Industrial Automation Quotes

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I would say, then, that you are faced with a future in which education is going to be number one amongst the great world industries.
R. Buckminster Fuller (Education Automation: Freeing the Scholar to Return to His Studies)
The more automated society gets and the more powerful the attacking AI becomes, the more devastating cyberwarfare can be. If you can hack and crash your enemy’s self-driving cars, auto-piloted planes, nuclear reactors, industrial robots, communication systems, financial systems and power grids, then you can effectively crash his economy and cripple his defenses. If you can hack some of his weapons systems as well, even better.
Max Tegmark (Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence)
The birth of the fast food industry coincided with Eisenhower-era glorifications of technology, with optimistic slogans like “Better Living through Chemistry” and “Our Friend the Atom.” The sort of technological wizardry that Walt Disney promoted on television and at Disneyland eventually reached its fulfillment in the kitchens of fast food restaurants. Indeed, the corporate culture of McDonald’s seems inextricably linked to that of the Disney empire, sharing a reverence for sleek machinery, electronics, and automation. The leading fast food chains still embrace a boundless faith in science—and as a result have changed not just what Americans eat, but also how their food is made.
Eric Schlosser (Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal)
(one study found that 88 percent of the loss of US manufacturing jobs between 2006 and 2013 was due to automation and related factors),69 it is easy to blame trade with other countries for hollowing out industrial towns and throwing workers onto the unemployment line.
Max Boot (The Corrosion of Conservatism: Why I Left the Right)
By any numerical measure, humanity is becoming rapidly less poor. But between half and two-thirds of people in the West have been treading water – at best – for a generation. Tens of millions of Westerners will struggle to keep their heads above the surface over the coming decades. The spread of automation, including artificial intelligence and remote intelligence, which some call the fourth industrial revolution, is still in its early stages.
Edward Luce (The Retreat of Western Liberalism)
We cannot deal with the increasing maldistribution of wealth, the increasing alienation of millions, or the lack of a unified purpose and goal by increasing the efficiency of production, increasing the automation of industry, accelerating our technology, or increasing our reliance on the profit motives of multinational corporations.
Carl R. Rogers (A Way of Being)
We should reinforce modern machining facilities with high performance in line with the global trend of machine industry development, press the production of products, high-speed drawings, and unmanned automation," he said. "We should set up test sites for comprehensive measurement in the factory and allow various load, interlock tests and impact tests depending on the characteristics of the products." 정품구입문의하는곳~☎위커메신저:PP444☎라인:PPPK44↔☎텔레:ppt89[☎?카톡↔rrs9] 정품구입문의하는곳~☎위커메신저:PP444☎라인:PPPK44↔☎텔레:ppt89[☎?카톡↔rrs9] 정품구입문의하는곳~☎위커메신저:PP444☎라인:PPPK44↔☎텔레:ppt89[☎?카톡↔rrs9] On the first day, Kim conducted field guidance on plants in Jagang Province, including the Kanggye Tracker General Factory, the Kanggye Precision Machinery General Factory, the Jangja Steel Manufacturing Machinery Plant and the February 8 Machine Complex. All of these factories are North Korea's leading munitions factories with decades of history. Defense ministers of South Korea, the U.S. and Japan gathered together to discuss ways to cooperate on the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and strengthen defense cooperation among the three countries. South Korean Defense Minister Chung Kyung-doo was acting U.S. Defense Secretary Patrick Shannahan and Japanese Defense Minister Takeshi Iwaya at the Shangri-La Hotel in Singapore, where the 18th Asia Security Conference was held from 9 a.m. on Sunday.
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Automation won’t take your job, but the self-inflicted imprisonment of industrial isolation will.
Richie Norton
Thanks to technology, we now have access to the entirety of human knowledge from a device that fits in our pocket. The internet is humanity's greatest gift.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Just as the invention of new forms of industrial automation in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries had the paradoxical effect of turning more and more of the world’s population into full-time industrial workers, so has all the software designed to save us from administrative responsibilities in recent decades ultimately turned us all into part or full-time administrators.
David Graeber (The Utopia of Rules: On Technology, Stupidity, and the Secret Joys of Bureaucracy)
Medicine, psychology, criminology, sociology. Which treat bodies as machinery (passim Descartes, the “father” of our Western subject). Developing alongside the dirty sciences. Industrialization, Taylorization, automation.
Charles Bernstein (The Politics of Poetic Form)
Let us fool ourselves no longer. At the very moment Western nations, threw off the ancient regime of absolute government, operating under a once-divine king, they were restoring this same system in a far more effective form in their technology, reintroducing coercions of a military character no less strict in the organization of a factory than in that of the new drilled, uniformed, and regimented army. During the transitional stages of the last two centuries, the ultimate tendency of this system might b e in doubt, for in many areas there were strong democratic reactions; but with the knitting together of a scientific ideology, itself liberated from theological restrictions or humanistic purposes, authoritarian technics found an instrument at hand that h as now given it absolute command of physical energies of cosmic dimensions. The inventors of nuclear bombs, space rockets, and computers are the pyramid builders of our own age: psychologically inflated by a similar myth of unqualified power, boasting through their science of their increasing omnipotence, if not omniscience, moved by obsessions and compulsions no less irrational than those of earlier absolute systems: particularly the notion that the system itself must be expanded, at whatever eventual co st to life. Through mechanization, automation, cybernetic direction, this authoritarian technics has at last successfully overcome its most serious weakness: its original dependence upon resistant, sometimes actively disobedient servomechanisms, still human enough to harbor purposes that do not always coincide with those of the system. Like the earliest form of authoritarian technics, this new technology is marvellously dynamic and productive: its power in every form tends to increase without limits, in quantities that defy assimilation and defeat control, whether we are thinking of the output of scientific knowledge or of industrial assembly lines. To maximize energy, speed, or automation, without reference to the complex conditions that sustain organic life, have become ends in themselves. As with the earliest forms of authoritarian technics, the weight of effort, if one is to judge by national budgets, is toward absolute instruments of destruction, designed for absolutely irrational purposes whose chief by-product would be the mutilation or extermination of the human race. Even Ashurbanipal and Genghis Khan performed their gory operations under normal human limits. The center of authority in this new system is no longer a visible personality, an all-powerful king: even in totalitarian dictatorships the center now lies in the system itself, invisible but omnipresent: all its human components, even the technical and managerial elite, even the sacred priesthood of science, who alone have access to the secret knowledge by means of which total control is now swiftly being effected, are themselves trapped by the very perfection of the organization they have invented. Like the Pharoahs of the Pyramid Age, these servants of the system identify its goods with their own kind of well-being: as with the divine king, their praise of the system is an act of self-worship; and again like the king, they are in the grip of an irrational compulsion to extend their means of control and expand the scope of their authority. In this new systems-centered collective, this Pentagon of power, there is no visible presence who issues commands: unlike job's God, the new deities cannot be confronted, still less defied. Under the pretext of saving labor, the ultimate end of this technics is to displace life, or rather, to transfer the attributes of life to the machine and the mechanical collective, allowing only so much of the organism to remain as may be controlled and manipulated.
