Howard Schultz Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Howard Schultz. Here they are! All 165 of them:

Mass advertising can help build brands, but authenticity is what makes them last. If people believe they share values with a company, they will stay loyal to the brand.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Dream more than others think practical. Expect more than others think possible. Care more than others think wise.
Howard Schultz
In this ever-changing society, the most powerful and enduring brands are built from the heart. They are real and sustainable. Their foundations are stronger because they are built with the strength of the human spirit, not an ad campaign. The companies that are lasting are those that are authentic.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
In times of adversity and change, we really discover who we are and what we're made of.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Grow with discipline. Balance intuition with rigor. Innovate around the core. Don't embrace the status quo. Find new ways to see. Never expect a silver bullet. Get your hands dirty. Listen with empathy and overcommunicate with transparency. Tell your story, refusing to let others define you. Use authentic experiences to inspire. Stick to your values, they are your foundation. Hold people accountable, but give them the tools to succeed. Make the tough choices; it's how you execute that counts. Be decisive in times of crisis. Be nimble. Find truth in trials and lessons in mistakes. Be responsible for what you see, hear, and do. Believe.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
If you examine a butterfly according to the laws of aerodynamics, it shouldn't be able to fly. But the butterfly doesn't know that, so it flies
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
One of the fundamental aspects of leadership, I realized more and more, is the ability to instill confidence in others when you yourself are feeling insecure
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Authentic brands don't emerge from marketing cubicles or advertising agencies. They emanate from everything the company does...
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
My passion. My commitment. This is the most important thing in my life other than my family.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
People want guidance, not rhetoric. They need to know what the plan of action is, and how it will be implemented. They want to be given responsibility to help solve the problem and authority to act on it.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
There are moments in our lives when we summon the courage to make choices that go against reason, against common sense and the wise counsel of people we trust. But we lean forward nonetheless because, despite all risks and rational argument, we believe that the path we are choosing is the right and best thing to do. We refuse to be bystanders, even if we do not know exactly where our actions will lead. This is the kind of passionate conviction that sparks romances, wins battles, and drives people to pursue dreams others wouldn’t dare. Belief in ourselves and in what is right catapults us over hurdles, and our lives unfold. “Life is a sum of all your choices,” wrote Albert Camus. Large or small, our actions forge our futures and hopefully inspire others along the way.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Remember: You'll be left with an empty feeling if you hit the finish line alone. When you run a race as a team, though, you'll discover that much of the reward comes from hitting the tape together. You want to be surrounded not just by cheering onlookers but by a crowd of winners, celebrating as one.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
To stay vigorous, a company needs to provide a stimulating and challenging environment for all these types: the dreamer, the entrepreneur, the professional manager, and the leader. If it doesn't, it risks becoming yet another mediocre corporation.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Whatever you can do, or dream you can, . . . begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it. —GOETHE
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
There's a metaphor Vincent Eades likes to use: "If you examine a butterfly according to the laws of aerodynamics, it shouldn't be able to fly. But the butterfly doesn't know that, so it flies.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
For all the promise of digital media to bring people together, I still believe that the most sincere, lasting powers of human connection come from looking directly into someone else's eyes, with no screen in between.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
To be an enduring, great company, you have to build a mechanism for preventing or solving problems that will long outlast any one individual leader.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Dream more than others think practical. Expect more than others think possible.
Howard Schultz
Work should be personal. For all of us. Not just for the artist and entrepreneur. Work should have meaning for the accountant, the construction worker, the technologist, the manager and the clerk.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
There are moments in our lives when we summon the courage to make choices that go against reason, against common sense and the wise counsel of people we trust.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Early on I realized that I had to hire people smarter and ore qualified than I was in a number of different fields, and I had to let go of a lot of decision-making. I can't tell you how hard that is. But if you've imprinted your values on the people around you, you can dare to trust them to make the right moves.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Life is a sum of all your choices,” wrote Albert Camus. Large or small, our actions forge our futures, hopefully inspiring others along the way.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Every step of the way, I made it a point to underpromise and overdeliver. In the long run, that's the only way to ensure security in any job.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
But the reasons against going to New Orleans--that spicy southern city known for jazz and Mardi Gras and hospitality--were the very reasons we had to go.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
There are moments in our lives when we summon the courage to make choices that go against reason, against common sense and the wise counsel of people we trust. But we lean forward nonetheless because, despite all risks and rational argument, we believe that the path we are choosing is right and best thing to do. We refuse to be bystanders, even if we do not know exactly where our actions will lead.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
When we love something, emotion often drives our actions. This is the gift and the challenge entrepreneurs face every day. The companies we dream of and build from scratch are part of us and intensely personal. They are our families. Our lives. But the entrepreneurial journey is not for everyone. Yes, the highs are high and the rewards can be thrilling. But the lows can break your heart. Entrepreneurs must love what they do to such a degree that doing it is worth sacrifice and, at times, pain. But doing anything else, we think, would be unimaginable
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
when we love something, emotion often drives our actions.
Howard Schultz
After the storm, many citizens left New Orleans to live elsewhere, but those who stayed were determined to rebuild. They loved their city.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
When you’re in a hole, quit digging!
