Freedom Of Navigation Quotes

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Loss is like a wind, it either carries you to a new destination or it traps you in an ocean of stagnation. You must quickly learn how to navigate the sail, for stagnation is death.
Val Uchendu
He dreamed of her hand tangling in his, a pulse of power twining them together. He dreamed of them racing through foreign streets, not the London ones they’d navigated, but crooks and bends in places he’d never been, and ones he might never see. But there she was, at his side, pulling him toward freedom.
Victoria Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
You have a unique body and mind, with a particular history and conditioning. No one can offer you a formula for navigating all situations and all states of mind. Only by listening inwardly in a fresh and open way will you discern at any given time what most serves your healing and freedom.
Tara Brach (True Refuge: Finding Peace and Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart)
It might seem to you that living in the woods on a riverbank would remove you from the modern world. But not if the river is navigable, as ours is. On pretty weekends in the summer, this riverbank is the very verge of the modern world. It is a seat in the front row, you might say. On those weekends, the river is disquieted from morning to night by people resting from their work. This resting involves traveling at great speed, first on the road and then on the river. The people are in an emergency to relax. They long for the peace and quiet of the great outdoors. Their eyes are hungry for the scenes of nature. They go very fast in their boats. They stir the river like a spoon in a cup of coffee. They play their radios loud enough to hear above the noise of their motors. They look neither left nor right. They don't slow down for - or maybe even see - an old man in a rowboat raising his lines... I watch and I wonder and I think. I think of the old slavery, and of the way The Economy has now improved upon it. The new slavery has improved upon the old by giving the new slaves the illusion that they are free. The Economy does not take people's freedom by force, which would be against its principles, for it is very humane. It buys their freedom, pays for it, and then persuades its money back again with shoddy goods and the promise of freedom.
Wendell Berry (Jayber Crow)
Complete freedom is not what a trail offers. Quite the opposite; a trail is a tactful reduction of options.
Robert Moor (On Trails: An Exploration)
A current pejorative adjective is narcissistic. Generally, a narcissist is anyone better looking than you are, but lately the adective is often applied to those "liberals" who prefer to improve the lives of others rather than exploit them. Apparently, a concern for others is self-love at its least attractive, while greed is now a sign of the hightest altruism. But then to reverse, periodically, the meanings of words is a very small price to pay for our vast freedom not only to conform but to consume.
Gore Vidal (Point to Point Navigation)
Fallen women are afforded a species of freedom. Footnote: There is of course no such thing as a fallen woman, unless we are speaking of a woman who recently tripped on the stairs. One of the most difficult elements of this world is the way its social rules are simultaneously rigid and arbitrary. It is impermissible to engage in physical love before binding legal marriage, unless one is a young man of means. Men must be bold and assertive, but only if they are light-skinned. Any persons may fall in love regardless of station, but only if one is a woman and the other a man. I urge you not to navigate your own life by such faulty borders, my dear. There are, after all, other worlds.
Alix E. Harrow (The Ten Thousand Doors of January)
A beginning is a very delicate time. Know then, that is is the year 10191. The known universe is ruled by the Padishah Emperor Shaddam the Fourth, my father. In this time, the most precious substance in the universe is the spice Melange. The spice extends life. The spice expands consciousness. A product of the Spive, the red Sapho juice, stains the lips of the Mentats but allows them to be human computers, as thinking machines have been outlawed. The spice is vital to space travel. The Spacing Guild and its navigators, who the spice has mutated over 4000 years, use the orange spice gas, which gives them the ability to fold space. That is, travel to any part of the universe without moving. Because the Guild controls all interplanetary travel, they are the highest power in the Universe. The Spice also plays a very secret role in the Bene Gesserit sisterhood, of which I am a part. The sisterhood has been interfering with the marriages, and the children thereof, of the great Houses of the Universe, cleverly intermixing one bloodline with another to form the Kwisatz Haderach, a super being. They plan to control this super being and use his powers for their own selfish purposes. The breeding plan has been carried out in a strict manner for 90 generations. The goal of the super being is in sight. But now, so close to the prize, a Bene Gesserit woman, Jessica, the bound concubine of Duke Leto Atreides, who has been ordered to bear only daughters, has given birth to a son. Oh, yes. I forgot to tell you. The spice exists on only one planet in the entire universe. A desolate, dry planet with vast deserts. Hidden away within the rocks of these deserts are a people known as the Fremen, who have long held a prophecy that a man would come, a messiah, who would lead them to true freedom. The planet is Arrakis, also known as Dune.
