Jacqueline Woodson Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Jacqueline Woodson. Here they are! All 100 of them:

Even the silence has a story to tell you. Just listen. Listen.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
But on paper, things can live forever. On paper, a butterfly never dies.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
I believe in one day and someday and this perfect moment called Now.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Time comes to us softly, slowly. It sits beside us for a while. Then, long before we are ready, it moves on.
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
You can't always be pushing people away. Someday nobody'll come back.
Jacqueline Woodson (The Dear One)
When there are many worlds you can choose the one you walk into each day.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Then I let the stories live inside my head, again and again until the real world fades back into cricket lullabies and my own dreams.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
How can I explain to anyone that stories are like air to me, I breathe them in and let them out over and over again.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
The empty swing set reminds us of this-- that bad won't be bad forever, and what is good can sometimes last a long, long time.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
I know now that what is tragic isn’t the moment. It is the memory.
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
Sometimes, I don't know that words for things, how to write down the feeling of knowing that every dying person leaves something behind.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
In all your getting, get understanding.
Jacqueline Woodson (Hush)
People are going to judge you all the time no matter what you do...Don't worry about other people. Worry about you.
Jacqueline Woodson (The Dear One)
I lifted my head to look up into the changing leaves, thinking how at some point, we were all headed home. At some point, all of this, everything and everyone, became memory.
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
Sometimes...you have to try to forget people you love just so you can keep living.
Jacqueline Woodson (Between Madison and Palmetto)
Somewhere in my brain each laugh, tear and lullaby becomes memory.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Does it sound crazy to say I looked at her and saw the world falling into some kind of order that I didn’t even know it was out of?
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
Guess that's where the tears came from, knowing that there's so much in this great big world that you don't have a single ounce of control over. Guess the sooner you learn that, the sooner you'll have one less heartbreak in your life.
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
I think only once in your life do you find someone that you say, "Hey, this is the person I want to spend the rest of my time on this earth with." And if you miss it, or walk away from it, or even maybe, blink - it's gone.
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
I want to catch words one day. I want to hold them then blow gently, watch them float right out of my hands.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Some evenings I don't know where the old pains end and the new ones begin. Feels like the older you get the more they run into one long, deep aching.
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
You're a part of me...You're in my heart. Forever and always, all right? —D
Jacqueline Woodson (After Tupac and D Foster)
I work hard, he says, I treat people like I want to be treated. God sees this, God knows.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
He loved October. Had always loved it. There was something sad and beautiful about it - the ending and beginning of things.
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
I do not know if these hands will become Malcolm’s—raised and fisted or Martin’s—open and asking or James’s—curled around a pen. I do not know if these hands will be Rosa’s or Ruby’s gently gloved and fiercely folded calmly in a lap, on a desk, around a book, ready to change the world . . .
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Who hasn't walked through a life of small tragedies?
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
I wouldn't mind the early autumn if you came home today I'd tell you how much I miss you and know I'd be okay. It's funny how we never know exactly how our life will go It's funny how a dream can fade with the break of day. Time can't erase the memory and time can't bring you home Last Summer was a part of me and now a part is gone. —Margaret
Jacqueline Woodson (Last Summer with Maizon)
Maybe, I am thinking, there is something hidden like this, in all of us. A small gift from the universe waiting to be discovered.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
If I loved someone enough, I would go anywhere in the world with them." —Staggerlee
Jacqueline Woodson (The House You Pass on the Way)
Maybe this was our last summer as best friends. I feel like something's going to change now and I'm not going to be able to change it back. —Margaret
Jacqueline Woodson (Last Summer with Maizon)
I knew I was lost inside the world, watching it and trying to understand why too often I felt like I was standing just beyond the frame—of everything.
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
I'm always wondering if he'll return. Sometimes I pray that he doesn't. And sometimes I hope he will. I wish on falling stars and eyelashes. Absence isn't solid the way death is. It's fluid, like language. And it hurts so much...so, so much.
Jacqueline Woodson (Maizon at Blue Hill)
This is what kindness does, Ms.Albert said. Each little thing we do goes out, like a ripple, into the world.
Jacqueline Woodson (Each Kindness)
You have those walls up all around you...Come a day you gonna want to tear them down brick by brick and gonna find that the cement is all hard. What you gonna do then?