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
For more than three decades, coffee has captured my imagination because it is a beverage about individuals as well as community. A Rwandan farmer. Eighty roast masters at six Starbucks plants on two continents. Thousands of baristas in 54 countries. Like a symphony, coffee's power rests in the hands of a few individuals who orchestrate its appeal. So much can go wrong during the journey from soil to cup that when everything goes right, it is nothing short of brilliant! After all, coffee doesn't lie. It can't. Every sip is proof of the artistry -- technical as well as human -- that went into its creation.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
When you give up,' said a slim older man whose home we rebuilt, 'you might as well lay down and die.' It was obvious that we weren't just giving people back their homes, but also restoring a sense of dignity.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Be bold, but be fair. Don't give in. If others around you have integrity, too, you can prevail
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
All great companies have passed through bad years that forced soul-searching and rethinking of priorities. How we deal with them will be the litmus test.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
This is not his job, I thought, it's his passion.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
So when some refer to Starbucks' coffee as an affordable luxury, I think to myself, Maybe so. But more accurate, I like to think, is that the starbucks experience - personal connection- is an affordable necessity. We are all hungry for community.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
And with the right mentor, don't be afraid to expose your vulnerabilities. Admit you don't know what you don't know. When you acknowledge your weaknesses and ask for advice, you'll be surprised how much others will help.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Whenever I see someone carrying a cup of coffee from a Starbucks competitor, whether it’s an independent coffee shop or a fast-food chain, I take their decision not to come to Starbucks personally. I wonder what I, as Starbucks’ chairman and ceo, might have done to keep them away and what I might do to encourage them to come back or to try us for the first time.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Protect and preserve your core customers," he [Jim Sinegal, cofounder and CEO of Costco] told our marketing team when I invited him to speak to us. "The cost of losing your core customers and trying to get them back during a down economy will be much greater than the cost of investing in them and trying to keep them.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Just. Plain. [Fu*king.] Grilled. Swordfish.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Hiring people is an art, not a science, and resumes can't tell you whether someone will fit into a company's culture.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
The world belongs to the few people who are not afraid to get their hands dirty.” I
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Infusing work with purpose and meaning, however, is a two-way street. Yes, love what you do, but your company should love you back.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
There is a word that comes to my mind when I think about our company and our people. That word is 'love.' I love Starbucks because everything we've tried to do is steeped in humanity. Respect and dignity. Passion and laughter. Compassion, community, and responsibility. Authenticity. These are Starbucks' touchstones, the source of our pride. Valuing personal connections at a time when so many people sit alone in front of screens; aspiring to build human relationships in an age when so many issues polarize so many; and acting ethically, even if it costs more, when corners are routinely cut--these are honorable pursuits, at the core of what we set out to be.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Many of us spent time talking with the men and women who had lived through Katrina, and we heard stories of not only individual sacrifice and loss, but also of neighbors taking care of neighbors. The power of community was so evident in New Orleans.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
At Starbucks 0 as in any business, in any life - there are so many hectic moments during the day when we are simply trying to do the job, trying to put out the fires, trying to solve any number of small problems, that we often lose sight of what it is we're really here to do.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Large or small, our actions forge our futures, hopefully inspiring others along the way.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Her tecrübe sizi bir sonrakine hazırlar. Bir sonrakinin ne olacağını hiç bilemezsiniz.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Starbucks has always been about so much more than coffee. But without great coffee, we have no reason to exist.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
I could not allow us, or myself, to drift into a sea of mediocrity after so many years of hard work
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
One of the terrible tragedies, for me, was the fact that my father passed away before he could witness what I achieved.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
I’ve said often that every enterprise and organization has a memory. And those memories create a path for people to follow.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
The point of a coffee store was not just to teach customers about fine coffee but to show them how to enjoy it.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
In the course of the year I spent trying to raise money, I spoke to 242 people, and 217 of them said “no.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Whatever you do, don’t play it safe. Don’t do things the way they’ve always been done. Don’t try to fit the system. If you do what’s expected of you, you will never accomplish more than others expect
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
The best ideas are those that create a new mind-set or sense a need before others do, and it takes an astute investor to recognize an idea that not only is ahead of its time but also has long-term prospects.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
History shows that silence is unforgivable, for it gives bigotry license. And when meek words masquerade as moral courage, they are perceived as indifference and give the worst of human nature permission to flourish.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
But my story is as much one of perseverance and drive as it is of talent and luck. I willed it to happen. I took my life in my hands, learned from anyone I could, grabbed what opportunity I could, and molded my success step by step. Fear of failure drove me at first, but as I tackled each challenge, my anxiety was replaced by a growing sense of optimism. Once you overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles, other hurdles become less daunting.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life depend on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received. —ALBERT EINSTEIN
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Less than 1 percent of our population have served our military abroad since the September 11, 2001, attacks. Add their direct family members, and they still amount to less than 5 percent of the nation. Most Americans have no skin in the game.
