Isle Of Wight Quotes

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Dearest creature in creation, Study English pronunciation. I will teach you in my verse Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse. I will keep you, Suzy, busy, Make your head with heat grow dizzy. Tear in eye, your dress will tear. So shall I! Oh hear my prayer. Just compare heart, beard, and heard, Dies and diet, lord and word, Sword and sward, retain and Britain. (Mind the latter, how it’s written.) Now I surely will not plague you With such words as plaque and ague. But be careful how you speak: Say break and steak, but bleak and streak; Cloven, oven, how and low, Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe. Hear me say, devoid of trickery, Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore, Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles, Exiles, similes, and reviles; Scholar, vicar, and cigar, Solar, mica, war and far; One, anemone, Balmoral, Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel; Gertrude, German, wind and mind, Scene, Melpomene, mankind. Billet does not rhyme with ballet, Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet. Blood and flood are not like food, Nor is mould like should and would. Viscous, viscount, load and broad, Toward, to forward, to reward. And your pronunciation’s OK When you correctly say croquet, Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve, Friend and fiend, alive and live. Ivy, privy, famous; clamour And enamour rhyme with hammer. River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb, Doll and roll and some and home. Stranger does not rhyme with anger, Neither does devour with clangour. Souls but foul, haunt but aunt, Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant, Shoes, goes, does. Now first say finger, And then singer, ginger, linger, Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge, Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age. Query does not rhyme with very, Nor does fury sound like bury. Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth. Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath. Though the differences seem little, We say actual but victual. Refer does not rhyme with deafer. Foeffer does, and zephyr, heifer. Mint, pint, senate and sedate; Dull, bull, and George ate late. Scenic, Arabic, Pacific, Science, conscience, scientific. Liberty, library, heave and heaven, Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven. We say hallowed, but allowed, People, leopard, towed, but vowed. Mark the differences, moreover, Between mover, cover, clover; Leeches, breeches, wise, precise, Chalice, but police and lice; Camel, constable, unstable, Principle, disciple, label. Petal, panel, and canal, Wait, surprise, plait, promise, pal. Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair, Senator, spectator, mayor. Tour, but our and succour, four. Gas, alas, and Arkansas. Sea, idea, Korea, area, Psalm, Maria, but malaria. Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean. Doctrine, turpentine, marine. Compare alien with Italian, Dandelion and battalion. Sally with ally, yea, ye, Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, and key. Say aver, but ever, fever, Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver. Heron, granary, canary. Crevice and device and aerie. Face, but preface, not efface. Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bass. Large, but target, gin, give, verging, Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging. Ear, but earn and wear and tear Do not rhyme with here but ere. Seven is right, but so is even, Hyphen, roughen, nephew Stephen, Monkey, donkey, Turk and jerk, Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work. Pronunciation (think of Psyche!) Is a paling stout and spikey? Won’t it make you lose your wits, Writing groats and saying grits? It’s a dark abyss or tunnel: Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale, Islington and Isle of Wight, Housewife, verdict and indict. Finally, which rhymes with enough, Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough? Hiccough has the sound of cup. My advice is to give up!!!
Gerard Nolst Trenité (Drop your Foreign Accent)
It was high tide, and the sound of the waves coming in sounded like the breath of an enormous dinosaur. Round the lighthouse, on the opposite side to Snugs’ room, Mr andMrs Merryweather put down the blinds, and blew out the candle. They were very tired, and tomorrow was Christmas Eve on The Isle of Wight.
Suzy Davies (Snugs The Snow Bear (Snugs Series #1))
An island, on the other hand, is small. There are fewer species, and the competition for survival has never reached anything like the pitch that it does on the mainland. Species are only as tough as they need to be, life is much quieter and more settled [..] So you can imagine what happens when a mainland species gets introduced to an island. It would be like introducing Al Capone, Genghis Khan and Rupert Murdoch into the Isle of Wight - the locals wouldn't stand a chance.
Douglas Adams (Last Chance to See)
When first I set eyes on The Isle of Wight Polar Bear, my world was filled, in that instant, with the magic and wonder of childhood.
Suzy Davies (Snugs The Snow Bear (Snugs Series #1))
So you can imagine what happens when a mainland species gets introduced to an island. It would be like introducing Al Capone, Genghis Khan, and Rupert Murdoch into the Isle of Wight—the locals wouldn’t stand a chance.
Douglas Adams (Last Chance to See)
Americanism in all its forms seemed to be trashy and wasteful and crude, even brutal. There was a metaphor ready to hand in my native Hampshire. Until some time after the war, the squirrels of England had been red. I can still vaguely remember these sweet Beatrix Potter–type creatures, smaller and prettier and more agile and lacking the rat-like features that disclose themselves when you get close to a gray squirrel. These latter riffraff, once imported from America by some kind of regrettable accident, had escaped from captivity and gradually massacred and driven out the more demure and refined English breed. It was said that the gray squirrels didn't fight fair and would with a raking motion of their back paws castrate the luckless red ones. Whatever the truth of that, the sighting of a native English squirrel was soon to be a rarity, confined to the north of Scotland and the Isle of Wight, and this seemed to be emblematic, for the anxious lower middle class, of a more general massification and de-gentrification and, well, Americanization of everything.
Christopher Hitchens (Hitch 22: A Memoir)
So we went to the high-level platform, and saw the engine-driver, and asked him if he was going to Kingston.  He said he couldn’t say for certain of course, but that he rather thought he was.  Anyhow, if he wasn’t the 11.5 for Kingston, he said he was pretty confident he was the 9.32 for Virginia Water, or the 10 a.m. express for the Isle of Wight, or somewhere in that direction, and we should all know when we got there.  We slipped half-a-crown into his hand, and begged him to be the 11.5 for Kingston.
Jerome K. Jerome (Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog))
I know this sounds like quite a pile. I know, too, that some of you will wonder why I don't just buy a Kindle. I see your point, but the trouble is that to do so would be to forgo the pleasure of the moment when, years in the future, sand falls from the pages of an old book, and you suddenly remember the Isle of Wight and A Passage to India, a Greek island and The Map of Love, or whatever. For me, a ghostly trace of Ambre Solaire rising from the pages of a sun-bleached paperback is a way back to the past: to favourite stories as much as to favourite beaches.
Rachel Cooke
Can we go to Alum Bay, please?" Snugs asked the moose, his little nose twitching with excitement, and his voice a little faster than usual because he couldn't wait
Suzy Davies (Snugs The Snow Bear (Snugs Series #1))
It wasn’t until the final years of her life that Neville and Patsie became almost reunited. Neville now lived a few hundred yards from the house that I grew up in as a teenager on the Isle of Wight, and Patsie in her old age would spend long summers living with us there as well. The two of them would take walks together and sit on the bench overlooking the sea. But Neville always struggled to let her in close again, despite her warmth and tenderness to him. Neville had held fifty years of pain after losing her, and such pain is hard to ignore. As a young man I would often watch her slip her fingers into his giant hand, and it was beautiful to see. I learned two very strong lessons from them: the grass isn’t always greener elsewhere, and true love is worth fighting for.