Lewis Mumford
Between 1811 and 1817, a group of English textile workers whose jobs were threatened by the automated looms of the first Industrial Revolution rallied around a perhaps mythical, Robin Hood–like figure named Ned Ludd and attacked mills and machinery before being suppressed by the British government.
Erik Brynjolfsson (The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies)
Specialists will continue to lose not because of automation, but because of the imprisonment of industrial isolation. Leaders and innovators who stay relevant see the interconnectedness of a broad use of skillsets that specialists can’t see and use creativity to solve problems in times of complexity.
Richie Norton
Homo sapiens have explored many ages: the Stone Age, the Bronze Age, the Iron Age and, as of late, the Industrial Age, of which we have only tried for a couple hundred years. Before we seemingly dive headfirst into a Digital, Automated or Artificial Age, we are in desperate need of an Age of Reflection.
Freequill (What's Going On? How Can We Help?: The Consequences of Capitalism and Actionable Steps Towards a Healthy and Sustainable Future)
The story of humanity – evolution of our species; prehistoric shift from foraging to permanent agriculture; rise and fall of antique, medieval, and early modern civilizations; economic advances of the past two centuries; mechanization of agriculture; diversification and automation of industrial protection; enormous increases in energy consumption; diffusion of new communication and information networks; and impressive gains in quality of life – would not have been possible without an expanding and increasingly intricate and complex use of materials.
Vaclav Smil (Making the Modern World: Materials and Dematerialization)
The extermination of the Jews has sometimes been seen as a kind of industrialized, assembly-line kind of mass murder, and this picture has at least some element of truth to it. No other genocide in history has been carried out by mechanical means - gassing - in specially constructed facilities like those in operation at Auschwitz or Treblinka. At the same time, however, these facilities did not operate efficiently or effectively, and if the impression given by calling them industrialized is that they were automated or impersonal, then it is a false one. Men such as Hess and Stangl and their subordinates tried to insulate themselves from the human dimensions of what they were doing by referring to their victims as 'cargo' or 'items.' Talking to Gerhard Stabenow, the head of the SS Security Service in Warsaw, in September 1942, Wilm Hosenfeld noted how the language Stabenow used distanced himself from the fact that what he was involved in was the mass murder of human beings: 'He speaks of the Jews as ants or other vermin, of their 'resettlement', that means their mass murder, as he would of the extermination of the bedbugs in the disinfestation of a house.' But at the same time such men were not immune from the human emotions they tried so hard to repress, and they remembered incidents in which individual women and children had appealed to their conscience, even if such appeals were in vain. The psychological strain that continual killing of unarmed civilians, including women and children, imposed on such men was considerable, just as it had been in the case of the SS Task Forces, whose troops had been shooting Jews in their hundreds of thousands before the first gas vans were deploted in an attempt not only to speed up the killing but also to make it somehow more impersonal.
Richard J. Evans (The Third Reich at War (The History of the Third Reich, #3))
It’s hard to believe you’d have an economy at all if you gave pink slips to more than half the labor force. But that—in slow motion—is what the industrial revolution did to the workforce of the early 19th century. Two hundred years ago, 70 percent of American workers lived on the farm. Today automation has eliminated all but 1 percent of their jobs, replacing them (and their work animals) with machines. But the displaced workers did not sit idle. Instead, automation created hundreds of millions of jobs in entirely new fields. Those who once farmed were now manning the legions of factories that churned out farm equipment, cars, and other industrial products. Since then, wave upon wave of new occupations have arrived—appliance repair person, offset printer, food chemist, photographer, web designer—each building on previous automation. Today, the vast majority of us are doing jobs that no farmer from the 1800s could have imagined.
Kevin Kelly (The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future)
Imagine that seven out of ten working Americans got fired tomorrow. What would they all do? It’s hard to believe you’d have an economy at all if you gave pink slips to more than half the labor force. But that—in slow motion—is what the industrial revolution did to the workforce of the early 19th century. Two hundred years ago, 70 percent of American workers lived on the farm. Today automation has eliminated all but 1 percent of their jobs, replacing them (and their work animals) with machines. But the displaced workers did not sit idle. Instead, automation created hundreds of millions of jobs in entirely new fields. Those who once farmed were now manning the legions of factories that churned out farm equipment, cars, and other industrial products. Since then, wave upon wave of new occupations have arrived—appliance repair person, offset printer, food chemist, photographer, web designer—each building on previous automation. Today, the vast majority of us are doing jobs that no farmer from the 1800s could have imagined. It
Kevin Kelly (The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future)
If you’re feeling down about the world, the book, “Resource Revolution: How to Capture the Biggest Business Opportunity in a Century,” is an antidote. Mr. Rogers and Mr. Heck outline how emerging advances — among them 3-D printing, autonomous vehicles, modular construction systems and home automation — might in time alter some of the world’s largest industries and bring prosperity to billions of people.
Anonymous
We are the ones who saw how perpetual motion, as realized by the Worker-Factory-Mechanic, could be the vanguard of an equitable future. All that was needed was a raw material capable of matching AI's tireless pace. We found it in that bountiful gift that comes from our dear Mother Earth: industrial-grade hemp.
Philip Wyeth (Hot Ash and the Oasis Defect (Ashley Westgard, #1))
In an age of extreme automation and globalization, how can the 90 percent for whom income is stagnant or falling respond? For the Tea Party, the answer is to circle the wagons around family and church, and to get on bended knee to multinational companies to lure them to you from wherever they are. This is the strategy Southern governors have used to lure textile firms from New England or car manufacturers from New Jersey and California, offering lower wages, anti-union legislation, low corporate taxes, and big financial incentives. For the liberal left, the best approach is to nurture new business through a world-class public infrastructure and excellent schools. An example is what many describe as the epicenter of a new industrial age: Silicon Valley—with Google, Twitter, Apple, and Facebook—and its environs, as well as the electric car and solar industries. The reds might be the Louisiana model, and to some degree, the blues are the California one.
Arlie Russell Hochschild (Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right)
Subsidy dependency has been coupled with the huge upturn in the so-called ‘financialisation’ of industry, whereby a company’s funds are increasingly dedicated to repurchasing their own shares in order to boost their stock price. In 2010, for example, the US American Energy Innovation Council (AEIC) asked the US government to triple state spending on clean energy to $16bn a year, at the end of a decade in which the companies comprising the council had spent $237bn on stock repurchases.477 From 2008 to 2017, 466 S&P 500 companies distributed $4 trillion to shareholders as buybacks, equal to 53% of profits, along with $3.1 trillion as dividends.This is explained away on the social democratic left as shareholder greed. But it is driven by the need to valorise capital. We did not cover it earlier, but Marx identified the increasing role of share capital as one of the main counter-tendencies.