Howard Schultz (For Love of Country: What Our Veterans Can Teach Us About Citizenship, Heroism, and Sacrifice)
Bir şirketin, çalışanlarıyla arasında kurduğu güven ilişkisinden daha değerli bir şey yoktur. İnsanlar yönetimin kazancı adilce paylaştırmadığına inanırsa şirketten soğurlar. Yönetime güvenmemeye başladıklarında ise şirketin geleceği tartışmalı hale gelir.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
I’ve never thought of the third place just as a physical environment. For me, the third place has always been a feeling. An emotion. An aspiration that all people can come together and be uplifted as a result of a sense of belonging. This is the cornerstone of our business, yes, but “belonging” is also a basic human right, which should be afforded all members of a society.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Living in the same city as Microsoft, I’m only too aware that, even in low-technology businesses like coffee, the Next Big Thing could knock the dominant player into second place tomorrow. I keep pushing to make sure that Starbucks thinks of the Next Big Thing before it has even crossed anybody else’s mind. In fact, Don Valencia is working on it even as I’m writing this book.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
There are moments in our lives when we summon the courage to make choices that go against reason, against common sense and the wise counsel of people we trust. But we lean forward nonetheless because, despite all risks and rational argument, we believe that the path we are choosing is the right and best thing to do. We refuse to be bystanders, even if we do not know exactly where our actions will lead.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
I can be a bit romantic about history, but I’m also pragmatic about the present. America cannot, of course, have open borders. We need a clear, sustainable immigration policy, one that better manages the flow of people who do not pose a threat and can contribute to our economy and culture. Immigration laws can be sensible without extinguishing the idea that brought so many here and compels so many to stay.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Günlük hayatta, kolay yolu seçmenizi isteyen dostlarınızdan, ailenizden ve iş arkadaşlarınızdan, mevcut yöntemleri tatbik etmeniz yönünde öyle çok baskı görürsünüz ki sadece statükoyu kabul etmemeniz değil sizden bekleneni yapmanız da zorlaşabilir. Ama kendinize, hayalinize gerçekten inandığınızda, kontrolü elinize almak ve vizyonunuzu gerçeğe dönüştürmek için elinizden gelebilecek her şeyi yapmanız gerekir.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Çoğumuz, hayallerimizin suya düşecek gibi olduğu önemli anlarla karşı karşıya kalırız. Bu tür olaylara karşı hazırlıklı değilsinizdir ama nasıl tepki vereceğiniz önemlidir. Önemli olan sahip olduğunuz değerleri unutmamanızdır. Cesur ama dürüst olun. Teslim olmayın. Çevrenizdeki diğer insanlar da dürüstse başarırsınız. Beklenmedik toplar kafanıza çarptığında savunmasız kalabilirsiniz. İşte böyle durumlarda bir fırsatı kaçırabilirsiniz. Böyle anlar, aynı zamanda gücünüzün test edildiği zamanlardır.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Large or small, our actions forge our futures, hopefully inspiring others along the way. Entrepreneurs must love what they do to such a degree that doing it is worth sacrifice and, at times, pain. But doing anything else, we think, would be unimaginable. In times of adversity and change, we really discover who we are and what we’re made of. Effective leaders share two intertwined attributes: an unbridled level of confidence about where their organizations are headed, and the ability to bring people along. Fixing moments, like mopping a dirty floor, only provides short-term satisfaction. But take the time to understand the cause of the problem—like how to keep a floor from getting so dirty in the first place—solves, and maybe eliminates, a problem. How leaders embody the values they espouse sets a tone, an expectation, that guides their employees’ behaviors. While I would not want to constantly battle against the odds, the raw feeling of accomplishing something that others did not think possible, or leading people beyond where they thought they could go, is extremely gratifying.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
What distinguishes the talented person who makes it from the person who has even more talent but doesn’t get ahead? Look at the aspiring actors waiting tables in New York, as an example: Many of them are probably no less gifted than stars like Robert DeNiro and Susan Sarandon. Part of what constitutes success is timing and chance. But most of us have to create our own opportunities and be prepared to jump when we see a big one others can’t see. It’s one thing to dream, but when the moment is right, you’ve got to be willing to leave what’s familiar and go out to find your own sound. That’s what I did in 1985. If I hadn’t, Starbucks wouldn’t be what it is today.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Hardy reinforces his narrative with stories of heroes who didn’t have the right education, the right connections, and who could have been counted out early as not having the DNA for success: “Richard Branson has dyslexia and had poor academic performance as a student. Steve Jobs was born to two college students who didn’t want to raise him and gave him up for adoption. Mark Cuban was born to an automobile upholsterer. He started as a bartender, then got a job in software sales from which he was fired.”8 The list goes on. Hardy reminds his readers that “Suze Orman’s dad was a chicken farmer. Retired General Colin Powell was a solid C student. Howard Schultz, the CEO of Starbucks, was born in a housing authority in the Bronx … Barbara Corcoran started as a waitress and admits to being fired from more jobs than most people hold in a lifetime. Pete Cashmore, the CEO of Mashable, was sickly as a child and finished high school two years late due to medical complications. He never went to college.” What do each of these inspiring leaders and storytellers have in common? They rewrote their own internal narratives and found great success. “The biographies of all heroes contain common elements. Becoming one is the most important,”9 writes Chris Matthews in Jack Kennedy, Elusive Hero. Matthews reminds his readers that young John F. Kennedy was a sickly child and bedridden for much of his youth. And what did he do while setting school records for being in the infirmary? He read voraciously. He read the stories of heroes in the pages of books by Sir Walter Scott and the tales of King Arthur. He read, and dreamed of playing the hero in the story of his life. When the time came to take the stage, Jack was ready.
Carmine Gallo (The Storyteller's Secret: From TED Speakers to Business Legends, Why Some Ideas Catch On and Others Don't)
When companies fail, or fail to grow, it’s almost always because they don’t invest in the people, the systems, and the processes they need.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Sporcati le mani. Ascolta e comunica con trasparenza. Racconta la tua storia e non lasciare che siano gli altri a definirti. Trai ispirazione da chi ha esperienze reali da raccontarti. Lega le loro storie ai tuoi valori. Fai scelte dure: è l’azione quella che conta. Cerca la verità e le lezioni in ogni errore. Sii responsabile per quello che vedi, ascolti e fai.
