Empowerment In The Workplace Quotes

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Most people think a beautiful woman doesn’t have to work as hard to get what she wants. And that might be true when she’s at a bar trying to get a drink, or when she’s in Home Depot trying to find someone to help her down the plumbing aisle. But it’s not true in the workplace. A beautiful woman often has to work twice as hard to be seen for who she is here. Because, unfortunately, there are still men out there who can’t see past beauty.
Vi Keeland (Inappropriate)
Women need to keep asking for what they’re worth, and leaders need to make sure women are paid the same, whether they ask for it or not.
Mikaela Kiner (Female Firebrands: Stories and Techniques to Ignite Change, Take Control, and Succeed in the Workplace)
Recognizing that you have a bias and blind spots is essential to personal growth.
Mikaela Kiner (Female Firebrands: Stories and Techniques to Ignite Change, Take Control, and Succeed in the Workplace)
Controlling your mindset is one of the most powerful badass things you can do.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
You now have more experience and wisdom than ever before. Age enhances your value.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
We believe that we don’t have what it takes to compete, therefore we don’t compete.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
I don’t care how old you are—fifty, sixty, or seventy. Your value doesn’t diminish with each birthday.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
For those who still believe structural inequality is a figment of feminists’ imagination, let’s recap some of the ways the financial odds are stacked against women. The gender pay gap sits stubbornly at around 18 per cent in Australia. (It gets wider the higher up the ladder you go, by the way). Female-dominated occupations are less well paid than male-dominated ones. Six out of ten Australians work in an industry dominated by one gender. Australia has one of the highest rates of part-time work in the world: 25 per cent of us work part time. Women make up 71.6 per cent of all part-time workers and 54.7 per cent of all casual employees. Australian women are among the best educated in the world but have relatively low comparable workplace participation and achievement rates. And just to add insult to injury, products marketed to women are more expensive than those marketed to men!
Jane Caro (Accidental Feminists)
I have to hand it to the patriarchy. It has been a brilliant and comprehensive strategy to keep women under control, to create so many hurdles and levels of difficulty—both overt and covert, both in the workplace and in the home, both through the tax system and the lack of services—that women must expend much of their energy just overcoming them and have little left over for battling promotion and higher wages. Exhaustion is a feminist issue.
Jane Caro
With many high-earning, public women espousing operating as individuals, "feminism" was reduced to a self-empowerment strategy. A way to get things. A way to get more of the things you thought you deserved. A way to consume. But it also performed something far more sinister: "feminism" became automatically imbued with agency and autonomy, starting popular feminist discourse with a lack of class literacy. Centering popular feminism there meant that the women and other marginalized genders who didn't have the necessary means to secure independence or power—in broader culture, in their families, in their communities, in their workplaces—were not a part of this conversation about becoming an optimized agent of self.
Koa Beck (White Feminism: From the Suffragettes to Influencers and Who They Leave Behind)
There is an old question, rarely voiced these days, but nevertheless running as an undercurrent beneath the squabbles and misunderstandings that occur in households, workplaces and universities on a daily basis. ‘What do women want?’ has been asked in a bewildered, almost exasperated, tone since women first began to say they wanted more. Yet the answer seems to us to be simple and entirely self-evident. Women want what all sentient human beings want. They want to develop their own talents and put them to good use, to earn and control their own money so they can be truly independent and make free choices. They want to gain status and respect as they prove to be worth of it. To love and to be loved as free and equal adults, to be allowed their human flaws and foibles and not to be unfairly judged for them, and to be forgiven when they fail, behave badly or have trouble coping. To be the subject and not the object. They want, in short, what men want. – pg. 237
Jane Caro Catherine Fox
CONFESSIONS OF A CLING-ON If a man is walking in a forest and makes a statement, but there is no woman around to hear it, is he still wrong? Or if a woman is walking in the forest and asks for something, and there is no man around to hear her, is she still needy? These Zen koans capture some of the frustrations people have with the opposite gender. And where is the dividing line between someone simply having a need, and someone being a needy person? Is it written in heaven somewhere what is too much need, too little need and just right amount of need for the “normal person?” Ask pop radio psychologists Dr. Laura, or Sally Jessie Rafael, or any number of experts who claim to know for sure, and you’ll get some very different answers. And isn’t it fun to see the new sophisticated ways our advanced culture is developing to make each other wrong? You better keep up with the latest technical terminology or you will be at the mercy of those who do. Whoever has read the latest most recent self-help book has the clear advantage. Example: Man: “Get real, would you! Your Venusian codependency has got you trapped in your learned helpless victim act, and indulging in your empowerment phobia again.” Woman: “When you call me codependent, I feel (notice the political correctness of the feeling word) that you are simply projecting your own disowned, unintegrated, emotionally unavailable Martian counterdependency to protect your inner ADD two year old from ever having to grow up. So there!” Speaking of diagnosis, remember the codependent. Worrying about codependency was like a virus that everyone had from about 1988 to 1994. Here’s a prayer to commemorate the codependent: The Codependent’s Prayer by Kelly Bryson Our Authority, which art in others, self-abandonment be thy name. Codependency comes when others’ will is done, At home, as it is in the workplace. give us this day our daily crumbs of love. And give us a sense of indebtedness, As we try to get others to feel indebted to us. And lead us not into freedom, but deliver us from awareness. For thine is the slavery and the weakness and the dependency, For ever and ever. Amen.