Frank Herbert
The city is not merely a repository of pleasures. It is the stage on which we fight our battles, where we act out the drama of our own lives. It can enhance or corrode our ability to cope with everyday challenges. It can steal our autonomy or give us the freedom to thrive. It can offer a navigable environment, or it can create a series of impossible gauntlets that wear us down daily. The messages encoded in architecture and systems can foster a sense of mastery or helplessness.
Charles Montgomery (Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design)
Freedom begins in the mind of the individual. You'll never be able to do a particular thing if you don't navigate your thoughts positively. Complaining and neglecting to take action creates stagnation. Free your mind and the rest will follow.
Amaka Imani Nkosazana (Heart Crush)
Habits are undeniably useful tools, relieving us of the need to run a complex mental operation every time we’re confronted with a new task or situation. Yet they also relieve us of the need to stay awake to the world: to attend, feel, think, and then act in a deliberate manner. (That is, from freedom rather than compulsion.) If you need to be reminded how completely mental habit blinds us to experience, just take a trip to an unfamiliar country. Suddenly you wake up! And the algorithms of everyday life all but start over, as if from scratch. This is why the various travel metaphors for the psychedelic experience are so apt. The efficiencies of the adult mind, useful as they are, blind us to the present moment. We’re constantly jumping ahead to the next thing. We approach experience much as an artificial intelligence (AI) program does, with our brains continually translating the data of the present into the terms of the past, reaching back in time for the relevant experience, and then using that to make its best guess as to how to predict and navigate the future. One of the things that commends travel, art, nature, work, and certain drugs to us is the way these experiences, at their best, block every mental path forward and back, immersing us in the flow of a present that is literally wonderful—wonder being the by-product of precisely the kind of unencumbered first sight, or virginal noticing, to which the adult brain has closed itself. (It’s so inefficient!) Alas, most of the time I inhabit a near-future tense, my psychic thermostat set to a low simmer of anticipation and, too often, worry. The good thing is I’m seldom surprised. The bad thing is I’m seldom surprised.
Michael Pollan (How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence)
Before they are able to enter a new story, most people—and probably most societies as well—must first navigate the passage out of the old. In between the old and the new there is an empty space. It is a time when the lessons and learnings of the old story are integrated. Only when that work has been done is the old story really complete. Then, there is nothing, the pregnant emptiness from which all being arises. Returning to essence, we regain the ability to act from essence. Returning to the space between stories, we can choose from freedom and not from habit.
Charles Eisenstein (The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know Is Possible (Sacred Activism))
Mostly, however, I am a mystic. A mystic is someone who understands, contacts, and maps the invisible roads inside of us. Since I was a child, I’ve always felt as comfortable navigating these inner highways as I have moving on the external plane of existence. It seems that I show up in people’s lives when they’re ready to cross a threshold into more consciousness, healing, and awakening.
Barbara De Angelis (Soul Shifts: Transformative Wisdom for Creating a Life of Authentic Awakening, Emotional Freedom & Practical Spirituality)
From Preach’s time as a prison chaplain, before he joined the Atlanta PD, he knew the true horror of incarceration was not the loss of freedom, but the daily choices one was forced to make to survive. Navigating the jungle without becoming one of the animals. Most people that landed behind bars—not all, but most—had disadvantaged upbringings and poor choices to blame. It was prison that turned them into criminals.
