H G Wells Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to H G Wells. Here they are! All 100 of them:

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We all have our time machines, don't we. Those that take us back are memories...And those that carry us forward, are dreams.
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H.G. Wells
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Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo.
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H.G. Wells (The Wife of Sir Isaac Harman)
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If you fell down yesterday, stand up today.
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H.G. Wells
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Our true nationality is mankind.
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H.G. Wells
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The forceps of our minds are clumsy forceps, and crush the truth a little in taking hold of it.
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H.G. Wells
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Advertising is legitimised lying.
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H.G. Wells
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Sometimes, you have to step outside of the person you've been and remember the person you were meant to be. The person you want to be. The person you are.
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H.G. Wells
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Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no need of change.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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If we don't end war, war will end us.
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H.G. Wells
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It sounds plausible enough tonight, but wait until tomorrow. Wait for the common sense of the morning.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.
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H.G. Wells
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Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe.
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H.G. Wells
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We should strive to welcome change and challenges, because they are what help us grow. With out them we grow weak like the Eloi in comfort and security. We need to constantly be challenging ourselves in order to strengthen our character and increase our intelligence.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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Losing your way on a journey is unfortunate. But, losing your reason for the journey is a fate more cruel.
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H.G. Wells
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Looking at these stars suddenly dwarfed my own troubles and all the gravities of terrestrial life.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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If you are in difficulties with a book, try the element of surprise: attack it at an hour when it isn't expecting it.
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H.G. Wells
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Life... is like a grapefruit. Well, it's sort of orangey-yellow and dimpled on the outside, wet and squidgy in the middle. It's got pips inside, too. Oh, and some people have half a one for breakfast.
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Douglas Adams (So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #4))
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once you lose yourself, you have two choices: find the person you used to be, or lose that person completely.
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H.G. Wells
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What really matters is what you do with what you have.
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H.G. Wells
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There's truths you have to grow into.
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H.G. Wells (Love and Mr. Lewisham)
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We must not allow the clock and the calendar to blind us to the fact that each moment of life is a miracle and mystery.
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H.G. Wells
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What on earth would a man do with himself, if something did not stand in his way?
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H.G. Wells
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I hope, or I could not live.
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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Very simple was my explanation, and plausible enough---as most wrong theories are!
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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I want to be a society vampire, you see.
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F. Scott Fitzgerald
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And I have by me, for my comfort, two strange white flowers - shriveled now, and brown and flat and brittle - to witness that even when mind and strength had gone, gratitude and a mutual tenderness still lived on in the heart of men.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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It is possible to believe that all the past is but the beginning of a beginning, and that all that is and has been is but the twilight of the dawn. It is possible to believe that all the human mind has ever accomplished is but the dream before the awakening.
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H.G. Wells
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Civilization is in a race between education and catastrophe. Let us learn the truth and spread it as far and wide as our circumstances allow. For the truth is the greatest weapon we have.
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H.G. Wells
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We are kept keen on the grindstone of pain and necessity.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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All men, however highly educated, retain some superstitious inklings.
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H.G. Wells (The Invisible Man)
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No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else's draft.
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H.G. Wells
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Face this world. Learn its ways, watch it, be careful of too hasty guesses at its meaning. In the end you will find clues to it all.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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He began to realize that you cannot even fight happily with creatures that stand upon a different mental basis to yourself.
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H.G. Wells
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This isn't a war," said the artilleryman. "It never was a war, any more than there's war between man and ants.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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Civilization is a race between disaster and education.
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H.G. Wells
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An animal may be ferocious and cunning enough, but it takes a real man to tell a lie.
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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I must confess that I lost faith in the sanity of the world
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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Be a man!... What good is religion if it collapses under calamity? Think of what earthquakes and floods, wars and volcanoes, have done before to men! Did you think that God had exempted [us]? He is not an insurance agent.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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For after the Battle comes quiet.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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The crisis of today is the joke of tomorrow.
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H.G. Wells
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Find the thing you want to do most intensely, make sure that’s it, and do it with all your might. If you live, well and good. If you die, well and good. Your purpose is done
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H.G. Wells
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It is a law of nature we overlook, that intellectual versatility is the compensation for change, danger, and trouble. An animal perfectly in harmony with its environment is a perfect mechanism. Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. Only those animals partake of intelligence that have a huge variety of needs and dangers.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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New and stirring things are belittled because if they are not belittled the humiliating question arises 'Why then are you not taking part in them?
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H.G. Wells
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We are always getting away from the present moment. Our mental existence, which are immaterial and have no dimensions, are passing along the Time-Dimension with a uniform velocity from the cradle to the grave.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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Few people realise the immensity of vacancy in which the dust of the material universe swims.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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It is when suffering finds a voice and sets our nerves quivering that this pity comes troubling us.
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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I grieved to think how brief the dream of the human intellect had been. It had committed suicide.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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Alone-- it is wonderful how little a man can do alone! To rob a little, to hurt a little, and there is the end.