Howard Schultz
When I thought about our thicket of challenges both known and unknown, the word that came to mind was familiar and apt: “Onward.” More than just a rallying cry or an attitude, “onward” seemed to connote the dual nature of how Starbucks had to do battle and do business in these increasingly complex, uncertain times. “Onward” implied optimism with eyes wide open, a never-ending journey that honored the past while reinventing the future. “Onward” meant fighting with not just heart and hope, but also intelligence and operational rigor, constantly striving to balance benevolence with accountability. “Onward” was about forging ahead with steadfast belief in ourselves while putting customers’ needs first and respecting the power of competition. Yes, everyone at Starbucks could indulge his or her passion—be it for coffee, the environment, marketing, or design—but only if we did not lose sight of the need for profits. “Onward” was about getting dirty but coming out clean; balancing our responsibility to shareholders with social conscience; juggling research and finances with instinct and humanity. And “onward” described the fragile act of balancing by which Starbucks would survive our crucible and thrive beyond it. With heads held high but feet firmly planted in reality. This was how we would win. I knew this to be true.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
But I do think effective leaders share two intertwined attributes: an unbridled level of confidence about where their organizations are headed, and the ability to bring people along.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
It’s significant that the revenue generated by the large numbers of small bets Howard Schultz made after retaking control of Starbucks is almost equal to the company’s total annual profit. In a good year Starbucks earns about one billion dollars on revenues of ten billion; the incremental revenue generated by his many small bets exceeds the company’s total average annual profits. A strong argument can be made that without the many small bets he made—excluding their potential effect on future revenues and profits—the company would still be struggling to make a profit.
Jason Jennings (The Reinventors: How Extraordinary Companies Pursue Radical Continuous Change)
Ultimately, brands are built by people who passionately believe in their brands. Indeed, many of the world’s best brands can be linked to a single person: Howard Schultz created Starbucks, Steve Jobs built Apple, Pleasant Roland formed American Girl, Richard Branson developed Virgin, and Phil Knight was the driving force behind Nike. Brand builders understand and believe in the power of brands.     Tim
Alice M. Tybout (Kellogg on Branding: The Marketing Faculty of The Kellogg School of Management)
Whatever you do, don’t play it safe. Don’t do things the way they’ve always been done. Don’t try to fit the system. If you do what’s expected of you, you’ll never accomplish more than others expect.
Howard Schultz
Во многих компаниях страстными проповедниками рискованных, смелых идей становятся менеджеры среднего звена и даже служащие низшего уровня. Важно, чтобы менеджеры прислушивались к этим идеям, испытывали их и применяли на практике, даже если руководство настроено скептически.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Труднее всего было поддерживать высокий моральный дух. Нельзя идти к предполагаемому инвестору и не выказывать в полной мере всю страсть и энтузиазм по поводу предлагаемой идеи. Нельзя показывать, что вы угнетены, когда встречаетесь с владельцем недвижимости, чтобы договориться об аренде. Но если на этой неделе у вас уже состоялось три или четыре бесплодные встречи, как подстегнуть себя? Приходится быть хамелеоном. Вот вы выступаете перед кем-то. Вы подавлены, но просто обязаны говорить так же уверенно, как будто это ваша первая встреча.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Лучшие идеи — те, что создают новый образ мышления или потребность.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Я старался сделать Starbucks такой компанией, в которой желал бы работать своему отцу. Не имея даже аттестата средней школы, он наверняка никогда не смог бы стать директором. Но если бы он получил работу в одной из наших кофеен или на обжарочном заводе, он не ушел бы оттуда в отчаянии из-за того, что его не ценили. Он получал бы хорошие медицинские пособия, владел бы фондовыми опционами и работал бы в атмосфере, где на его жалобы и предложения реагировали  бы своевременно и относились бы к ним с уважением.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Я настолько тесно ассоциировал себя со Starbucks, что любой ее недостаток воспринимал как свой собственный. Поэтому я работал с сотрудниками над совершенствованием навыков дружелюбного обслуживания покупателей и разрабатывал пособия, предназначенные помочь нашим клиентам узнать побольше о кофе.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Нет ничего более ценного, чем доверие и уверенность в отношениях со служащими. Если люди считают, что руководство поступает несправедливо, они отчуждаются. А как только они перестают доверять руководству, на кону — будущее компании.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Я рано понял, что должен брать на работу людей более умных и квалифицированных, чем я сам, в целом ряде областей, и отдать в их руки известную часть полномочий. Это так трудно, что не выразить словами. Но если вы уже внушили свои принципы окружающим, смело доверьтесь им, они примут правильное решение.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
But just as valuable, he imprinted upon the company the power of candor and the value of truth telling. He taught me—a kid who grew up trying to keep peace in my own home—that disagreement was not a sign of disrespect, and that heated conflict was not something to avoid. Just the opposite. If Howard had an opinion, he voiced it, and he encouraged others to do so, too. He didn’t hesitate to argue with people, especially me. Through his leadership style, I saw that honest communication, even when it stings emotionally, is the root of productive problem solving.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
When you do something for the first time, questions and problems are the two things you can count on.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
I don’t say that all people have equal talent,” Kennedy told his crowd of supporters. “But what I do say is that everyone should have their chance to develop their talent equally.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Ihave come to believe that people must not stand by in the face of human distress and broken systems. And if these two predicaments are intertwined—if human suffering is the result of others abdicating their responsibilities, or showing a lack of respect for another person—it becomes what can only be described as an injustice.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Speaking out is a necessary beginning, but not the same as real change.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Believe in your dreams and dream big. And then after you've done that, dream bigger!