Jacqueline Woodson (The Dear One)
For God so loved the world, their father would say, he gave his only begotten son. But what about his daughters, I wondered. What did God do with his daughters?
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
We all have the same dream, my grandmother says. To live equal in a country that’s supposed to be the land of the free. She lets out a long breath, deep remembering.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Look how beautifully black we are. And as we dance, I am not Melody who is sixteen, I am not my parents’ once illegitimate daughter—I am a narrative, someone’s almost forgotten story. Remembered.
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
No matter how big you get, it's still okay to cry because everybody's got a right to their own tears.
Jacqueline Woodson (Peace, Locomotion)
He wondered where that stuff went to, where love went to, how a person could just love somebody one day and boom –- the next day love somebody else.
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
Y'all know how much I love you? "Infinity and back again," I say the way I've said it a million times. And then, daddy says to me, "go on and add a little bit more to that.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Maybe this is how it happened first for everyone—adults promising us their own failed futures.
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
Mama says it's okay to be on the quiet side—if quiet means you're listening, watching, taking it all in.
Jacqueline Woodson (From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun)
Something about memory. It takes you back to where you were and lets you just be there for a time.
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
There was a time when I believed there was loss that could not be defined, that language had not caught up to death's enormity.
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
If this moment was a sentence, I’d be the period.
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
Nothing in the world is like this- a bright white page with pale blue lines. The smell of a newly sharpened pencil the soft hush of it moving finally one day into letters.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Will the words end, I ask whenever I remember to. Nope, my sister says, all of five years old now, and promising me infinity.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
This earth is seventy percent water. Hard not to walk into it.
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
Lately, I'd been feeling like I was standing outside watching everything and everybody. Wishing I could take the part of me that was over there and the part of me that was over here and push them together—make myself into one whole person like everybody else.
Jacqueline Woodson (After Tupac and D Foster)
Age will do that to you. Soon as something starts coming to your mind, it snatches it back. Makes you forget the stuff you want to remember. Brings back the memories you’re busy trying to forget.
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
That's what makes best friends. It's not whether or not you live on the same block or go to the same school, but how you feel about each other in your hearts.
Jacqueline Woodson (Maizon at Blue Hill)
Fifteen. Sixteen was probably something, but fifteen - fifteen was a place between here and nowhere.
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
Everyone else has gone away. And now coming back home isn't really coming back home at all.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Deep winter and the night air is cold. So still, it feels like the world goes on forever in the darkness until you look up and the earth stops in a ceiling of stars. My head against my grandfather's arm, a blanket around us as we sit on the front porch swing. Its whine like a song. You don't need words on a night like this. Just the warmth of your grandfather's arm. Just the silent promise that the world as we know it will always be here.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
I feel like the world stopped. And I got off...and then it started spinning again, but too fast for me to hop back on. I feel like I'm still trying to get a...to get some kind of foothold on living
Jacqueline Woodson (Behind You)
If you come as softly as the wind within the trees. You may hear what I hear. See what sorrow sees. If you come as lightly as threading dew, I will take you gladly, nor ask more of you.
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
Mama was always saying I was a brain snob, that I didn't like people who didn't think. I didn't know if that was snobby. Who wanted to walk around explaining everything to people all the time?
Jacqueline Woodson
Racism doesn't know color, death doesn't know age, and pain doesn't know might.
Jacqueline Woodson (Maizon at Blue Hill)
I don't know," he said softly. "I look into the future and I don't see anything else. It's like it's this big blank space where I should be.
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
When we can't find my sister, we know / she is under the kitchen table, a book in her hand, / a glass of milk and a small bowl of peanuts beside her. / We know we can call Odella's name out loud, / slap the table hard with our hands, / dance around it singing 'She'll Be Coming 'Round the Mountain' / so many times the song makes us sick / and the circling makes us dizzy / and still / my sister will do nothing more / than slowly turn the page.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
. . . Love changes and changes. Then it changes again. . .
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
Write down what I think I know. The knowing will come. Just keep listening...
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
I am not gifted. When I read, the words twist twirl across the page. When they settle, it is too late. The class has already moved on. I want to catch words one day. I want to hold them then blow gently, watch them float right out of my hands.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Some people don't believe that you can meet a person and know that's the person for you for the rest of your life. I'm not going to try to argue with them on that. I know what I know.
