Geoffrey Chaucer Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Geoffrey Chaucer. Here they are! All 100 of them:

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Patience is a conquering virtue.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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The lyf so short, the craft so long to lerne.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Parliament of Birds (Hesperus Poetry))
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What is better than wisdom? Woman. And what is better than a good woman? Nothing.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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people can die of mere imagination
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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If gold rusts, what then can iron do?
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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the greatest scholars are not usually the wisest people
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Complete Poetry and Prose)
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No empty handed man can lure a bird
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Reading list (1972 edition)[edit] 1. Homer – Iliad, Odyssey 2. The Old Testament 3. Aeschylus – Tragedies 4. Sophocles – Tragedies 5. Herodotus – Histories 6. Euripides – Tragedies 7. Thucydides – History of the Peloponnesian War 8. Hippocrates – Medical Writings 9. Aristophanes – Comedies 10. Plato – Dialogues 11. Aristotle – Works 12. Epicurus – Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus 13. Euclid – Elements 14. Archimedes – Works 15. Apollonius of Perga – Conic Sections 16. Cicero – Works 17. Lucretius – On the Nature of Things 18. Virgil – Works 19. Horace – Works 20. Livy – History of Rome 21. Ovid – Works 22. Plutarch – Parallel Lives; Moralia 23. Tacitus – Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania 24. Nicomachus of Gerasa – Introduction to Arithmetic 25. Epictetus – Discourses; Encheiridion 26. Ptolemy – Almagest 27. Lucian – Works 28. Marcus Aurelius – Meditations 29. Galen – On the Natural Faculties 30. The New Testament 31. Plotinus – The Enneads 32. St. Augustine – On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine 33. The Song of Roland 34. The Nibelungenlied 35. The Saga of Burnt NjΓ‘l 36. St. Thomas Aquinas – Summa Theologica 37. Dante Alighieri – The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy 38. Geoffrey Chaucer – Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales 39. Leonardo da Vinci – Notebooks 40. NiccolΓ² Machiavelli – The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy 41. Desiderius Erasmus – The Praise of Folly 42. Nicolaus Copernicus – On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres 43. Thomas More – Utopia 44. Martin Luther – Table Talk; Three Treatises 45. FranΓ§ois Rabelais – Gargantua and Pantagruel 46. John Calvin – Institutes of the Christian Religion 47. Michel de Montaigne – Essays 48. William Gilbert – On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies 49. Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote 50. Edmund Spenser – Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene 51. Francis Bacon – Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis 52. William Shakespeare – Poetry and Plays 53. Galileo Galilei – Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences 54. Johannes Kepler – Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World 55. William Harvey – On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals 56. Thomas Hobbes – Leviathan 57. RenΓ© Descartes – Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy 58. John Milton – Works 59. MoliΓ¨re – Comedies 60. Blaise Pascal – The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises 61. Christiaan Huygens – Treatise on Light 62. Benedict de Spinoza – Ethics 63. John Locke – Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education 64. Jean Baptiste Racine – Tragedies 65. Isaac Newton – Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics 66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz – Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology 67. Daniel Defoe – Robinson Crusoe 68. Jonathan Swift – A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal 69. William Congreve – The Way of the World 70. George Berkeley – Principles of Human Knowledge 71. Alexander Pope – Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man 72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu – Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws 73. Voltaire – Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary 74. Henry Fielding – Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones 75. Samuel Johnson – The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
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Mortimer J. Adler (How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading)
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Forbid Us Something and That Thing we Desire
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Expierience treacherous. Judgement difficult.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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Purity in body and heart May please some--as for me, I make no boast. For, as you know, no master of a household Has all of his utensils made of gold; Some are wood, and yet they are of use.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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The life so brief, the art so long in the learning, the attempt so hard, the conquest so sharp, the fearful joy that ever slips away so quickly - by all this I mean love, which so sorely astounds my feeling with its wondrous operation, that when I think upon it I scarce know whether I wake or sleep.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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How potent is the fancy! People are so impressionable, they can die of imagination.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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Love will not be constrain'd by mastery. When mast'ry comes, the god of love anon Beateth his wings, and, farewell, he is gone. Love is a thing as any spirit free.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Amor vincit omnia
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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the guilty think all talk is of themselves.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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Time and Tide wait for no man
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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Youth may outrun the old, but not outwit.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Ful wys is he that kan himselve knowe.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Riverside Chaucer)
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Then you compared a woman's love to Hell, To barren land where water will not dwell, And you compared it to a quenchless fire, The more it burns the more is its desire To burn up everything that burnt can be. You say that just as worms destroy a tree A wife destroys her husband and contrives, As husbands know, the ruin of their lives.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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By God, if women had written stories, As clerks had within here oratories, They would have written of men more wickedness Than all the mark of Adam may redress.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Wife of Bath's Prologue & Tale)