Ted Reese (Socialism or Extinction: Climate, Automation and War in the Final Capitalist Breakdown)
The vague contention that the economy must be decarbonised via the replacement of fossil fuels by renewable energy is inadequate when building the new infrastructure required currently relies on continued and expanded environmental plunder, such as the mining of cobalt and lithium for batteries. Resource extraction is responsible for 50% of global emissions, with minerals and metal mining responsible for 20% of emissions even before the manufacturing stage.[36] The ‘green’ industrial revolution proposed by social democrats may end up with a carbon neutral system of production by the time it is finished, but in the meantime it would be anything but. That mankind and nature have been so profoundly alienated from each other under capitalism requires that they be reunited if the planet is to remain habitable.[37] One of the ways that this alienation has been most concretely institutionalised has been through the international prohibition and under-utilisation of the hemp and cannabis plants, the most prolific and versatile crops on Earth that were used for thousands of years before capitalism for food, fuel, medicine, clothing and construction. As we shall see, not only does hemp remain capable of providing for most of humanity’s needs, it is the key not only to reversing desertification and stabilising the climate, but also furthering technological and industrial progress. We therefore argue that saving the planet is bound up with ending this alienation and completing the transition from a labour-intensive extraction-based economy to a hemp-based fully automated system of production. A green industrial revolution must be precisely that – green.
Ted Reese (Socialism or Extinction: Climate, Automation and War in the Final Capitalist Breakdown)
Years later I asked Herb why he believed in our company at a time when nobody else did. I pointed out that, at the time, Allen & Company wasn’t very involved in technology, let alone data center automation. Herb replied, “I didn’t understand anything about your business and I understood very little about your industry. What I saw was two guys come visit me when every other public company CEO and chairman was hiding under their desk. Not only did you come see me, but you were more determined and convinced you would succeed than guys running giant businesses. Investing in courage and determination was an easy decision for me.” That’s how Herb Allen does business. And that’s why, if given the chance, you’d be a fool not to do business with Herb.
Ben Horowitz (The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers)
s s i o n o f R a t i o n a l S o f t w a r e C o r p o r a t i o n i s t o e n s u r e t h e s u c c e s s o f c u s t o m e r s c o n s t r u c t i n g t h e s o f t w a r e s y s t e m s t h a t t h e y d e p e n d o n . We enable our customers to achieve their business objectives by turning software into a source of competitive advantage, speeding time-to-market, reducing the risk of failure, and improving software quality. We fulfill our mission with the Rational ApproachTM, a comprehensive softwareengineering solution consisting of three elements: • A configurable set of processes and techniques for the development of software, based on iterative development, object modeling, and an architectural approach to software reuse. • An integrated family of application construction tools that automate the Rational Approach throughout the software lifecycle. • Technical consulting services delivered by our worldwide field organization of software engineers and technical sales professionals. Our customers include businesses in the Asia/Pacific region, Europe, and North America that are leaders in leveraging semiconductor, communications, and software technologies to achieve their business objectives. We serve customers in a diverse range of industries, such as telecommunications
Anonymous
o n o f R a t i o n a l S o f t w a r e C o r p o r a t i o n i s t o e n s u r e t h e s u c c e s s o f c u s t o m e r s c o n s t r u c t i n g t h e s o f t w a r e s y s t e m s t h a t t h e y d e p e n d o n . We enable our customers to achieve their business objectives by turning software into a source of competitive advantage, speeding time-to-market, reducing the risk of failure, and improving software quality. We fulfill our mission with the Rational ApproachTM, a comprehensive softwareengineering solution consisting of three elements: • A configurable set of processes and techniques for the development of software, based on iterative development, object modeling, and an architectural approach to software reuse. • An integrated family of application construction tools that automate the Rational Approach throughout the software lifecycle. • Technical consulting services delivered by our worldwide field organization of software engineers and technical sales professionals. Our customers include businesses in the Asia/Pacific region, Europe, and North America that are leaders in leveraging semiconductor, communications, and software technologies to achieve their business objectives. We serve customers in a diverse range of industries, such as telecommunications, banking and financial services, manufacturing, transportation, aerospace, and defense.They construct software applications for a wide range of platforms, from microprocessors embedded in telephone switching systems to enterprisewide information systems running on company-specific intranets. Rational Software Corporation is traded on the NASDAQ system under the symbol RATL.1
Anonymous
A new era of production has begun. Its principles of organization are as different from those of the industrial era as those of the industrial era were different from the agricultural. The cybernation revolution has been brought about by the combination of the computer and the automated self-regulating machine. This results in a system of almost unlimited productive capacity which requires progressively less human labor.16 The
Erik Brynjolfsson (The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies)
In a 2016 book widely publicized in the US, Stern claimed that 58 per cent of all jobs would be automated eventually, driven by the ethos of shareholder value. He told the American media group Bloomberg, ‘It’s not like the fall of the auto and steel industries. That hit just a sector of the country. This will be widespread. People will realize that we don’t have a storm anymore; we have a tsunami.’16 Nevertheless, there are reasons to be sceptical about the prospect of a jobless or even workless future. It is the latest version of the ‘lump of labour fallacy’, the idea that there is only a certain amount of labour and work to be done, so that if more of it can be automated or done by intelligent robots, human workers will be rendered redundant. In any case, very few jobs can be automated in their entirety. The suggestion in a much-cited study17 that nearly half of all US jobs are vulnerable to automation has been challenged by, among others, the OECD, which puts the figure of jobs ‘at risk’ at 9 per cent for industrialized countries.18
Guy Standing (Basic Income: And How We Can Make It Happen)
The Industrial Revolution automated manual work and the Information Revolution did the same for mental work, but machine learning automates automation itself.
Pedro Domingos (The Master Algorithm: How the Quest for the Ultimate Learning Machine Will Remake Our World)
Best4Automation is the industry marketplace, which combines all the advantages of a modern on-line shop with the fast logistics of large manufacturers. Our well-known manufacturers and partners in automation technology such as Schmersal, Murrplastik, wenglor sensoric, Murrelektronik, Stego, Siemens, Fibox and Captron cover a wide spectrum of electronic and electromechanical components for mechanical engineering, plant construction and maintenance.