Howard Schultz
Оглядываясь назад, я понял, что мы сделали брэнд модным таким способом, о каком не писал ни один учебник в бизнес–школах. Мы создали брэнд Starbucks прежде всего с помощью своих людей, а не покупателей — подход прямо противоположный тому, что используют компании, производящие крекеры и овсяные хлопья. Поскольку мы были уверены, что лучший способ оправдать и превзойти ожидания потребителей — нанимать и обучать лучших людей, мы вкладывали в сотрудников, рьяно относившихся к хорошему кофе. Страсть и преданность сделали наших партнеров лучшими посланниками нашего кофе и нашего брэнда. Их знания и усердие завоевывали покупателей и заставляли их возвращаться к нам.
Howard Schultz
Многие предприниматели попадают в ловушку: они так захвачены своим собственным видением, что когда идея возникает у какого-то сотрудника, особенно у такого, который не вписывается в уже существующее видение, возникает соблазн подавить ее. Я почти сделал то же самое с одним из самых успешных продуктов Starbucks, ледяной смесью черного кофе и молока, которую мы называем Frappuccino.
Howard Schultz
Если мы поприветствуем посетителей, обменяемся несколькими словами помимо заказа напитка, а затем приготовим его в точности так, как нравится клиенту, они захотят вернуться к нам снова. В Америке очень много посредственных розничных компаний. Будь то химчистка, супермаркет или банк, общение урезается до номера кредитки или личного идентификационного кода. Вы — одна из тысяч транзакций в очереди клиентов, предшествующих вам и идущих следом. Но когда вы сталкиваетесь с опытом более высокого уровня, когда к вам относятся доброжелательно, когда кто-то прилагает усилия, чтобы вы почувствовали себя кем-то особенным, когда вас приветствуют улыбкой и считают умным, это не скоро забывается.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
55 percent—about 1.4 million veterans among this generation—said they feel disconnected from civilian life in America.
Howard Schultz (For Love of Country: What Our Veterans Can Teach Us About Citizenship, Heroism, and Sacrifice)
At its core, I believe leadership is about instilling confidence in others
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Going against conventional wisdom is the foundation of innovation
Howard Schultz
The best innovations sense and fulfill a need before others realize the need even exist, creating a new mind-set
Howard Schultz
At the very heart of being a merchant is a desire to tell a story by making sensory, emotional connections. Once, twice, or 16,000 times.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Starbucks was under attack, mostly from within.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Starbucks is intensely personal. Aside from brushing their teeth, what else do so many people do habitually every day? They drink coffee. Same time. Same store. Same beverage. There's a special relationship millions have developed with our brand, our people, our stores, and our coffee. Preserving that relationship is an honorable but enormous responsibility.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
When we went to automatic espresso machines, we solved a major problem in terms of speed of service and efficiency. At the same time, we overlooked the fact that we would remove much of the romance and theater that was in play. .
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Skepticism has come to be synonymous with sophistication, and glibness is mistaken for intelligence.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
A founder's perspective is unique. Entrepreneurs are builders, and the lens through which I view Starbucks and the marketplace is somewhat different from what it would be if I were a professionally schooled manager.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
The merchant's success depends on his or her ability to tell a story. What people see or hear or smell or do when they enter a space guides their feelings, enticing them to celebrate whatever the seller has to offer.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Reading: “Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life Without Losing Its Soul” Book by Howard Schultz “When you’re surrounded by people who share a passionate commitment around a common purpose, anything is possible.” Howard Schultz, Executive Chairman of Starbucks #smitanairjain #leadership #womenintech #thoughtleaders #tedxspeaker #technology #tech #success #strategy #startuplife #startupbusiness #startup #mentor #leaders #itmanagement #itleaders #innovation #informationtechnology #influencers #Influencer #hightech #fintechinfluencer #fintech #entrepreneurship #entrepreneurs #economy #economics #development #businessintelligence #business
Howard Schultz
Behind every cup of Starbucks is the world's highest-quality, ethically sourced coffee beans; baristas with health-care coverage and stock in the company; farmers who are treated fairly and humanely; a mission to treat all people with respect and dignity; and passionate coffee experts whose knowledge about coffee cannot be matched by any other coffee company.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
So many of us are hungry to restore a collective sense of pride in our nation. And we have what it takes to do so. Yet many people have become numb, even accepting, to the shockingly cruel rhetoric we sometimes hear from our neighbors and leaders. But we should remember there are more Americans who speak out against intolerance than those who spew it. Just because anger and fear are louder than kindness and optimism does not mean that anger and fear must prevail, or define a new American identity. The negativity that streams through our media and social feeds is a false—or at least incomplete—narrative. Every time harsh Tweets dominate news cycles, we can remind ourselves of Mary Poole’s empathy in Montana, or the compassion of Rebecca Crowder in West Virginia, or Bryan Stevenson’s adamant calls for justice in our courts. Countless acts of dignity are unfolding offline, away from earshot, and they matter. We already have what it takes to rise above divisiveness and the vitriol of a hurtful few and steer the country toward an even better “us.” Not so we can be great again, but so we can become an even stronger, safer, more fair, prosperous, and inclusive version of ourselves. Those who champion common-sense problem solving, and there are legions of us, are eager to keep fixing, reinventing, improving. In these pages, I tried to amplify our existing potential to eclipse dysfunction by recounting Mark Pinsky’s collaborative spirit, for example, and Michael Crow’s innovative bent, and Brandon Dennison’s entrepreneurial gumption, and Dakota Keyes’ steadfast belief in her young students, and in herself. They are reminders that the misplaced priorities of President Trump and his administration do not represent the priorities of the majority of Americans. And while there are heroes who hold office, members of both parties, Democrats and Republicans, have been complicit in the fracturing of trust that has plagued our political system for years now. In fact, I believe that the American people as a whole are better than our current political class.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Just because others cannot see your vision doesn’t mean that vision isn’t achievable.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
For me, the idea of a “third place” is not just something that exists between four walls. It is a mind-set. A way to exist in the world. That’s why I set out to build a profitable business that also expressed a core ethos: that people of all kinds can come together and uplift one another.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Ideals that our nation was founded on, including equality and liberty for all, have yet to be fully realized. In some corners, their very existence is being threatened. The continuation of American democracy also is not a foregone conclusion. In fact, the American Dream that I have lived and still believe in—the notion that everyone should have an equal opportunity to rise from the ground up—is at a crossroads. More people need to have a fair chance at their dreams, however humble or ambitious those dreams may be, and now is the time to talk about what those chances might look like for everyone. Together, we have the potential to reimagine and deliver on the promise of our country, as I hope this book reveals.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Starbucks is in every state. Whether people like the company or not, we are an undeniable presence in communities, on the ground across America. I always tried to spend as much time as I could on that ground and in our stores, talking to partners and customers—and listening more than I spoke. Among the things I’ve learned is that the cliché is true: most people do share the same desires—to be valued, to be understood, to be loved, to have a chance to go after our dreams, however humble or audacious those dreams may be. Beyond that, I’ve come to believe that the majority of people have potential that is easy to overlook, but that when tapped is boundless. Most people I have met in America want to be in control of their own fate. They just need a chance.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
