Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues. Let every eye negotiate for itself, And trust no agent; for beauty is a witch Against whose charms faith melteth into blood.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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By this hand, I love thee. Beatrice Use it for my love some other way than swearing by it.
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William Shakespeare
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Is he not approved in the height a villain that hath slandered, scorned, dishonoured my kinswoman? O that I were a man! What, bear her in hand until they come to take hands, and then, with public accusation, uncovered slander, unmitigated rancour - O God, that I were a man! I would eat his heart in the market-place.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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If [God] send me no husband, for the which blessing I am at him upon my knees every morning and evening ...
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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So you walk softly and look sweetly and say nothing. I am yours for the walk and especially when I walk away.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Come, lady, come; you have lost the heart of Signior Benedick. BEATRICE Indeed, my lord, he lent it me awhile; and I gave him use for it, a double heart for his single one: marry, once before he won it of me with false dice, therefore your grace may well say I have lost it. DON PEDRO You have put him down, lady, you have put him down. BEATRICE So I would not he should do me, my lord, lest I should prove the mother of fools.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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No, sure, my lord, my mother cried, but then there was a star danced, and under that was I born.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Neighbours, you are tedious. DOGBERRY It pleases your worship to say so, but we are the poor duke's officers; but truly, for mine own part, if I were as tedious as a king, I could find it in my heart to bestow it all of your worship.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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There are no faces truer than those that are so washed. How much better is it to weep at joy than to joy at weeping!
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I may chance have some odd quirks and remnants of wit broken on me, because I have railed so long against marriage: but doth not the appetite alter? a man loves the meat in his youth that he cannot endure in his age. Shall quips and sentences and these paper bullets of the brain awe a man from the career of his humour? No, the world must be peopled. When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.
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William Shakespeare
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Pause awhile, And let my counsel sway you.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Men from children nothing differ.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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And now, tell me, for which of my bad qualities did you first fall in love with me?’ β€˜All of them together,’ she said. β€˜They maintained such a well organised state of evil that they wouldn’t allow any good quality to intermingle with them
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Dost thou not suspect my place? Dost thou not suspect my years? O that he were here to write me down an ass! But masters, remember that I am an ass. Though it be not written down, yet forget not that I am an ass. No, thou villain, thou art full of piety, as shall be proved upon thee by good witness. I am a wise fellow, and which is more, an officer, and which is more, a householder, and which is more, as pretty a piece of flesh as any is in Messina, and one that knows the law, go to . . . and one that hath two gowns, and everything handsome about him. Bring him away. O that I had been writ down an ass!
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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...Having no recourse, I feel back on Shakespeare. Leif would recognize it and understand the context properly. With my remaining few seconds of consciousness, I quoted Benedick from Much Ado About Nothing, who spoke these words to his former friend: "you are a Villain: I jest not." and then I collapsed into a pool of my own blood.
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Kevin Hearne (Tricked (The Iron Druid Chronicles, #4))
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I should think this a gull, but that the white-bearded fellow speaks it; knavery cannot, sure, hide himself in such reverence.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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For thee I'll lock up all the gates of love And on my eyelids shall conjecture hang, To turn all beauty into thoughts of harm, And never shall it be more gracious.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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There is no measure in the occasion that breeds; therefore the sadness is without limit.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I am gone, though I am here. There is no love in you. Nay, I pray you let me go.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Don't make much ado about nothing.
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Aesop (Aesop's Fables (Illustrated))
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Wooing, wedding, and repenting is as a Scotch jig, a measure, and a cinque-pace: the first suit is hot and hasty like a Scotch jig--and full as fantastical; the wedding, mannerly modest, as a measure, full of state and ancientry; and then comes repentance and with his bad legs falls into the cinque-pace faster and faster, till he sink into his grave.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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If I had my mouth, I would bite; if I had my liberty, I would do my liking: in the meantime, let me be that I am, and seek not to alter me.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Much ado about nothing.
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William Shakespeare
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I don't purchase people with money, or hiss like a snake to attract their attention, all i do is to rest on my couch because i have the conviction that no human can progress with an exception without a power behind.
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Michael Bassey Johnson
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God help the noble Claudio! if he have caught the Benedick, it will cost him a thousand pound ere a’ be cured.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I wonder that you will still be talking, Signior Benedick: nobody marks you. Benedick: What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living?
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Ho! now you strike like the blind man; t'was the boy that stole your meat, and you'll beat the post.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I know, the way the trees know they're rooted to the ground, that I'm rooted to you. That no matter your answer here this evening, I am yours until I'm nothing but dust in the wind. Maybe even then.
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Samantha Young (Much Ado About You)
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How much better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping!