Bear Grylls (Mud, Sweat and Tears)
Girls aside, the other thing I found in the last few years of being at school, was a quiet, but strong Christian faith – and this touched me profoundly, setting up a relationship or faith that has followed me ever since. I am so grateful for this. It has provided me with a real anchor to my life and has been the secret strength to so many great adventures since. But it came to me very simply one day at school, aged only sixteen. As a young kid, I had always found that a faith in God was so natural. It was a simple comfort to me: unquestioning and personal. But once I went to school and was forced to sit through somewhere in the region of nine hundred dry, Latin-liturgical, chapel services, listening to stereotypical churchy people droning on, I just thought that I had got the whole faith deal wrong. Maybe God wasn’t intimate and personal but was much more like chapel was … tedious, judgemental, boring and irrelevant. The irony was that if chapel was all of those things, a real faith is the opposite. But somehow, and without much thought, I had thrown the beautiful out with the boring. If church stinks, then faith must do, too. The precious, natural, instinctive faith I had known when I was younger was tossed out with this newly found delusion that because I was growing up, it was time to ‘believe’ like a grown-up. I mean, what does a child know about faith? It took a low point at school, when my godfather, Stephen, died, to shake me into searching a bit harder to re-find this faith I had once known. Life is like that. Sometimes it takes a jolt to make us sit and remember who and what we are really about. Stephen had been my father’s best friend in the world. And he was like a second father to me. He came on all our family holidays, and spent almost every weekend down with us in the Isle of Wight in the summer, sailing with Dad and me. He died very suddenly and without warning, of a heart attack in Johannesburg. I was devastated. I remember sitting up a tree one night at school on my own, and praying the simplest, most heartfelt prayer of my life. ‘Please, God, comfort me.’ Blow me down … He did. My journey ever since has been trying to make sure I don’t let life or vicars or church over-complicate that simple faith I had found. And the more of the Christian faith I discover, the more I realize that, at heart, it is simple. (What a relief it has been in later life to find that there are some great church communities out there, with honest, loving friendships that help me with all of this stuff.) To me, my Christian faith is all about being held, comforted, forgiven, strengthened and loved – yet somehow that message gets lost on most of us, and we tend only to remember the religious nutters or the God of endless school assemblies. This is no one’s fault, it is just life. Our job is to stay open and gentle, so we can hear the knocking on the door of our heart when it comes. The irony is that I never meet anyone who doesn’t want to be loved or held or forgiven. Yet I meet a lot of folk who hate religion. And I so sympathize. But so did Jesus. In fact, He didn’t just sympathize, He went much further. It seems more like this Jesus came to destroy religion and to bring life. This really is the heart of what I found as a young teenager: Christ comes to make us free, to bring us life in all its fullness. He is there to forgive us where we have messed up (and who hasn’t), and to be the backbone in our being. Faith in Christ has been the great empowering presence in my life, helping me walk strong when so often I feel so weak. It is no wonder I felt I had stumbled on something remarkable that night up that tree. I had found a calling for my life.
Bear Grylls (Mud, Sweat and Tears)
My time at Eton did develop in me a character trait that is essentially, I guess, very English: the notion that it is best to be the sort of person who messes about and plays the fool but who, when it really matters, is tough to the core. I think it goes back to the English Scarlet Pimpernel mentality: the nobility of aspiring to be the hidden hero. (In fact, I am sure it is no coincidence that over the years, so many senior SAS officers have also been Old Etonians. Now explain that one, when the SAS really is the ultimate meritocracy? No school tie can earn you a place there. That comes only with sweat and hard work. But the SAS also attracts a certain personality and attitude. It favors the individual, the maverick, and the quietly talented. That was Eton for you, too.) This is essentially a very English ethos: work hard, play hard; be modest; do your job to your utmost, laugh at yourself; and sometimes, if you have to, cuff it. I found that these qualities were ones that I loved in others, and they were qualities that subconsciously I was aspiring to in myself--whether I knew it or not. One truth never changed for me at Eton: however much I threw myself into life there, the bare fact was that I still really lived for the holidays--to be back at home with my mum and dad, and Lara, in the Isle of Wight. It was always where my heart really was.
Bear Grylls (Mud, Sweat and Tears)
Over the next few days we spent every waking moment together. We made up silly dances, did puzzles in the evening, and she stood smiling on the beach waiting for me as I took my customary New Year’s dip in the freezing cold North Atlantic. I just had a sense that we were meant to be. I even found out she lived in the next-door road along from where I was renting a room from a friend in London. What were the chances of that? As the week drew to a close we both got ready to head back south to London. She was flying. I was driving. “I’ll beat you to London,” I challenged her. She smiled knowingly. “No, you won’t.” (But I love your spirit.) She, of course, won. It took me ten hours to drive. But at 10:00 P.M. that same night I turned up at her door and knocked. She answered in her pajamas. “Damn, you were right,” I said, laughing. “Shall we go for some supper together?” “I’m in my pajamas, Bear.” “I know, and you look amazing. Put a coat on. Come on.” And so she did. Our first date, and Shara in her pajamas. Now here was a cool girl. From then on we were rarely apart. I delivered love letters to her office by day and persuaded her to take endless afternoons off. We roller-skated in the parks, and I took her down to the Isle of Wight for the weekends. Mum and Dad had since moved to my grandfather’s old house in Dorset, and had rented out our cottage on the island. But we still had an old caravan parked down the side of the house, hidden under a load of bushes, so any of the family could sneak into it when they wanted. The floors were rotten and the bath full of bugs, but neither Shara nor I cared. It was heaven just to be together. Within a week I knew she was the one for me and within a fortnight we had told each other that we loved each other, heart and soul. Deep down I knew that this was going to make having to go away to Everest for three and a half months very hard. But if I survived, I promised myself that I would marry this girl.
Bear Grylls (Mud, Sweat and Tears)
Ken Wharfe Before Diana disappeared from sight, I called her on the radio. Her voice was bright and lively, and I knew instinctively that she was happy, and safe. I walked back to the car and drove slowly along the only road that runs adjacent to the bay, with heath land and then the sea to my left and the waters of Poole Harbour running up toward Wareham, a small market town, to my right. Within a matter of minutes, I was turning into the car park of the Bankes Arms, a fine old pub that overlooks the bay. I left the car and strolled down to the beach, where I sat on an old wall in the bright sunshine. The beach huts were locked, and there was no sign of life. To my right I could see the Old Harry Rocks--three tall pinnacles of chalk standing in the sea, all that remains, at the landward end, of a ridge that once ran due east to the Isle of Wight. Like the Princess, I, too, just wanted to carry on walking. Suddenly, my radio crackled into life: “Ken, it’s me--can you hear me?” I fumbled in the large pockets of my old jacket, grabbed the radio, and said, “Yes. How is it going?” “Ken, this is amazing, I can’t believe it,” she said, sounding truly happy. Genuinely pleased for her, I hesitated before replying, but before I could speak she called again, this time with that characteristic mischievous giggle in her voice. “You never told me about the nudist colony!” she yelled, and laughed raucously over the radio. I laughed, too--although what I actually thought was “Uh-oh!” But judging from her remarks, whatever she had seen had made her laugh. At this point, I decided to walk toward her, after a few minutes seeing her distinctive figure walking along the water’s edge toward me. Two dogs had joined her and she was throwing sticks into the sea for them to retrieve; there were no crowd barriers, no servants, no police, apart from me, and no overattentive officials. Not a single person had recognized her. For once, everything for the Princess was “normal.” During the seven years I had worked for her, this was an extraordinary moment, one I shall never forget.