The faults of history cannot be undone, but if we confront them we can begin to learn, change the present, and create a better future. Discussion is a good place to start, but talking can never be enough.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Empathy and emotions do not equate to knowledge or true understanding about others’ circumstances.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope,” Kennedy famously said in a speech delivered in South Africa in 1966 to condemn apartheid as well as the discrimination in his own country. “Crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
I am not ashamed of the wealth I have accumulated through Starbucks’ success. But I have never been interested in broadcasting my personal net worth. I’m very private in that regard. Money is not a measure by which I judge myself or want others to judge me. At the end of the day, we must each close our eyes and find peace with the decisions we have made. Among the things I have come to understand is how money can too easily amplify the best and worst of human nature. People with vast wealth are not immune to the heartbreaks of life, some of which are brought about by that wealth. There are also emotional aches that no amount of money can possibly ease. And while money can afford us our dreams, it can also imbue our failures with the destructive breadth of a tsunami.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Our values were human values. Ethics, integrity, sharing, support, teamwork, caring, respect, and loyalty were all ideals I included in that first mission statement. I also wanted to instill a sense of ambitious camaraderie: “We will set aggressive goals and drive ourselves to achieve them,” the mission statement said. “It’s an adventure, and we’re in it together.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Being entrepreneurial means you will fail. You just have to be willing to listen to people who tell you something is broken, and then fix it.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Whether you are Republican or Democrat or independent or Libertarian, it doesn’t matter,” I said. “I think we all have a sense that there’s something not quite right [in the country], that we’re drifting toward mediocrity.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Your station in life does not define you. The promise of America is for all of us.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
What I know in my soul is that the prejudice, inequality, and broken systems that do exist are wrong and dangerous. As Americans, they anger and shame so many of us. Personally, I can’t just sit on a couch and watch the news, or run a company, while society erupts, or walk into some form of retirement and be still. On the sidelines is not where most of us want to be. We must see beyond what’s in front of us. We must reimagine the promise of America. How? By using empathy to try to understand, raising our voices to condemn darkness, and casting our votes to choose the kind of leadership we want our grandchildren to grow up with. But we must also use our hard skills and resources to craft a better reality for ourselves, our neighbors and those with whom we share this land. We can protest but also plan. Search for the truth and share it broadly. Listen to others, and blend ideas. Criticize, but also create. It’s time to commit to a deeper level of shared accountability—to neighbor as well as to stranger, and to self. Americans will always have differences, because that is the nature of the republic we have created. But we owe our children a less divisive America, just as many of our parents fought for a less divided country than the one they inherited. It is time for all of us to elevate the best of ourselves. It is time to climb, and to reclaim the high ground. To do so we must make a choice, one that we have made before. It is a choice between renewal or decline. Our country has a history of renewal at moments when we’ve faced decline, but we also know that renewing our nation’s honor is not a forgone conclusion. The future is not going to bend toward America because we’re American. We’re going to have to bend it ourselves, nudge it, move it. At every turn, let us choose to replace meanness with kindness; pettiness with significance; hate with love; gridlock with compromise; complaints with creative solutions. As a nation, we must be tough but not at the expense of one another. So let us also champion and celebrate those with strength of character—the upstanders among us—because there are so many whose daily intentions and actions echo the heroism of the past, who strive for honesty in the present, and who are already reimagining the promise of America, and will do so for years to come. Above all, let us choose to believe in each other because now and always—we are in this together.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
criticize by creation, not by finding fault.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
To see my world not as it was, but as it could be. This became a lifetime habit. And in some ways, that’s the story I’ve tried to tell in this book: how we can all reimagine a better future by learning from the past with as much clarity and wisdom as we can muster, and by summoning the will and doing the work to bring that future into being. This has been my life’s journey.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
One way to describe the American Dream is as a promise—a promise of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Inherent to that pursuit, I believe, is having access to opportunities like education and good jobs, healthcare and ownership, support from family and friends, and generosity from strangers. Opportunity shows up as luck, but is also embedded into our social, governmental, and corporate constructs.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
It is important to ground ourselves in the reason for the lunch counter sit-ins and freedom rides,” she said, referring to the civil rights movement. Freedom and equality are not just about soothing emotions and restoring dignity, “but about what it means to be a full citizen with all its benefits” and privileges. Discrimination, I understood her to be saying, hurts feelings and breaks hearts. But it’s about so much more: it blocks real chances to be our best selves and live our fullest lives in a country that promises just that.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
Big opportunities lie in the creation of something new. But that innovation has to be relevant and inspiring, or it will burst into color and fade away as quickly as fireworks.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
We dot our floors with microkitchens, pockets where you can grab a coffee, a piece of organic fruit, or a snack, and take a few minutes to relax. Often you’ll see Googlers chatting and comparing notes over a cookie and a chessboard or around a pool table. Sergey once said, “No one should be more than two hundred feet away from food,” but the real purpose of these microkitchens is to do the same thing Howard Schultz tried to create with Starbucks. Schultz saw the need for a “third place” beyond the home and office, where people could relax, refresh, and connect with one another. We try to do the same thing, by giving Googlers a place to meet up that looks and feels different from their desk. And we use the placement of these microkitchens to draw people from different groups together. Often they’ll sit at the border between two different teams, with the goal of having those people bump into one another. At minimum, they might have a great conversation. And maybe they’ll hit on an idea for our users that hasn’t been thought of yet.