Best4automation
Humans have two types of abilities – physical and cognitive. In the past, machines competed with humans mainly in raw physical abilities, while humans retained an immense edge over machines in cognition. Hence as manual jobs in agriculture and industry were automated, new service jobs emerged that required the kind of cognitive skills only humans possessed: learning, analysing, communicating and above all understanding human emotions. However, AI is now beginning to outperform humans in more and more of these skills, including in the understanding of human emotions
Yuval Noah Harari (21 Lessons for the 21st Century)
while AI is busy improving itself, robotics’ industry spending is set to exceed $135 billion in 2019, nearly double its 2015 figure.[132] Not only will vehicles lose their drivers, the vehicles themselves are likely to be built by robots, especially since the automotive industry is the number one buyer of automated robots
Klaus Schwab (Shaping the Fourth Industrial Revolution)
It took organized labor and the collective action of workers to make full-time employment in the semi-automated world of industrial manufacturing inhabitable. Unfortunately, the valorization and validation of full-time employment also made it easier for corporate interests to position piecework and, later, other forms of temporary or contract labor as expendable, that is, work that did not warrant protections.
Mary L. Gray (Ghost Work: How to Stop Silicon Valley from Building a New Global Underclass)
Automation has reached the point where most businesses need dramatically fewer employees. “Presumably, this should make companies more profitable and increase their willingness to invest in new products and services,” writes Larsson. “It does not. Instead, there is competition between more and more equal competitors, and all are forced to reduce prices to get their goods sold. The advantages of leading companies are getting smaller and smaller and it is becoming ever more difficult to find areas where unique advantages can be developed.”36 Regardless of the industry, “Most companies tend to use the same standard systems and more and more companies arrive at a situation where time and cost have been reduced to a minimum.
Richard Heinberg (The End of Growth: Adapting to our new economic reality)
The labor arbitrage view of global trade, a model that goes back to the dawn of the First Industrial Revolution, assumes that manufacturing will always flow to low-cost countries. But the new automation view suggests that the advantages of cheap labor are shrinking while other factors—closeness to the ultimate consumer, transportation costs (including possible carbon taxes), flexibility, quality, and reliability—are rising.
Chris Anderson (Makers: The New Industrial Revolution)
Terry Guo of Foxconn has been aggressively installing hundreds of thousands of robots to replace an equivalent number of human workers. He says he plans to buy millions more robots in the coming years. The first wave is going into factories in China and Taiwan, but once an industry becomes largely automated, the case for locating a factory in a low-wage country becomes less compelling. There may still be logistical advantages if the local business ecosystem is strong, making it easier to get spare parts, supplies, and custom components. But over time inertia may be overcome by the advantages of reducing transit times for finished products and being closer to customers, engineers and designers, educated workers, or even regions where the rule of law is strong. This can bring manufacturing back to America, as entrepreneurs like Rod Brooks have been emphasizing. A
Erik Brynjolfsson (The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies)
The impact of AI and robotics on labour markets is expected to grow, both in developing and developed regions. In the United States, estimates range from 10% to nearly 50% of US jobs at risk of computerization.[135],[136] In China, Foxconn replaced 60,000 workers in factories with robots over the course of two years.[137] Automation could undermine industrialization in developing countries by undercutting their labour cost advantage: production once offshored by developed countries is now being reshored.[138
Klaus Schwab (Shaping the Fourth Industrial Revolution)
As personalized, 1:1 guest communication becomes the standard in our industry, pretending to stay in business without some level of marketing automation is entrepreneurial myopia
Simone Puorto
It is a useful way of thinking about why the Klan opposed immigration (which brought a bunch of new kids to the block who might mow the lawn for less money) and was anxious about technological change in general (the move from agrarian life to industrialized economy and then the attendant march of automation in factories meant jobs would become ever more difficult to come by).
Jon Meacham (The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels)
The Fourth Industrial Revolution is creating a self-employment economy based on creativity - gig workers, freelancers, Apps, investments and entrepreneurship. It is now much easier to start your own thing than any other time in history. Don’t focus on the threats; focus on the opportunities! There's more to sell than just labour.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
The declining rate of profit To shore up our understanding of the declining rate of profit it is helpful to represent capital production with the formula c + v + s. The value of c is not increased in production but merely preserved by it, whereas v is the only part of capital that enables the capitalist to increase the value of their capital. s is the portion of the newly created value appropriated by the capitalist. The rate of surplus value is therefore s / v and the rate of profit is the ratio between surplus value and total capital, that is s / (c + v). The organic composition of capital, c / v, measures the difference between the rate of surplus value, s / v, and the rate of profit – ie, in general, the higher the organic composition of capital, the more capital-intensive the industry, and the lower the rate of profit; the more labour-intensive, the higher the rate of profit. Because the demands of capital accumulation, as well as the need to stay ahead of or keep up with competitors, compels capitalists to innovate in order to raise productivity, the fundamental tendency of the capitalist system is to increase the ratio of constant capital to variable capital. But when the organic composition of capital, c / v, increases, other things being equal, the profit rate, s / (c + v), declines.
Ted Reese (Socialism or Extinction: Climate, Automation and War in the Final Capitalist Breakdown)
As we boldly enter the new decade, we need to make sure that we do so in a way that fosters individual talents and preserves the entrepreneurial spirit rising in Africa; as young people are rising as risk-takers, inventors, disruptors and thought leaders.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
In a world where everything is connected, where machines can talk, learn and mimic humans, a world where machines are employable, where performance is at its peak, innovation at its finest and job loss at its highest. There is only one spot left to transform and that is YOU.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted provides answers that translate far-future thinking into insights and strategies to stay relevant and unlock opportunities in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Our world is changing fast, but all is not lost in the race to automation. With the rise of the robotic, the focus is shifting from people power to intellectual capital. With or without a certificate, a disruptor’s mind can foresee limitless opportunities in the newly emerging economy. You can create your own path using the power of the internet.
Nicky Verd
The future will not seem so scary if talent is put to use.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
With the rise of Artificial Intelligence. the future certainly has the potential to draw more on an individual’s talents than certificates.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted is a book that provides you with ready-to-implement pragmatic blueprints for personal transformation, unconventional thinking and helps you look at the world through a fresh lens, one that turns assumptions and conventions upside down.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
At some point, something or someone is going to disrupt your entire life. Shouldn't it be you? The ability to disrupt yourself is critical in today’s volatile economic environment that's changing faster and more furiously than ever.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Machines do not require leave, lunch breaks, smoke breaks, toilet breaks or any breaks for that matter. Robotics do not come late to work. Robots are drama free, they don’t organise protest action and they don’t complain about workload.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Robots cannot be injured or killed in the line of work, and can be used in situations far too dangerous for human risk. Robots are more hygienic and deliver a finished product at a fraction of the time it takes a human. Faster output leads to increased sales. No matter how cheap human labour may become, buying highly skilled robotics is still cheaper as one pays only once.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Put your future in good hands – your own! Personal disruption means not waiting for the government or your family members to hand something to you. It means rethinking the parameters of your life, and perhaps even of your community, maybe even your country.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
The Fourth Industrial Revolution is creating a demand for new skills and new competencies.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Understanding what 4IR is all about will help put into perspective how some of the world’s most cutting-edge technologies like Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, Blockchain, IoT, AR, 3D Printing and many others will impact your own life.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Don't fight the Fourth Industrial Revolution, embrace it and become part of the revolution!