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H.G. Wells (The Invisible Man, with eBook)
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The fact is, the Time Traveller was one of those men who are too clever to be believed: you never felt that you saw all round him; you always suspected some subtle reserve, some ingenuity in ambush, behind his lucid frankness.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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Adapt or perish, now as ever, is nature's inexorable imperative.
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H.G. Wells
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There is, though I do not know how there is or why there is, a sense of infinite peace and protection in the glittering hosts of heaven.
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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I went over the heads of the things a man reckons desirable. No doubt invisibility made it possible to get them, but it made it impossible to enjoy them when they are got.
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H.G. Wells (The Invisible Man)
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By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers; it would still be his were the Martians ten times as mighty as they are. For neither do men live nor die in vain.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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There are really four dimensions, three which we call the three planes of Space, and a fourth, Time.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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The Anglo-Saxon genius for parliamentary government asserted itself; there was a great deal of talk and no decisive action.
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H.G. Wells (The Invisible Man)
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Night, the mother of fear and mystery, was coming upon me.
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H.G. Wells
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Are we all bubbles blown by a baby?
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H.G. Wells
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The crying sounded even louder out of doors. It was as if all the pain in the world had found a voice
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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Things that would have made fame of a less clever man seemed tricks in his hands. It is a mistake to do things too easily.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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Perhaps I am a man of exceptional moods. I do not know how far my experience is common. At times I suffer from the strangest sense of detachment from myself and the world about me; I seem to watch it all from the outside, from somewhere inconceivably remote, out of time, out of space, out of the stress and tragedy of it all. This feeling was very strong upon me that night. Here was another side to my dream.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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I never blame anyone," said Kemp. "It's quite out of fashion.
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H.G. Wells (The Invisible Man)
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Looking at these stars suddenly dwarfed my own troubles and all the gravities of terrestrial life. I thought of their unfathomable distance, and the slow inevitable drift of their movements out of the unknown past into the unknown future.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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...fact takes no heed of human hopes.
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H.G. Wells (The Sleeper Awakes)
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I was a battleground of fear and curiosity.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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I write as straight as I can, just as I walk as straight as I can, because that is the best way to get there.
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H.G. Wells
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By this time I was no longer very much terrified or very miserable. I had, as it were, passed the limit of terror and despair. I felt now that my life was practically lost, and that persuasion made me capable of daring anything
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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Tell the truth and read story books;it will take you to the magical moment in a glory night.
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H.G. Wells
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I suppose everything in existence takes its colour from the average hue of our surroundings.
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Doctor Moreau)
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We must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its own inferior races. The Tasmanians . . . were entirely swept out of existence in a war of extermination waged by European immigrants, in the space if fifty years. Are we such apostles of mercy as to complain if the Martians warred in the same spirit?
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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But there are times when the little cloud spreads, until it obscures the sky. And those times I look around at my fellow men and I am reminded of some likeness of the beast-people, and I feel as though the animal is surging up in them. And I know they are neither wholly animal nor holy man, but an unstable combination of both.
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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When she was fifteen if you'd told her that when she was twenty she'd be going to bed with bald-headed men and liking it, she would have thought you very abstract.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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I saw huge buildings rise up faint and fair, and pass like dreams.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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My days I devote to reading and experiments in chemistry, and I spend many of the clear nights in the study of astronomy. There is, though I do not know how there is or why there is, a sense of infinite peace and protection in the glittering hosts of heaven. There it must be, I think, in the vast and eternal laws of matter, and not in the daily cares and sins and troubles of men, that whatever is more than animal within us must find its solace and its hope.
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H.G. Wells (The Island of Dr. Moreau)
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Art and religion, carnivals and saturnalia, dancing and listening to oratory - all these have served, in H. G. Wells's phrase, as Doors in the Wall.
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Aldous Huxley (The Doors of Perception)
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Go away. I'm all right. [last words]
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H.G. Wells
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If only I had thought of a Kodak! I could have flashed that glimpse of the Under-world in a second, and examined it at leisure.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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To sit among all those unknown things before a puzzle like that is hopeless. That way lies monomania. Face this world. Learn its ways, watch it, be careful of too hasty guesses at its meaning. In the end you will find clues to it all.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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With wine and food, the confidence of my own table, and the necessity of reassuring my wife, I grew by insensible degrees courageous and secure.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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But-! I say! The common conventions of humanity-' 'Are all very well for common people.
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H.G. Wells (The Invisible Man)
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The art of ignoring is one of the accomplishments of every well-bred girl, so carefully instilled that at last she can even ignore her own thoughts and her own knowledge.
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H.G. Wells (Ann Veronica)
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For a time I believed that mankind had been swept out of existence, and that I stood there alone, the last man left alive.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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It is not reasonable that those who gamble with men's lives should not pay with their own.
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H.G. Wells
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But giving drugs to a cat is no joke, Kemp!
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H.G. Wells (The Invisible Man)
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This has ever been the fate of energy in security; it takes to art and to eroticism, and then comes languor and decay.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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...the voice was indisputable. It continued to swear with that breadth and variety that distinguishes the swearing of a cultivated man.