Laszlo Bock (Work Rules!: Insights from Inside Google That Will Transform How You Live and Lead)
Если вы предлагаете покупателям то, к чему они не привыкли, нечто настолько лучшее, что потребуется время, чтобы привить к нему вкус, — можно вызвать у них ощущение открытия, восхищения и преданности, которое привяжет их. На это может уйти больше времени, но если ваш товар превосходен, лучше приучить покупателей любить его, чем приспосабливаться к пристрастиям массового рынка.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Основатели Starbucks поняли основополагающую истину торговли: чтобы что-то значить для покупателей, нужно сделать ставку на ум и искушенность и научить тех, кто жаждет знаний.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Life is a sum of all your choices,
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Next, the memo summarized seven priorities: be recognized as the undisputed coffee authority; engage and inspire our partners with better training and new benefits; reignite customers’ emotional attachment to our brand; expand our stores around the world, but try to make each one feel like the heart of the local neighborhood; be a leader in ethical sourcing and environmental impact efforts; create new, relevant products to help grow revenue; operate a more efficient and profitable business model.
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
If you're really honest with yourself, as I have tried to be with myself, along the way in building the company, there has been something we have lost. And it's no one's fault and there's no punishment or blame. Weare what we are—but the question is, What are we going to do about it and how are we going to fix it?
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Starbucks Venture Scape Summary Starbucks had been driving rapid expansion globally but in the process the company had lost some of its magic with customers. In an eighteen-month period, ceo Howard Schultz and his leadership team undertook a venture to reframe the company’s mission, shift employee mind-sets, and reinvigorate the customer experience to bring Starbucks back to its roots.
Nancy Duarte (Illuminate: Ignite Change Through Speeches, Stories, Ceremonies, and Symbols)
I had written hundreds of memos during my 26 years at the company, and all had shared a common thread. They were about self-examination in the pursuit of excellence, and a willingness not to embrace the status quo. This is a cornerstone of my leadership philosophy.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Our strategy was to do more of what had worked in the past. But we were not pushing ourselves to do things better or differently. We were not innovating in lasting ways. We were venturing into unrelated businesses like entertainment. And we were pushing products that deviated too far from the core coffee experience.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
We also sold books, creating several best sellers and helping to put unknown authors on the map.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
In Seattle, Washington, in 1971, Howard Schultz, the owner of a local coffee roasting and distribution company, noted the increasing affluence of the American public and their desire to receive gracious treatment in their daily activities. Schultz recognized that there was a market for small businesses featuring top quality coffee and an opportunity to relax in an attractive environment. To take advantage of these emerging Minitrends, Mr. Schultz initiated the very successful Starbucks chain which offers top quality coffee drinks in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere Starbucks has a long record of appreciating Minitrends, but failed to recognize the trend that more economically-stressed customers were beginning to opt for similar, lower-cost drinks offered by fast food restaurants such as McDonald’s. While still popular, in summer 2008, the Starbucks company announced the termination of 1,000 employees, and in November 2008, the company reported a 98 percent decline in profit for the third quarter of the year. To be more economically competitive, Starbucks has recently introduced a line of instant coffee.
John H. Vanston (Minitrends: How Innovators & Entrepreneurs Discover & Profit From Business & Technology Trends: Between Megatrends & Microtrends Lie MINITRENDS, Emerging Business Opportunities in the New Economy)
It’s one thing to dream, but when the moment is right, you’ve got to be willing to leave what’s familiar and go out to find your own sound
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks, believed the most powerful brands are built from the heart.
David Kelly (Social Media: Strategies To Mastering Your Brand- Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat (Social Media, Social Media Marketing))
It is not the fault of the baristas working behind the counter. It is the responsibility of the leadership team to keep our culture alive, growing and thriving.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
When you’re surrounded by people who share a passionate commitment around a common purpose, anything is possible.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
A well-built brand is the culmination of intangibles that do not directly flow to the revenue or profitability of a company, but contribute to its texture. Forsaking them can take a subtle, collective toll.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
I've been really lucky. And I really, genuinely believe that if you tell people that they have what it takes to succeed, they'll prove you right.