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
The secret to growth in this new era of disruptive technologies is being willing to ‘learn and relearn’ even if what you knew previously brought you success.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Educating yourself about technology and automation now gives you an excellent opportunity to future-proof your skills or business and helps amplify your potential
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Job loss due to automation is irreversible. Since automation provides huge advantages to companies that deploy it, it’s very unlikely that they will return to using humans for the same tasks.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Those who don’t adapt become victims of disruption, trapped in the downward spiral of recycling their problems.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Human labour does not stand a chance against disruptive technologies. Artificial Intelligence can handle insurance claims, do basic bookkeeping, manage investment portfolios, do legal research, and perform HR tasks.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Quintessential conglomerates are slashing away layers of management structures, breaking themselves up and automating processes.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Certificates are no longer a guaranteed ticket to success. You can do more today with your life having just an internet connection; and that’s an opportunity our parents and grandparents never had.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
In the past, businesses were built on the brick and mortar model, transactions were done in triplicate, using carbon paper, and success was based on educational background and certificates. Fast forward to today. The internet, connectivity and emerging technologies have completely changed the game. To compete and survive in this new era requires a disruptive approach.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
You cannot stop the Fourth Industrial Revolution but you can influence its direction and impact in your life.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Many of us bought into society’s social contract of success, which states – go to school, get good grades, get a job and live happily ever after. But this doesn’t work anymore. At the most basic level, disrupting yourself will demand that you breach this contract of social conditioning and conformity.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Revolutions bring disruptions and disruptions bring opportunities.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
You can do more today with your life by having just an internet connection and that’s an opportunity our parents and grandparents never had.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
As the Fourth Industrial Revolution continue to evolve, the winners will be those who are able to quickly adapt to change, upskill themselves and fully participate in entrepreneurship and innovation-driven ecosystems, providing new business models and ideas rather than those who can only bring certificates to the table or only offer low-skilled labor.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
The Fourth Industrial Revolution is not about new Apps or new technologies. It is about a new era, new ways of thinking and new ways of doing business.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
The Fourth Industrial Revolution does bring a sense of gloom and doom but don’t focus on the threats; focus on the opportunities!
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
The Fourth Industrial Revolution is ushering in a new economic era, exposing new sources of value and growth. New opportunities, businesses and markets can be created as a result of this new economy.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Fourth Industrial Revolution has democratized entrepreneurship. The old entrepreneurial model was capital intensive – premises, equipment, brick and mortar stuff. But now there’s opportunity for businesses that can even be run from a smart phone or Internet cafe. Some businesses can be set up in a day or two and with minimum risk and capital. As I mentioned in Part One of my book, titled, Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted. “You can do more today with your life having just an internet connection; and that’s an opportunity our parents and grandparents never had.
Nicky Verd (Disrupt Yourself Or Be Disrupted)
Computer-controlled machines have eliminated precisely the jobs created for a host of machine operators during the Second Industrial Revolution. The workers that were once pulled into decent-paying jobs in mass-production industries are now being pushed out.
Carl Benedikt Frey (The Technology Trap: Capital, Labor, and Power in the Age of Automation)
When industries fixate on automating jobs away, they paradoxically spoke demand for ghost work, shredding the social contract between employer and worker in their wake.
Mary L. Gray (Ghost Work: How to Stop Silicon Valley from Building a New Global Underclass)
For example, there’s an uncharacteristic explosion of creativity among accountants. Yes, accountants: Groups like the Thriveal C.P.A. Network and the VeraSage Institute are leading that profession from its roots in near-total risk aversion to something approaching the opposite. Computing may have commoditized much of the industry’s everyday work, but some enterprising accountants are learning how to use some of their biggest assets — the trust of their clients and access to financial data — to provide deep insights into a company’s business. They’re identifying which activities are most profitable, which ones are wasteful and when the former become the latter. Accounting once was entirely backward-looking and, because no one would pay for an audit for fun, dependent on government regulation. It was a cost. Now real-time networked software can make it forward-looking and a source of profit. It’s worth remembering, though, that this process never ends: As soon as accountants discover a new sort of service to provide their customers, some software innovator will be seeking ways to automate it, which means those accountants will work to constantly come up with even newer ideas. The failure loop will
Anonymous
Fanuc's computerized controls, used in more than half of the world's machine tools, give lathes, grinders, and milling machines the agility to turn metal into just about any manufactured product, from a titanium hip implant to the aluminum strut in the wing of a Boeing 747. Fanuc's Robodrill, an all-in-one machining center, is used to shape the shiny metal band that wraps around the iPhone. “They've got great clients like Apple,” Loeb says. “And with labor costs going up,” the automation industry “is an obvious area of growth.
Anonymous
Automation, which is both the most advanced sector of modern industry and the epitome of its practice, obliges the commodity system to resolve the following contradiction: The technological developments that objectively tend to eliminate work must at the same time preserve labor as a commodity, because labor is the only creator of commodities. The only way to prevent automation (or any other less extreme method of increasing labor productivity) from reducing society’s total necessary labor time is to create new jobs. To this end the reserve army of the unemployed is enlisted into the tertiary or “service” sector, reinforcing the troops responsible for distributing and glorifying the latest commodities; and in this it is serving a real need, in the sense that increasingly extensive campaigns are necessary to convince people to buy increasingly unnecessary commodities.