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
If someone had taken that book out of my hand said, You’re too old for this maybe I’d never have believed that someone who looked like me could be in the pages of the book that someone who looked like me had a story.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Sometimes you do have to laugh to keep from crying. And sometimes the world feels all right and good and kind of like it's becoming nice again around you. And you realize it, and realize how happy you are in it, and you just gotta laugh.
Jacqueline Woodson (Peace, Locomotion)
I'm gonna kiss you in each room," he said. "Then it's dinnertime." "How many rooms to this place?" Ellie asked, her eyes wide. Miah shrugged. "I'm not counting.
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
And as we stood half circle in the bright school yard, we saw the lost and beautiful and hungry in each of us. We saw home.
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
Some days I just think the whole world and life and everything is stupid. And that's 'cause I be missing you.
Jacqueline Woodson (Peace, Locomotion)
I think I'd rather have my heart broke than do the breaking. —Lena
Jacqueline Woodson (Lena)
we looked, we saw the people trying to dream themselves out. As though there was someplace other than this place. As though there was another Brooklyn.
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
Fast nights make long days,
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
No past. No future. Just this perfect Now.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
This is how the time moves - an hour here, a day somewhere, and then it's night and then it's morning. A clock ticking on a shelf. A small child running to school, a father coming home. Time moves over us and past us, and the feeling of lips pressed against lips fades into memory. A picture yellows at its edges. A phone rings in an empty room.
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
It's easier to make up stories than it is to write them down. When I speak, the words come pouring out of me. The story wakes up and walks all over the room. Sits in a chair, crosses one leg over the other, says, Let me introduce myself. Then just starts going on and on.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
I was eleven, the idea of two identical digits in my age still new and spectacular and heartbreaking. The girls must have felt this. They must have known. Where had ten, nine, eight, and seven gone?
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
If the worst thing in the world happened, would I help protect someone else? Would I let myself be a harbor for someone who needs it?’ Then she said, ‘I want each of you to say to the other: I will harbor you.’ I will harbor you.
Jacqueline Woodson (Harbor Me)
Seems like every time life starts straightening itself out, something's gotta go and happen.
Jacqueline Woodson (Peace, Locomotion)
I love that people think the world is even halfway ready for what we about to bring.
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
Back then, we still all believed in happy endings. None of us knew yet how many endings and beginnings one story could have.
Jacqueline Woodson (Harbor Me)
Someday somebody's going to come along and knock this old fence down.
Jacqueline Woodson (The Other Side)
Creating a novel means moving into the past, the hoped for, the imagined. It is an emotional journey, fraught at times with characters who don't always do or say what a writer wishes.
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
In downtown Greenville, they painted over the WHITE ONLY signs, except on the bathroom doors, they didn’t use a lot of paint so you can still see the words, right there like a ghost standing in front still keeping you out.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Thing about white people," Jeremiah's father tells him, "they know what everybody else is, but they don't know they're white" - "Maybe some know it" His father eyed him and smiled "When they walk into a party and everyone's black, they know it. Or when they get caught in Harlem after nightfall, they know it. But otherwise...
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
Kids are something. All they can see is the beauty in a moment.
Jacqueline Woodson (Behind You)
I would never trust her. Not one hundred percent. Not the way some people can trust their mothers.
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
I am not my sister. Words from the books curl around each other make little sense until I read them again and again, the story settling into memory. Too slow my teacher says. Read Faster. Too babyish, the teacher says. Read older. But I don't want to read faster or older or any way else that might make the story disappear too quickly from where it's settling inside my brain, slowly becoming a part of me. A story I will remember long after I've read it for the second, third, tenth, hundredth time.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
And when I can't speak it, I write it down. I wish I was different. Wish I was taller, smarter, could talk out loud the way I write things down. I wish I didn't always feel like I was on the outside, looking in like a Peeping Tom.
Jacqueline Woodson (From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun)
Orba (feminine), the Latin word for orphaned, parentless, childless, widowed. There was a time when I believed there was loss that could not be defined, that language had not caught up to death's enormity. But it has. Orbus, orba, orbum, orbi, orbae, orborum, orbo, orbis...
