Count Of Monte Cristo Quotes

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I am not proud, but I am happy; and happiness blinds, I think, more than pride.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
All human wisdom is contained in these two words - Wait and Hope
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
It's necessary to have wished for death in order to know how good it is to live.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Woman is sacred; the woman one loves is holy.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Moral wounds have this peculiarity - they may be hidden, but they never close; always painful, always ready to bleed when touched, they remain fresh and open in the heart.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
The difference between treason and patriotism is only a matter of dates.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
How did I escape? With difficulty. How did I plan this moment? With pleasure.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
When you compare the sorrows of real life to the pleasures of the imaginary one, you will never want to live again, only to dream forever.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Learning does not make one learned: there are those who have knowledge and those who have understanding. The first requires memory and the second philosophy.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
For all evils there are two remedies - time and silence.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
All human wisdom is contained in these two words--"Wait and Hope.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Life is a storm, my young friend. You will bask in the sunlight one moment, be shattered on the rocks the next. What makes you a man is what you do when that storm comes. You must look into that storm and shout as you did in Rome. Do your worst, for I will do mine! Then the fates will know you as we know you
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
There are two ways of seeing: with the body and with the soul. The body's sight can sometimes forget, but the soul remembers forever.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I have always had more dread of a pen, a bottle of ink, and a sheet of paper than of a sword or pistol.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
We are always in a hurry to be happy...; for when we have suffered a long time, we have great difficulty in believing in good fortune.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Ah, lips that say one thing, while the heart thinks another,
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I don’t think man was meant to attain happiness so easily. Happiness is like those palaces in fairy tales whose gates are guarded by dragons: we must fight in order to conquer it.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Fool that I am," said he,"that I did not tear out my heart the day I resolved to revenge myself".
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Until the day when God shall deign to reveal the future to man, all human wisdom is summed up in these two words,-Wait and hope.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Often we pass beside happiness without seeing it, without looking at it, or even if we have seen and looked at it, without recognizing it.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
...The friends we have lost do not repose under the ground...they are buried deep in our hearts. It has been thus ordained that they may always accompany us...
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Those born to wealth, and who have the means of gratifying every wish, know not what is the real happiness of life, just as those who have been tossed on the stormy waters of the ocean on a few frail planks can alone realize the blessings of fair weather.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
To learn is not to know; there are the learners and the learned. Memory makes the one, philosophy the others.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
For the happy man prayer is only a jumble of words, until the day when sorrow comes to explain to him the sublime language by means of which he speaks to God.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Abbe Faria: Here is your final lesson - do not commit the crime for which you now serve the sentence. God said, Vengeance is mine. Edmond Dantes: I don't believe in God. Abbe Faria: It doesn't matter. He believes in you.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo, V1 (The Count of Monte Cristo, part 1 of 2))
Hatred is blind; rage carries you away; and he who pours out vengeance runs the risk of tasting a bitter draught.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
It is the way of weakened minds to see everything through a black cloud. The soul forms its own horizons; your soul is darkened, and consequently the sky of the future appears stormy and unpromising
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
...remember that what has once been done may be done again.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
What I’ve loved most after you, is myself: that is, my dignity and that strength which made me superior to other men. That Strength was my life. You’ve broken it with a word, so I must die.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
So much the worse for those who fear wine, for it is because they have some bad thoughts which they are afraid the liquor will extract from their hearts.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
There is neither happiness nor unhappiness in this world; there is only the comparison of one state with another. Only a man who has felt ultimate despair is capable of feeling ultimate bliss. It is necessary to have wished for death in order to know how good it is to live.....the sum of all human wisdom will be contained in these two words: Wait and Hope.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Philosophy cannot be taught; it is the application of the sciences to truth.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Now I'd like someone to tell me there is no drama in real life!
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
And now...farewell to kindness, humanity and gratitude. I have substituted myself for Providence in rewarding the good; may the God of vengeance now yield me His place to punish the wicked.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Be happy, noble heart, be blessed for all the good thou hast done and wilt do hereafter, and let my gratitude remain in obscurity like your good deeds.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
A weakened mind always sees everything through a black veil. The soul makes its own horizons; your soul is dark, which is why you see such a cloudy sky.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Haste is a poor counselor
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
...but my friends call me Edmund Dantes.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Life is a storm. One minute you will bathe under the sun and the next you will be shattered upon the rocks. That's when you shout, "Do your worst, for I will do mine!" and you will be remembered forever.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
In politics, my dear fellow, you know, as well as I do, there are no men, but ideas — no feelings, but interests; in politics we do not kill a man, we only remove an obstacle, that is all.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
What would you not have accomplished if you had been free?" "Possibly nothing at all; the overflow of my brain would probably, in a state of freedom, have evaporated in a thousand follies; misfortune is needed to bring to light the treasures of the human intellect. Compression is needed to explode gunpowder. Captivity has brought my mental faculties to a focus; and you are well aware that from the collision of clouds electricity is produced — from electricity, lightning, from lightning, illumination.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
If you wish to discover the guilty person, first find out to whom the crime might be useful.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
But Valentine, why despair, why always paint the future in such sombre hues?" Maximilien asked. "Because, my friend, I judge it by the past.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I am hungry, feed me; I am bored, amuse me.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Yet man will never be perfect until he learns to create and destroy; he does know how to destroy, and that is half the battle.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I am a Count, Not a Saint.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
On what slender threads do life and fortune hang… !
