Kenneth Williams Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Kenneth Williams. Here they are! All 26 of them:

There is no possible idea," Kenneth thought as he came onto the terrace, "to which the mind of man can't supply some damned alternative or other. Yet one must act.
Charles Williams (War in Heaven)
Infamy! Infamy! They've all got it in for me!
Frank Muir (Take It From Here)
(Sunday, 20 March 1988) Oh! to be out of it for ever! To cease upon the midnight with no pain. Why do I linger? Not from love of life, I've always found it awful... no, it's rather from a sense of curiosity... not wanting to miss the third act.
Kenneth Williams (The Kenneth Williams Diaries)
Infamy! Infamy! They’ve all got it in for me!
Kenneth Williams
(Tuesday, 21 April 1964) They needn't talk to me about loneliness. I've walked too many miles of pavement. I've scanned so many faces - I've looked with so much furtive hope, but it's never right. Only in my imagination. There, I have marvellous conversations with someone attractive, slow, charmingly phlegmatic & naturally reticent, and with me, he becomes articulate. But in fact, I take a sleeping pill & tell myself to shut up.
Kenneth Williams (The Kenneth Williams Diaries)
Thomas B. Costain, Herman Wouk, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Kenneth Roberts, Edna Ferber, Sholem Asch, Ben Ames Williams, Frederic Wakeman, Frances Parkinson Keyes, Irwin Shaw, Budd Schulberg, Hamilton Basso, and, of course, Samuel Shellabarger.
Samuel Shellabarger (Prince of Foxes: The Best-Selling Historical Epic)
(Tuesday, 22 January 1985) Providing there is no pain I shall be happy to go when the time comes; nothing here has really delighted me except Art, the life-experience itself has no fascination for me and the very sight of active humanity invariably fills me with nausea.
Kenneth Williams (The Kenneth Williams Diaries)
It was William Penn who said, “Right is right, even if everyone is against it, and wrong is wrong, even if everyone is for it.” Brent knew that there was nothing right about this place and the way the prisoners were treated, and he was determined to do whatever he could to change that.
Kenneth Eade (A Patriot's Act (Brent Marks Legal Thrillers #1))
The need to cry, like a child, for all the stupid wasting of the thousand chances life has offered me. O! for the real courage to speak out bravely, to do one decisive, unselfish, and creative deed. Instead of watching the sand run through the glass and let the time trickle through one's hands...
Kenneth Williams (The Kenneth Williams Diaries)
… the countryside and the village are symbols of stability and security, of order. Yet they are also, as I have noted, liminal spaces, at a very narrow remove from the atavistic Wild. Arcadia is not the realm even of Giorgione and of Claude, with its cracked pillars and thunderbolts, its lurking banditti; still less is it Poussin’s sun-dappled and regularised realm of order, where, although the lamb may be destined for the altar and the spit, all things proceed with charm and gravity and studied gesture; least of all is it the degenerate and prettified Arcady of Fragonard and Watteau, filled with simpering courtier-Corydons, pallid Olympians, and fat-arsed putti. (It is only family piety that prevents me from taking a poker to an inherited coffee service in gilt porcelain with bastardised, deutero-Fragonard scenes painted on the sides of every damned thing. Cue Wallace Greenslade: ‘… “Round the Horne”, with Marie Antoinette as the dairymaid and Kenneth Williams as the manager of the camp-site….’) No: Arcadia is the very margin of the liminal space between the safe tilth and the threatening Wild, in which Pan lurks, shaggy and goatish, and Death proclaims, from ambush, et in Arcadia ego. Arcadia is not the Wide World nor the Riverbank, but the Wild Wood. And in that wood are worse than stoats and weasels, and the true Pan is no Francis of Assisi figure, sheltering infant otters. The Wild that borders and penetrates Arcady is red in tooth and claw.
G.M.W. Wemyss
(Tuesday, 1 October 1968) Why oh! why did I keep on postponing experiences until it was too late to have them? I'm like someone who wanted - indeed ached to swim, but never dared put my foot in the water. Just sat and watched others doing it, till eventually the very idea of the water is alien and frightening. I am the living proof of the futility of thought without action.