Kelly Bryson (Don't Be Nice, Be Real)
Performance measure. Throughout this book, the term performance measure refers to an indicator used by management to measure, report, and improve performance. Performance measures are classed as key result indicators, result indicators, performance indicators, or key performance indicators. Critical success factors (CSFs). CSFs are the list of issues or aspects of organizational performance that determine ongoing health, vitality, and wellbeing. Normally there are between five and eight CSFs in any organization. Success factors. A list of 30 or so issues or aspects of organizational performance that management knows are important in order to perform well in any given sector/ industry. Some of these success factors are much more important; these are known as critical success factors. Balanced scorecard. A term first introduced by Kaplan and Norton describing how you need to measure performance in a more holistic way. You need to see an organization’s performance in a number of different perspectives. For the purposes of this book, there are six perspectives in a balanced scorecard (see Exhibit 1.7). Oracles and young guns. In an organization, oracles are those gray-haired individuals who have seen it all before. They are often considered to be slow, ponderous, and, quite frankly, a nuisance by the new management. Often they are retired early or made redundant only to be rehired as contractors at twice their previous salary when management realizes they have lost too much institutional knowledge. Their considered pace is often a reflection that they can see that an exercise is futile because it has failed twice before. The young guns are fearless and precocious leaders of the future who are not afraid to go where angels fear to tread. These staff members have not yet achieved management positions. The mixing of the oracles and young guns during a KPI project benefits both parties and the organization. The young guns learn much and the oracles rediscover their energy being around these live wires. Empowerment. For the purposes of this book, empowerment is an outcome of a process that matches competencies, skills, and motivations with the required level of autonomy and responsibility in the workplace. Senior management team (SMT). The team comprised of the CEO and all direct reports. Better practice. The efficient and effective way management and staff undertake business activities in all key processes: leadership, planning, customers, suppliers, community relations, production and supply of products and services, employee wellbeing, and so forth. Best practice. A commonly misused term, especially because what is best practice for one organization may not be best practice for another, albeit they are in the same sector. Best practice is where better practices, when effectively linked together, lead to sustainable world-class outcomes in quality, customer service, flexibility, timeliness, innovation, cost, and competitiveness. Best-practice organizations commonly use the latest time-saving technologies, always focus on the 80/20, are members of quality management and continuous improvement professional bodies, and utilize benchmarking. Exhibit 1.10 shows the contents of the toolkit used by best-practice organizations to achieve world-class performance. EXHIBIT 1.10 Best-Practice Toolkit Benchmarking. An ongoing, systematic process to search for international better practices, compare against them, and then introduce them, modified where necessary, into your organization. Benchmarking may be focused on products, services, business practices, and processes of recognized leading organizations.
Douglas W. Hubbard (Business Intelligence Sampler: Book Excerpts by Douglas Hubbard, David Parmenter, Wayne Eckerson, Dalton Cervo and Mark Allen, Ed Barrows and Andy Neely)
A conscious business is a type of self-organizing, living system that learns, grows, evolves, self-organizes, and even self-actualizes on its own. The right degree of decentralization, empowerment, collaboration, love, and care in the workplace enables organizations to adapt, innovate, and evolve faster and enjoy a strong, sustainable competitive advantage.
John E. Mackey (Conscious Capitalism, With a New Preface by the Authors: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business)
I ask you to reclaim the word 'ambition.' Face the world with a healthy, sparkling dose of it. Come from a why-not-me mentality. You can make a difference to your team. To your workplace. To your neighborhood. The world needs you to bring it. We’re counting on it.
Michelle Kinsman (Real-World Feminist Handbook: Practical Advice on How to Find, Win & Kick Ass at Your First Job)
The greatest privilege that men in the workplace have had isn't a corporate or public policy. It's a partner at home. A nonpaid working dad (a.k.a. Stay-at-home dad) might be some working moms' idea of a superhero. But nonpaid working dads are not the ultimate solution. We do not need role reversal; rather, we need a new model of teamwork in which both parents are meaningfully engaged at work and at home, collaboratively making decisions that reflect what matters most to them.
Tiffany Dufu (Drop the Ball: Achieving More by Doing Less)
Almost every woman I know has talked about equality in the workplace, about women supporting women, and about women championing other women. But I've also seen that women knock each other down and say mean things about other women more than I've ever seen from my male counterparts. Women: Stop knocking each other down, and let's start building each other up. Men are already there to stomp on you; the last thing we need is for women to join in on the act.
Tan France (Naturally Tan)
Remember, it takes courage, vulnerability, and humility to admit what you don’t know and experiment with new behaviors.
Mikaela Kiner (Female Firebrands: Stories and Techniques to Ignite Change, Take Control, and Succeed in the Workplace)
It’s long overdue that we expose this behavior and create environments where everyone feels safe and can be productive at work.
Mikaela Kiner (Female Firebrands: Stories and Techniques to Ignite Change, Take Control, and Succeed in the Workplace)
Women need to work together if we want to dispel the myth that there’s only room for one woman at the table.
Mikaela Kiner (Female Firebrands: Stories and Techniques to Ignite Change, Take Control, and Succeed in the Workplace)
In addition to the external barriers erected by society, women are hindered by barriers that exist within ourselves. We hold ourselves back in ways both big and small, by lacking self-confidence, by not raising our hands, and by pulling back when we should be leaning in. We internalize the negative messages we get throughout our lives - the messages that say it's wrong to be outspoken, aggressive, more powerful than men. We lower our own expectations of what we can achieve. We continue to do the majority of the housework and child care. We compromise our career goals to make room for partners and children who may not even exist yet. Compared to our male colleagues, fewer of us aspire to senior positions. This is not a list of things other women have done. I have made every mistake on this list. At times, I still do. My argument is that getting rid of these internal barriers is critical to gaining power. Others have argued that women can get to the top only when the institutional barriers are gone. This is the ultimate chicken-and-egg situation. The chicken: Women will tear down the external barriers once we achieve leadership roles. We will march into our bosses' offices and demand what we need, including pregnancy parking. Or better yet, we'll become bosses and make sure all women have what they need. The egg: We need to eliminate the external barriers to get women into those roles in the first place. Both sides are right. So rather than engage in philosophical arguments over which comes first, let's agree to wage battles on both fronts. They are equally important. I am encouraging women to address the chicken, but I fully support those who are focusing on the egg. Internal obstacles are rarely discussed and often underplayed. Throughout my life, I was told over and over about inequalities in the workplace and how hard it would be to have a career and a family. I rarely heard anything, however, about the ways I might hold myself back. These internal obstacles deserve a lot more attention, in part because they are under our own control. We can dismantle the hurdles in ourselves today. We can start this very moment.
Sheryl Sandberg
I have written this book to encourage women to dream big, forge a path through the obstacles, and achieve their full potential. I am hoping that each woman will set her own goals and reach for them with gusto. And I am hoping that each man will do his part to support women in the workplace and in the home, also with gusto. As we start using the talents of the entire population, our institutions will be more productive, our homes will be happier, and the children growing up in those homes will no longer be held back by narrow stereotypes.
Sheryl Sandberg
It’s time for women fifty and beyond to claim their workplace power.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
Being a badass means owning who you are, owning your experience, your wisdom, your talent, your age.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
Ambition doesn’t end on a particular birthday. Own it and live it.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
Make it your mission to finish your career on your terms with a bang, not a whimper.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
The bottom line is that gendered ageism is a factor in our careers. There’s no denying it.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
Be proud of how you show up every day, feeling comfortable in your own skin, being your magnificent you.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
When you're fearful of aging, you don't step into your full power and potential.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
When did wrinkles become shameful and when did we start buying into all this bullshit?
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
Say it out loud: “I’m not done yet!” Own it. Live it.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
What a waste of time it is to be anxious and worried about aging instead of living.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
You can’t sit on your ass and wait for things to miraculously happen for you.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
Our age works against us, as does our gender, and we can’t take this shit lying down.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
Loving yourself is badass, about as badass as you can get.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
It’s your time and you have to claim it.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)
Don’t be stingy with your praise and support of other women. What goes around comes around. It’s great karma.
Bonnie Marcus (Not Done Yet!: How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power)