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Pain, thou art not an evil
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Order is the key to all problems.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
It is the infirmity of our nature always to believe ourselves much more unhappy than those who groan by our sides!
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I hate this life of the fashionable world, always ordered, measured, ruled, like our music-paper. What I have always wished for, desired, and coveted, is the life of an artist, free and independent, relying only on my own resources, and accountable only to myself.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Upon my word," said Dantes, "you make me shudder. Is the world filled with tigers and crocodiles?" "Yes; and remember that two legged tigers and crocodiles are more dangerous than the others.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
If it is ones lot to be cast among fools, one must learn foolishness.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
The wretched and the miserable should turn to their Savior first, yet they do not hope in Him until all other hope is exhausted.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness.
Alexandre Dumas
Your life story is a novel; and people, though they love novels wound between two yellow paper covers, are oddly suspicious of those which come to them in living vellum.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
No, I slept as I always do when I am bored and have not the courage to amuse myself, or when I am hungry and have not the desire to eat.--The Count of Monte Cristo
Alexandre Dumas
He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness… Live, then and be happy beloved children of my heart and never forget that until the day when God shall deign to reveal the future to man, all human wisdom is summed up in these two words – wait and hope.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
You can come share a tasty meal of bread, raisins, and fresh cheese. With that, and The Count of Monte Cristo, anyone can live to a hundred.
Carlos Ruiz Zafón (The Shadow of the Wind (The Cemetery of Forgotten Books, #1))
Youth is a blossom whose fruit is love; happy is he who plucks it after watching it slowly ripen.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I have no will, unless it be the will never to decide. I have been so overwhelmed by the many storms that have broken over my head, that I am become passive in the hands of the Almighty, like a sparrow in the talons of an eagle. I live, because it is not ordained for me to die.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
It is not the tree that forsakes the flower, but the flower that forsakes the tree.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I love the life you've always made so sweet for me and I'd regret it if I had to die.' 'Do you mean to say that if I left you---' 'I'd die, yes.' 'Then you love me?
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
God is merciful to all, as he has been to you; he is first a father, then a judge.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
...for there are two distinct sorts of ideas, those that proceed from the head and those that emanate from the heart.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
And now,' said the unknown, 'farewell kindness, humanity, and gratitude! Farewell to all the feelings that expand the heart! I have been heaven's substitute to recompense the good - now the god of vengeance yields to me his power to punish the wicked!
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
In every country where independence has taken the place of liberty, the first desire of a manly heart is to possess a weapon which at once renders him capable of defence or attack, and, by rendering its owner fearsome, makes him feared.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
We frequently pass so near to happiness without seeing, without regarding it, or if we do see and regard it, yet without recognizing it.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
So, preferring death to capture, I accomplished the most astonishing deeds, and which, more then once, showed me that the too great care we take of our bodies is the only obstacle to the sucess of those projects which require rapid decision, and vigorous and determined execution. In reality, when you have once devoted your life to your enterprises, you are no longer the equal of other men, or, rather, other men are no longer your equals, and whosoever has taken this resolution, feels his strength and resources doubled.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Live, for a day will come when you will be happy and bless life
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Return to the world still more brilliant because of your former sorrows.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I am selfish — you have already said so— and as a selfish man I think not of what others would do in my situation, but of what I intend doing myself. Alexandre Dumas. The Count of Monte Cristo (Kindle Locations 11677-11678).