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H.G. Wells (The Invisible Man)
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Suddenly, like a thing falling upon me from without, came fear.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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A time will come when a politician who has wilfully made war and promoted international dissension will be as sure of the dock and much surer of the noose than a private homicide. It is not reasonable that those who gamble with men's lives should not stake their own.
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H.G. Wells
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So some respectable dodo in the Mauritius might have lorded it in his nest, and discussed the arrival of that shipful of pitiless sailors in want of animal food. β€œWe will peck them to death tomorrow, my dear.
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H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds)
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Strength is the outcome of need; security sets a premium on feebleness. The work of ameliorating the conditions of life -- the true civilizing process that makes life more and more secure -- had gone steadily on to a climax... And the harvest was what I saw.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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You must follow me carefully. I shall have to controvert one or two ideas that are almost universally accepted. The geometry, for instance, they taught you at school is founded on a misconception.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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You cannot imagine the craving for rest that I feelβ€”a hunger and thirst. For six long days, since my work was done, my mind has been a whirlpool, swift, unprogressive and incessant, a torrent of thoughts leading nowhere, spinning round swift and steady
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H.G. Wells (When the Sleeper Wakes)
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It may be that we exist and cease to exist in alternations, like the minute dots in some forms of toned printing or the succession of pictures on a cinema film. It may be that reality is an illusion of movement in an eternal, static, multidimensional universe. We may be only a story written on the ground of the inconceivable; the pattern on a rug beneath the feet of the incomprehensible.
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H.G. Wells
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I’ll never find out now What A. thought of me. If B. ever forgave me in the end. Why C. pretended everything was fine. What part D. played in E.’s silence. What F. had been expecting, if anything. Why G. forgot when she knew perfectly well. What H. had to hide. What I. wanted to add. If my being around meant anything to J. and K. and the rest of the alphabet.
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WisΕ‚awa Szymborska
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To do such a thing would be to transcend magic. And I beheld, unclouded by doubt, a magnificent vision of all that invisibility might mean to a manβ€”the mystery, the power, the freedom. Drawbacks I saw none. You have only to think! And I, a shabby, poverty-struck, hemmed-in demonstrator, teaching fools in a provincial college, might suddenly becomeβ€”this.
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H.G. Wells (The Invisible Man)
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We look back through countless millions of years and see the great will to live struggling out of the intertidal slime, struggling from shape to shape and from power to power, crawling and then walking confidently upon the land, struggling generation after generation to master the air, creeping down the darkness of the deep; we see it turn upon itself in rage and hunger and reshape itself anew, we watch it draw nearer and more akin to us, expanding, elaborating itself, pursuing its relentless inconceivable purpose, until at last it reaches us and its being beats through our brains and arteries...It is possible to believe that all the past is but the beginning of a beginning, and that all that is and has been is but the twilight of the dawn. It is possible to believe that all that the human mind has accomplished is but the dream before the awakening; out of our lineage, minds will spring that will reach back to us in our littleness to know us better than we know ourselves. A day will come, one day in the unending succession of days, when beings, beings who are now latent in our thoughts and hidden in our loins, shall stand upon this earth as one stands upon a footstool, and shall laugh and reach out their hands amidst the stars.
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H.G. Wells
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What, unless biological science is a mass of errors, is the cause of human intelligence and vigour? Hardship and freedom: conditions under which the active, strong, and subtle survive and the weaker go to the wall; conditions that put a premium upon the loyal alliance of capable men, upon self-restraint, patience, and decision. And the institution of the family, and the emotions that arise therein, the fierce jealousy, the tenderness for offspring, parental self-devotion, all found their justification and support in the imminent dangers of the young.
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H.G. Wells (The Time Machine)
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Human history can be viewed as a slowly dawning awareness that we are members of a larger group. Initially our loyalties were to ourselves and our immediate family, next, to bands of wandering hunter-gatherers, then to tribes, small settlements, city-states, nations. We have broadened the circle of those we love. We have now organized what are modestly described as super-powers, which include groups of people from divergent ethnic and cultural backgrounds working in some sense together β€” surely a humanizing and character building experience. If we are to survive, our loyalties must be broadened further, to include the whole human community, the entire planet Earth. Many of those who run the nations will find this idea unpleasant. They will fear the loss of power. We will hear much about treason and disloyalty. Rich nation-states will have to share their wealth with poor ones. But the choice, as H. G. Wells once said in a different context, is clearly the universe or nothing.
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Carl Sagan (Cosmos)
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That Anarchist world, I admit, is our dream; we do believe - well, I, at any rate, believe this present world, this planet, will some day bear a race beyond our most exalted and temerarious dreams, a race begotten of our wills and the substance of our bodies, a race, so I have said it, 'who will stand upon the earth as one stands upon a footstool, and laugh and reach out their hands amidst the stars,' but the way to that is through education and discipline and law. Socialism is the preparation for that higher Anarchism; painfully, laboriously we mean to destroy false ideas of property and self, eliminate unjust laws and poisonous and hateful suggestions and prejudices, create a system of social right-dealing and a tradition of right-feeling and action. Socialism is the schoolroom of true and noble Anarchism, wherein by training and restraint we shall make free men.
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H.G. Wells (New Worlds for Old)