Layton Green (A Shattered Lens (Detective Preach Everson #2))
[L]ife presents itself by no means as a gift for enjoyment, but as a task, a drudgery to be performed; and in accordance with this we see, in great and small, universal need, ceaseless cares, constant pressure, endless strife, compulsory activity, with extreme exertion of all the powers of body and mind. Many millions, united into nations, strive for the common good, each individual on account of his own; but many thousands fall as a sacrifice for it. Now senseless delusions, now intriguing politics, incite them to wars with each other; then the sweat and the blood of the great multitude must flow, to carry out the ideas of individuals, or to expiate their faults. In peace industry and trade are active, inventions work miracles, seas are navigated, delicacies are collected from all ends of the world, the waves engulf thousands. All push and drive, others acting; the tumult is indescribable. But the ultimate aim of it all, what is it? To sustain ephemeral and tormented individuals through a short span of time in the most fortunate case with endurable want and comparative freedom from pain, which, however, is at once attended with ennui; then the reproduction of this race and its striving. In this evident disproportion between the trouble and the reward, the will to live appears to us from this point of view, if taken objectively, as a fool, or subjectively, as a delusion, seized by which everything living works with the utmost exertion of its strength for some thing that is of no value. But when we consider it more closely, we shall find here also that it is rather a blind pressure, a tendency entirely without ground or motive.
Thomas Ligotti (The Conspiracy Against the Human Race: A Contrivance of Horror)
My intentions for readers of this book are that you recognize that pleasure is a measure of freedom; notice what makes you feel good and what you are curious about; learn ways you can increase the amount of feeling-good time in your life, to have abundant pleasure; decrease any internal or projected shame or scarcity thinking around the pursuit of pleasure, quieting any voices of trauma that keep you from your full sacred sensual life; create more room for joy, wholeness, and aliveness (and less room for oppression, repression, self-denial and unnecessary suffering) in your life; identify strategies beyond denial or repression for navigating pleasure in relationship to others; and begin to understand the liberation possible when we collectively orient around pleasure and longing. Bonus: realize you are a pleasure activist!
Adrienne Maree Brown (Pleasure Activism: The Politics of Feeling Good (Emergent Strategy))
What it like to sail?" she asked. His gaze shifted, and he stared into the distance. "It's freedom. Like riding a powerful horse with a gait like silk. You speed over the waves, carried on the wind, held up over an unknowable depth of water beneath you, with the entire sky above. And that sky is a different color depending on where on earth you are. There are a thousand shades of blue. You can look up and know where you are, just by the color. And the stars at night - there's indescribable beauty in the stars, like a woman's eyes, flashing, shining... And yet, they are tools, enabling navigation, a map to follow..." She stared at his profile as he spoke, at the scars that marred his brow and cheeks, the crooked line of his broken nose, the elegant, aristocratic line of his jaw, half-hidden under the shadow of stubble, and the soft, sensual curve of his mouth. She saw the sea in his eyes, smelled the wind, tasted the salt, and she felt her chest tighten with a longing to sail, to experience speed and adventure. Breathless, she felt the presence of the man in the portrait, the rogue, the bold captain. Her heart twisted as she imagined him in prison, beaten, chained, tormented to madness. He was still a prisoner, trapped inside the cage of his injured flesh, his damaged bones, his memories of unspeakable horrors. What would it take to set him free?
Lecia Cornwall (Beauty and the Highland Beast (Highland Fairy Tales #1))
Sociologist Annette Lareau, for example, analyzed how class-based differences in parenting styles help children from more privileged backgrounds succeed in schools.49 Lareau found that more privileged parents adopted an approach to parenting that she terms concerted cultivation. These parents viewed their children as projects that need to be carefully nourished and attended to in order to succeed. In line with such beliefs, they tended to play more active roles in their children’s schooling, directly intervening with school administrators to advocate for better grades, better teachers, and access to accelerated academic tracks for their kids. Additionally, they tended to provide educational enrichment outside of school and enroll their children in structured extracurricular activities. Such actions helped facilitate their children’s academic performance, foster positive impressions among classroom teachers, and secure scarce spots in high-quality or advanced academic tracks. Additionally, participation in structured extracurricular activities helps children become more skillful in interacting with adults outside of the family. It also helps them attend selective colleges, given that these institutions use extracurricular participation as an admissions criterion.50 By contrast, Lareau found that working-class parents adopted a child-rearing strategy she terms natural growth: a belief that children thrive when they have freedom to develop on their own and with the guidance of trusted school authorities. These parents tended not to intervene in their children’s school lives and instead left the choice of which activities to pursue up to their kids. This approach resulted in disadvantages for working-class children compared to their more affluent peers with respect to both securing resources that are helpful for academic performance and building winning academic and extracurricular résumés for the college admissions race. Yet parents’ cultural resources are only part of the story of educational stratification. Parents often explicitly and implicitly teach their children scripts for navigating gatekeeping interactions and institutions. They can do so through formal instruction, such as teaching children how to behave in particular situations (e.g., “Ask for something when you need help” or “When you are angry, use your words”).51 But children also learn through osmosis, imitating the interaction styles of adult caregivers. From a young age, economically privileged children are socialized into interactional styles emphasizing independence, self-expression, agency, and entitlement.52 Just as affluent parents are more likely to advocate for placing their kids into classes with good teachers or to dispute poor treatment of a child, affluent children similarly learn to act on the social world to get the resources they need.
Lauren A. Rivera (Pedigree: How Elite Students Get Elite Jobs)
Sociologist Annette Lareau, for example, analyzed how class-based differences in parenting styles help children from more privileged backgrounds succeed in schools.49 Lareau found that more privileged parents adopted an approach to parenting that she terms concerted cultivation. These parents viewed their children as projects that need to be carefully nourished and attended to in order to succeed. In line with such beliefs, they tended to play more active roles in their children’s schooling, directly intervening with school administrators to advocate for better grades, better teachers, and access to accelerated academic tracks for their kids. Additionally, they tended to provide educational enrichment outside of school and enroll their children in structured extracurricular activities. Such actions helped facilitate their children’s academic performance, foster positive impressions among classroom teachers, and secure scarce spots in high-quality or advanced academic tracks. Additionally, participation in structured extracurricular activities helps children become more skillful in interacting with adults outside of the family. It also helps them attend selective colleges, given that these institutions use extracurricular participation as an admissions criterion.50 By contrast, Lareau found that working-class parents adopted a child-rearing strategy she terms natural growth: a belief that children thrive when they have freedom to develop on their own and with the guidance of trusted school authorities. These parents tended not to intervene in their children’s school lives and instead left the choice of which activities to pursue up to their kids. This approach resulted in disadvantages for working-class children compared to their more affluent peers with respect to both securing resources that are helpful for academic performance and building winning academic and extracurricular résumés for the college admissions race. Yet parents’ cultural resources are only part of the story of educational stratification. Parents often explicitly and implicitly teach their children scripts for navigating gatekeeping interactions and institutions. They can do so through formal instruction, such as teaching children how to behave in particular situations (e.g., “Ask for something when you need help” or “When you are angry, use your words”).51 But children also learn through osmosis, imitating the interaction styles of adult caregivers. From a young age, economically privileged children are socialized into interactional styles emphasizing independence, self-expression, agency, and entitlement.52 Just as affluent parents are more likely to advocate for placing their kids into classes with good teachers or to dispute poor treatment of a child, affluent children similarly learn to act on the social world to get the resources they need.53
Lauren A. Rivera (Pedigree: How Elite Students Get Elite Jobs)
(RIC), designers at Vanderbilt University and prosthetics company Freedom Innovations reached a breakthrough by creating artificial limbs that allow amputees to walk up stairs, rotate an ankle, and navigate sloped terrains merely by thinking about it.