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Yet do not miss the moral, my good men. For Saint Paul says that all that’s written well Is written down some useful truth to tell. Then take the wheat and let the chaff lie still.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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You are the cause by which I die.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Knight's Tale)
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And high above, depicted in a tower, Sat Conquest, robed in majesty and power, Under a sword that swung above his head, Sharp-edged and hanging by a subtle thread.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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And once he had got really drunk on wine, Then he would speak no language but Latin.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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One flesh they are; and one flesh, so I'd guess, Has but one heart, come grief or happiness.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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It seems to me that poverty is an eyeglass through which one may see his true friends.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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But Christ's lore and his apostles twelve, He taught and first he followed it himself.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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earn what you can since everything's for sale
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Canterbury Tales)
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For if a priest be foul, on whom we trust, No wonder is a common man should rust" -The Prologue of Chaucers Canterbury Tales-
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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Thus in this heaven he took his delight And smothered her with kisses upon kisses Till gradually he came to know where bliss is.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Troilus and Criseyde)
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For hym was levere have at his beddes heed Twenty bookes, clad in blak or reed, Of Aristotle and his philosophie, Than robes riche, or fithele, or gay sautrie.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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If no love is, O God, what fele I so? And if love is, what thing and which is he? If love be good, from whennes cometh my woo? If it be wikke, a wonder thynketh me
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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we know little of the things for which we pray
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Canterbury Tales)
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The man who has no wife is no cuckold.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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For he would rather have, by his bedside, twenty books, bound in black or red, of Aristotle and his philosophy, than rich robes or costly fiddles or gay harps.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Who shall give a lover any law?’ Love is a greater law, by my troth, than any law written by mortal man.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Until we're rotten, we cannot be ripe.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury tales of Geoffrey Chaucer Volume 2)
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By God," quod he, "for pleynly, at a word, Thy drasty rymyng is nat worth a toord!
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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High on a stag the Goddess held her seat, And there were little hounds about her feet; Below her feet there was a sickle moon, Waxing it seemed, but would be waning soon. Her statue bore a mantle of bright green, Her hand a bow with arrows cased and keen; Her eyes were lowered, gazing as she rode Down to where Pluto has his dark abode.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Youre tale anoyeth al this compaignye. Swich talkyng is nat worth a boterflye,
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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It has an unhappy effect upon the human understanding and temper, for a man to be compelled in his gravest investigation of an argument, to consider, not what is true, but what is convenient.
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William Godwin (Life of Geoffrey Chaucer; The Early English Poet: Including Memoirs of His Near Friend and Kinsman, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster: With Sketches of)
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Then the Miller fell off his horse.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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I'll die for stifled love, by all that's true.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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He who repeats a tale after a man, Is bound to say, as nearly as he can, Each single word, if he remembers it, However rudely spoken or unfit, Or else the tale he tells will be untrue, The things invented and the phrases new.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales was expected to clock in at anywhere between 100 and 120 chapters. Unfortunately, the dude only managed to finish 24 tales before he suffered an insurmountable and permanent state of writer's block commonly known as death.
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Jacopo della Quercia
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Ye knowe eek, that in forme of speche is chaunge With-inne a thousand yeer, and wordes tho That hadden prys, now wonder nyce and straunge Us thinketh hem; and yet they spake hem so, And spedde as wel in love as men now do.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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Whan that Aprill with his shoures soote The droghte of March hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veyne in switch licour Of which vertu engendred is the flour; Whan Zephirus eek with his sweete breeth Inspired hath in every holt and heeth The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne Hath in the Ram his half cours yronne, And smale foweles maken melodye, That slepen al the nyght with open ye (So Priketh hem Nature in hir corages), Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages, And palmeres for to seken straunge strondes, To ferne halwes, kowthe in sondry londes; And specially from every shires ende Of Engelond to Caunterbury they wende, The hooly blisful martir for to seke, That hem hath holpen whan that they were seeke
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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When that Aprille with his shoures sote. The droghte of Marche hath perced to the rote, And bathed every veyne in swich licour, Of which vertue engendred is the flour.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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If you are poor your very brother hates you And all your friends avoid you, sad to say.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Lust is addicted to novelty.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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the harm that’s in the world now as often comes through folly as through malice.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Troilus and Cressida)
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And shame it is, if that a priest take keep, To see a shitten shepherd and clean sheep:
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales, and Other Poems)
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O woman’s counsel is so often cold! A woman’s counsel brought us first to woe, Made Adam out of Paradise to go Where he had been so merry, so well at ease.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales (Penguin Classics S.))