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Ah," said the jailer, "do not always brood over what is impossible, or you will be mad in a fortnight.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Perhaps what I am about to say will appear strange to you gentlemen, socialists, progressives, humanitarians as you are, but I never worry about my neighbor, I never try to protect society which does not protect me -- indeed, I might add, which generally takes no heed of me except to do me harm -- and, since I hold them low in my esteem and remain neutral towards them, I believe that society and my neighbor are in my debt.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Well, father, in the shipwreck of life, for life is an eternal shipwreck of our hopes, I cast into the sea my useless encumbrance, that is all, and I remain with my own will, disposed to live perfectly alone, and, consequently, perfectly free. (Eugenie to her father)
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
We are never quits with those who oblige us," was Dantes' reply; "for when we do not owe them money, we owe them gratitude.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
He who has a partner has a master.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Weakened minds see everything through a black veil; the soul forms its own horizons; your soul is darkened, and consequently the sky of your future appears stormy and unpromising.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I have no fear of ghosts, and I have never heard it said that so much harm had been done by the dead during 6,000 years as it brought by the living in a single day.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
You who are in power have only the means that money produces — we who are in expectation, have those which devotion prompts.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Joy to hearts which have suffered long is like the dew on the ground after a long drought; both the heart and the ground absorb that beneficent moisture falling on them, and nothing is outwardly apparant.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
What a fool I was, not to tear my heart out on the day when I resolved to avenge myself!
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
These men are in prison: that is the Outsider’s verdict. They are quite contented in prison—caged animals who have never known freedom; but it is prison all the same. And the Outsider? He is in prison too: nearly every Outsider in this book has told us so in a different language; but he knows it. His desire is to escape. But a prison-break is not an easy matter; you must know all about your prison, otherwise you might spend years in tunnelling, like the Abbe in The Count of Monte Cristo, and only find yourself in the next cell.
Colin Wilson (The Outsider)
Edmond Dantes: I don’t believe in God. Abbe Faria: That doesn’t matter, He believes in you…
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo (Great Illustrated Classics))
To save a man and thereby to spare a father's agony and a mother's feelings is not to do a noble deed, it is but an act of humanity.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
God is always the last resource.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
...does that not tell you that grief is like life and that there is always somethings unknown beyond it?
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
in prosperity prayers seem but a mere medley of words, until misfortune comes and the unhappy sufferer first understands the meaning of the sublime language in which he invokes the pity of heaven!
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
(...) the tree forsakes not the flower: the flower falls from the tree.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo (Great Illustrated Classics))
Tell the angel who will watch over your life to pray now and then for a man who, like Satan, believed himself for an instant to be equal to God, but who realized in all humility that supreme power and wisdom are in the hands of God alone.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
One always hurries towards happiness, Monsieur Danglars, because when one has suffered much, one is at pains to believe in it.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
...joy takes a strange effect at times, it seems to oppress us almost the same as sorrow.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Unfortunates, who ought to begin with God, do not have any hope in him till they have exhausted all other means of deliverance.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I maintain my pride in the face of men, but I abandon it before God, who drew me out of nothingness to make me what I am.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Every individual, from the highest to the lowest degree, has his place in the ladder of social life, and around him swirls a little world of interests, composed of stormy passions and conflicting atoms
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I have met countless patients who told me that they “are” bipolar or borderline or that they “have” PTSD, as if they had been sentenced to remain in an underground dungeon for the rest of their lives, like the Count of Monte Cristo. None of these diagnoses takes into account the unusual talents that many of our patients develop or the creative energies they have mustered to survive.
Bessel van der Kolk (The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma)
We’ll go where the air is pure, where all sounds are soothing, where, no matter how proud one may be, one feels humble and finds oneself small- in short, we’ll go to the sea. I love the sea as one loves a mistress and I long for her when I haven’t seen her for some time
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Punctuality is the politness of kings" p.154
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
For all evils there are two remedies—time and silence.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
That is a dream also; only he has remained asleep, while you have awakened; and who knows which of you is the most fortunate?
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
So he went down, smiling sceptically and mutter the final word in human wisdom: 'Perhaps!
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I regret having helped you clarify your past and having told you what I did.' 'Why?' 'Because I've instilled in your heart a feeling that wasn't there before: vengeance.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Oh, mankind, race of crocodiles! How well I recognize you down there, and how worthy you are of yourselves!
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
There are people who are willing to suffer and swallow their tears at leisure, and God will not doubt reward them in heaven for their resignation; but those who have the will to struggle strike back at fate in retaliation for the blows they receive. Do you intend to fight back at fate, Valentine? That's what I came here to ask you. -Maximilien Morrel
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
It's easy to be friends with when shares the same opinions.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Upon my word,' said Dantes, 'you make me tremble. If I listen much longer to you, I shall believe the world is filled with tigers and crocodiles.' 'Remember that two-legged tigers and crocodiles are more dangerous than those that walk on four.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Life's best adventures are as close as your nearest bookshelf. Tour Europe with the Count of Monte Cristo. Dance a ball with Mr Darcy. Hunt down bad guys with Stephanie Plum. Amazing things can happen when you read.
Ally Carter (Cheating at Solitaire (Cheating at Solitaire, #1))
But if you like, you can come share a tasty meal of bread, raisins, and fresh Burgos cheese. With that, and The Count of Monte Cristo, anyone can live to a hundred.