Bertalan Meskó (The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Technology AND The Human Touch)
I'm a bartender. How can I stop when surrounded by smoke and smokers at every turn?" I recall attempts where I hoped smoking friends would be supportive in not smoking around me, and not leave their packs lying around to tempt me. While most tried, it usually wasn't long before they forgot. I recall thinking them insensitive and uncaring. I recall grinding disappointment and intense brain chatter, that more than once seized upon frustrated support expectations as this addict's excuse for relapse. Instead of expecting them to change their world for me, the smart move would have been for me to want to extinguish my brain's subconscious feeding cues related to being around them and their addiction. The smart move would have been to take back my world, or as much of it as I wanted. As I sit here typing in this room, around me are a number of packs of cigarettes: Camel, Salem, Marlboro Lights and Virginia Slims. I use them during presentations and have had cigarettes within arms reach for years. Don't misconstrue this. It is not a smart move for someone struggling in early recovery to keep cigarettes on hand. But if a family member or best friend smokes or uses tobacco, or our place of employment sells tobacco or allows smoking around us, we have no choice but to work toward extinguishing tobacco product, smoke and smoker cues almost immediately. And we can do it! Millions of comfortable ex-users handle and sell tobacco products as part of their job. You may find this difficult to believe, but I've never craved or wanted to smoke any of the cigarettes that surround me, even when holding packs or handling individual cigarettes during presentations. Worldwide, millions of ex-smokers successfully navigated recovery while working in smoke filled nightclubs, restaurants, bowling alleys, casinos, convenience stores and other businesses historically linked to smoking. And millions broke free while their spouse, partner or best friend smoked like a chimney. Instead of fighting or hiding from the world, take it back. Why allow our circumstances to wear us down? Small steps, just one moment at a time, embrace challenge. Extinguish use cues and claim your prize once you do, another slice of a nicotine-free life. Recovery is about taking back life. Why fear it? Instead, savor and relish reclaiming it. Maybe I'll have a crave tomorrow. But it's been so many years (since 2001) that I'm not sure I'd recognize it. Why fear our circumstances when we can embrace them? They cannot
John R. Polito (Freedom from Nicotine - The Journey Home)
Through the devices in our pockets, we are reminded of our limitless freedom, limitless opportunities, limitless ways to indulge our interests. And yet, our lives feel more difficult to navigate than ever.
Heather Havrilesky (What If This Were Enough?: Essays)
Freedom is the ability to make conscious choices in accord with our deepest values. It is the opposite of reactivity, which we could define as acting on every whim, impulse, and emotion that we experience. Reactivity leads us to self-destructive choices. Freedom requires self-awareness and the skill of choosing where to place our attention and how to frame the circumstances we find ourselves in. We all feel hopeless at times. Events have the power to knock us to our knees. Even with self-awareness, it's too much to expect that our response to everything be transcendent. We all grow tired of trying. Or as one of my friends put it, "I am so damn tired of these fucking growth experiences.
Mary Pipher (Women Rowing North: Navigating Life’s Currents and Flourishing As We Age)
You can have a day where you give tips and tricks on how to navigate your yoga lifestyle in a busy schedule, for example, and even pre-advise on upcoming content you will be providing.
Jason Heiber (Instagram Stories: The Secret ATM in Your Pocket - Financial Freedom Between Your Thumbs)
Fair or unfair, however, globalization has not been kind to Confucius. The Western ideas that have seeped into East Asian society over the past two hundred years have caused many in the region to rethink the value of their Confucian heritage. Western political and social philosophies brought in very different concepts of family and gender relationships, systems of government and education, and methods of corporate governance. Democracy has taken hold, as have American notions of gender equality, personal freedoms, and the rule of law. East Asian nations are being profoundly altered by these new ideas. Democracy movements have toppled authoritarian regimes across East Asia. Women are increasingly fighting for their proper place in politics and the corporate world. For much of the past two centuries, East Asians have equated progress with westernization, striving to copy its economic, political, and social systems. Capitalism and industrialization became the tools to end poverty and gain clout on the world stage, electoral politics the ideal for choosing leaders and navigating divisions in society. The route to success no longer passed through Confucian academies, but through Harvard and Yale. Being westernized, in language, dress, and social life, has been the mark of being modern and competitive. Politicians and reformers across East Asia have sought to uproot Confucian influence, at times violently, in their quest for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Many East Asians no longer wished to be Confucius, as they had for centuries on end. They wished to forget him.