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Be nat wrooth, my lord, though that I pleye. Ful ofte in game a sooth I have herd seye!
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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La moraleja de todas las tragedias es la misma: que la Fortuna siempre ataca a los reinos prepotentes cuando menos lo esperan.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Cuentos de Canterbury (Spanish Edition))
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people have managed to marry without arithmetic
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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you are the cause by which I die
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Canterbury Tales)
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Though there was nowhere one so busy as he/ He was less busy than he seemed to be.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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And if love is, what thing and which is he? If love be good, from whennes cometh my woo?
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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if gold rust, what shall iron do? For if a Priest, upon whom we trust, be foul, no wonder a layman may yield to lust.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Her statue, glorious in majesty, Stood naked, floating on a vasty sea, And from the navel down there were a mass Of green and glittering waves as bright as glass. In her right hand a cithern carried she And on her head, most beautiful to see, A garland of fresh roses, while above There circles round her many a flickering dove.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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In general, my liege lady,’ he began, β€˜Women desire to have dominion Over their husbands, and their lovers too; They want to have mastery over them. That’s what you most desireβ€”even if my life Is forfeit. I am here; do what you like.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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But for to telle yow al hir beautee, It lyth nat in my tonge, n'yn my konnyng; I dar nat undertake so heigh a thyng. Myn Englissh eek is insufficient. It moste been a rethor excellent That koude his colours longynge for that art, If he sholde hire discryven every part. I am noon swich, I moot speke as I kan.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Three years went by in happiness and health; He bore himself so well in peace and war That there was no one Theseus valued more.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales (Penguin Classics S.))
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doctors & druggists wash each other's hands
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Canterbury Tales)
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For naturally a beast desires to flee From any enemy that he may see, Though never yet he's clapped on such his eye.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Canterbury Tales)
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Shepherds too soft who let their duty sleep, Encourage wolves to tear the lambs and sleep.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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I know that my singing doesn’t make the moon rise, nor does it make the stars shine. But without my song, the night would seem empty and incomplete. There is more to daybreak than light, just as there is more to nighttime than darkness.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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Truly she was of elegant deportment, and very pleasing and amiable in bearing. She took pains to counterfeit the manners of the court and to be dignified in behavior and to be held worthy of reverence.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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We’re like two dogs in battle on their own; They fought all day but neither got the bone, There came a kite above them, nothing loth, And while they fought he took it from them both." From Chaucer's "The Knight's Tale
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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Lo, which a greet thing is affeccioun! Men may die of imaginacioun, So depe may impressioun be take.
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Geoffrey Chaucer
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la virtud que corona la perfecciΓ³n es la paciencia".
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Cuentos de Canterbury (Spanish Edition))
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This world nys but a thurghfare ful of wo, And we been pilgrymes, passynge to and fro.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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He kept his tippet stuffed with pins for curls, And pocket-knives, to give to pretty girls.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales (Penguin Classics S.))
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Yet from the wise take this for common sense That to the poor all times are out of joint Therefore beware of reaching such a point.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales (Penguin Classics S.))
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Well did he know the taverns in every town, and every hosteller and bar-maid, far better than he knew any leper or beggar.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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So astute was he in his buying and selling, and in his borrowings, that no one knew if he was in debt.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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High in moral virtue was his speech, and gladly would he learn and gladly teach.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Well is it said that neither love nor power Admit a rival, even for an hour.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales (Penguin Classics S.))