Anonymous
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Anonymous
The fascination with automation in part reflected the country’s mood in the immediate postwar period, including a solid ideological commitment to technological progress. Representatives of industry (along with their counterparts in science and engineering) captured this mood by championing automation as the next step in the development of new production machinery and American industrial prowess. These boosters quickly built up automation into “a new gospel of postwar economics,” lauding it as “a universal ideal” that would “revolutionize every area of industry.” 98 For example, the November 1946 issue of Fortune magazine focused on the prospects for “The Automatic Factory.” The issue included an article titled “Machines without Men” that envisioned a completely automated factory where virtually no human labor would be needed. 99 With visions of “transforming the entire manufacturing sector into a virtually labor-free enterprise,” factory owners in a range of industries began to introduce automation in the postwar period. 100 The auto industry moved with particular haste. After the massive wave of strikes in 1945–46, automakers seized on automation as a way to replace workers with machines. 101 As they converted back to civilian auto production after World War II, they took the opportunity to install new labor-saving automatic production equipment. The two largest automakers, Ford and General Motors, set the pace. General Motors introduced the first successful automated transfer line at its Buick engine plant in Flint in 1946 (shortly after a 113-day strike, the longest in the industry’s history). The next year Ford established an automation department (a Ford executive, Del S. Harder, is credited with coining the word “automation”). By October 1948 the department had approved $ 3 million in spending on 500 automated devices, with early company estimates predicting that these devices would result in a 20 percent productivity increase and the elimination of 1,000 jobs. Through the late 1940s and 1950s Ford led the way in what became known as “Detroit automation,” undertaking an expensive automation program, which it carried out in concert with the company’s plans to decentralize operations away from the city. A major component of this effort was the Ford plant in the Cleveland suburb of Brook Park, a $ 2 billion engine-making complex that attracted visitors from government, industry, and labor and became a national symbol of automation in the 1950s. 102
Stephen M. Ward (In Love and Struggle: The Revolutionary Lives of James and Grace Lee Boggs (Justice, Power, and Politics))
Corporate interests raised a nearly unified voice heralding automation as a certain and universal beneficial advancement. However, some observers saw the new technology as a cause for concern and cautioned that the final word on automation would depend on the choices that industry and the nation made in the face of difficult questions regarding the pace of automation’s implementation, the uses of the new productivity, and the fate of displaced workers as well as depleted or eliminated job classifications, communities, and even industries. Norbert Wiener, for example, a prominent MIT mathematician and pioneer in the science of cybernetics, emphasized the potentially calamitous economic and social consequences of the new production technology. Wiener had begun to express concerns about the impacts of automation on labor and the entire society during World War II, and he authored two books in the immediate Cold War years warning that potentially disastrous unemployment and related social problems may come from industry’s drive toward automation. He characterized automation and computer controls in the production process as the “modern” or “second” industrial revolution, which even more than the first held “unbounded possibilities for good and evil.” 104 In particular, Wiener feared that the larger impact of the changes caused by automation would be a massive displacement of workers, compounded by the profit-driven indifference of industry. “The automatic machine … will produce an unemployment situation, in comparison with which the present recession and even the depression of the thirties will seem a pleasant joke.” 105
Stephen M. Ward (In Love and Struggle: The Revolutionary Lives of James and Grace Lee Boggs (Justice, Power, and Politics))
In America, where the USDA’s interpretation of the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act exempts chicken slaughter, the voltage is kept low — about one-tenth the level necessary to render the animals unconscious. After it has traveled through the bath, a paralyzed bird’s eyes might still move. Sometimes the birds will have enough control of their bodies to slowly open their beaks, as though attempting to scream. The next stop on the line for the immobile-but-conscious bird will be an automated throat slitter. Blood will slowly drain out of the bird, unless the relevant arteries are missed, which happens, according to another worker I spoke with, “all the time.” So you’ll need a few more workers to function as backup slaughterers —“kill men” — who will slit the throats of the birds that the machine misses. Unless they, too, miss the birds, which I was also told happens “all the time.” According to the National Chicken Council — representatives of the industry — about 180 million chickens are improperly slaughtered each year.
Jonathan Safran Foer (Eating Animals)
The bank knew exactly what it was looking for and how to go about it. There was consensus on two critical aspects: the system had to be centralized and had to be based on UNIX, even if that meant spending tonnes of money. MicroBanker, a fully integrated online banking automation system, developed by Citicorp Information Technology Industries Ltd (Citil), a Citibank subsidiary, fit the bill, but Citil was not willing to deal with HDFC Bank. A small outfit, Citil thought, would not be able to afford the system. Citil was expanding operations in Africa and Europe and was not too keen to sell the software to a start-up Indian bank. While Citil reluctantly made a presentation on the system, Citibank intervened before a deal could be signed, saying that selling MicroBanker to HDFC Bank could give the Indian bank more muscle as a competitor. Aditya had to call Rajesh Hukku, Citil head, to play ball and he relented. Citil later became i-Flex Solutions Ltd (now Oracle Financial Services Software Ltd).
Tamal Bandopadhyaya (A Bank for the Buck)
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Our inventions have long been ahead of us in terms of efficiency and sanity, productivity and predictability. Oh, how we’ve wished we could be manmade, too. What has been keeping us back, keeping us messy? The animal impediment, within and without. Eliminating these impediments, we will surely be catching up with our machines, resembling them more and more impeccably.
Amy Leach (Things That Are)
The reason is clear from the market share numbers. In the 1999 Euromoney poll, almost 48 per cent of market share was held by banks outside the top ten; by the 2006 poll, that number had halved to about 24 per cent. These banks did not have a business large enough to justify spending the money needed to automate. In fact, the collective market share decline of smaller banks masked a shift in behaviour that was even worse news for the career prospects of the traders who worked in them. Increasingly, FX giants like Deutsche would give these banks access to systems like Autobahn or the equivalent. Their salespeople would simply quote the Deutsche Bank (or Citibank, UBS or Barclays) rate to their customers with a small spread to offset the credit risk. No need for expensive traders. In effect, the smaller banks had shifted from ‘manufacturing’ FX rates to being distributors to clients with whom they had a strong relationship based on regional expertise or history. ‘You guys just sucked us dry,’ complained an old friend and adversary at the time – he was in his late thirties, from a smaller bank, and we were at his ‘leaving-the-industry’ drinks. ‘But,’ he added resignedly, with a slightly drunken grin, ‘I guess that’s just that old whore Capitalism for you.’ He became a maths teacher.
Kevin Rodgers (Why Aren't They Shouting?: A Banker’s Tale of Change, Computers and Perpetual Crisis)
Man: Don't these precedents suggest that there is something inherently pre-industrial about the applicability of libertarian ideas—that they necessarily presuppose a rather rural society in which technology and production are fairly simple, and in which the economic organization tends to be small-scale and localized? Well, let me separate that into two questions: one, how anarchists have felt about it, and two, what I think is the case. As far as anarchist reactions are concerned, there are two. There has been one anarchist tradition—and one might think, say, of Kropotkin as a representative—which had much of the character you describe. On the other hand there's another anarchist tradition that develops into anarcho-syndicalism which simply regarded anarchist ideas as the proper mode of organization for a highly complex advanced industrial society. And that tendency in anarchism merges, or at least inter-relates very closely with a variety of left-wing Marxism, the kind that one finds in, say, the Council Communists that grew up in the Luxemburgian tradition, and that is later represented by Marxist theorists like Anton Pannekoek, who developed a whole theory of workers' councils in industry and who is himself a scientist and astronomer, very much part of the industrial world. So which of these two views is correct? I mean, is it necessary that anarchist concepts belong to the pre-industrial phase of human society, or is anarchism the rational mode of organization for a highly advanced industrial society? Well, I myself believe the latter, that is, I think that industrialization and the advance of technology raise possibilities for self-management over a broad scale that simply didn't exist in an earlier period. And that in fact this is precisely the rational mode for an advanced and complex industrial society, one in which workers can very well become masters of their own immediate affairs, that is, in direction and control of the shop, but also can be in a position to make the major substantive decisions concerning the structure of the economy, concerning social institutions, concerning planning regionally and beyond. At present, institutions do not permit them to have control over the requisite information, and the relevant training to understand these matters. A good deal could be automated. Much of the necessary work that is required to keep a decent level of social life going can be consigned to machines—at least in principle—which means humans can be free to undertake the kind of creative work which may not have been possible, objectively, in the early stages of the industrial revolution.