Michael A. Schuman (Confucius: And the World He Created)
When it did, he dreamed of her. Dreamed of her standing on his balcony, goading him to come out and play. He dreamed of her hand tangling in his, a pulse of power twining them together. He dreamed of them racing through foreign streets, not the London ones they'd navigated, but crooks and bends in places he'd never been, and ones he might never see. But there she was, at his side, pulling him towards freedom.
V.E. Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
Eventually each of us comes to the point where we realize that how we were taught to live is not the way we were born to live. Mega-successful British playwright Tom Stoppard wrote, “It’s the best possible time to be alive, when almost everything you thought you knew is wrong!” At a crucial instant each of us starts trusting our inner guidance more than others’ opinions or directives. Facing this crossroad can be frightening, as it may call us to make changes in our life that others might not approve of. You may even have to reinvent yourself. Yet it is liberating to recognize that you have more choices and freedom than you realized. Such a moment marks the beginning of your true spiritual path.
Alan Cohen (The Tao Made Easy: Timeless Wisdom to Navigate a Changing World)
The second component is accountability. Because the Bible instructs us to “confess your trespasses to one another, and pray for one another, that you may be healed,” we must be willing to confront or be confronted by one another when we exhibit unhealthy patterns. Furthermore, we must be inclined to submit ourselves to the authority of not just our leaders but our peers. You see, our community’s prayer life is directly connected to our shared life. We can only pray for and bear together the burdens we know about. Independence isn’t the path to freedom but to captivity. Autonomy isn’t the way to painlessness but to quiet suffering. If you don’t have accountability, you don’t have community. How many divorces would have been prevented if people were in true community? How many suicides would have been stopped? How many cries for help would have been heard? How many bankruptcies would have been avoided? How many affairs would have been evaded? How many needs would have been met? Now, there’s nothing more stressful than trying to solve a problem that has no solution. So where do you go from here? How can you find biblical community? How can you begin pursuing a life of real Christian relationships? You have two options: you either plant it or find it. You either seek God’s navigation for your life and ask Him to reveal the remnants of counter-cultural, biblical communities that are scattered across the world, or you create it. Now as many of you know, it’s just about impossible to create something you’ve never experienced. That’s why Veronica and I have chosen to devote the rest of our lives to helping people find this. If you’re interested in learning more, consider our nonprofit program at UnlearnChurch.org.
Dale Partridge (Saved from Success: How God Can Free You from Culture’s Distortion of Family, Work, and the Good Life)
And as sad as it might have been, part of me actually longed to go back to that cell. It was a horrible and soul-sucking place, but I knew how to navigate life on the inside. Freedom was foreign territory.
Aly Martinez (Release (The Release Series, #1))
If I may be permitted the indulgence of another of my favourite pictures, it is that of a seaside bay. With a small boat, and the tide low, one has to be extremely careful not to strike barely submerged rocks, and has to navigate with caution among the visible obstructions. The situation is by no means carefree; it could be damaging to one’s craft, even dangerous to one’s person.Yet, a few hours later, with a full tide, the whole scene is transformed. The menacing rocks are now at least several feet below one’s keel, and one may sail freely within the area. This has more than incidental parallels with James C. Thomson’s concept, which he named High Level Health. Not mere absence or avoidance of uncomfortable symptoms, but a genuine freedom to live and move fully
C. Leslie Thomson
Times like this, I don't wish for ignorance. I look around and I see the bloated ignorance of the lumpen proletariat: roly-poly, sausage-fingered, ginger-topped fathers of at least two illegitimate children trying to massage the asses of waiflike, peroxide-scarred students who are themselves trying to navigate adulthood with their new-found freedom from outdated parenting.
Ayize Jama-Everett (The Liminal People)
Books and stories are lifelines, and libraries house those lifelines, making them available to all. They are important not just for the books, but for the space and freedom they provide, as well as the navigation and advice provided by librarians.
Alan Bennett (The Library Book)
As you navigate the bumpy waters of your business, you should create a system around every problem that arises. 
Korbett Miller (De-Mythify: Finding freedom in your small business.)