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One shouldn’t be too inquisitive in life Either about God’s secrets or one’s wife. You’ll find God’s plenty all you could desire; Of the remainder, better not enquire.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Canterbury Tales)
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Fortune has dealt us this adversity: Some malign aspect or disposition Of Saturn in some adverse position Has brought it on us; nothing's to be done: It stood thus in our stars when we were born; The long and short of it is this: Endure.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Canterbury Tales: The Knight's Tale)
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Upon his arm he bare a gay bracer*, *small shield And by his side a sword and a buckler, And on that other side a gay daggere, Harnessed well, and sharp as point of spear:
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales, and Other Poems)
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But of no nombre mencioun made he, Of bigamye, or of octogamye33. Why sholde men thanne speke of it vileinye34?
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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For thus men seyth, "That on thenketh the beere, But al another thenketh his ledere.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Troilus and Criseyde)
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Men may the wise atrenne, and naught atrede.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Troilus and Criseyde)
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Go, litel bok, go, litel myn tragedye,
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Troilus and Criseyde)
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Β«El leΓ³n estΓ‘ siempre al acecho para matar al inocente si puede.Β»
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Cuentos de Canterbury (Spanish Edition))
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When April with its sweet showers has pierced the drought of March to the root, and bathed every vein of earth with that liquid by whose power the flowers are engendered; when the zephyr, too, with its dulcet breath, has breathed life into the tender new shoots in every copse and on every hearth, and the young sun has run half his course in the sign of the Ram, and the little birds that sleep all night with their eyes open give song (so Nature prompts them in their hearts), then, as the poet Geoffrey Chaucer observed many years ago, folk long to go on pilgrimages. Only, these days, professional people call them conferences. The modern conference resembles the pilgrimage of medieval Christendom in that it allows the participants to indulge themselves in all the pleasures and diversions of travel while appearing to be austerely bent on self-improvement. To be sure, there are certain penitential exercises to be performed - the presentation of a paper, perhaps, and certainly listening to papers of others.
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David Lodge
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The time always flees; it will wait for no man. And through you are still in the flower of your young manhood, age creeps on steadily, as quiet as a stone, and death meanaces every age and strikes in every rank, for no one escapes. As surely as we know that we will die, so we are uncertain of the day when death shall fall on us.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Full is my heart of revelry and grace." But suddenly he fell in grievous case; For ever the latter end of joy is woe. God knows that worldly joys do swiftly go; And if a rhetorician could but write, He in some chronicle might well indite And mark it down as sovereign in degree.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Canterbury Tales)
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This Nicholas anon leet fle a fart As greet as it had been a thonder-dent, That with the strook he was almoost yblent; And he was redy with his iren hoot, And Nicholas amydde the ers he smoot. Of gooth the skyn an hande-brede aboute, The hoote kultour brende so his toute, And for the smert he wende for to dye.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Miller's Prologue and Tale)
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Go litel bok, go, litel myn tragedye, Ther God thi makere yet, er that he dye, So sende myght to make in som comedye! But litel book, no makyng thow n'envie, But subgit be to alle poesye; And kis the steppes where as thow seest pace Virgile, Ovide, Omer, Lucan, and Stace.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (Troilus and Criseyde)
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By Pluto sent at the request of Saturn. Arcita’s horse in terror danced a pattern And leapt aside and foundered as he leapt, And ere he was aware Arcite was swept Out of the saddle and pitched upon his head Onto the ground, and there he lay for dead; His breast was shattered by the saddle-bow.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales (Penguin Classics S.))
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Ye sey right sooth; this Monk he clappeth lowde. He spak how Fortune covered with a clowde I noot nevere what; and als of a tragedie Right now ye herde, and pardee, no remedie It is for to biwaille ne compleyne That that is doon, and als it is a peyne, As ye han seyd, to heere of hevynesse. Sire Monk, namoore of this, so God yow blesse! Youre tale anoyeth al this compaignye. Swich talkyng is nat worth a boterflye,
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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When kindled was the fire, with sober face Unto Diana spoke she in that place. β€œO thou chaste goddess of the wildwood green, By whom all heaven and earth and sea are seen, Queen of the realm of Pluto, dark and low, Goddess of maidens, that my heart dost know For all my years, and knowest what I desire, Oh, save me from thy vengeance and thine ire That on Actaeon fell so cruelly. Chaste goddess, well indeed thou knowest that I Desire to be a virgin all my life, Nor ever wish to be man’s love or wife. I am, thou know’st, yet of thy company, A maid, who loves the hunt and venery, And to go rambling in the greenwood wild, And not to be a wife and be with child. I do not crave the company of man.
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)
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Throgh me men gon into that blysful place Of hertes hele and dedly woundes cure; Thorgh me men gon unto the welle of grace, There grene and lusty May shal evere endure. This is the wey to al good aventure. Be glad, thow redere, and thy sorwe of-caste; Al open am I - passe in, and sped thee faste!' 'Thorgh me men gon,' than spak that other side, 'Unto the mortal strokes of the spere Of which Disdayn and Daunger is the gyde, There nevere tre shal fruyt ne leves bere. This strem yow ledeth to the sorweful were There as the fish in prisoun is al drye; The'eschewing is only the remedye!
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Geoffrey Chaucer (The Parliament of Birds (Hesperus Poetry))
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Mr. Morris's poem is ushered into the world with a very florid birthday speech from the pen of the author of the too famous Poems and Ballads,β€”a circumstance, we apprehend, in no small degree prejudicial to its success. But we hasten to assure all persons whom the knowledge of Mr. Swinburne's enthusiasm may have led to mistrust the character of the work, that it has to our perception nothing in common with this gentleman's own productions, and that his article proves very little more than that his sympathies are wiser than his performance. If Mr. Morris's poem may be said to remind us of the manner of any other writer, it is simply of that of Chaucer; and to resemble Chaucer is a great safeguard against resembling Swinburne.
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Henry James (Views and Reviews (Project Gutenberg, #37424))
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Deacon met my glare with an impish grin. β€œAnyway, did you celebrate Valentine’s Day when you were slumming with the mortals?” I blinked. β€œNot really. Why?” Aiden snorted and then disappeared into one of the rooms. β€œFollow me,” Deacon said. β€œYou’re going to love this. I just know it.” I followed him down the dimly-lit corridor that was sparsely decorated. We passed several closed doors and a spiral staircase. Deacon went through an archway and stopped, reaching along the wall. Light flooded the room. It was a typical sunroom, with floor-to-ceiling glass windows, wicker furniture, and colorful plants. Deacon stopped by a small potted plant sitting on a ceramic coffee table. It looked like a miniature pine tree that was missing several limbs. Half the needles were scattered in and around the pot. One red Christmas bulb hung from the very top branch, causing the tree to tilt to the right. β€œWhat do you think?” Deacon asked. β€œUm… well, that’s a really different Christmas tree, but I’m not sure what that has to do with Valentine’s Day.” β€œIt’s sad,” Aiden said, strolling into the room. β€œIt’s actually embarrassing to look at. What kind of tree is it, Deacon?” He beamed. β€œIt’s called a Charlie Brown Christmas Tree.” Aiden rolled his eyes. β€œDeacon digs this thing out every year. The pine isn’t even real. And he leaves it up from Thanksgiving to Valentine’s Day. Which thank the gods is the day after tomorrow. That means he’ll be taking it down.” I ran my fingers over the plastic needles. β€œI’ve seen the cartoon.” Deacon sprayed something from an aerosol can. β€œIt’s my MHT tree.” β€œMHT tree?” I questioned. β€œMortal Holiday Tree,” Deacon explained, and smiled. β€œIt covers the three major holidays. During Thanksgiving it gets a brown bulb, a green one for Christmas, and a red one for Valentine’s Day.” β€œWhat about New Year’s Eve?” He lowered his chin. β€œNow, is that really a holiday?” β€œThe mortals think so.” I folded my arms. β€œBut they’re wrong. The New Year is during the summer solstice,” Deacon said. β€œTheir math is completely off, like most of their customs. For example, did you know that Valentine’s Day wasn’t actually about love until Geoffrey Chaucer did his whole courtly love thing in the High Middle Ages?” β€œYou guys are so weird.” I grinned at the brothers. β€œThat we are,” Aiden replied. β€œCome on, I’ll show you your room.” β€œHey Alex,” Deacon called. β€œWe’re making cookies tomorrow, since it’s Valentine’s Eve.” Making cookies on Valentine’s Eve? I didn’t even know if there was such a thing as Valentine’s Eve. I laughed as I followed Aiden out of the room. β€œYou two really are opposites.” β€œI’m cooler!” Deacon yelled from his Mortal Holiday Tree room
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Jennifer L. Armentrout (Deity (Covenant, #3))