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
If we had had jazz, would we have survived differently? If we had known our story was a blues with a refrain running through it, would we have lifted our heads, said to each other, This is memory again and again until the living made sense? Where would we be now if we had known there was a melody to our madness? Because even though Sylvia, Angela, Gigi, and I came together like a jazz improv - half notes tentatively moving toward one another until the ensemble found its footing and the music felt like it had always been playing - we didn't have jazz to know this was who we were. We had the Top 40 music of the 1970s trying to tell our story. It never quite figured us out.
Jacqueline Woodson (Another Brooklyn)
Some evenings, I kneel toward Mecca with my uncle. Maybe Mecca is the place Leftie goes to in his mind, when the memory of losing his arm becomes too much. Maybe Mecca is good memories, presents and stories and poetry and arroz con pollo and family and friends... Maybe Mecca is the place everyone is looking for... It's out there in front of you, my uncle says. I know I'll know it when I get there.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
In our yearbook, there is a picture of me and Miah - sitting in Central Park - Miah has his lips poked out and is about to kiss me on my cheek. And I'm looking straight into the camera laughing. Two and half years have passed, and still, this is how I remember us. This is how I will always remember us. And I know when I look at that picture, when I think back to those few months with Miah, that I did not miss the moment.
Jacqueline Woodson (If You Come Softly)
You're writing, you're coasting, and you're thinking, 'This is the best thing I've ever written, and it's coming so easily, and these characters are so great.' You put it aside for whatever reason, and you open it up a week later and the characters have turned to cardboard and the book has completely fallen apart," she says. "That's the moment of truth for every writer: Can I go on from here and make this book into something? I think it separates the writers from the nonwriters. And I think it's the reason a lot of people have that unfinished manuscript around the house, that albatross.
Jacqueline Woodson
I am born as the South explodes, too many people too many years enslaved, then emancipated but not free, the people who look like me keep fighting and marching and getting killed so that today— February 12, 1963 and every day from this moment on, brown children like me can grow up free. Can grow up learning and voting and walking and riding wherever we want. I am born in Ohio but the stories of South Carolina already run like rivers through my veins.
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
Every day since she was a baby, I’ve told Iris the story. How they came with intention. How the only thing they wanted was to see us gone. Our money gone. Our shops and schools and libraries—everything—just good and gone. And even though it happened twenty years before I was even a thought, I carry it. I carry the goneness. Iris carries the goneness. And watching her walk down those stairs, I know now that my grandbaby carries the goneness too. But both of them need to know that inside the goneness you gotta carry so many other things. The running. The saving. The surviving.
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)
My love for looking deeply and closely at the world, for putting my whole self into it, and by doing so, seeing the many, many possibilities of a narrative, turned out to be a gift, because taking my sweet time taught me everything I needed to know about writing. And writing taught me everything I needed to know about creating worlds where people could be seen and heard, where their experiences could be legitimized, and where my story, read or heard by another person, inspired something in them that became a connection between us, a conversation. And isn't that what this is all about -- finding a way, at the end of the day, to not feel alone in this world, and a way to feel like we've changed it before we leave? Stone to hammer, man to mummy, idea to story -- and all of it, remembered.
Jacqueline Woodson
So as technology continues to speed ahead, I continue to read slowly, knowing that I am respecting the author's work and the story's lasting power. And I read slowly to drown out the noise and remember those who came before me, who were probably the first people who finally learned to control fire and circled their new power of flame and light and heat. And I read slowly to remember the Selfish Giant, how he finally tore that wall down and let the children run free through his garden. And I read slowly to pay homage to my ancestors, who were not allowed to read at all. They, too, must have circled fires, speaking softly of their dreams, their hopes, their futures. Each time we read, write or tell a story, we step inside their circle, and it remains unbroken. And the power of story lives on.