The Russian war should have been the most popular war of modern times: it was a war of good sense, for real interests, for the tranquillity and security of all; it was purely pacific and conservative. It was a war for a great cause, the end of uncertainties and the beginning of security. A new horizon and new labors were opening out, full of well-being and prosperity for all. The European system was already founded; all that remained was to organize it. Satisfied on these great points and with tranquility everywhere, I too should have had my Congress and my Holy Alliance. Those ideas were stolen from me. In that reunion of great sovereigns we should have discussed our interests like one family, and have rendered account to the peoples as clerk to master. Europe would in this way soon have been, in fact, but one people, and anyone who traveled anywhere would have found himself always in the common fatherland. I should have demanded the freedom of all navigable rivers for everybody, that the seas should be common to all, and that the great standing armies should be reduced henceforth to mere guards for the sovereigns. On returning to France, to the bosom of the great, strong, magnificent, peaceful, and glorious fatherland, I should have proclaimed her frontiers immutable; all future wars purely defensive, all aggrandizement antinational. I should have associated my son in the Empire; my dictatorship would have been finished, and his constitutional reign would have begun. Paris would have been the capital of the world, and the French the envy of the nations! My leisure then, and my old age, would have been devoted, in company with the Empress and during the royal apprenticeship of my son, to leisurely visiting, with our own horses and like a true country couple, every corner of the Empire, receiving complaints, redressing wrongs, and scattering public buildings and benefactions on all sides and everywhere. Napoleon, predestined by Providence for the gloomy role of executioner of the peoples, assured himself that the aim of his actions had been the peoples’ welfare and that he could control the fate of millions and by the employment of power confer benefactions.
Leo Tolstoy (War and Peace)
In forgiving others, I free myself towards belonging and wholeness, be it with the person I am forgiving, or with myself.
Sharon Weil (ChangeAbility: How Artists, Activists, and Awakeners Navigate Change)
We each share in innumerable physical and emotional experiences. Our like-kind responses to the external world connect every person together whoever walked this earth. Who has not seen death tap dancing amongst the shagged icicles of a winter wonderland? Who has not heard their hearts petals welcome the bloom of springtime’s opalescence? Who has not experienced the calm of leaves rusting beneath their feet or felt befallen with an overwhelming sense of regeneration after slathered in baptismal wetness by an unexpected rainstorm? Who has not drunk in the smoky smells of leaves burning in October, hunted solace in the singeing embrace of a campfire on a cold winter night, or sought to escape from summers burning blanket of oppression by dunking their overheated stovetop into a mountain stream of clear water? Who has not felt the cold kiss of winter or experienced the melted butter feeling of crawling into bed after a day of hard work? Who is exempt from the punch of hunger in their gut or immune from the enraged screams of an unquenchable thirst? Who has not broken out in a frisson of Goosebumps when passing the graveyard on an ill-omened evening and experienced the electric sensation of ghostly fingernails running down the tapered stem of their spine? Who has not fallen in love at first sight? Who has not danced on the edge of a cliff, stared into the gloom, and asked themselves what if they slipped over the lip? Who has not experienced the existential vertigo, the anxiety of dizziness that freedom brings whenever a human being standing in solitude navigates amongst the tension between the finite and infinite and contemplates the possibility or of the divine shaping reality?
Kilroy J. Oldster (Dead Toad Scrolls)
Freedom is not the absence of boundaries, it is the ability to fulfill created intent.
Ben Stuart (Single, Dating, Engaged, Married: Navigating Life and Love in the Modern Age)
They had similar conceptions as to how teaching history, a full history, would shape how students navigated the world. They were acutely aware that this knowledge gave their students new eyes, a new sense of freedom and understanding - the ability to know the lie, so they cannot be lied to anymore.