Larry King (The People's Princess: Cherished Memories of Diana, Princess of Wales, from Those Who Knew Her Best)
I look back now and can see how much my father also found his own freedom in the adventures we did together, whether it was galloping along a beach in the Isle of Wight with me behind him, or climbing on the steep hills and cliffs around the island’s coast. It was at times like these that I found a real intimacy with him. It was also where I learned to recognize that tightening sensation, deep in the pit of my stomach, as being a great thing to follow in life. Some call it fear. I remember the joy of climbing with him in the wintertime. It was always an adventure and often turned into much more than just a climb. Dad would determine that not only did we have to climb a sheer hundred-and-fifty-foot chalk cliff, but also that German paratroopers held the high ground. We therefore had to climb the cliff silently and unseen, and then grenade the German fire position once at the summit. In reality this meant lobbing clumps of manure toward a deserted bench on the cliff tops. Brilliant. What a great way to spend a wet and windy winter’s day when you are age eight (or twenty-eight, for that matter). I loved returning from the cliff climbs totally caked in mud, out of breath, having scared ourselves a little. I learned to love that feeling of the wind and rain blowing hard on my face. It made me feel like a man, when in reality I was a little boy. We also used to talk about Mount Everest, as we walked across the fields toward the cliffs. I loved to pretend that some of our climbs were on the summit face of Everest itself. We would move together cautiously across the white chalk faces, imagining they were really ice. I had this utter confidence that I could climb Everest if he were beside me. I had no idea what Everest would really involve but I loved the dream together. These were powerful, magical times. Bonding. Intimate. Fun. And I miss them a lot even today. How good it would feel to get the chance to do that with him just once more. I think that is why I find it often so emotional taking my own boys hiking or climbing nowadays. Mountains create powerful bonds between people. It is their great appeal to me. But it wasn’t just climbing. Dad and I would often go to the local stables and hire a couple of horses for a tenner and go jumping the breakwaters along the beach. Every time I fell off in the wet sand and was on the verge of bursting into tears, Dad would applaud me and say that I was slowly becoming a horseman. In other words, you can’t become a decent horseman until you fall off and get up again a good number of times. There’s life in a nutshell.
Bear Grylls (Mud, Sweat and Tears)
UKIP SHIPPING FORECAST by Nicholas Pegg After a UKIP councillor claimed widespread flooding in the UK was God’s punishment for allowing same-sex marriage, author/performer Nicholas Pegg wrote his own version of the Shipping Forecast. His recording went viral, receiving 250,000 hits in four days. ‘And now the shipping forecast issued by UKIP on Sunday the 19 January 2014 at 1200 UTC. There are warnings of gays in Viking, Forties, Cromarty, Southeast Iceland and Bongo Bongo land. The general synopsis at midday: Low intelligence expected, becoming Little England by midnight tonight. And now the area forecasts for the next 24 hours. Viking, North Utsire, South Utsire: south easterly gay seven to severe gay nine, occasionally bisexual. Showers – gay. Forties, Cromarty, Forth, Tyne, Dogger, Fisher: women veering southerly 4 or 5, losing their identity and becoming sluts. Rain – moderate or gay. German blight, immigration veering north – figures variable, becoming psychotic. Showers – gay. Humber, Thames, Dover, Wight, Portland, Plymouth: benefit tourism 98%, becoming variable – later slight, or imaginary. Showers – gay. Biscay, Trafalgar: warm, lingering nationalism. Kiss me Hardy, later becoming heterosexual – good. FitzRoy, Sole, Lundy, Fastnet, Irish Sea, Shannon, Rockall, Malin, Hebrides, Bailey: right or extreme right, veering racist 4 or 5, increasing to 5 to 7. Homophobic outburst – back-peddling westerly and becoming untenable. Showers – gay. Fair Isle, Faeroes, South East Iceland: powerbase decreasing, variable – becoming unelectable. Good. And that concludes the forecast.
Nic Compton (The Shipping Forecast: A Miscellany)
the Isle of Wight, with occasional visits to
Mary S. Lovell (The Churchills: In Love and War)
Pretty soon after returning from Everest, I was asked to give a lecture on the Everest expedition to my local sailing club in the Isle of Wight. It would be the first of many lectures that I would eventually give, and would soon become my main source of income after returning from the mountain. Those early talks were pretty ropey, though, by anyone’s standards. That first one went okay, mainly due to the heavy number of family members in the audience. Dad cried, Mum cried, Lara cried. Everyone was proud and happy. The next talk was to a group of soldiers on a course with the SAS. I took one of my old buddies along with me for moral support. Huge Mackenzie-Smith always jokes to this day how, by the time I finished, the entire room had fallen asleep. (They had been up all night on an exercise, I hasten to add--but still--it wasn’t my finest hour.) We had to wake them--one by one. I had a lot to learn about communicating a story if I was to earn any sort of a living by giving talks.
Bear Grylls (Mud, Sweat and Tears)
Jones had a dog; it had a chain; Not often worn, not causing pain; But, as the I.K.L. had passed Their 'Unleashed Cousins Act’ at last, Inspectors took the chain away; Whereat the canine barked ‘Hooray!’ At which, of course, the S.P.U. (Whose Nervous Motorists’ Bill was through) Were forced to give the dog in charge For being Audibly at Large. None, you will say, were now annoyed, Save, haply, Jones - the yard was void. But something being in the lease About ‘alarms to aid the police,’ The U.S.U. annexed the yard For having no sufficient guard. Now if there’s one condition The C.C.P. are strong upon It is that every house one buys Must have a yard for exercise; So Jones, as tenant, was unfit, His state of health was proof of it. Two doctors of the T.T.U.'s Told him his legs, from long disuse, Were atrophied; and saying ‘So From step to higher step we go Till everything is New and True.’ They cut his legs off and withdrew. You know the E.T.S.T.'s views Are stronger than the T.T.U.'s: And soon (as one may say) took wing The Arms, though not the Man, I sing. To see him sitting limbless there Was more than the K.K. could bear. 'In mercy silence with all speed That mouth there are no hands to feed; What cruel sentimentalist, O Jones, would doom thee to exist - Clinging to selfish Selfhood yet? Weak one! Such reasoning might upset The Pump Act, and the accumulation Of all constructive legislation; Let us construct you up a bit ­­- ' The head fell off when it was hit: Then words did rise and honest doubt, And four Commissioners sat about Whether the slash that left him dead Cut off his body or his head. An author in the Isle of Wight Observed with unconcealed delight A land of just and old renown Where Freedom slowly broadened down From Precedent to Precedent. And this, I think, was what he meant.