Carlos Ruiz Zafón (The Angel's Game (The Cemetery of Forgotten Books, #2))
You're not worried about anything, are you?" said Danglers. "It seems to me everything's going perfectly for you." "That's exactly what worries me," replied Dantes. "I don't think man was meant to attain happiness so easily. Happiness is like those palaces in fairy tales whose gates are guarded by dragons: we must fight in order to conquer it.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
-I'm going to heaven! I replied. -What do you mean, you're going to heaven? -Let me pass. -And what will you do in heaven, my poor child? -I'm going there to kill God, who killed Daddy.
Tom Reiss (The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo)
I was delighted to see you again, and forgot for the moment that all happiness is fleeting.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I know the world is a drawing-room, from which we must retire politely and honestly; that is, with a bow, and our debts of honor paid.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Uncertainty is worse than all
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Death is the only serious preoccupation in life.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Can we account for instinct?' said Monte Cristo. 'Are there not some places where we seem to breathe sadness? — why, we cannot tell. It is a chain of recollections — an idea which carries you back to other times, to other places — which, very likely, have no connection with the present time and place.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
My son, philosophy as I understand it, is reducible to no rules by which it can be learned; it is the amalgamation of all the sciences, the golden cloud which bears the soul to heaven.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
من ذاق اﻷلم والعذاب كان أقدر الناس على أن يحس بالسعادة القصوى
الكسندر دوماس (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I know what happiness and what despair are, and I never make a jest of such feelings. Take it, then, but in exchange —
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Yes; I am a supercargo; pen, ink, and paper are my tools, and without my tools I am fit for nothing.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
There are some situations which men understand by instinct, by which reason is powerless to explain; in such cases the greatest poet is he who gives utterance to the most natural and vehement outburst of sorrow. Those who hear the bitter cry are as much impressed as if they listened to an entire poem, and when th sufferer is sincere they are right in regarding his outburst as sublime.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I have been taken by Satan into the highest mountain in the earth, and when there he said he to me, ‘Child of earth, what wouldst thou have to make thee adore me?’ I replied, ‘Listen, I wish to be Providence myself, for I feel that the most beautiful, noblest, most sublime thing in the world, is to recompense and punish.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Without reflecting that this is the only moment in which you can study character," said the count; "on the steps of the scaffold death tears off the mask that has been worn through life, and the real visage is disclosed.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
He pointed out to him the bearings of the coast, explained to him the variations of the compass, and taught him to read in that vast book opened over our heads which they call heaven, and where God writes in azure with letters of diamonds.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
that Englishman who came to challenge me three or four months ago, and whom I killed to stop him bothering me
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Life is very tenacious in these lawyers.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Gli uomini veramente generosi sono sempre pronti a divenire compassionevoli allorché la disgrazia del nemico supera i limiti del loro odio.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Great is the truth, fire can not burn, nor water can drown it!
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Unfortunately in this world of ours, each person views things through a certain medium, which prevents his seeing them in the same light as others…
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness. We must have felt what it is to die, Morrel, that we may appreciate the enjoyments of life. Live, then, and be happy, beloved children of my heart, and never forget, that until the day when God will deign to reveal the future to man, all human wisdom is contained in these two words, - ‘Wait and hope.’ – Your friend, Edmond Dantes, Count of Monte Cristo. The eyes of both were fixed on the spot indicated by the sailor, and on the blue-line separating the sky from the Mediterranean Sea, they perceived a large white sail.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
На този свят няма нито щастие, нито нещастие, има само сравняване между едно състояние и друго. Нищо повече. Само който е изпитал безгранична злочестина, може да изпита безгранично щастие. Човек трябва да е пожелал да умре, за да разбере колко хубав е животът.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
The king! I thought he was philosopher enough to allow that there was no murder in politics. In politics, my dear fellow, you know, as well as I do, there are no men, but ideas - no feelings, but interests; in politics we do not kill a man, we only remove an obstacle, that is all.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
...for, however all other feelings may be withered in a woman's nature, there is always one bright smiling spot in the maternal breast, and that is where a dearly-beloved child is concerned.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
You are my son Dantés! You are the child of my captivity. My priestly office condemned me to celibacy: God sent you to me both to console the man who could not be a father and the prisoner who could not be free
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Todo mal tienes dos remedios; el tiempo y el silencio.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Before one is afraid, one sees clearly; while one is afraid, one sees double; and after being afraid, one sees dimly.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Why does a steward steal? He steals because he's not sure he'll always remain with his master and wants to make his future secure.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Darling, has not the count just told us that all human wisdom is summed up in two words? Wait and hope.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
and I will say to you, rude as it may seem, `My brother, you sacrifice greatly to pride; you may be above others, but above you there is God.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
On the 24th of February, 1810, the look-out at Notre-Dame de la Garde signalled the three-master, the Pharaon from Smyrna, Trieste, and Naples.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
You were able to wait,' said Dantes, sighing. 'Your long labor gave you a constant occupation, and when you didn't have your work to distract you, you had your hopes to console you.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
So I have 8 to 10 screenplays written and unproduced. And frankly, some of them are my favorite stories. I have a Western version of The Count Of Monte Cristo where the count has a clockwork hand. I have a screenplay called Mephisto's Bridge about a Faustian deal with the devil. I love them all.