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I pray thee, cease thy counsel, Which falls into mine ears as profitless As water in a sieve: give not me counsel; Nor let no comforter delight mine ear But such a one whose wrongs do suit with mine: ... for, brother, men Can counsel and speak comfort to that grief Which they themselves not feel; but, tasting it, Their counsel turns to passion, which before Would give preceptial medicine to rage, Fetter strong madness in a silken thread, Charm ache with air and agony with words. No, no; 'tis all men's office to speak patience To those that wring under the load of sorrow, But no man's virtue nor sufficiency To be so moral when he shall endure The like himself. Therefore give me no counsel: My griefs cry louder than advertisement.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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do much wonder that one man, seeing how much another man is a fool when he dedicates his behaviors to love, will, after he hath laughed at such shallow follies in others, become the argument of his own scorn by falling in love:
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I had rather be a canker in a hedge than a rose in his grace; and it better fits my blood to be disdained of all than to fashion a carriage to rob love from any: in this, though I cannot be said to be a flattering honest man, it must not be denied but I am a plain-dealing villain. I am trusted with a muzzle and enfranchised with a clog; therefore I have decreed not to sing in my cage. If I had my mouth, I would bite; if I had my liberty, I would do my liking: in the meantime, let me be that I am, and seek not to alter me.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Love goes by haps, Some cupid kills with arrows, Some with traps
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Much Ado About Nothing
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O Hero, what a Hero hadst thou been.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Prince, thou art sad. Get thee a wife, get thee a wife. There is no staff more reverend than one tipped with horn.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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There’s no face more sincere than one washed in tears.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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She loves him with an enraged affection, it is past the infinite of thought.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I cannot be a man with wishing, therefore I will die a woman with grieving.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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That a woman conceived me, I thank her; that she brought me up, I likewise give her most humble thanks. But that I will have a recheat winded in my forehead or hang my bugle in an invisible baldrick, all women shall pardon me. Because I will not do them the wrong to mistrust any, I will do myself the right to trust none. And the fine is, for the which I may go the finer, I will live a bachelor.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I don't see anything other than pretensions and low mentality in women who make a man run after a hole that would soon be inhabited by termites and worms.
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Michael Bassey Johnson
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the pleached bower, Where honeysuckles ripened by the sun Forbid the sun to enter, like favorites Made proud by princes, that advance their pride Against that power that bred it.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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A victory is twice itself when the achiever brings home full numbers.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Well, every one can master a grief, but he that has it.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat; it ever changes with the next block.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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What need the bridge much broader than the flood? The fairest grant is the necessity.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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One doth not know / How much an ill word may empoison liking.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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But, masters, remember that I am an ass; though it be not written down, yet forget not that I am an ass.
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Dogberry
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Hath she made her affection known to Benedick? LEONATO No, and swears she never will; that's her torment. CLAUDIO 'Tis true, indeed, so your daughter says. 'Shall I,' says she, 'that have so oft encountered him with scorn, write to him that I love him?
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I do love nothing in the world so well as you: is not that strange? BEATRICE As strange as the thing I know not. It were as possible for me to say I loved nothing so well as you: but believe me not; and yet I lie not; I confess nothing, nor I deny nothing. I am sorry for my cousin. BENEDICK By my sword, Beatrice, thou lovest me. BEATRICE Do not swear, and eat it. BENEDICK I will swear by it that you love me; and I will make him eat it that says I love not you. BEATRICE Will you not eat your word? BENEDICK With no sauce that can be devised to it. I protest I love thee. BEATRICE Why, then, God forgive me! BENEDICK What offence, sweet Beatrice? BEATRICE You have stayed me in a happy hour: I was about to protest I loved you. BENEDICK And do it with all thy heart. BEATRICE I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest. BENEDICK Come, bid me do any thing for thee.
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William Shakespeare
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I have marked A thousand blushing apparitions To start into her face, a thousand innocent shames In angel whiteness beat away those blushes; And in her eye there hath appeared a fire, To burn the errors that these Princes hold Against her Maiden truth.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I will not be sworn but love may transform me to an oyster, but I’ll take my oath on it, till he have made an oyster of me, he shall never make me such a fool. One woman is fair, yet I am well; another is wise, yet I am well; another virtuous, yet I am well; but till all graces be in one woman, one woman shall not come in my grace. Rich she shall be, that’s certain; wise, or I’ll none; virtuous, or I’ll never cheapen her; fair, or I’ll ever look on her; mild, or come not near me; noble, or not I for an angel; of good discourse, an excellent musician, and her hair shall be of what color it please God. Ha! The Prince and Monsieur Love! I will hide me in the arbor.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Benedick Scott was on his way to freedom or profound failure or, if the usual order of things held up, both. Two chests, strapped closed and marked for delivery to an apartment in Manhattan, sat at the end of his bed. On his person he needed only his typewriter, slung over his shoulder in a battered case. He'd stuffed the case with socks to cushion any dinging, along with his shaving kit, a worn copy of Middlemarch, and thirty-four pages of typed future.
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McKelle George (Speak Easy, Speak Love)