G.K. Chesterton (Poems by G. K. Chesterton)
13. You Can’t Become A Horseman Until You’ve Fallen Off A Horse When I was a kid, my dad and I would often rent a couple of horses and go riding on the beaches of the Isle of Wight where I grew up. They are some of my best childhood memories, even though there were many times I fell off on to the hard wet sand. But just as I was about to burst into tears, my dad would then start to applaud me. Applaud the fall? But why? Dad wanted me to understand that I could only become a horseman if I had fallen off a horse a few times - that we only become good at something when we do it enough. That means there will be times when we get thrown off and find ourselves face down in the mud. Life is much the same. It’s a vital lesson for almost any path we choose to take in life: whatever you want to do, the chances are that if it is worth doing it will be difficult. We all fall off a few horses. And getting thrown to the ground by the unexpected is a big part of learning how to ride. It is how to get good at something - don’t be afraid to make mistakes. So see the inevitable setbacks and mishaps as vital parts of the learning process. The stumbles teach us more about how to stay up than they do about falling down.
Bear Grylls (A Survival Guide for Life: How to Achieve Your Goals, Thrive in Adversity, and Grow in Character)
Do our possessions mourn us? Do electric sheep dream of Roy Batter? Will my coat, riddled with holes, remember the rich hours of our companionship? Asleep on buses from Vienna to Prague, nights at the opera, walks by the sea, the grave of Swinburne in the Isle of Wight, the arcades of Paris, the caverns of Luray, the cafés of Buenos Aires. Human experience bound in its threats. How many poems bleeding from its ragged sleeves? I averted my eyes just for a moment, drawn by another coat that was warmer and softer, but that I did not love. Why is it that we lose the things we love, and things cavalier cling to us and will be the measure of our worth after we're gone?
Patti Smith (M Train)
Thirty-nine years later the spellbinding performance was released, along with Lerner’s footage, on the CD/DVD Leonard Cohen: Live at the Isle of Wight 1970. A
Sylvie Simmons (I'm Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen)
Ken Wharfe In 1987, Ken Wharfe was appointed a personal protection officer to Diana. In charge of the Princess’s around-the-clock security at home and abroad, in public and in private, Ken Wharfe became a close friend and loyal confidant who shared her most private moments. After Diana’s death, Inspector Wharfe was honored by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace and made a Member of the Victorian Order, a personal gift of the sovereign for his loyal service to her family. His book, Diana: Closely Guarded Secret, is a Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller. He is a regular contributor with the BBC, ITN, Sky News, NBC, CBS, and CNN, participating in numerous outside broadcasts and documentaries for BBC--Newsnight, Channel 4 News, Channel 5 News, News 24, and GMTV. My memory of Diana is not her at an official function, dazzling with her looks and clothes and the warmth of her manner, or even of her offering comfort among the sick, the poor, and the dispossessed. What I remember best is a young woman taking a walk in a beautiful place, unrecognized, carefree, and happy. Diana increasingly craved privacy, a chance “to be normal,” to have the opportunity to do what, in her words, “ordinary people” do every day of their lives--go shopping, see friends, go on holiday, and so on--away from the formality and rituals of royal life. As someone responsible for her security, yet understanding her frustration, I was sympathetic. So when in the spring of the year in which she would finally be separated from her husband, Prince Charles, she yet again raised the suggestion of being able to take a walk by herself, I agreed that such a simple idea could be realized. Much of my childhood had been spent on the Isle of Purbeck in Dorset, a county in southern England approximately 120 miles from London; I remembered the wonderful sandy beaches of Studland Bay, on the approach to Poole Harbour. The idea of walking alone on miles of almost deserted sandy beach was something Diana had not even dared dream about. At this time she was receiving full twenty-four-hour protection, and it was at my discretion how many officers should be assigned to her protection. “How will you manage it, Ken? What about the backup?” she asked. I explained that this venture would require us to trust each other, and she looked at me for a moment and nodded her agreement. And so, early one morning less than a week later, we left Kensington Palace and drove to the Sandbanks ferry at Poole in an ordinary saloon car. As we gazed at the coastline from the shabby viewing deck of the vintage chain ferry, Diana’s excitement was obvious, yet not one of the other passengers recognized her. But then, no one would have expected the most photographed woman in the world to be aboard the Studland chain ferry on a sunny spring morning in May. As the ferry docked after its short journey, we climbed back into the car and then, once the ramp had been lowered, drove off in a line of cars and service trucks heading for Studland and Swanage. Diana was driving, and I asked her to stop in a sand-covered area about half a mile from the ferry landing point. We left the car and walked a short distance across a wooded bridge that spanned a reed bed to the deserted beach of Shell Bay. Her simple pleasure at being somewhere with no one, apart from me, knowing her whereabouts was touching to see. Diana looked out toward the Isle of Wight, anxious by now to set off on her walk to the Old Harry Rocks at the western extremity of Studland Bay. I gave her a personal two-way radio and a sketch map of the shoreline she could expect to see, indicating a landmark near some beach huts at the far end of the bay, a tavern or pub, called the Bankes Arms, where I would meet her.
Larry King (The People's Princess: Cherished Memories of Diana, Princess of Wales, from Those Who Knew Her Best)
Ken Wharfe In 1987, Ken Wharfe was appointed a personal protection officer to Diana. In charge of the Princess’s around-the-clock security at home and abroad, in public and in private, Ken Wharfe became a close friend and loyal confidant who shared her most private moments. After Diana’s death, Inspector Wharfe was honored by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace and made a Member of the Victorian Order, a personal gift of the sovereign for his loyal service to her family. His book, Diana: Closely Guarded Secret, is a Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller. He is a regular contributor with the BBC, ITN, Sky News, NBC, CBS, and CNN, participating in numerous outside broadcasts and documentaries for BBC--Newsnight, Channel 4 News, Channel 5 News, News 24, and GMTV. And so, early one morning less than a week later, we left Kensington Palace and drove to the Sandbanks ferry at Poole in an ordinary saloon car. As we gazed at the coastline from the shabby viewing deck of the vintage chain ferry, Diana’s excitement was obvious, yet not one of the other passengers recognized her. But then, no one would have expected the most photographed woman in the world to be aboard the Studland chain ferry on a sunny spring morning in May. As the ferry docked after its short journey, we climbed back into the car and then, once the ramp had been lowered, drove off in a line of cars and service trucks heading for Studland and Swanage. Diana was driving, and I asked her to stop in a sand-covered area about half a mile from the ferry landing point. We left the car and walked a short distance across a wooded bridge that spanned a reed bed to the deserted beach of Shell Bay. Her simple pleasure at being somewhere with no one, apart from me, knowing her whereabouts was touching to see. Diana looked out toward the Isle of Wight, anxious by now to set off on her walk to the Old Harry Rocks at the western extremity of Studland Bay. I gave her a personal two-way radio and a sketch map of the shoreline she could expect to see, indicating a landmark near some beach huts at the far end of the bay, a tavern or pub, called the Bankes Arms, where I would meet her. She set off at once, a tall figure clad in a pair of blue denim jeans, a dark-blue suede jacket, and a soft scarf wrapped loosely around her face to protect her from the chilling, easterly spring wind. I stood and watched as she slowly dwindled in the distance, her head held high, alone apart from busy oyster catchers that followed her along the water’s edge. It was a strange sensation watching her walking away by herself, with no bodyguards following at a discreet distance. What were my responsibilities here? I kept thinking. Yet I knew this area well, and not once did I feel uneasy. I had made this decision--not one of my colleagues knew. Senior officers at Scotland Yard would most certainly have boycotted the idea had I been foolish enough to give them advance notice of what the Princess and I were up to.