Noam Chomsky (Chomsky On Anarchism)
While many futurists and business leaders believe that robots and automation are taking jobs from humans, I believe that it's the humans who are takin the jobs away from robots.
Jacob Morgan (The Employee Experience Advantage: How to Win the War for Talent by Giving Employees the Workspaces they Want, the Tools they Need, and a Culture They Can Celebrate)
The key to successfully navigating the Fourth Industrial Revolution is more than simply learning new skills. It is knowing yourself and the unique value you have to offer any potential customer or employer.
Larry Boyer (The Robot in the Next Cubicle: What You Need to Know to Adapt and Succeed in the Automation Age)
The history of the development of any urban center will be incomplete without a mention of the role of mass transit in the whole process. In deed the role of mass transit as a catalyst of industrial revolution and urbanization cannot be over emphasized. In the case of the New
Clifford N. Opurum (Automated Fare Collection System & Urban Public Transportation: An Economic & Management Approach To Urban Transit Systems)
Knowledge work is where agricultural work was at the dawn of the industrial economy. Then, the machines of the industrial economy, like the steam shovel and cotton gin, automated manual work. Now, the software of the information economy, from ATMs to self-driving cars and the AI able to make medical diagnosis, is automating knowledge work.
Ron Davison (The Fourth Economy: Inventing Western Civilization)
The world in which I grew up, the old industrial economy, was radically transformed by the last wave of innovation. The story is by now well worn: technology, automation, globalization.
Alec J. Ross (The Industries of the Future)
Determine Keywords Use Compete PRO to find out which keywords drive traffic in an industry category; then create a search with them in Traackr to find the influencers. Validate Use the automated tools as a stepping-stone in the influencer discovery process, read their blogs, and validate the data to build relationships with influencers. Show Commitment Influencer identification is not a one-time thing. You need to do it regularly. It is a marriage, not a date. Welcome Surprises Don’t discount the “little” guy. Some of their one-to-one interactions are stronger than those of broadcasters. It takes only a pebble to start an avalanche. Combine Tools Use Google to find the most relevant keywords, Traackr to gain insights, and Klout to validate Twitter. Value Relevance Over Popularity Choose relevance over popularity. The most popular influencers on social media are often the least helpful in a social media campaign. Study Understand the influencer’s core audience. Combine Human and Machine Tools and technology are a good place to start, but we always need the human element.
William Leake (Complete B2B Online Marketing)
THE SK8 MAKER VS. GLOBAL INDUSTRIALIZATION This new era of global industrialization is where my personal analogy with the history of the skateboard maker diverges. It’s no longer cost-effective to run a small skateboard company in the U.S., and the handful of startups that pull it off are few and far between. The mega manufacturers who can churn out millions of decks at low cost and record speed each year in Chinese factories employ proprietary equipment and techniques that you and I can barely imagine. Drills that can cut all eight truck holes in a stack of skateboard decks in a single pull. CNC machinery to create CAD-perfect molds used by giant two-sided hydraulic presses that can press dozens of boards in a few hours. Computer-operated cutting bits that can stamp out a deck to within 1⁄64 in. of its specified shape. And industrial grade machines that apply multicolored heat-transfer graphics in minutes. In a way, this factory automation has propelled skateboarding to become a multinational, multi-billion dollar industry. The best skateboarders require this level of precision in each deck. Otherwise, they could end up on their tails after a failed trick. Or much worse. As the commercial deck relies more and more on a process that is out of reach for mere mortals, there is great value in the handmade and one of a kind. Making things from scratch is a dying art on the brink of extinction. It was pushed to the edge when public schools dismissed woodworking classes and turned the school woodshop into a computer lab. And when you separate society from how things are made—even a skateboard—you lose touch with the labor and the materials and processes that contributed to its existence in the first place. It’s not long before you take for granted the value of an object. The result is a world where cheap labor produces cheap goods consumed by careless customers who don’t even value the things they own.
Matt Berger (The Handmade Skateboard: Design & Build a Custom Longboard, Cruiser, or Street Deck from Scratch)
A somewhat provocative example of the interconnections between the gaming industry and finance. A technologist working for a large London hedge fund hinted this to me in interview. Trained in computer science and engineering, this interviewee first worked as a network programmer for large online multiplayer games. His greatest challenge was the fact that the Internet is not instantaneous: when a player sends a command to execute in action, it takes time for the signal to reach the computer server and interact with the commands of other players. For the game to be realistic, such delays have to be taken into account when rendering reality on the screen. The challenge for the network programmer is to make these asymmetries as invisible as possible so that the game seem 'equitable to everyone.' The problem is similar in finance, where the physical distance from the stock exchange's matching engines matters tremendously, requiring a similar solution to the problem of latency: simulating the most likely state of the order book on the firm's computers in order to estimate the most advantageous strategies or the firm's trading algorithms. Gaming and finance are linked not through an institutional imperative of culture or capital - or even a strategy, as such - but rather through the more mundane and lowly problems of how to fairly manage latency and connectivity.
Juan Pablo Pardo-Guerra (Automating Finance: Infrastructures, Engineers, and the Making of Electronic Markets)
Look for industries where technology can reduce high transaction costs or remove high-cost gatekeepers. In many cases, you’re looking for transactions that can be automated and run by algorithms. The more you can use technology to reduce transaction costs, the more opportunity you’ll have to add value to both sides. The ultimate goal is to remove entire steps from the transaction. Remember, transaction costs aren’t always about money. They also include time and effort, among other things.
Alex Moazed (Modern Monopolies: What It Takes to Dominate the 21st Century Economy)
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The quandary was how to make workers efficient and attentive, when their actual labor had been degraded by automation. The motivation previously supplied by the intrinsic satisfactions of manual work was to be replaced with ideology; industrial arts education now concerned itself with moral formation.
Matthew B. Crawford (Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry Into the Value of Work)
Humans have two types of abilities – physical and cognitive. In the past, machines competed with humans mainly in raw physical abilities, while humans retained an immense edge over machines in cognition. Hence as manual jobs in agriculture and industry were automated, new service jobs emerged that required the kind of cognitive skills only humans possessed: learning, analysing, communicating and above all understanding human emotions.
Yuval Noah Harari (21 Lessons for the 21st Century)
For a well-defined, standard, and stable process involving hand-offs between people and systems, it is preferable to use a smart workflow platform. Such platforms offer pre-developed modules. These are ready-to-use automation programs customized by industry and by business function (e.g., onboarding of clients in retail banking). In addition, they are modular. For example, a module might include a form for client data collection, and another module might support an approval workflow. In addition, these modules can be linked to external systems and databases using connectors, such as application programming interfaces (APIs), which enable resilient data connectivity. Hence, with smart workflows, there is no need to develop bespoke internal and external data bridges. This integration creates a system with high resiliency and integrity. In addition, the standardization by industry and function of these platforms, combined with the low-code functionality, helps to accelerate the implementation.