Jacqueline Woodson
My birth certificate says: Female Negro Mother: Mary Anne Irby, 22, Negro Father: Jack Austin Woodson, 25, Negro In Birmingham, Alabama, Martin Luther King Jr. is planning a march on Washington, where John F. Kennedy is president. In Harlem, Malcolm X is standing on a soapbox talking about a revolution. Outside the window of University Hospital, snow is slowly falling. So much already covers this vast Ohio ground. In Montgomery, only seven years have passed since Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a city bus. I am born brown-skinned, black-haired and wide-eyed. I am born Negro here and Colored there and somewhere else, the Freedom Singers have linked arms, their protests rising into song: Deep in my heart, I do believe that we shall overcome someday. and somewhere else, James Baldwin is writing about injustice, each novel, each essay, changing the world. I do not yet know who I’ll be what I’ll say how I’ll say it . . . Not even three years have passed since a brown girl named Ruby Bridges walked into an all-white school. Armed guards surrounded her while hundreds of white people spat and called her names. She was six years old. I do not know if I’ll be strong like Ruby. I do not know what the world will look like when I am finally able to walk, speak, write . . . Another Buckeye! the nurse says to my mother. Already, I am being named for this place. Ohio. The Buckeye State. My fingers curl into fists, automatically This is the way, my mother said, of every baby’s hand. I do not know if these hands will become Malcolm’s—raised and fisted or Martin’s—open and asking or James’s—curled around a pen. I do not know if these hands will be Rosa’s or Ruby’s gently gloved and fiercely folded calmly in a lap, on a desk, around a book, ready to change the world . . .
Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming)
All Summer in a Day” by Ray Bradbury Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo Big Nate series by Lincoln Peirce The Black Cauldron (The Chronicles of Prydain) by Lloyd Alexander The Book Thief  by Markus Zusak Brian’s Hunt by Gary Paulsen Brian’s Winter by Gary Paulsen Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis The Call of the Wild by Jack London The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White The Chronicles of Narnia series by C. S. Lewis Diary of a Wimpy Kid series by Jeff Kinney Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury The Giver by Lois Lowry Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling Hatchet by Gary Paulsen The High King (The Chronicles of Prydain) by Lloyd Alexander The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien Holes by Louis Sachar The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins I Am LeBron James by Grace Norwich I Am Stephen Curry by Jon Fishman Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell Johnny Tremain by Esther Hoskins Forbes Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson LeBron’s Dream Team: How Five Friends Made History by LeBron James and Buzz Bissinger The Lightning Thief  (Percy Jackson and the Olympians) by Rick Riordan A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle Number the Stars by Lois Lowry The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton The River by Gary Paulsen The Sailor Dog by Margaret Wise Brown Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor “A Sound of Thunder” by Ray Bradbury Star Wars Expanded Universe novels (written by many authors) Star Wars series (written by many authors) The Swiss Family Robinson by Johann D. Wyss Tales from a Not-So-Graceful Ice Princess (Dork Diaries) by Rachel Renée Russell Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt Under the Blood-Red Sun by Graham Salisbury The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Andrew Clements (The Losers Club)
Every moment for all the generations was leading to you here on my lap, your head against your granddaddy’s chest, already four years old. Hair smelling like coconut oil. Something beneath that, though. Little-girl sweat—almost sour, but then just when I think that’s what it is, it turns, sweetens somehow. Makes me want to sit here forever breathing in your scalp. When did your arms get so long? Your feet so big? These footie pajamas with reindeer all over them remind me of the ones your mama used to wear. She used to fall asleep on my lap just like this. Back at the other house. Oh time time time time. Where’d you go where’d you go? My legs hurt tonight. Another place too—deep in my back somewhere, there’s a dull, aching pain. I try not to think about it. Old people used to always say, You only as old as you feel. Here I am closer to fifty than forty, but I feel older than that most days. Feel like the world is trying to pull me down back into it. Like God went ahead and said, I’ve changed my mind about you, Po’Boy. A bath with Epsom salts helps some evenings. Ginger tea keeps Sabe’s good cooking in my belly. Sitting here holding you at the end of the day—that’s . . . well, I’m not going to lie and say this isn’t the best thing that ever happened to my life because it is. Look at you laughing in your sleep. Got me wondering what you’re dreaming about. What’s making you laugh like that? Tell your granddaddy what’s playing in your pretty brown head, my little Melody. Name like a song. Like you were born and it was cause for the world to sing. You know how much your old granddaddy loves when you sing him silly songs? Sabe says she’s gonna have to get some earplugs if she has to hear one more verse of “Elmo’s World” or that song about how to grow a garden. But me, I can listen to your voice forever. Can’t hear you singing enough.
Jacqueline Woodson (Red at the Bone)