Larry King (The People's Princess: Cherished Memories of Diana, Princess of Wales, from Those Who Knew Her Best)
Ken Wharfe In 1987, Ken Wharfe was appointed a personal protection officer to Diana. In charge of the Princess’s around-the-clock security at home and abroad, in public and in private, Ken Wharfe became a close friend and loyal confidant who shared her most private moments. After Diana’s death, Inspector Wharfe was honored by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace and made a Member of the Victorian Order, a personal gift of the sovereign for his loyal service to her family. His book, Diana: Closely Guarded Secret, is a Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller. He is a regular contributor with the BBC, ITN, Sky News, NBC, CBS, and CNN, participating in numerous outside broadcasts and documentaries for BBC--Newsnight, Channel 4 News, Channel 5 News, News 24, and GMTV. Diana looked out toward the Isle of Wight, anxious by now to set off on her walk to the Old Harry Rocks at the western extremity of Studland Bay. I gave her a personal two-way radio and a sketch map of the shoreline she could expect to see, indicating a landmark near some beach huts at the far end of the bay, a tavern or pub, called the Bankes Arms, where I would meet her. She set off at once, a tall figure clad in a pair of blue denim jeans, a dark-blue suede jacket, and a soft scarf wrapped loosely around her face to protect her from the chilling, easterly spring wind. I stood and watched as she slowly dwindled in the distance, her head held high, alone apart from busy oyster catchers that followed her along the water’s edge.
Larry King (The People's Princess: Cherished Memories of Diana, Princess of Wales, from Those Who Knew Her Best)
Ken Wharfe In 1987, Ken Wharfe was appointed a personal protection officer to Diana. In charge of the Princess’s around-the-clock security at home and abroad, in public and in private, Ken Wharfe became a close friend and loyal confidant who shared her most private moments. After Diana’s death, Inspector Wharfe was honored by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace and made a Member of the Victorian Order, a personal gift of the sovereign for his loyal service to her family. His book, Diana: Closely Guarded Secret, is a Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller. He is a regular contributor with the BBC, ITN, Sky News, NBC, CBS, and CNN, participating in numerous outside broadcasts and documentaries for BBC--Newsnight, Channel 4 News, Channel 5 News, News 24, and GMTV. It was a strange sensation watching her walking away by herself, with no bodyguards following at a discreet distance. What were my responsibilities here? I kept thinking. Yet I knew this area well, and not once did I feel uneasy. I had made this decision--not one of my colleagues knew. Senior officers at Scotland Yard would most certainly have boycotted the idea had I been foolish enough to give them advance notice of what the Princess and I were up to. Before Diana disappeared from sight, I called her on the radio. Her voice was bright and lively, and I knew instinctively that she was happy, and safe. I walked back to the car and drove slowly along the only road that runs adjacent to the bay, with heath land and then the sea to my left and the waters of Poole Harbour running up toward Wareham, a small market town, to my right. Within a matter of minutes, I was turning into the car park of the Bankes Arms, a fine old pub that overlooks the bay. I left the car and strolled down to the beach, where I sat on an old wall in the bright sunshine. The beach huts were locked, and there was no sign of life. To my right I could see the Old Harry Rocks--three tall pinnacles of chalk standing in the sea, all that remains, at the landward end, of a ridge that once ran due east to the Isle of Wight. Like the Princess, I, too, just wanted to carry on walking. Suddenly, my radio crackled into life: “Ken, it’s me--can you hear me?” I fumbled in the large pockets of my old jacket, grabbed the radio, and said, “Yes. How is it going?” “Ken, this is amazing, I can’t believe it,” she said, sounding truly happy. Genuinely pleased for her, I hesitated before replying, but before I could speak she called again, this time with that characteristic mischievous giggle in her voice. “You never told me about the nudist colony!” she yelled, and laughed raucously over the radio. I laughed, too--although what I actually thought was “Uh-oh!” But judging from her remarks, whatever she had seen had made her laugh. At this point, I decided to walk toward her, after a few minutes seeing her distinctive figure walking along the water’s edge toward me. Two dogs had joined her and she was throwing sticks into the sea for them to retrieve; there were no crowd barriers, no servants, no police, apart from me, and no overattentive officials. Not a single person had recognized her. For once, everything for the Princess was “normal.” During the seven years I had worked for her, this was an extraordinary moment, one I shall never forget.
Larry King (The People's Princess: Cherished Memories of Diana, Princess of Wales, from Those Who Knew Her Best)
We were now receiving daily very accurate weather reports from the Bracknell Weather Centre in the UK. These gave us the most advanced precision forecast available anywhere in the world. The meteorologists were able to determine wind strengths to within five knots accuracy at every thousand feet of altitude. Our lives would depend on these forecasts back up the mountain. Each morning, the entire team would crowd eagerly around the laptop to see what the skies were bringing--but it did not look good. Those early signs of the monsoon arriving in the Himalayas, the time when the strong winds over Everest’s summit begin to rise, didn’t seem to be coming. All we could do was wait. Our tents were very much now home to us at base camp. We had all our letters and little reminders from our families. I had a seashell I had taken from a beach on the Isle of Wight, in which Shara had written my favorite verse--one I had depended on so much through the military. “Be sure of this, that I am with you always, even unto the end of the earth.” Matthew 28:20. I reread it every night at base camp before I went to sleep. There was no shame in needing any help up here.
Bear Grylls (Mud, Sweat and Tears)
Germany - Tübingen, Stuttgart, Rottenburg am Neckar, Nuremberg, Vaduz, Füssen. Switzerland – Lucerne. United Kingdom – London, Isle of Wight.
Young (Unbridled (A Harem Boy's Saga, #2))
I know people have swum the 3.5 mile stretch of the Solent from the Isle of Wight to the mainland for charity, and some just for the hell of it in the Cross Solent Swim, but this was at night, in the dark and without the help of a nearby boat to haul me in to safety. I didn’t have the benefit of tidal maps, accompanied swimming mates in near perfect conditions or the likes. I only my strength of determination and the beckoning lights on the mainland to aim for.
Stephen Richards (Psycho Stephen)
In January 1995 three prisoners, two category ‘A’ prisoners and a lifer escaped from Parkhurst Prison on the Isle of Wight. After four days of freedom they were recaptured. My length of freedom far surpassed theirs.
Stephen Richards (Psycho Stephen)
The far more dependable Bede, writing from the monastery at Jarrow, completed his Ecclesiastical History of the English People in 731. It is thanks to him that we are able to differentiate between the three tribes of ‘barbarians’, namely Saxons, Angles and Jutes. According to Bede, Jutes from the Jutland peninsula of northern Denmark occupied Kent and the Isle of Wight, while Saxons from Saxony in north-west Germany settled in southern England. They eventually differentiated into the East Saxons, in Essex, the Mid-Saxons farther west (and remembered in the now vanished county of Middlesex) and the West Saxons of Wessex, which was much later divided into Hampshire, Wiltshire and Dorset. The Angles, originally located in Angeln in southern Denmark, between Saxony and Jutland, took over East Anglia, as well as the Midlands, which became Mercia, and Northumbria in the north-east.
Bryan Sykes (Saxons, Vikings, and Celts: The Genetic Roots of Britain and Ireland)
Wondering what was going on in her restless brain, Gabriel stroked back a lock of loose hair that clung to her cheek. “What are you thinking about?” he asked. “The wedding? Your family?” “A rhombus,” Pandora said absently. His brows lifted. “You’re referring to the parallelogram with opposite equal obtuse angles?” “Yes, Cousin West told me the Isle of Wight is shaped like a rhombus. I was just thinking that if ‘rhombus’ were an adjective . . .” Raising a gloved hand to her chin, Pandora tapped her fingertips against her lips. “It would be rhombuseous.” Gabriel toyed with a tiny silk flower on her hat. “Rhombusphobia,” he said, entering into the game. “Fear of rhombus.” That earned him a spontaneous grin. Her deep blue eyes became places to frolic and revel in. “Rhombusolotry. Worship of rhombus.
Lisa Kleypas (Devil in Spring (The Ravenels, #3))
Will the injured person make a successful by a Pittsburgh Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the company if an accident occurs while visiting a historic site in Virginiabeach ? Many of you may be members of English Heritage or the National Trust in the Virginiabeach . These wonderful organisations, including historic castles and ancient ruins, help to preserve some of our national treasures. A nice day out visiting one of these places can't beat you. An accident on such a day out might, however, result in tragedy. When an accident happens, will the injured individual make a successful claim by a Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the organisation for personal injury? Accident at Castle Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight Mr Taylor, aged almost 60, visited the castle on 11 April 2011. He chose to walk down an informal path leading to a grass path below from an elevated canon firing platform.Sadly, Mr. Taylor lost his balance and plunged into a moat over a wall. He dropped about 12 feet and sustained a severe injury to his head.The Case against English Heritage by Mr Taylor made a lawsuit against English Heritage for personal injuries by Virginiabeach personal injury lawyer. His case was that the area was unsafe and, by means of a warning, he should have been warned of the risk. He believed that he was lured unknowingly down the path successfully without fully appreciating the possibility of falling a considerable distance. Wasn't any of it really his own fault? Do English Heritage and the like have to put up signs warning of dangers everywhere? The Court of Appeal Chamber at the Court of Appeal, English Heritage appealed. malpractice attorney injury lawyer #personalinjurylawyerPittsburgh #carcrash #injured #legaladvice #accidentattorney #caraccidentattorney #injuryattorney #legalservices #covid #lawyerup #injurylawyers #chiropractor #lawoffice #personalinjurylawfirm #criminaldefense #florida #miami #accidents #legalhelp #freeconsultation #injuryrecovery #PersonalInjuryLawyer #LawyersNearMe
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Will the injured person make a successful by a Sanbernardino Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the company if an accident occurs while visiting a historic site in Sanbernardino ? Many of you may be members of English Heritage or the National Trust in the Sanbernardino . These wonderful organisations, including historic castles and ancient ruins, help to preserve some of our national treasures. A nice day out visiting one of these places can't beat you. An accident on such a day out might, however, result in tragedy. When an accident happens, will the injured individual make a successful claim by a Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the organisation for personal injury? Accident at Castle Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight Mr Taylor, aged almost 60, visited the castle on 11 April 2011. He chose to walk down an informal path leading to a grass path below from an elevated canon firing platform.Sadly, Mr. Taylor lost his balance and plunged into a moat over a wall. He dropped about 12 feet and sustained a severe injury to his head.The Case against English Heritage by Mr Taylor made a lawsuit against English Heritage for personal injuries by Sanbernardino personal injury lawyer. His case was that the area was unsafe and, by means of a warning, he should have been warned of the risk. He believed that he was lured unknowingly down the path successfully without fully appreciating the possibility of falling a considerable distance. Wasn't any of it really his own fault? Do English Heritage and the like have to put up signs warning of dangers everywhere? The Court of Appeal Chamber at the Court of Appeal, English Heritage appealed.personal injury attorney where necessary, put up signs where the risks warrant doing so, We must all accept responsibility for ourselves while enjoying our days out. We should not hope to make a successful claim for personal injuries because our fault really was the accident. We should hope, however, that English Heritage and other organisations can take fair steps to take care of our safety so that days out do not end in disaster. malpractice attorney injury lawyer #personalinjurylawyerSanbernardino #carcrash #injured #legaladvice #accidentattorney #caraccidentattorney #injuryattorney #legalservices #covid #lawyerup #injurylawyers #chiropractor #lawoffice #personalinjurylawfirm #criminaldefense #florida #miami #accidents #legalhelp #freeconsultation #injuryrecovery #PersonalInjuryLawyer #LawyersNearMe
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Will the injured person make a successful by a Sanantonio Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the company if an accident occurs while visiting a historic site in Sanantonio ? Many of you may be members of English Heritage or the National Trust in the Sanantonio . These wonderful organisations, including historic castles and ancient ruins, help to preserve some of our national treasures. A nice day out visiting one of these places can't beat you. An accident on such a day out might, however, result in tragedy. When an accident happens, will the injured individual make a successful claim by a Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the organisation for personal injury? Accident at Castle Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight Mr Taylor, aged almost 60, visited the castle on 11 April 2011. He chose to walk down an informal path leading to a grass path below from an elevated canon firing platform.Sadly, Mr. Taylor lost his balance and plunged into a moat over a wall. He dropped about 12 feet and sustained a severe injury to his head.The Case against English Heritage by Mr Taylor made a lawsuit against English Heritage for personal injuries by Sanantonio personal injury lawyer. His case was that the area was unsafe and, by means of a warning, he should have been warned of the risk. He believed that he was lured unknowingly down the path successfully without fully appreciating the possibility of falling a considerable distance. Wasn't any of it really his own fault? Do English Heritage and the like have to put up signs warning of dangers everywhere? The Court of Appeal Chamber at the Court of Appeal, English Heritage appealed.personal injury attorney where necessary, put up signs where the risks warrant doing so, We must all accept responsibility for ourselves while enjoying our days out. We should not hope to make a successful claim for personal injuries because our fault really was the accident. We should hope, however, that English Heritage and other organisations can take fair steps to take care of our safety so that days out do not end in disaster. malpractice attorney injury lawyer #personalinjurylawyerSanantonio #carcrash #injured #legaladvice #accidentattorney #caraccidentattorney #injuryattorney #legalservices #covid #lawyerup #injurylawyers #chiropractor #lawoffice #personalinjurylawfirm #criminaldefense #florida #miami #accidents #legalhelp #freeconsultation #injuryrecovery #PersonalInjuryLawyer #LawyersNearMe
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Will the injured person make a successful by a Richmond Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the company if an accident occurs while visiting a historic site in Richmond ? Many of you may be members of English Heritage or the National Trust in the Richmond . These wonderful organisations, including historic castles and ancient ruins, help to preserve some of our national treasures. A nice day out visiting one of these places can't beat you. An accident on such a day out might, however, result in tragedy. When an accident happens, will the injured individual make a successful claim by a Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the organisation for personal injury? Accident at Castle Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight Mr Taylor, aged almost 60, visited the castle on 11 April 2011. He chose to walk down an informal path leading to a grass path below from an elevated canon firing platform.Sadly, Mr. Taylor lost his balance and plunged into a moat over a wall. He dropped about 12 feet and sustained a severe injury to his head.The Case against English Heritage by Mr Taylor made a lawsuit against English Heritage for personal injuries by Richmond personal injury lawyer. His case was that the area was unsafe and, by means of a warning, he should have been warned of the risk. He believed that he was lured unknowingly down the path successfully without fully appreciating the possibility of falling a considerable distance. Wasn't any of it really his own fault? Do English Heritage and the like have to put up signs warning of dangers everywhere? The Court of Appeal Chamber at the Court of Appeal, English Heritage appealed.personal injury attorney where necessary, put up signs where the risks warrant doing so, We must all accept responsibility for ourselves while enjoying our days out. We should not hope to make a successful claim for personal injuries because our fault really was the accident. We should hope, however, that English Heritage and other organisations can take fair steps to take care of our safety so that days out do not end in disaster. malpractice attorney injury lawyer #personalinjurylawyerRichmond #carcrash #injured #legaladvice #accidentattorney #caraccidentattorney #injuryattorney #legalservices #covid #lawyerup #injurylawyers #chiropractor #lawoffice #personalinjurylawfirm #criminaldefense #florida #miami #accidents #legalhelp #freeconsultation #injuryrecovery #PersonalInjuryLawyer #LawyersNearMe
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Will the injured person make a successful by a Pueblo Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the company if an accident occurs while visiting a historic site in Pueblo ? Many of you may be members of English Heritage or the National Trust in the Pueblo . These wonderful organisations, including historic castles and ancient ruins, help to preserve some of our national treasures. A nice day out visiting one of these places can't beat you. An accident on such a day out might, however, result in tragedy. When an accident happens, will the injured individual make a successful claim by a Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the organisation for personal injury? Accident at Castle Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight Mr Taylor, aged almost 60, visited the castle on 11 April 2011. He chose to walk down an informal path leading to a grass path below from an elevated canon firing platform.Sadly, Mr. Taylor lost his balance and plunged into a moat over a wall. He dropped about 12 feet and sustained a severe injury to his head.The Case against English Heritage by Mr Taylor made a lawsuit against English Heritage for personal injuries by Pueblo personal injury lawyer. His case was that the area was unsafe and, by means of a warning, he should have been warned of the risk. He believed that he was lured unknowingly down the path successfully without fully appreciating the possibility of falling a considerable distance. Wasn't any of it really his own fault? Do English Heritage and the like have to put up signs warning of dangers everywhere? The Court of Appeal Chamber at the Court of Appeal, English Heritage appealed. malpractice attorney injury lawyer #personalinjurylawyerPueblo #carcrash #injured #legaladvice #accidentattorney #caraccidentattorney #injuryattorney #legalservices #covid #lawyerup #injurylawyers #chiropractor #lawoffice #personalinjurylawfirm #criminaldefense #florida #miami #accidents #legalhelp #freeconsultation #injuryrecovery #PersonalInjuryLawyer #LawyersNearMe
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Will the injured person make a successful by a Reno Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the company if an accident occurs while visiting a historic site in Reno ? Many of you may be members of English Heritage or the National Trust in the Reno . These wonderful organisations, including historic castles and ancient ruins, help to preserve some of our national treasures. A nice day out visiting one of these places can't beat you. An accident on such a day out might, however, result in tragedy. When an accident happens, will the injured individual make a successful claim by a Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the organisation for personal injury? Accident at Castle Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight Mr Taylor, aged almost 60, visited the castle on 11 April 2011. He chose to walk down an informal path leading to a grass path below from an elevated canon firing platform.Sadly, Mr. Taylor lost his balance and plunged into a moat over a wall. He dropped about 12 feet and sustained a severe injury to his head.The Case against English Heritage by Mr Taylor made a lawsuit against English Heritage for personal injuries by Reno personal injury lawyer. His case was that the area was unsafe and, by means of a warning, he should have been warned of the risk. He believed that he was lured unknowingly down the path successfully without fully appreciating the possibility of falling a considerable distance. Wasn't any of it really his own fault? Do English Heritage and the like have to put up signs warning of dangers everywhere? The Court of Appeal Chamber at the Court of Appeal, English Heritage appealed.personal injury attorney where necessary, put up signs where the risks warrant doing so, We must all accept responsibility for ourselves while enjoying our days out. We should not hope to make a successful claim for personal injuries because our fault really was the accident. We should hope, however, that English Heritage and other organisations can take fair steps to take care of our safety so that days out do not end in disaster. malpractice attorney injury lawyer #personalinjurylawyerReno #carcrash #injured #legaladvice #accidentattorney #caraccidentattorney #injuryattorney #legalservices #covid #lawyerup #injurylawyers #chiropractor #lawoffice #personalinjurylawfirm #criminaldefense #florida #miami #accidents #legalhelp #freeconsultation #injuryrecovery #PersonalInjuryLawyer #LawyersNearMe
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Will the injured person make a successful by a Pueblo Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the company if an accident occurs while visiting a historic site in Virginiabeach ? Many of you may be members of English Heritage or the National Trust in the Virginiabeach . These wonderful organisations, including historic castles and ancient ruins, help to preserve some of our national treasures. A nice day out visiting one of these places can't beat you. An accident on such a day out might, however, result in tragedy. When an accident happens, will the injured individual make a successful claim by a Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the organisation for personal injury? Accident at Castle Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight Mr Taylor, aged almost 60, visited the castle on 11 April 2011. He chose to walk down an informal path leading to a grass path below from an elevated canon firing platform.Sadly, Mr. Taylor lost his balance and plunged into a moat over a wall. He dropped about 12 feet and sustained a severe injury to his head.The Case against English Heritage by Mr Taylor made a lawsuit against English Heritage for personal injuries by Virginiabeach personal injury lawyer. His case was that the area was unsafe and, by means of a warning, he should have been warned of the risk. He believed that he was lured unknowingly down the path successfully without fully appreciating the possibility of falling a considerable distance. Wasn't any of it really his own fault? Do English Heritage and the like have to put up signs warning of dangers everywhere? The Court of Appeal Chamber at the Court of Appeal, English Heritage appealed. malpractice attorney injury lawyer #personalinjurylawyerPueblo #carcrash #injured #legaladvice #accidentattorney #caraccidentattorney #injuryattorney #legalservices #covid #lawyerup #injurylawyers #chiropractor #lawoffice #personalinjurylawfirm #criminaldefense #florida #miami #accidents #legalhelp #freeconsultation #injuryrecovery #PersonalInjuryLawyer #LawyersNearMe
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Will the injured person make a successful by a Sacramento Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the company if an accident occurs while visiting a historic site in Sacramento ? Many of you may be members of English Heritage or the National Trust in the Sacramento . These wonderful organisations, including historic castles and ancient ruins, help to preserve some of our national treasures. A nice day out visiting one of these places can't beat you. An accident on such a day out might, however, result in tragedy. When an accident happens, will the injured individual make a successful claim by a Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the organisation for personal injury? Accident at Castle Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight Mr Taylor, aged almost 60, visited the castle on 11 April 2011. He chose to walk down an informal path leading to a grass path below from an elevated canon firing platform.Sadly, Mr. Taylor lost his balance and plunged into a moat over a wall. He dropped about 12 feet and sustained a severe injury to his head.The Case against English Heritage by Mr Taylor made a lawsuit against English Heritage for personal injuries by Sacramento personal injury lawyer. His case was that the area was unsafe and, by means of a warning, he should have been warned of the risk. He believed that he was lured unknowingly down the path successfully without fully appreciating the possibility of falling a considerable distance. Wasn't any of it really his own fault? Do English Heritage and the like have to put up signs warning of dangers everywhere? The Court of Appeal Chamber at the Court of Appeal, English Heritage appealed.personal injury attorney where necessary, put up signs where the risks warrant doing so, We must all accept responsibility for ourselves while enjoying our days out. We should not hope to make a successful claim for personal injuries because our fault really was the accident. We should hope, however, that English Heritage and other organisations can take fair steps to take care of our safety so that days out do not end in disaster. malpractice attorney injury lawyer #personalinjurylawyerSacramento #carcrash #injured #legaladvice #accidentattorney #caraccidentattorney #injuryattorney #legalservices #covid #lawyerup #injurylawyers #chiropractor #lawoffice #personalinjurylawfirm #criminaldefense #florida #miami #accidents #legalhelp #freeconsultation #injuryrecovery #PersonalInjuryLawyer #LawyersNearMe
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Will the injured person make a successful by a Saintpetersburg Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the company if an accident occurs while visiting a historic site in Saintpetersburg ? Many of you may be members of English Heritage or the National Trust in the Saintpetersburg . These wonderful organisations, including historic castles and ancient ruins, help to preserve some of our national treasures. A nice day out visiting one of these places can't beat you. An accident on such a day out might, however, result in tragedy. When an accident happens, will the injured individual make a successful claim by a Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the organisation for personal injury? Accident at Castle Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight Mr Taylor, aged almost 60, visited the castle on 11 April 2011. He chose to walk down an informal path leading to a grass path below from an elevated canon firing platform.Sadly, Mr. Taylor lost his balance and plunged into a moat over a wall. He dropped about 12 feet and sustained a severe injury to his head.The Case against English Heritage by Mr Taylor made a lawsuit against English Heritage for personal injuries by Saintpetersburg personal injury lawyer. His case was that the area was unsafe and, by means of a warning, he should have been warned of the risk. He believed that he was lured unknowingly down the path successfully without fully appreciating the possibility of falling a considerable distance. Wasn't any of it really his own fault? Do English Heritage and the like have to put up signs warning of dangers everywhere? The Court of Appeal Chamber at the Court of Appeal, English Heritage appealed.personal injury attorney where necessary, put up signs where the risks warrant doing so, We must all accept responsibility for ourselves while enjoying our days out. We should not hope to make a successful claim for personal injuries because our fault really was the accident. We should hope, however, that English Heritage and other organisations can take fair steps to take care of our safety so that days out do not end in disaster. malpractice attorney injury lawyer #personalinjurylawyerSaintpetersburg #carcrash #injured #legaladvice #accidentattorney #caraccidentattorney #injuryattorney #legalservices #covid #lawyerup #injurylawyers #chiropractor #lawoffice #personalinjurylawfirm #criminaldefense #florida #miami #accidents #legalhelp #freeconsultation #injuryrecovery #PersonalInjuryLawyer #LawyersNearMe
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Will the injured person make a successful by a Saintlouis Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the company if an accident occurs while visiting a historic site in Saintlouis ? Many of you may be members of English Heritage or the National Trust in the Saintlouis . These wonderful organisations, including historic castles and ancient ruins, help to preserve some of our national treasures. A nice day out visiting one of these places can't beat you. An accident on such a day out might, however, result in tragedy. When an accident happens, will the injured individual make a successful claim by a Personal Injury Lawyers Near me against the organisation for personal injury? Accident at Castle Carisbrooke on the Isle of Wight Mr Taylor, aged almost 60, visited the castle on 11 April 2011. He chose to walk down an informal path leading to a grass path below from an elevated canon firing platform.Sadly, Mr. Taylor lost his balance and plunged into a moat over a wall. He dropped about 12 feet and sustained a severe injury to his head.The Case against English Heritage by Mr Taylor made a lawsuit against English Heritage for personal injuries by Saintlouis personal injury lawyer. His case was that the area was unsafe and, by means of a warning, he should have been warned of the risk. He believed that he was lured unknowingly down the path successfully without fully appreciating the possibility of falling a considerable distance. Wasn't any of it really his own fault? Do English Heritage and the like have to put up signs warning of dangers everywhere? The Court of Appeal Chamber at the Court of Appeal, English Heritage appealed.personal injury attorney where necessary, put up signs where the risks warrant doing so, We must all accept responsibility for ourselves while enjoying our days out. We should not hope to make a successful claim for personal injuries because our fault really was the accident. We should hope, however, that English Heritage and other organisations can take fair steps to take care of our safety so that days out do not end in disaster. malpractice attorney injury lawyer #personalinjurylawyerSaintlouis #carcrash #injured #legaladvice #accidentattorney #caraccidentattorney #injuryattorney #legalservices #covid #lawyerup #injurylawyers #chiropractor #lawoffice #personalinjurylawfirm #criminaldefense #florida #miami #accidents #legalhelp #freeconsultation #injuryrecovery #PersonalInjuryLawyer #LawyersNearMe
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When little Snugs looked out he saw that the roofs of the cottages, that nestled close to the lighthouse, were now completely white. At ground level, sleet was blowing over the garden, and along the paths. It wouldn’t be long before The Isle of Wight would be snow white – he was sure about that!
Suzy Davies (Snugs The Snow Bear (Snugs Series #1))
A static caravan is a type of caravaning holiday that uses buildings that have been vacant for some time. Generally, they are used by caravanners as an alternative to motorhomes. They offer many advantages over a touring caravan and can be purchased from a variety of locations. If you are looking for a static caravan for sale in the UK, the Internet can prove to be a useful tool to find one. The following list contains the latest sales of static caravans for sale in the Isle of Wight.
Static Caravans For Sale Isle Of Wight
And Mrs. Ali is so quintessentially Indian, or at least quintessentially Pakistani, in the best sense.” “Actually, I’m from Cambridge,” said Mrs. Ali in a mild voice. “The municipal hospital, ward three. Never been further abroad than the Isle of Wight.
Helen Simonson (Major Pettigrew's Last Stand)