Clint Smith III
We are in the womb of materialism, in a cocoon of illusions of fear, where slaves are born. 2. Deja vu karmic, infantile nostalgia New neurons of thinking are formed in the anatomy of philosophy, evolutionary maturation is formed. In the bathysphere, one perceives the bottomless depth of philosophy with the unknown flora and fauna of evolutionary thinking. More and more often, one can feel the deja vu karmic, infantile nostalgia of romance keeps us in the karmic merry-go-rounds and the swing of childish stubbornness and cheerful fear. Where love finds eternity in the nostalgia of romance, a sense of the pricelessness of the moments. We remain in the past during life and after life. where we experience déjà vu as we are ghosts. Consciousness matures with each new life, and subconsciousness is a piggy bank of nostalgia. Reincarnation and the wheel of samsara is the kindergarten of infantilism and childhood fears. This is a time loop of a philosophical lesson in life. Incubator and cocoon of growing up. Amnesia lowers everything into oblivion, and life turns into nothingness, and only intuition is the navigator of genius and maturity in eternity. Life is not enough to understand its laws of variability, there are only theories. Only the evolution of fear and selfishness is possible. Science and culture are useless without knowledge of the future. 3. The game leads to the logical end of the cycle. From one playful, infantile mindset of manipulation of populism to another. All modes change as the design and graphics of the game reality change. 4. We are limited by the illusion of materialism in the small screen of marketing It's amazing how we are constrained by the illusion of materialism in the small screen of marketing. Nature seems to be endless as the earth is round. With its abundance and originality in colors. There, in natural landscapes, freedom of thought and the flight of poetry like birds in the sky. Computers suck life out of us as well as materialism. In nature, we feel the infinity of life, in the harmonious cycles of rebirth. The world is so gigantic and the screen is so small. Nature as the best decor for life. Sweet dream of life in nature. Life seems full, and the soul is full of happiness and romance. No urban autism.
Musin Almat Zhumabekovich.
The soul seems to consist of billions of stars of dreams and hopes. We are unknown worlds even for ourselves, our mood and sensations are nature. In space, you can live billions of lives and billions of moods as moods of nature. An endless abundance of varieties of images of life experiences, the universe lulls us with dreams and depth of knowledge. 2. Life is a philosophical lens Life is how we see it, it is the philosophical lens of a video camera in our minds, the philosophical video effect of the video of our memory. 3. Genes and philosophy Chemistry anatomical biology develops gene philosophy. 4. Money is an evolutionary, infantile stagnation in the development of the brain. At the expense of money, a person seeks to return to childhood and stay there. 5. Advertising is a lawyer who, through hypnosis, proves the genius or stupidity of a person or a product through herd instinct, to elevate or destroy. Advertising can turn a criminal into a victim. Advertising does not care which side it is on, it matters who pays more. Advertising manipulates selfishness, it creates the illusion of general selfishness that unites and creates the mass thinking of conformism. All that you see around you is all advertising. Advertising is music, cinema, literature, everything related to the visual arts, science, philosophy, culture, etc. All this is a temporary fashionable propaganda of thinking. Manipulation through advertising where you have been convinced of something for centuries. 6. Inflation and exchange rates will increase the number of divorces, more orphans and single-parent families. 7. The genitals hinder the evolutionary development of the brain, since the trends of modern culture develop at the expense of the genitals, inflation, egoism, infantilism, etc. The world will heal profundity. 8. Selfishness is an abstraction of lies, surrealism of self-deception. 9. Marketing of selfish dogmas and propaganda is the architecture of modern thinking in which modern theories and hypotheses and other kinds of opinions are placed that grow to the level of dogmas. 10. The human world is built through knowledge, namely through awareness. Books are a pillar and foundation. But awareness is the very building piercing the clouds, the building of the universe soaring into space like a spaceship plows through the depths of space of profundity. We reach the pinnacle of knowledge through the experience and opinions of other people who comprehend this world with the help of intuition, which is the main navigator in the development of culture and science. A person feels the weight of the evolutionary degeneration of the brain and heart and soul. The mind gains wings and freedom. The source of knowledge fills life with meaning so everything converges in its place and becomes understandable and the fear of ignorance decreases. Thinking is built at the expense of books, but intuition is a wormhole into endless depths of awareness and a look into the future. The abundance of opinions of theories of hypotheses speaks of ignorance and selfishness of vanity. Through books we learn the anatomy of philosophy. In books we accumulate someone else's experience and other people's insights and feel more fulfilling and more alive. Author: Musin Almat Zhumabekovich
Musin Almat Zhumabekovich.