Kenneth Williams (The Kenneth Williams Diaries)
Irrelevant’ Chris Fogle turns a page. Howard Cardwell turns a page. Ken Wax turns a page. Matt Redgate turns a page. ‘Groovy’ Bruce Channing attaches a form to a file. Ann Williams turns a page. Anand Singh turns two pages at once by mistake and turns one back which makes a slightly different sound. David Cusk turns a page. Sandra Pounder turns a page. Robert Atkins turns two separate pages of two separate files at the same time. Ken Wax turns a page. Lane Dean Jr. turns a page. Olive Borden turns a page. Chris Acquistipace turns a page. David Cusk turns a page. Rosellen Brown turns a page. Matt Redgate turns a page. R. Jarvis Brown turns a page. Ann Williams sniffs slightly and turns a page. Meredith Rand does something to a cuticle. ‘Irrelevant’ Chris Fogle turns a page. Ken Wax turns a page. Howard Cardwell turns a page. Kenneth ‘Type of Thing’ Hindle detaches a Memo 402-C(1) from a file. ‘Second-Knuckle’ Bob McKenzie looks up briefly while turning a page. David Cusk turns a page. A yawn proceeds across one Chalk’s row by unconscious influence. Ryne Hobratschk turns a page. Latrice Theakston turns a page. Rotes Group Room 2 hushed and brightly lit, half a football field in length. Howard Cardwell shifts slightly in his chair and turns a page. Lane Dean Jr. traces his jaw’s outline with his ring finger. Ed Shackleford turns a page. Elpidia Carter turns a page. Ken Wax attaches a Memo 20 to a file. Anand Singh turns a page. Jay Landauer and Ann Williams turn a page almost precisely in sync although they are in different rows and cannot see each other. Boris Kratz bobs with a slight Hassidic motion as he crosschecks a page with a column of figures. Ken Wax turns a page. Harriet Candelaria turns a page. Matt Redgate turns a page. Ambient room temperature 80° F. Sandra Pounder makes a minute adjustment to a file so that the page she is looking at is at a slightly different angle to her. ‘Irrelevant’ Chris Fogle turns a page. David Cusk turns a page. Each Tingle’s two-tiered hemisphere of boxes. ‘Groovy’ Bruce Channing turns a page. Ken Wax turns a page. Six wigglers per Chalk, four Chalks per Team, six Teams per group. Latrice Theakston turns a page. Olive Borden turns a page. Plus administration and support. Bob McKenzie turns a page. Anand Singh turns a page and then almost instantly turns another page. Ken Wax turns a page. Chris ‘The Maestro’ Acquistipace turns a page. David Cusk turns a page. Harriet Candelaria turns a page. Boris Kratz turns a page. Robert Atkins turns two separate pages. Anand Singh turns a page. R. Jarvis Brown uncrosses his legs and turns a page. Latrice Theakston turns a page. The slow squeak of the cart boy’s cart at the back of the room. Ken Wax places a file on top of the stack in the Cart-Out box to his upper right. Jay Landauer turns a page. Ryne Hobratschk turns a page and then folds over the page of a computer printout that’s lined up next to the original file he just turned a page of. Ken Wax turns a page. Bob Mc-Kenzie turns a page. Ellis Ross turns a page. Joe ‘The Bastard’ Biron-Maint turns a page. Ed Shackleford opens a drawer and takes a moment to select just the right paperclip. Olive Borden turns a page. Sandra Pounder turns a page. Matt Redgate turns a page and then almost instantly turns another page. Latrice Theakston turns a page. Paul Howe turns a page and then sniffs circumspectly at the green rubber sock on his pinkie’s tip. Olive Borden turns a page. Rosellen Brown turns a page. Ken Wax turns a page. Devils are actually angels. Elpidia Carter and Harriet Candelaria reach up to their Cart-In boxes at exactly the same time. R. Jarvis Brown turns a page. Ryne Hobratschk turns a page. ‘Type of Thing’ Ken Hindle looks up a routing code. Some with their chin in their hand. Robert Atkins turns a page even as he’s crosschecking something on that page. Ann Williams turns a page. Ed Shackleford searches a file for a supporting document. Joe Biron-Maint turns a page. Ken Wax turns a page.
David Foster Wallace (The Pale King)
It was William Penn who said, “Right is right, even if everyone is against it, and wrong is wrong, even if everyone is for it.
Kenneth Eade (Brent Marks Legal Thriller Series: Box Set One)
If there must be madness, something may be said for having it on a heroic scale." John Kenneth Galbraith quoted in Money and Power
William D. Cohan
Even before that poor fool Greenspan had called it out, I’d heard her name. Who hadn’t? When I was in Chicago, she’d been denounced every day in the American newspapers. According to them, she was, among much else; a traitor, a lesbian, a German spy, a corruptor of youth. One of the taxi drivers had assured me she was a Jewish nymphomaniac and a poisoner of reservoirs. Someone else had blamed her for the new strain of locusts that was resistant to all but German pesticides. Before then, I’d read the generally shrill letters of denunciation she sent three times a week from Montreal to The Daily Telegraph. Before starting work for Richardson on that vast hymn of praise to the Führer, she’d published an equally vast cycle of plays about the trial of Anslinger after some future American uprising. A cut down version had been played at the Old Vic, with Kenneth Williams as Anslinger. The critical derision it received had only made her Telegraph philippics more demented. Of course, I knew about Ayn Rand.