Guillermo del Toro
He was a fine, tall, slim young fellow, with black eyes, and hair as dark as the raven’s wing; and his whole appearance bespoke that calmness and resolution peculiar to men accustomed from their cradle to contend with danger.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Carry your sorrow inside you as the cloud conceals ruin and death like a deadly secret that is understood only when the storm breaks.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
What, no wine?
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
The heart breaks when it has swelled too much in the warm breath of hope, then finds itself enclosed in cold reality.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
You instinctively display the greatest virtue, or rather the chief defect, of us eccentric Parisians- that is, you assume the vices you have not, and conceal the virtues you possess.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Why do you mention my father?' screamed he; 'Why do you mingle a recollection of him with the affairs of today?' Because I am he who saved your father's life when he wished to destroy himself, as you do today-because I am the man who sent the purse to your young sister, and the Paraon to Old Morrel-because I am the Edmond Dantes who nursed you, a child, on my knees.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Why, in truth, sir," was Monte Cristo's reply, "man is but an ugly caterpillar for him who studies him through a solar microscope; but you said, I think, that I had nothing else to do. Now, really, let me ask, sir, have you? — do you believe you have anything to do? or to speak in plain terms, do you really think that what you do deserves being called anything?
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Моите мечти нямат граници - аз винаги искам невъзможното.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Ние минаваме често пъти покрай щастието, без да го видим, без да го погледнем, или ако сме го видели и погледнали - без да го познаем
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
It was clear that Mme Danglars was suffering from one of those nervous irritations which women are often unable to explain even to themselves.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
A man is always in a hurry to be happy.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I want to be free of you, the way you, obviously, are free of me.
The Count of Monte Cristo
Happiness even makes the wicked good.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I'm not proud, but I'm happy, and I think happiness makes a man even blinder than pride.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Youth is the flower of which love is the fruit; Happy the gatherer who picks it after watching it slowly mature.
Alexandre Dumas
let us call on M. de Monte Cristo; he is admirably adapted to revive one's spirits, because he never interrogates, and in my opinion those who ask no questions are the best comforters.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I possessed nearly five thousand volumes in my library at Rome; but after reading them over many times, I found out that with a hundred and fifty well-chosen books a man possesses a complete analysis of all human knowledge, or at least all that is either useful or desirable to be acquainted with. – Abbe Faria
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Look, look,' cried the count, seizing the young man's hands - "look, for on my soul it is curious. Here is a man who had resigned himself to his fate, who was going to the scaffold to die - like a coward, it is true, but he was about to die without resistance. Do you know what gave him strength? - do you know what consoled him? It was, that another partook of his punishment - that another partook of his anguish - that another was to die before him. Lead two sheep to the butcher's, two oxen to the slaughterhouse, and make one of them understand that his companion will not die; the sheep will bleat for pleasure, the ox will bellow with joy. But man - man, who God created in his own image - man, upon whom God has laid his first, his sole commandment, to love his neighbour - man, to whom God has given a voice to express his thoughts - what is his first cry when he hears his fellowman is saved? A blasphemy. Honour to man, this masterpiece of nature, this king of the creation!
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I wish to be Providence myself, for I feel that the most beautiful, noblest, most sublime thing in the world, is to recompense and punish.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
...paleness is always looked upon as a strong proof of aristocratic descent and distinguished breeding.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Youth is a flower of which love is the fruit; happy is he who, after facing watched its silent growth, is permitted to gather and call it his own
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
The sum of all human wisdom will be contained in these two words: Wait and hope." ~Edmond Dantes
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
But excessive grief is like a storm at sea, where the frail bark is tossed from the depths to the top of the wave.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Every man has a devouring passion in his heart, as every fruit has its worm.
Alexandre Dumas
Danglars was one of those men born with a pen behind the ear, and an inkstand in place of a heart. Everything with him was multiplication or subtraction.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
The most curious spectacle in life is that of death.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
GENERAL, I have learned that the jack ass whose business it is to report to you upon the battle of the 27th [the 27 Nivôse, i.e., January 16] stated that I was only in observation throughout the battle. I don't wish any such observation on him, for he would have shit in his pants. Salute and Brotherhood! ALEX. DUMAS
Tom Reiss (The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo)
...the overflow of my brain would probably, in a state of freedom, have evaporated in a thousand follies; it needs trouble and difficulty and danger to hollow out various mysterious and hidden mines of human intelligence. Pressure is required, you know, to ignite powder: captivity has collected into one single focus all the floating faculties of my mind; they have come into close contact in the narrow space in which they have been wedged. You know that from the collision of clouds electricity is produced and from electricity comes the lightning from whose flash we have light amid our greatest darkness.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
It was a strange thing: one never appeared to take a step forward int he heart or mind of this man. Those who wished, so to speak, to force their way into intimacy with him found the path blocked.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Come now, be a man!' he thought. 'We are used to adversity; let's not be crushed by a mere disappointment, or else I shall have suffered for nothing. The heart breaks when it has swelled too much in the warm breath of hope, then finds itself enclosed in cold reality.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
the greater number of a man's errors come before him disguised under the specious form of necessity; then, after error has been committed in a moment of excitement, of delirium, or of fear, we see that we might have avoided and escaped it.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
He's right: They have to put madmen with madmen.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
A meno che non muoia, sarò sempre ciò che sono.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
No, happily that unjust prejudice is forgotten which made the son responsible for the father's actions. Review your life, Albert ...
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
...but he laughed as the English do at the end of his teeth.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Sólo el que ha experimentado el colmo del infortunio puede sentir la felicidad suprema
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Happy! who can answer for that? Happiness or unhappiness is the secret known but to oneself…
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Is the world filled with tigers and crocodiles?” “Yes; and remember that two-legged tigers and crocodiles are more dangerous than the others.” “Never
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Drunk, if you like; so much the worse for those who fear wine, for it is because they have bad thoughts which they are afraid the liquor will extract from their hearts;" and Caderousse began to sing the two last lines of a song very popular at the time, —
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Starvation!" exclaimed the abbe, springing from his seat. "Why, the vilest animals are not suffered to die by such a death as that. The very dogs that wander houseless and homeless in the streets find some pitying hand to cast them a mouthful of bread; and that a man, a Christian, should be allowed to perish of hunger in the midst of other men who call themselves Christians, is too horrible for belief. Oh, it is impossible - utterly impossible!
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Oh, certainly, death, sudden and violent, was a good way to foil his implacable enemies, who seemed to be pursuing him with some incomprehensible desire for vengeance. Yes, but that meant dying!
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Without words, protestations, or vows, I have laid my life in your hands. You fail me, and, I repeat once more, you are quite right in acting thus; nevertheless in losing you I lose part of my life.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
The King! I thought him enough of a philosopher to realize that there is no such thing as murder in politics. You know as well as I do, my dear boy, that in politics there are no people, only ideas; no feelings, only interests. In politics, you don't kill a man, you remove an obstacle, that's all.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
But my real treasure is not that, my dear friend, which awaits me beneath the sombre rocks of Monte Cristo, it is your presence...it is the rays of intelligence you have elicited from my brain, the languages you have implanted in my memory, and which have taken root there with all their philological ramifications. These different sciences that you have made so easy to me by the depth of the knowledge you possess of them, and the clearness of the principles to which you have reduced them- this is my treasure, my beloved friend, and with this you have made me rich and happy.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Fernand," cried he, "of my hundred names I need only tell you one, to overwhelm you! But you guess it now do you not? - or, rather, you remember it? For notwithstanding all my sorrows and my tortures, I show you today a face which the happiness of revenge makes young again..
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
There is neither happiness nor misery in the world; there is only the comparison of one state with another, nothing more. He who has felt the deepest grief is best able to experience supreme happiness. We must have felt what it is to die, Morrel, that we may appreciate the enjoyments of living.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
This will do," said he, "and from this letter, which might have ruined me, I will make my fortune. Now to the work I have in hand." And after having assured himself that the prisoner was gone, the deputy procureur hastened to the house of his betrothed.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Dantes passed through all the stages of torture natural to prisoners in suspense. He was sustained at first by that pride of conscious innocence which is the sequence to hope; then he began to doubt his own innocence, which justified in some measure the governor's belief in his mental alienation; and then, relaxing his sentiment of pride, he addressed his supplications, not to God, but to man. God is always the last resource. Unfortunates, who ought to begin with God, do not have any hope in him till they have exhausted all other means of deliverance.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
There are men who have suffered and who have not only gone on living, but even built a new fortune on the ruins of their former happiness. From the depths into which their enemies have plunged them, they have risen again with such vigor and glory that they have dominated their former conquerors and cast them down in their turn.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
My dear fellow " Said Albert, turning to Franz " here is an admirable adventure; we will fill our carriage with pistols, blunderbusses, and double-barreled shotguns. Luigi Vampa comes to take us, and we take him - we bring him back to Rome , and present him to him holiness the Pope, who asks how he can repay so great a service; Then we merely ask for a cariage and a pair of horses, and we will see the Carnival in the carriage , and doubtless the Roman people will crown us at the capitol , and proclaim us, like Curtius and the veiled Horatius, the preservers of there country." Whilst Albert proposed this scheme, signor Pastrini's face assumed an expression impossible to describe.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
He leaned closer. “That’s what I’m trying to do. Your face is absolutely adorable when you blush.” My ears burned. Oh great, am I the color of a tomato now? “Yeah, well, I can make you blush,” I retorted. “By telling you how hot you are, and that when that little piece of black hair falls into your eyes, it’s so sexy it makes me forget my words, and...” I stopped, suddenly aware of how warm the mausoleum was. “Go on,” Caspian prodded, shaking his head so that his hair covered one green eye. I blushed again, and glanced around me, slowly backing away from him. I just needed some... space to clear my head. He followed me, stalking my every move. My blood felt like pure oxygen racing through my veins, fizzy and bubbling and making me want to float away. A hard wall at my back stopped me, but Caspian kept coming. I thought desperately of some way to change the subject. “I got you Moby-Dick,” I blurted out. He gave me a sly smile. “Mmmm, did you? How... interesting.” “And Treasure Island, and The Count of Monte Cristo.” I babbled on. “I thought you might like some boy books.” He stopped an inch away from me. I felt like I was his prisoner. “Let’s go back to the sexy and hot thing,” Caspian said. “Could we add a gorgeous or mysterious in there, too?” I gulped. “Like you don’t already know you’re all of those things. You probably had girls falling all over you before.” Caspian cocked his head to one side. “True. But I always thought it was because I was the quiet new guy. And besides, there’s only one person I was ever really interested in.” “Was?” I squeaked. Then I cleared my throat and tried again. “I mean—” “Am,” Caspian corrected himself. “Technically, I guess it’s both. I was interested the first day I saw her, and I still am interested in her.” His eyes glowed in the soft candlelight around us, and every last ounce of coherent thought left me. “It’s... um... really. It’s...” My head felt like it was thickening and my body was overheating, every word dragged from somewhere in the depths of my fuzzy brain. I waved a hand in front of my face to fan myself, and finally spit out what I was trying to say. “It’s hot in here. Don’t you think? It’s really warm.” “I only feel warmth when I’m standing next to you,” Caspian said. He stepped half an inch closer. “Like right now.
Jessica Verday (The Haunted (The Hollow, #2))
Ah, what he is; that is quite another thing. I have seen so many remarkable things in him, that if you would have me really say what I think, I shall reply that I really do look upon him as one of Byron's heroes, whom misery has marked with a fatal brand; some Manfred, some Lara, some Werner, one of those wrecks, as it were, of some ancient family, who, disinherited of their patrimony, have achieved one by the force of their adventurous genius, which has placed them above the laws of society.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
No, Maximilien, I am not offended," answered she, "but do you not see what a poor, helpless being I am, almost a stranger and an outcast in my father's house, where even he is seldom seen; whose will has been thwarted, and spirits broken, from the age of ten years, beneath the iron rod so sternly held over me; oppressed, mortified, and persecuted, day by day, hour by hour, minute by minute, no person has cared for, even observed my sufferings, nor have I ever breathed one word on the subject save to yourself. Outwardly and in the eyes of the world, I am surrounded by kindness and affection; but the reverse is the case. The general remark is, `Oh, it cannot be expected that one of so stern a character as M. Villefort could lavish the tenderness some fathers do on their daughters. What though she has lost her own mother at a tender age, she has had the happiness to find a second mother in Madame de Villefort.' The world, however, is mistaken; my father abandons me from utter indifference, while my mother-in-law detests me with a hatred so much the more terrible because it is veiled beneath a continual smile.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Listen,' said Morrel; 'it is not the first time you have contemplated our present position, which is a serious and urgent one; I do not think it is a moment to give way to useless sorrow; leave that for those who like to suffer at their leisure and indulge their grief in secret. There are such in the world, and God will doubtless reward them in heaven for their resignation on earth, but those who mean to contend must not lose one precious moment, but must return immediately the blow which fortune strikes. Do you intend to struggle against our ill-fortune?..