Pascal Bornet (INTELLIGENT AUTOMATION: Learn how to harness Artificial Intelligence to boost business & make our world more human)
As I reviewed the social terrain of the right-leaning people I had come to know—the companies, the state government, the church, Fox News—I reflected on my keyhole issue. Everyone I was talking to was enduring a great deal of pollution and despite the silence from companies, politicians, and state officials, nearly everyone clearly knew it. To some, such as Lee Sherman and Harold and Annette Areno, exposure had become the defining experience of their lives. To others, it was a passing matter. While many, like Madonna Massey, spoke of their love of capitalism, the dominant industry in their economy presented a decidedly mixed story. Oil was highly automated and accounted for some 15 percent of jobs—and even some of those were going to foreign workers at lower pay. The state had made huge cuts to local jobs and social services in order to bring in companies and, instead of money trickling down, a third of it was leaking out. To some degree, the community had become the site of local production without being the site of local producers. They were victims without a language of victimhood.
Arlie Russell Hochschild (Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right)
Even when there’s automation, this doesn’t always create the dire results we expect. Consider automatic teller machines (ATMs). When they were first rolled out in the late 1970s, there were serious concerns about bank teller layoffs. Between 1995 and 2010, the number of ATMs in America went from one hundred thousand to four hundred thousand, but mass teller unemployment wasn’t the result. Because ATMs made it cheaper to operate banks, the number of banks grew by 40 percent. More banks meant more jobs for human bank tellers, which is why bank teller employment actually rose during this period.
Peter H. Diamandis (The Future Is Faster Than You Think: How Converging Technologies Are Transforming Business, Industries, and Our Lives (Exponential Technology Series))
We must now begin to actively take part in automation, data analytics, and software development across industries and professions.
Jason Wingard (The Great Skills Gap: Optimizing Talent for the Future of Work)
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There's a clear link between this cultural pattern and Germany's place in history as one of the first countries in the world to become heavily industrialized. Imagine being a factory worker in the German automative industry. If you arrive at work four minutes late, the machine for which you are responsible gets started late, which exacts a real, measurable financial cost. To this day, the perception of time in Germany is partially rooted in the early impact of the industrial revolution, where factory work required the labor force to be on hand and in place at a precisely appointed moment. In other societies -particularly in developing world- life centers around the fact of constant change. As political systems shift and financial systems alter, as traffic surges and wanes, as monsoons or water shortages raise unforeseeable challenges, the successful managers are those who have developed the ability to ride out the changes with ease and flexibility.
Erin Meyer (The Culture Map: Breaking Through the Invisible Boundaries of Global Business)
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Aren’t fears of disappearing jobs something that people claim periodically, like with both the agricultural and industrial revolution, and it’s always wrong?” It’s true that agriculture went from 40 percent of the workforce in 1900 to 2 percent in 2017 and we nonetheless managed to both grow more food and create many wondrous new jobs during that time. It’s also true that service-sector jobs multiplied in many unforeseen ways and absorbed most of the workforce after the Industrial Revolution. People sounded the alarm of automation destroying jobs in the 19th century—the Luddites destroying textile mills in England being the most famous—as well as in the 1920s and the 1960s, and they’ve always been wildly off the mark. Betting against new jobs has been completely ill-founded at every point in the past. So why is this time different? Essentially, the technology in question is more diverse and being implemented more broadly over a larger number of economic sectors at a faster pace than during any previous time. The advent of big farms, tractors, factories, assembly lines, and personal computers, while each a very big deal for the labor market, were orders of magnitude less revolutionary than advancements like artificial intelligence, machine learning, self-driving vehicles, advanced robotics, smartphones, drones, 3D printing, virtual and augmented reality, the Internet of things, genomics, digital currencies, and nanotechnology. These changes affect a multitude of industries that each employ millions of people. The speed, breadth, impact, and nature of the changes are considerably more dramatic than anything that has come before.
Andrew Yang (The War on Normal People: The Truth About America's Disappearing Jobs and Why Universal Basic Income Is Our Future)
But the real and actual 'riggedness' of the Eurovision lies in the vision it presents to us as to what 'Culture' is supposed to be: a monotone, cheap, cloned industrialized song with some glamour attached. The formula is always the same: 24 cloned songs, like computer automated, and 2 'crazy' ones so it seems that all this clonedness is actually supported by creativity. But in this image of 'craziness' there is the same formula: cloned, boring songs with some carnavalesque stuff attached. The factual dynamics of the event are in fact fascist: its almost purely Riefenstahl, but the Chinese mass production version of it. It shows us one thing and one thing only: Countries are an illusion, they are all the same. There are no countries.
Martijn Benders
Now that you know what failure looks like, this is how you leave a lasting impression. The hiring manager needs to know what you can do for her. She’s looking for what you did, because that’s the best indication of what you can do for her. Depending on your years of experience, this can range: — from having mastered Microsoft Excel, including pivot tables and Vlookups, to writing VBA code to automating the work of your department and reducing cycle time 80%. — from how met your sales quota three years in a row to how you went to the Achievers Club five years in a row for exceeding quota by 25% or more, and — from organizing an industry conference for 100 guests to organizing and running five industry conferences where attendees numbered between five and ten thousand.
Clark Finnical (Job Hunting Secrets: (from someone who's been there))
National Agro Industries has been manufacturing Seed-cum-fertilizer Drills since 1956. We’re a Ludhiana-based company taking care of farmers all over India by designing modern equipment and machinery. Providing stable & durable machinery is our utmost priority.
National Agro
Automation is no longer just a problem for those working in manufacturing. Physical labor was replaced by robots; mental labor is going to be replaced by AI and software.
Andrew Yang
The second is the stressor to come – the much-heralded fourth industrial revolution where, according to some reports, up to 60 per cent of all jobs will become automated, and work as we know it will disappear. In the past, technological innovation was framed with optimism for huge improvements in standards of living, today the prevalent narrative seems one of fear and dystopia.
Eric Lonergan (Angrynomics)
Our UK company was established in 2012 after identifying the need for a specialist business to provide the service of “Contract Gasketing” in the UK. The decision to start this venture was based on the founders 30+ years in the industrial & automotive adhesive and sealant sector. Contract Gasketing is the use of high precision 6 axis robot systems, to automatically apply complex foam seals or adhesives directly to customers parts. This service being flexible enough to produce individual prototype parts, through the development phases to full, high-volume quantities. The benefit for the end customer, is that this robotic seal application can be adopted without the usual and significant capital investment in specialist automation and sealing technology.
Robafoam