Sean Gabb (The Churchill Memorandum)
For his - it doesn’t at all matter - mercy endureth forever,” the Archdeacon concluded, with a genial smile. He seemed to be rising moment by moment into a kind of delirious delight. His eyes moved from one to the other, changing from mere laughter as he looked at the Colonel into an impish and teasing mischief for Persimmons, and showing a feeling of real affection as they rested on Kenneth, between whom and himself there had appeared the beginnings of a definite attraction and friendship. Gregory looked at him with a certain perplexity. He understood Sir Giles’ insolent rudeness, though he despised it as Giles despised his own affectation of smoothness. But he saw no reason in the Archdeacon’s amusement, and began to wonder seriously whether Ludding’s blow had affected his mind.
Charles Williams (War in Heaven)
En palabras de Kenneth Hagin: «Jesús probó la muerte espiritual de cada hombre. Y su Espíritu y el hombre interior fueron al infierno en mi lugar. ¿No se da cuenta? La muerte física no podía quitarle sus pecados. Él gustó la muerte por cada hombre. Él está hablando de experimentar la muerte espiritual» (Citado en Jones y Woodbridge, Health, Wealth, & Happiness, p. 70). Para un tratamiento académico completo de esta enseñanza en los círculos de Palabra de Fe, ver William P. Atkinson, The ‘Spiritual Death’ of Jesus (Leiden, Países Bajos: Brill, 2009).
John F. MacArthur Jr. (Fuego extraño: El peligro de ofender al Espíritu Santo con adoración falsa)
(Tuesday, 21 July 1964) I would like very much to have been born very handsome. Not for its own sake, but for the sake of being attractive to others. The reason I am so conservative in my tiny circle of friends, and the reason I stay in the house so much, is because I think my face and body unprepossessing. I've no doubt that this is only a superficial excuse for a more profound complaint within me. This is of course the paradox of my own nature. The thing that I am, being the thing which I despise. But I think my despite is justified.
Kenneth Williams (The Kenneth Williams Diaries)
Their brothers are their heroes, and if anything happens to William Saunders or Robert Young, Kenneth and Larry might blame everyone around them, because we’re the citizens those men will have died for, and maybe they won’t believe we were worth it. Are we? Have we ever been worth it, any of the times before?
Helen Oyeyemi (Boy, Snow, Bird)
You have to remember, William. It may make the difference between freedom and half a lifetime in prison.
Kenneth Eade (Unreasonable Force (Brent Marks Legal Thrillers #4))
Even though the Judge would charge the jury that they should listen to all the evidence before they made up their minds, the chances were likely that 100% of them will have already decided if William was guilty or not before the trial was over.
Kenneth Eade (Unreasonable Force (Brent Marks Legal Thrillers #4))
Faced with the choice between changing one’s mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everybody gets busy on the proof. JOHN KENNETH GALBRAITH, AMERICAN ECONOMIST   The
William Bridges (Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change)
Write to make a difference. Write because you have something to say to us all. In dramatic writing, fiction, and nonfiction, this means knowing exactly what your work is about and being able to tell the publisher in ten words or less. The writing must demonstrate its premise in a convincing, persuasive way. Keep your audience in mind, their needs and their desires. Journalists do this by focusing on the 5 W’s (Who, What, When, Where, Why) because they know what their readers look for. Convey emotion, break out of your academic inhibitions and psychological barriers. William Faulkner hints at this when he says, “Writing is a craft consisting of pen, paper, and whiskey.” The purpose of the whiskey is to rid the author of inhibitions.
Kenneth Atchity (Write Time: Guide to the Creative Process, from Vision through Revision-and Beyond)
Repetition is indeed a great teacher when learning any mathematical skill.
Kenneth Williams (How To Really Calculate In Your Head!)
I'm too old, too tired and too talented to care!
Kenneth Williams
idea of Occam’s razor, a rule of thumb in problem-solving that recommends a preference for simplicity. When choosing between alternative explanations or solutions to a problem, embrace the less complicated: it will probably be more accurate than an intricate or elaborate answer with lots of parts. The idea was set forth (in a somewhat different form) by the English friar William of Ockham in the fourteenth century; the “razor” is to shave away the unnecessary to focus on the essential.
Kenneth Cukier (Framers: Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil)