Jay Shetty Quotes

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When you learn a little, you feel you know a lot. But when you learn a lot, you realize you know very little.
Jay Shetty
Remember, saying whatever we want, whenever we want, however we want, is not freedom. Real freedom is not feeling the need to say these things.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Cancers of the Mind: Comparing, Complaining, Criticizing.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The more we define ourselves in relation to the people around us, the more lost we are.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
our search is never for a thing, but for the feeling we think the thing will give us.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
In 1902, the sociologist Charles Horton Cooley wrote: “I am not what I think I am, and I am not what you think I am. I am what I think you think I am.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Actually, the greatest detachment is being close to everything and not letting it consume and own you. That’s real strength.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Salt is so humble that when something goes wrong, it takes the blame, and when everything goes right, it doesn’t take credit.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When we accept the temporary nature of everything in our lives, we can feel gratitude for the good fortune of getting to borrow them for a time.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Too often we love people who don’t love us, but we fail to return the love of others who do.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Albert Einstein said, “If you can’t explain something simply, you don’t understand it well enough.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Find me someone who has gone to the darkest parts of their own character where they were so close to their own self-destruction and found a way to get up and out of it, and I will bow on my knees to you. … You’re my teacher.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
But when we look for the good in others, we start to see the best in ourselves too.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Location has energy; time has memory. If you do something at the same time every day, it becomes easier and natural. If you do something in the same space every day, it becomes easier and natural.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When you learn to navigate and manage your breath, you can navigate any situation in life.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Because the only thing that stays with you from the moment you’re born until the moment you die is your breath. All your friends, your family, the country you live in, all of that can change. The one thing that stays with you is your breath.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
As Pema Chödrön says, “You are the sky. Everything else—it’s just the weather.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
It is impossible to build one’s own happiness on the unhappiness of others.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
If you don’t break your ego, life will break it for you.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Mudita is the principle of taking sympathetic or unselfish joy in the good fortune of others. If I only find joy in my own successes, I’m limiting my joy. But if I can take pleasure in the successes of my friends and family—ten, twenty, fifty people!—I get to experience fifty times the happiness and joy. Who doesn’t want that?
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Every day, think as you wake up, today I am fortunate to be alive, I have a precious human life, I am not going to waste it. —the Dalai Lama
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Everyone has a story, and sometimes our egos choose to ignore that. Don’t take everything personally—it is usually not about you.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Letting go gives us freedom, and freedom is the only condition for happiness
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Negativity is a trait, not someone’s identity. A person’s true nature can be obscured by clouds, but, like the sun, it is always there. And clouds can overcome any of us. We have to understand this when we deal with people who exude negative energy. Just like we wouldn’t want someone to judge us by our worst moments, we must be careful not to do that to others. When someone hurts you, it’s because they’re hurt. Their hurt is simply spilling over. They need help. And as the Dalai Lama says, “If you can, help others; if you cannot do that, at least do not harm them.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The arrogant ego desires respect, whereas the humble worker inspires respect.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
This ten-year-old monk added, “When you get stressed—what changes? Your breath. When you get angry—what changes? Your breath. We experience every emotion with the change of the breath. When you learn to navigate and manage your breath, you can navigate any situation in life.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Monks understand that routine frees your mind, but the biggest threat to that freedom is monotony. People complain about their poor memories, but I’ve heard it said that we don’t have a retention problem, we have an attention problem.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
I wish” is code for “I don’t want to do anything differently.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Being present is the only way to live a truly rich and full life.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
There is toxicity everywhere around us. In the environment, in the political atmosphere, but the origin is in people’s hearts. Unless we clean the ecology of our own heart and inspire others to do the same, we will be an instrument of polluting the environment. But if we create purity in our own heart, then we can contribute great purity to the world around us.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When you deal with fear and hardship, you realize that you’re capable of dealing with fear and hardship. This gives you a new perspective: the confidence that when bad things happen, you will find ways to handle them. With that increased objectivity, you become better able to differentiate what’s actually worth being afraid of and what’s not.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
According to the Gita, these are the higher values and qualities: fearlessness, purity of mind, gratitude, service and charity, acceptance, performing sacrifice, deep study, austerity, straightforwardness, nonviolence, truthfulness, absence of anger, renunciation, perspective, restraint from fault finding, compassion toward all living beings, satisfaction, gentleness/kindness, integrity, determination.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Yesterday is but a dream. Tomorrow is only a vision. But today well lived makes every yesterday a dream of happiness, and every tomorrow a vision of hope.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
If you are satisfied with who you are, you don't need to prove your worth to anyone else.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The grass is greener where you water it.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
saying whatever we want, whenever we want, however we want, is not freedom. Real freedom is not feeling the need to say these things.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
We say things to ourselves that we would never say to people we love
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Here’s the life hack: Service is always the answer. It fixes a bad day. It tempers the burdens we bear. Service helps other people and helps us. We don’t expect anything in return, but what we get is the joy of service. It’s an exchange of love. When you’re living in service, you don’t have time to complain and criticize. When you’re living in service, your fears go away. When you’re living in service, you feel grateful. Your material attachments diminish.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
use an anti-anxiety technique called 5-4-3-2-1. We are going to find five things you can see, four things you can touch, three things you can hear, two things you can smell, and one thing you can taste.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When we acknowledge that all of our blessings are like a fancy rental car or a beautiful Airbnb, we are free to enjoy them without living in constant fear of losing them. We are all the lucky vacationers enjoying our stay in Hotel Earth.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
First, we become aware of a feeling or issue—we spot it. Then we pause to address what the feeling is and where it comes from—we stop to consider it. And last, we amend our behavior—we swap in a new way of processing the moment. SPOT, STOP, SWAP.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
A quote from Alī, cousin and son-in-law of the Prophet Muhammed, best explains the monk idea of detachment: “Detachment is not that you own nothing, but that nothing should own you.” I love how this summarizes detachment in a way that it’s not usually explained.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Aspects of Love, “Everything you do in the day from washing to eating breakfast, having meetings, driving to work … watching television or deciding instead to read … everything you do is your spiritual life. It is only a matter of how consciously you do these ordinary things
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
But monks believe that when it comes to happiness and joy, there is always a seat with your name on it. In other words, you don’t need to worry about someone taking your place. In the theater of happiness, there is no limit. Everyone who wants to partake in mudita can watch the show. With unlimited seats, there is no fear of missing out.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Becoming a monk is a mindset that anyone can adopt.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Jim Carrey once said, “I think everybody should get rich and famous and do everything they ever dreamed of, so they can see that it’s not the answer.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
आप वही हैं, जो आप तब होते हैं, जब कोई नहीं देख रहा होता है।
Jay Shetty (Sanyasi ki Tarah Soche)
Criticizing someone else’s work ethic doesn’t make you work harder.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
If you want a new idea, read an old book. —attributed to Ivan Pavlov (among others)
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Sometimes we can trace our fears through the actions we take, and sometimes it’s the actions we’re reluctant to take
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Every night when I’m falling asleep, I say to myself, “I am relaxed, energized, and focused. I am calm, enthusiastic, and productive.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
We are all connected; to each other, biologically. To the Earth, chemically. And to the rest of the universe, atomically.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Happiness is feeling good about yourself, having close relationships, making the world a better place. More
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
To live intentionally, we must dig to the deepest why behind the want.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When you learn to navigate and manage your breath, you can navigate any situation in life
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
A bond has its own challenges—there can still be disagreement—but at least all parties want the same outcome.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Life’s too short to live without purpose, to lose our chance to serve, to let our dreams and aspirations die with us.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
that the mud and muck of life’s challenges can provide fertile ground for our development. As the lotus grows, it rises through the water to eventually blossom.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Śāntideva, “It is not possible to control all external events; but if I simply control my mind, what need is there to control other things?
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
CHEW YOUR DRINKS AND DRINK YOUR FOOD
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
To walk down the same old path and find a new stone is to open your mind.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
It is better to live your own destiny imperfectly than to live an imitation of somebody else’s life with perfection. —Bhagavad Gita 3.35
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Revenge is the mode of ignorance—it’s often said that you can’t fix yourself by breaking someone else.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
If you follow your bliss, he said, “doors will open for you that wouldn’t have opened for anyone else
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Negativity is a trait, not someone’s identity.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
I can use my awareness of my fear as a tool to help me make decisions that are truly in line with my values and purpose.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
when the fear of staying the same outweighs the fear of change, that is when we change
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
People come into your life for a reason, a season or a lifetime.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
In getting you where you want to be, meditation may show you what you don’t want to see.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Life is not going to go your way. You have to go your way and take life with you.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
studies by Albert Mehrabian showing that 55 percent of our communication is conveyed by body language, 38 percent is tone of voice, and a mere 7 percent is the actual words we speak.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Happiness and fulfillment come only from mastering the mind and connecting with the soul—not from objects or attainments. Success doesn’t guarantee happiness, and happiness doesn’t require success.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When you try to live your most authentic life, some of your relationships will be put in jeopardy. Losing them is a risk worth bearing; finding a way to keep them in your life is a challenge worth taking on.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Complainers, like the friend on the phone, who complain endlessly without looking for solutions. Life is a problem that will be hard if not impossible to solve. Cancellers, who take a compliment and spin it: “You look good today” becomes “You mean I looked bad yesterday?” Casualties, who think the world is against them and blame their problems on others. Critics, who judge others for either having a different opinion or not having one, for any choices they’ve made that are different from what the critic would have done. Commanders, who realize their own limits but pressure others to succeed. They’ll say, “You never have time for me,” even though they’re busy as well. Competitors, who compare themselves to others, controlling and manipulating to make themselves or their choices look better. They are in so much pain that they want to bring others down. Often we have to play down our successes around these people because we know they can’t appreciate them. Controllers, who monitor and try to direct how their friends or partners spend time, and with whom, and what choices they make. You can have fun with this list, seeing if you can think of someone to fit each type. But the real point of it is to help you
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
It is also important to share your own thoughts and dreams, hopes and worries. The vulnerability of exposing yourself is a way of giving trust and showing respect for another person’s opinion. It enables the other person to understand the previous experiences and beliefs you bring to whatever you do together.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
There’s nothing intrinsically wrong with cloudy or multifaceted intentions. We just need to remember that the less pure they are, the less likely they are to make us happy, even if they make us successful. When people gain what they want but aren’t happy at all, it’s because they did it with the wrong intention.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
At your core, who you really are–– your energy, values, thoughts, love, power, influence, talents–– is worth so much more than a few words could ever convey. You are indescribable. You are infinite. You are you. A forever work in progress, a perfectly imperfect human, a miraculous soul worthy of all good, loving, beautiful things. Never forget this.
Jay Shetty
When you are hired for a job, take a moment to reflect on all the lost jobs and/or failed interviews that led to this victory. You can think of them as necessary challenges along the way. When we learn to stop segmenting experiences and periods of our life and instead see them as scenes and acts in a larger narrative, we gain perspective that helps us deal with fear.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Love is a gift without any strings attached. This means that with it comes the knowledge that not all relationships are meant to endure with equal strength indefinitely. Remember that you are also a season, a reason, and a lifetime friend to different people at different times, and the role you play in someone else’s life won’t always match the role they play in yours.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
TRY THIS: AUDIT YOUR TIME Spend a week tracking how much time you devote to the following: family, friends, health, and self. (Note that we’re leaving out sleeping, eating, and working. Work, in all its forms, can sprawl without boundaries. If this is the case for you, then set your own definition of when you are “officially” at work and make “extra work” one of your categories.) The areas where you spend the most time should match what you value the most. Say the amount of time that your job requires exceeds how important it is to you. That’s a sign that you need to look very closely at that decision. You’re deciding to spend time on something that doesn’t feel important to you. What are the values behind that decision? Are your earnings from your job ultimately serving your values?
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Clinging to temporary things gives them power over us, and they become sources of pain and fear. But when we accept the temporary nature of everything in our lives, we can feel gratitude for the good fortune of getting to borrow them for a time. Even the most permanent of possessions, belonging to the most wealthy and powerful, don’t actually belong to them. This is just as true for the rest of us.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
As researchers Anders Ericsson and Robert Pool underscore in their book Peak, mastery requires deliberate practice, and lots of it. But if you love it, you do it. Picasso experimented with other forms of art but kept painting as his focus. Michael Jordan did a stint at baseball, but basketball was where he really thrived. Play hardest in your area of strength and you’ll achieve depth, meaning, and satisfaction in your life.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When monks talk about happiness, they tell the story of the musk deer, a tale derived from a poem by Kabir, a fifteenth-century Indian mystic and poet. The musk deer picks up an irresistible scent in the forest and chases it, searching for the source, not realizing that the scent comes from its own pores. It spends its whole life wandering fruitlessly. In the same way we search for happiness, finding it elusive, when it can be found within us.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Make a list of five people you care about, but also feel competitive with. Come up with at least one reason that you’re envious of each one: something they’ve achieved, something they’re better at, something that’s gone well for them. Did that achievement actually take anything away from you? Now think about how it benefitted your friend. Visualize everything good that has come to them from this achievement. Would you want to take any of these things away if you could, even knowing that they would not come to you? If so, this envy is robbing you of joy. Envy is more destructive to you than whatever your friend has accomplished. Spend your energy transforming it.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Kindness is as easy—and as hard—as this: genuinely wanting something good for someone else, thinking about what would benefit them, and putting effort into giving them that benefit.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
learning never ends............ so lets keep reading!!!!!
Jay Shetty
Society’s definition of a happy life is everybody’s and nobody’s. The only way to build a meaningful life is to filter out that noise and look within.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Everything you do in the day from washing to eating breakfast, having meetings, driving to work … watching television or deciding instead to read … everything you do is your spiritual life. It is only a matter of how consciously you do these ordinary things …
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
a person who is actively opposed or hostile to someone or something,” and “a thing that harms or weakens something.” Sometimes our own minds work against us. They convince us to do something, then make us feel guilty or bad about it, often because it’s gone against our values or morals.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
three ways I suggest you actively create space for reflection. First, on a daily basis I recommend you sit down to reflect on how the day went and what emotions you’re feeling. Second, once a month you can approximate the change that I found at the ashram by going someplace you’ve never been before to explore yourself in a different environment. This can be anything from visiting a park or library you’ve never been to before to taking a trip. Finally, get involved in something that’s meaningful to you—a hobby, a charity, a political cause. Another way to create space is to take stock of how we are filling the space that we have and whether those choices reflect our true values.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The impulsive, desire-driven child mind is tempered by the judicious, pragmatic adult mind, which says, “That’s not good for you,” or “Wait until later.” The adult mind reminds us to pause and assess the bigger picture, taking time to weigh the default reaction, decide if it’s appropriate, and propose other options. The intelligent parent knows what the child needs versus what it wants and can decide what is better for it in the long term.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
I am relaxed, energized, and focused. I am calm, enthusiastic, and productive.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
heard myself asking. I felt the urge to be around people who had the values I wanted, not the things I wanted. The monk told me that he was traveling and speaking in the UK all that week, and I was welcome to come to the rest of his events. And so I did.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Calm Balance Ease Stillness Peace
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When you protect your dharma, your dharma protects you. —Manusmriti 8:15
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
What we judge or envy or suspect in someone else can guide us to the darkness we have within ourselves.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Real freedom is letting go of things not wanted, the unchecked desires that lead us to unwanted ends.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
In this exercise we try to untangle the knot of pain and/or anger created by conflict. Even if the relationship is not one you want to salvage or have the option of rebuilding, this exercise will help you let go of anger and find peace. Before you start, visualize yourself in the other person’s shoes. Acknowledge their pain and understand that it is why they are causing you pain. Then, write a letter of forgiveness. List all the ways you think the other person did you wrong. Forgiving another person honestly and specifically goes a long way toward healing the relationship. Start each item with “I forgive you for…” Keep going until you get everything out. We’re not sending this letter, so you can repeat yourself if the same thing keeps coming to mind. Write everything you wanted to say but never had a chance. You don’t have to feel forgiveness. Yet. When you write it down, what you’re doing is beginning to understand the pain more specifically so that you can slowly let it go. Acknowledge your own shortcomings. What was your role, if any, in the situation or conflict? List the ways you feel you did wrong, starting each with the phrase “Please forgive me for…” Remember you can’t undo the past, but taking responsibility for your role will help you understand and let go of your anger toward yourself and the other person. When you are done with this letter, record yourself reading it. (Most phones can do this.) Play it back, putting yourself in the position of the objective observer. Remember that the pain inflicted on you isn’t yours. It’s the other person’s pain. As Wayne Dyer once wrote, when you squeeze an orange, you get orange juice. When you squeeze someone full of pain, pain comes out. Instead of absorbing it or giving it back, if you forgive, you help diffuse the pain.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
There are two lies some of us hear when we’re growing up. The first is “You’ll never amount to anything.” The second is “You can be anything you want to be.” The truth is— You can’t be anything you want. But you can be everything you are.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
What you run from only stays with you longer,
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
American spiritual luminary Tara Brach, founder of the Insight Meditation Community of Washington, DC, writes, “As long as we keep attaching our happiness to the external events of our lives, which are ever changing, we’ll always be left waiting for it.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
the only thing that stays with you from the moment you’re born until the moment you die is your breath. All your friends, your family, the country you live in, all of that can change. The one thing that stays with you is your breath.” This ten-year-old monk added, “When you get stressed—what changes? Your breath. When you get angry—what changes? Your breath. We experience every emotion with the change of the breath. When you learn to navigate and manage your breath, you can navigate any situation in life.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Researchers have found that by the end of our lives, on average, each of us will spend thirty-three years in bed (seven years of which will be spent trying to sleep), a year and four months exercising, and more than three years on vacation. If you’re a woman, you’ll spend 136 days getting ready. If you’re a man this number drops to 46 days.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
No matter what you think your values are, your actions tell the real story.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
on a daily basis I recommend you sit down to reflect on how the day went and what emotions you’re feeling. Second, once a month you can approximate the change that I found at the ashram by going someplace you’ve never been before to explore yourself in a different environment. This can be anything from visiting a park or library you’ve never been to before to taking a trip. Finally, get involved in something that’s meaningful to you—a hobby, a charity, a political cause.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When we are buried in nonessentials, we lose track of what is truly significant.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
To live intentionally, we must dig to the deepest why behind the want. This requires pausing to think not only about why we want something, but also who we are or need to be to get it, and whether being that person appeals to us.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Sister Joan Chittister, a Benedictine nun, wrote, “It is trust in the limits of the self that makes us open and it is trust in the gifts of others that makes us secure. We come to realize that we don’t have to do everything, that we can’t do everything, that what I can’t do is someone else’s gift and responsibility.… My limitations make space for the gifts of other people.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
removing distractions that prevent us from focusing on what matters most—finding meaning in life by mastering physical and mental desires. Some traditions give up speaking, some give up sex, some give up worldly possessions, and some give up all three. In the ashram, we lived with just what we needed and nothing more. I experienced firsthand the enlightenment of letting go. When we are buried in nonessentials, we lose track of what is truly significant.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
We are not our minds, but the mind is the vehicle by which we decide what is important in our hearts. The movies we watch, the music we hear, the books we read, the TV shows we binge, the people we follow online and offline. What’s on your news feed is feeding your mind. The more we are absorbed in celebrity gossip, images of success, violent video games, and troubling news, the more our values are tainted with envy, judgment, competition, and discontent.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
MONKEY MIND MONK MIND Overwhelmed by multiple branches Focused on the root of the issue Coasts in the passenger seat Lives intentionally and consciously Complains, compares, criticizes Compassionate, caring, collaborative Overthinks and procrastinates Analyzes and articulates Distracted by small things Disciplined Short-term gratification Long-term gain Demanding and entitled Enthusiastic, determined, patient Changes on a whim Commits to a mission, vision, or goal Amplifies negatives and fears Works on breaking down negatives and fears Self-centered and obsessed Self-care for service Multitasking Single-tasking Controlled by anger, worry, and fear Controls and engages energy wisely Does whatever feels good Seeks self-control and mastery Looks for pleasure Looks for meaning Looks for temporary fixes Looks for genuine solutions
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
First, we will let go, stripping ourselves from the external influences, internal obstacles, and fears that hold us back. You can think of this as a cleansing that will make space for growth.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
you do breathwork for the physical benefits—to find stillness and balance, to calm yourself; visualization for the psychological benefits—to heal the past and prepare for the future; and chanting for the psychic benefits—to connect with your deepest self and the universe, for real purification.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
If I sold more apples than you did yesterday, but you sold more today, this says nothing about whether I'm improving as an apple seller.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
If you can’t explain something simply, you don’t understand it well enough.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
It is trust in the limits of the self that makes us open and it is trust in the gifts of others that makes us secure. We come to realize that we don’t have to do everything, that we can’t do everything, that what I can’t do is someone else’s gift and responsibility.… My limitations make space for the gifts of other people.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Let’s not make happiness and success about the size of our homes, but about the size of our hearts; let’s not make it about gratification but gratitude.
Jay Shetty
There's a story about a monk who carried water from a well in two buckets, one of which had holes in it. He did this every day, without repairing the bucket. One day, a passer-by asked him why he continued to carry the leaky bucket. The monk pointed out that the side of the path where he carried the full bucket was barren, but on the other side of the path, where the bucket had leaked, beautiful wildflowers had flourished. "My imperfection has brought beauty to those around me," he said. Helen Keller, who became deaf and blind as a toddler after an unidentified illness, wrote, "When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us." When something doesn't go your way, say to yourself, "There's more for me out there." That's all...The more open you are to possible outcomes, the more you can make gratitude a go-to response.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Don't judge the moment. As soon as you label something as bad, your mind starts to believe it. Instead, be grateful for setbacks. Allow the journey of life to progress at its own pace and in its own roundabout way. The universe may have other plans in store for you.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
There are distractions, of course, but meditation doesn't eliminate distractions, distractions, it manages them.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
is better to live your own destiny imperfectly than to live an imitation of somebody else’s life with perfection. —Bhagavad Gita 3.35
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
You assume the love you receive will come from the person you gave it to. But it doesn’t always come from that person. Similarly, there are people who love you who you don’t give the same love in return.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
No matter how dissatisfied you are with your pyramid, don’t promote people without reason. They will only let you down. The biggest mistake we make is to assume that everyone else operates just like us. We believe that others value what we value. We believe that what we want in a relationship is what others want in a relationship. When someone says, “I love you,” we think they mean exactly what we mean when we say “I love you.” But if we think everyone is a reflection of ourselves, we fail to see things as they are. We see things as we are.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Another person might come in with a reason. They help you learn and grow, or they support you through a difficult time. It almost feels like they’ve been deliberately sent to you to assist or guide you through a particular experience, after which their central role in your life decreases.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Believe in your worth. You may undervalue yourself in the moment of a breakup, but your value doesn’t depend on someone’s ability to fully appreciate you. If you wrap your identity around the relationship, the pain you feel is that you’ve had to sacrifice that part of your identity. If you expected one person to fulfill all of your needs, then of course there is a vacuum when they’re gone. Now that you’re single, use this time to build a community of people with shared interests whom you want to be in your life forever. Make yourself whole. You need to be someone who makes you happy.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Again, I’m not suggesting you give up sex (though you certainly could), but what if you give yourself permission to be single, by yourself, able to focus on your career, your friends, and your peace of mind? Minister and philosopher Paul Tillich said, “Our language has wisely sensed these two sides of man’s being alone. It has created the word ‘loneliness’ to express the pain of being alone. And it has created the word ‘solitude’ to express the glory of being alone.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
This is the key: Your friend felt joy at being part of the gathering that you put together, and the effort they took to compose that thank-you note brought joy back to you. For each of you, gratitude comes from realizing that someone else is invested in you. It’s a feedback loop of love.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Out in the modern world, no matter how much we want to help others, we are distracted from the service mindset by the desire to be financially and emotionally stable and secure. If you’re lost and disconnected, your service will be cumbersome and less fulfilling. But when is the time right? Will it ever be right? Internal exploration has no endpoint. It’s an ongoing practice. Your problems will never be completely solved.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Find me someone who has gone to the darkest parts of their own character where they were so close to their own self-destruction and found a way to get up and out of it, and I will bow on my knees to you.… You’re my teacher.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The Bhagavad Gita refers to the austerity of speech, saying that we should only speak words that are truthful, beneficial to all, pleasing, and that don’t agitate the minds of others.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When we derive joy from other people’s failures, we’re building our houses and pride on the rocky foundations of someone else’s imperfection or bad luck.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
I hope this book has inspired you, and perhaps you will come away from it planning a fresh start. Maybe you’re thinking about how to change your routines, to listen to your mind in new ways, to bring more gratitude into your life, and more. But when you wake up tomorrow, things will go wrong. You might sleep through your alarm. Something will break. An important appointment will cancel. The universe isn’t going to suddenly give you green lights all the way to work. It’s a mistake to think that when we read a book, attend a class, and implement changes that we’ll fix everything. The externals will never be perfect, and the goal isn’t perfection. Life is not going to go your way. You have to go your way and take life with you. Understanding this will help you be prepared for whatever may come.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Appreciate everything, even the ordinary. Especially the ordinary.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Pero, si adoptamos una mentalidad de víctima, es más probable que nos sintamos con derecho a ciertas cosas y que actuemos de forma egoísta.
Jay Shetty (Piensa como un monje: Entrena tu mente para la paz interior y consigue una vida plena)
Plant Trees Under Whose Shade You Do Not Plan to Sit
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The ignorant work for their own profit… the wise work for the welfare of the world…
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Albert Einstein dijo: «Si no puedes explicar algo de forma sencilla es que no lo has entendido bien».
Jay Shetty (Piensa como un monje: Entrena tu mente para la paz interior y consigue una vida plena)
Here’s the irony: If you’ve ever pretended you know something, you probably discovered that it often takes the same amount of energy to feign confidence and feed vanity as it takes to work, practice, and achieve true confidence.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
You shouldn’t feel small compared to others, but you should feel small compared to your goals. My own approach to remaining humble in the face of success is to keep moving the goalposts. The measure of success isn’t numbers, it’s depth. Monks aren’t impressed by how long you meditate. We ask how deep you went. Bruce Lee said, “I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The salt is the pain of life. It is constant, but if you put it in a small glass, it tastes bitter. If you put it in a lake, you can’t taste it. Expand your senses, expand your world, and the pain will diminish. Don’t be the glass. Become the lake.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
As Iyanla Vanzant said to Oprah, “… until you heal the wounds of your past, you will continue to bleed. You can bandage the bleeding with food, with alcohol, with drugs, with work, with cigarettes, with sex; but eventually, it will all ooze through and stain your life. You must find the strength to open the wounds, stick your hands inside, pull out the core of the pain that is holding you in your past, the memories, and make peace with them.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Reflecting on the knowledge that we will die someday compels us to value the time we have and to spend our energy thoughtfully. Life’s too short to live without purpose, to lose our chance to serve, to let our dreams and aspirations die with us. Above all, I ask you to leave people and places better and happier than you found them.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Even if you think you already know a story, try to live it as a new experience every time.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Tibetan Buddhist nun Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo points out that we often mistake attachment for love. She says, “We imagine that the grasping and clinging that we have in our relationships shows that we love. Whereas actually, it is just attachment, which causes pain. Because the more we grasp, the more we are afraid to lose, then if we do lose, then of course we are going to suffer.” Ultimately, holding on to the wrong person causes us more pain than letting them go.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Create a time cushion at the beginning of the day or you'll spend the rest of the day searching for it. I guarantee you will never find that extra time in the middle of the day. Steal it from your morning sleep and give that sleep back to yourself at night. See what changes.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
.. monks simplify their clothing so as not to waste energy and time on dressing for the day. We each had two sets of robes - one to wear and one to wash. In similar fashion, the early morning wake up was designed to launch the day in the right spirit. It was an ungodly hour, yet it was spiritually enlightening.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
You can't do things with purpose and care if you have to speed through them. When you start the morning with high pressure and high stress, your programming your body to operate in that mode for the rest of the day, through conversations, meetings, appointments.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
As Iyanla Vanzant said to Oprah, “… until you heal the wounds of your past, you will continue to bleed. You can bandage the bleeding with food, with alcohol, with drugs, with work, with cigarettes, with sex; but eventually, it will all ooze through and stain your life. You must find the strength to open the wounds, stick your hands inside, pull out the core of the pain that is holding you in your past, the memories, and make peace with them.” Once you’ve unpacked your own bags and you’ve healed yourself (mostly), then you’ll come to relationships ready to give. You won’t be looking to them to solve your problems or fill a hole. Nobody completes you. You’re not half. You don’t have to be perfect, but you have to come to a place of giving. Instead of draining anyone else, you’re nourishing them.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Detachment is not that you own nothing, but that nothing should own you.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison’s first novel, wasn’t published until she was thirty-nine. And after a ten-year stint in college and time spent working as a ski instructor, Dietrich Mateschitz was forty before he created blockbuster energy drink company Red Bull. Pay attention, cultivate self-awareness, feed your strengths, and you will find your way. And once you discover your dharma, pursue it.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
La venganza es la modalidad de la ignorancia: no puedes resolver tus problemas causándoselos a otra persona
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
La cima del perdón, el auténtico sattva, es desearle lo mejor a la persona que te ha causado dolor
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
La humildad te permite ver claramente tus puntos fuertes y débiles para que puedas trabajar, aprender y crecer
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
No eres tu éxito ni tu fracaso. Mantén esa humildad después de que hayas conseguido algo. Cuando te feliciten, te elogien o te premien, ni te regodees en ello ni lo rechaces. Sé gentil en ese momento y después acuérdate de lo mucho que has trabajado y reconoce los sacrificios que has hecho
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Cuando empiezas el día con agradecimiento, estás abierto a las oportunidades, no a los obstáculos
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
El agradecimiento es la madre de todas las cualidades. Del mismo modo que una madre da a luz, el agradecimiento genera las demás cualidades, como compasión, resiliencia, confianza, pasión, etc., atributos positivos que nos ayudan a hallar sentido y a sintonizar con los demás
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
La persona que un día es tu maestro puede ser tu alumno al siguiente
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
La energía sexual no consiste solo en el placer. Es sagrada, ya que tiene el poder de engendrar un niño. Imagina lo que podemos crear dentro de nosotros si la aprovechamos
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Cuando vives al servicio, no tienes tiempo para quejarte ni criticar. Cuando vives al servicio, tus miedos desaparecen. Cuando vives al servicio, te sientes agradecido. Los apegos materiales disminuyen. El servicio es el camino directo a una vida llena de sentido
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Ya pensabais como monjes, pero ahora sois conscientes
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Cuando desconectamos de las opiniones, expectativas y obligaciones del mundo que nos rodea, empezamos a oírnos a nosotros mismos.
Jay Shetty (Piensa como un monje: Entrena tu mente para la paz interior y consigue una vida plena)
Al morir, deberías estar totalmente purificado, libre de lo que crees que tienes que hacer y de comparaciones y críticas, habiéndote enfrentado a la raíz de tu miedo; libre de deseos materiales, viviendo en tu dharma, habiendo aprovechado bien el tiempo y no habiendo cedido a las exigencias de la mente; libre del ego, habiendo dado más de lo que has recibido, pero luego habiendo entregado todo lo que has recibido; libre de privilegios y de falsas relaciones y expectativas
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Sometimes we have been wounded so deeply that we can’t imagine how we might forgive the person who hurt us. But, contrary to what most of us believe, forgiveness is primarily an action we take within ourselves. Sometimes it’s better (and safer and healthier) not to have direct contact with the person at all; other times, the person who hurt us is no longer around to be forgiven directly. But those factors don’t impede forgiveness because it is, first and foremost, internal. It frees you from anger.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Sometimes we deny responsibility for the negativity that we ourselves put out in the world, but negativity doesn’t always come from other people and it isn’t always spoken aloud.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Transformational forgiveness is linked to a slew of health improvements including: fewer medications taken, better sleep quality, and reduced somatic symptoms including back pain, headache, nausea, and fatigue.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Forgiveness eases stress, because we no longer recycle the angry thoughts, both conscious and subconscious, that stressed us out in the first place.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
People often equate detachment with indifference. They think that seeing things, people, and experiences as temporary or seeing them from a distance diminishes our ability to enjoy life, but that’s not the case. Only by detaching can we truly gain control of the mind.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson said, “We are all connected; to each other, biologically. To the Earth, chemically. And to the rest of the universe, atomically.” Knowing this, we must look to the universe to find true meaning in our lives.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The ignorant work for their own profit… the wise work for the welfare of the world… —Bhagavad Gita, 3:25
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The truth is, we'll never live entirely without fear and anxiety. We'll never be able to fix our economic, social, and political climates to entirely eliminate conflict and uncertainty, not to mention our everyday interpersonal challenges. And that's okay, because fear isn't bad; it's simply a warning flag - your mind saying "This doesn't look good! Something might go wrong!" It's what we do with that signal that matters.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Expand your senses, expand your world, and the pain will diminish. Don’t be the glass. Become the lake.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
You can either see the world through the lens of love and duty, or through the lens of necessity and force. Love and duty are more likely to lead to happiness.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
if we think everyone is a reflection of ourselves, we fail to see things as they are. We see things as we are.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Monks can withstand temptations, refrain from criticizing, deal with pain and anxiety, quiet the ego, and build lives that brim with purpose and meaning.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The goal of monk thinking is a life free of ego, envy, lust, anxiety, anger, bitterness, baggage.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
No matter what anyone says about me today or how I think I’ve grown, I have anchors that humble me. They remind me of who I was and what I might have become if I hadn’t met people who inspired me to change.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Appreciate everything, even the ordinary. Especially the ordinary. —Pema Chödrön
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When you’re present in gratitude, you can’t be anywhere else.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
As Gandhi said, “The golden way is to be friends with the world and to regard the whole human family as one.” The groups we establish for
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
As Gandhi said, “The golden way is to be friends with the world and to regard the whole human family as one.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
As a monk, I learned early on that our values are influenced by whatever absorbs our minds. We are not our minds, but the mind is the vehicle by which we decide what is important in our hearts. The movies we watch, the music we hear, the books we read, the TV shows we binge, the people we follow online and offline. What’s on your news feed is feeding your mind. The more we are absorbed in celebrity gossip, images of success, violent video games, and troubling news, the more our values are tainted with envy, judgment, competition, and discontent.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
they exhausted? Frustrated? Making improvements from where they once were?—and to factor in what has led to this behavior, before letting your ego jump in. Everyone has a story, and sometimes our egos choose to ignore that. Don’t take everything personally—it is usually not about you.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Some of my friends and colleagues stopped trying to gossip with me altogether; we had real conversations instead. Some trusted me more, realizing that since I didn’t gossip with them, I wouldn’t gossip about them. If there were people who thought I was just plain boring, well, I have nothing bad to say about them.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
eloquent,
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
A layperson who is consciously aiming to be continuously alive in the Now is a monk.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The goal of monk thinking is a life free of ego, envy, lust, anxiety, anger, bitterness, baggage. To my mind, adopting the monk mindset isn’t just possible—it’s necessary. We have no other choice. We need to find calm, stillness, and peace.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Already I was being taught the most important lesson: to focus on the root of things, not the leaf of the tree or symptoms of the problem.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When we criticize others, we can’t help but notice the bad in ourselves. But when we look for the good in others, we start to see the best in ourselves too.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
This is the first step to building your monk mind.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
feeling. Second, once a month you can approximate the change that I found at the ashram by going someplace you’ve never been before to explore yourself in a different environment. This can be anything from visiting a park or library you’ve never been to before to taking a trip. Finally, get involved in something that’s meaningful to you—a hobby, a charity, a political cause.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Values are abstract, elusive, and the world we live in constantly pushes blatant and subliminal suggestions as to what we should want, and how we should live, and how we form our ideas of who we are.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Insanity is doing the same thing again and again, expecting different results.” (This quote is often attributed to Einstein, although there’s no proof that he ever said it.) How many of us do the same thing, year after year, hoping our lives will transform? Thoughts repeat in our minds, reinforcing what we believe about ourselves. Our conscious isn’t awake to make edits. The narration playing in your mind is stuck in its beliefs about relationships, money, how you feel about yourself, how you should behave.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Use the awareness of what deep pain really is to keep smaller disruptions in perspective. And when you must face a truly devastating ten, own it, take the time to heal it. This is not about reducing the impact of all negative experiences; it’s about gaining a clearer view of them.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Most people are accustomed to looking for answers. Monks focus on questions. When I was trying to get close to my fear, I asked myself “What am I afraid of?” over and over again. When I’m trying to get to the root of a desire, I start with the question “Why?
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
We can’t sit around with true intentions expecting that what we want will fall into our laps. Nor can we expect someone to find us, discover how amazing we are, and hand us our place in the world. Nobody is going to create our lives for us. Martin
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
The emotion you fall asleep with at night is most likely the emotion you’ll wake up with in the morning.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
When the five senses and the mind are stilled, when the reasoning intellect rests in silence, then begins the highest path. —the Katha Upanishad
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
No matter what you think your values are, your actions tell the real story. What we do with our spare time shows what we value. For instance, you might put spending time with your family at the top of your list of values, but if you spend all your free time playing golf, your actions don’t match your values, and you need to do some self-examination.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)
Every choice in life is a battle between two wolves inside us. One represents anger, envy, greed, fear, lies, insecurity, and ego. The other represents peace, love, compassion, kindness, humility, and positivity. They are competing for supremacy.’ “ ‘Which wolf wins?’ the grandson asks. ‘The one you feed,’ the elder replies.” “But how do we feed them?” I asked my teacher. The monk said, “By what we read and hear. By who we spend time with. By what we do with our time. By where we focus our energy and attention.
Jay Shetty (Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day)