Howard Schultz
Dream more than others think practical. Expect more than others think possible. Care more than others think wise. — HOWARD SCHULTZ, FOUNDER OF STARBUCKS
Ido Leffler (Get Big Fast and Do More Good: Start Your Business, Make It Huge, and Change the World)
Howard Schultz, the man who built Starbucks into a colossus, isn’t so different from Travis in some ways.5.22 He grew up in a public housing project in Brooklyn, sharing a two-bedroom apartment with his parents and two siblings. When he was seven years old, Schultz’s father broke his ankle and lost his job driving a diaper truck. That was all it took to throw the family into crisis. His father, after his ankle healed, began cycling through a series of lower-paying jobs. “My dad never found his way,” Schultz told me. “I saw his self-esteem get battered. I felt like there was so much more he could have accomplished.” Schultz’s school was a wild, overcrowded place with asphalt playgrounds and kids playing football, basketball, softball, punch ball, slap ball, and any other game they could devise. If your team lost, it could take an hour to get another turn. So Schultz made sure his team always won, no matter the cost. He would come home with bloody scrapes on his elbows and knees, which his mother would gently rinse with a wet cloth. “You don’t quit,” she told him. His competitiveness earned him a college football scholarship (he broke his jaw and never played a game), a communications degree, and eventually a job as a Xerox salesman in New York City. He’d wake up every morning, go to a new midtown office building, take the elevator to the top floor, and go door-to-door, politely inquiring if anyone was interested in toner or copy machines. Then he’d ride the elevator down one floor and start all over again. By the early 1980s, Schultz was working for a plastics manufacturer when he noticed that a little-known retailer in Seattle was ordering an inordinate number of coffee drip cones. Schultz flew out and fell in love with the company. Two years later, when he heard that Starbucks, then just six stores, was for sale, he asked everyone he knew for money and bought it. That was 1987. Within three years, there were eighty-four stores; within six years, more than a thousand. Today, there are seventeen thousand stores in more than fifty countries.
Charles Duhigg (The Power Of Habit: Why We Do What We Do In Life And Business)
Any company, when faced with adversity, would be tempted to go forward with an idea that promises to quickly erase pain. But in business as in life, people have to stay true to their guiding principles.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Old is beautiful, but not if it is neglected.—Aldo Lorenzi, That Shop in Via Montenapoleone
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Finally, the stores’ design, so critical to atmosphere, seemed to lack the warm, cozy feeling of a neighborhood gathering place. Some people called our interior spaces cookie-cutter or sterile: Clearly we have had to streamline store design to gain efficiencies of scale . . . [but] one of the results has been stores that no longer have the soul of the past. . . .
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
How leaders embody the values they espouse sets a tone, an expectation, that guides their employees’ behaviors.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Wealth is the means and people are the ends. All our material riches will avail us little if we do not use them to expand the opportunities of our people. —JOHN F. KENNEDY, STATE OF THE UNION , JANUARY 1962
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Because not everyone can take charge of his or her destiny, those who do rise to positions of authority have a responsibility to those whose daily work keeps the enterprise running, not only to steer the correct course but to make sure no one is left behind.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
If you examine a butterfly according to the laws of aerodynamics, it shouldn’t be able to fly. But the butterfly doesn’t know that, so it flies.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
The businesses that thrive over the long haul are likely to be those that understand that cost cutting and revenue growing aren’t mutually exclusive. Eternal vigilance to both the top and bottom lines is the new ticket to prosperity.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
If you can raise profits by shaving costs on your main product and 90 percent of your customers wouldn’t even notice, why not just do it? Because we can tell the difference.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Twenty Million New Customers Are Worth Taking a Risk For
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
to
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
people became not just more cost conscious, but also more environmentally aware, health minded, and ethically driven.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
enough. Standing for an ovation at a baseball game is not enough. To do right by our veterans—to recognize their value to our society and fulfill our solemn obligation to those who volunteered to protect the rest of us—we first have to understand what they have accomplished and what they offer our nation.
Howard Schultz (For Love of Country: What Our Veterans Can Teach Us About Citizenship, Heroism, and Sacrifice)
At its core, I believe leadership is about instilling confidence in others,
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
«El coste de perder a vuestros clientes más fieles para luego tener que intentar recuperarlos en un momento económico tan bajo como el presente será mucho mayor que el coste de invertir en ellos e intentar no perderlos».
Howard Schultz (El desafío Starbucks: Cómo Starbucks luchó por su vida sin perder su alma)
Part 2: Confidence
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Without fanfare, Starbucks was also going to open two coffee shops in Seattle that were not like any of our existing stores. Each would serve Starbucks coffee but be unique
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
His latest job [My Dad] had been as a truck driver, picking up and delivering diapers. For months, he had complained bitterly about the odor and the mess, saying it was the worst job in the world. But now that he had lost it, he seemed to want it back.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It - How Starbucks Built A Company One Cup At A Time)
Years later, that image of my father -slumped on the family couch, his leg in a cast, unable to work or earn money, and ground down by the world- is still burned into my mind. Looking back now, I have a lot of respect for my dad. He never finished high school, but he was an honest man who worked hard.
Howard Schultz (Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time)
Kiss my ass, ya shiksa!
Howard Schultz (From the Ground Up: A Journey to Reimagine the Promise of America)
No business can do well for its shareholders without first doing well by all the people its business touches.
Howard Schultz (Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life without Losing Its Soul)
Recently, Howard Schultz, former CEO of Starbucks, came out against the term “billionaire,” instead preferring to be called “a person of means,” as though he’s now ashamed of what he’s built.
Jen Lancaster (Welcome to the United States of Anxiety: Observations from a Reforming Neurotic)