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Dantes had entered the Chateau d’If with the round, open, smiling face of a young and happy man, with whom the early paths of life have been smooth. and who anticipates a future corresponding with his past. This was now all changed. The oval face was lengthened, his smiling mouth had assumed the firm and marked lines which betoken resolution; his eyebrows were arched beneath a brow furrowed with thought; his eyes were full of melancholy, and from their depths occasionally sparkled gloomy fires of misanthropy and hatred; his complexion, so long kept from the sun, had now that pale color which produces, when the features are encircled with black hair, the aristocratic beauty of the man of the north; the profound learning he had acquired had besides diffused over his features a refined intellectual expression; and he had also acquired, being naturally of a goodly stature, that vigor which a frame possesses which has so long concentrated all its force within itself.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
Il mio regno è grande come il mondo, perché non sono né italiano né francese né indiano né americano né spagnolo: io sono cosmopolita. Nessun paese può dire di avermi visto nascere; Dio solo sa quale terra mi vedrà morire. Io adotto tutti i costumi, parlo tutte le lingue; [...] Dunque capirete che non essendo di alcun paese, non domandando protezione, non riconoscendo alcun uomo per mio fratello, non un solo scrupolo che arresta i potenti, non un solo ostacolo che paralizza i deboli, può arrestarmi e paralizzarmi. Ho solo due avversari, non dico due vincitori, perché li sottometto con la tenacia: la distanza e il tempo. Il terzo, ed è il più terribile, sta nella mia condizione di mortale. Ciò solo può fermarmi nella strada che percorro, e prima che abbia conseguito lo scopo a cui miro; tutto il resto l'ho calcolato. Ciò che gli uomini chiamano capricci della fortuna, ossia la rovina, i cambiamenti, le eventualità, li ho previsti tutti, e se qualcuno può colpirmi, nessuno può rovesciarmi. A meno che non muoia, sarò sempre ciò che sono.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)
I had a chance to read Monte Christo in prison once, too, but not to the end. I observed that while Dumas tries to create a feeling of horror, he portrays the Château d'If as a rather benevolent prison. Not to mention his missing such nice details as the carrying of the latrine bucket from the cell daily, about which Dumas with the ignorance of a free person says nothing. You can figure out why Dantès could escape. For years no one searched the cell, whereas cells are supposed to be searched every week. So the tunnel was not discovered. And then they never changed the guard detail, whereas experience tells us that guards should be changed every two hours so one can check on the other. At the Château d'If they didn't enter the cells and look around for days at a time. They didn't even have any peepholes, so d'If wasn't a prison at all, it was a seaside resort. They even left a metal bowl in the cell, with which Dantès could dig through the floor. Then, finally, they trustingly sewed a dead man up in a bag without burning his flesh with a red-hot iron in the morgue and without running him through with a bayonet at the guardhouse. Dumas ought to have tightened up his premises instead of darkening the atmosphere.
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (The First Circle)
He then said something in Arabic to Ali, who made a sign of obedience and withdrew, but not to any distance. As to Franz a strange transformation had taken place in him. All the bodily fatigue of the day, all the preoccupation of mind which the events of the evening had brought on, disappeared as they do at the first approach of sleep, when we are still sufficiently conscious to be aware of the coming of slumber. His body seemed to acquire an airy lightness, his perception brightened in a remarkable manner, his senses seemed to redouble their power, the horizon continued to expand; but it was not the gloomy horizon of vague alarms, and which he had seen before he slept, but a blue, transparent, unbounded horizon, with all the blue of the ocean, all the spangles of the sun, all the perfumes of the summer breeze; then, in the midst of the songs of his sailors, -- songs so clear and sonorous, that they would have made a divine harmony had their notes been taken down, -- he saw the Island of Monte Cristo, no longer as a threatening rock in the midst of the waves, but as an oasis in the desert; then, as his boat drew nearer, the songs became louder, for an enchanting and mysterious harmony rose to heaven, as if some Loreley had decreed to attract a soul thither, or Amphion, the enchanter, intended there to build a city. At length the boat touched the shore, but without effort, without shock, as lips touch lips; and he entered the grotto amidst continued strains of most delicious melody. He descended, or rather seemed to descend, several steps, inhaling the fresh and balmy air, like that which may be supposed to reign around the grotto of Circe, formed from such perfumes as set the mind a dreaming, and such fires as burn the very senses; and he saw again all he had seen before his sleep, from Sinbad, his singular host, to Ali, the mute attendant; then all seemed to fade away and become confused before his eyes, like the last shadows of the magic lantern before it is extinguished, and he was again in the chamber of statues, lighted only by one of those pale and antique lamps which watch in the dead of the night over the sleep of pleasure. They were the same statues, rich in form, in attraction, and poesy, with eyes of fascination, smiles of love, and bright and flowing hair. They were Phryne, Cleopatra, Messalina, those three celebrated courtesans. Then among them glided like a pure ray, like a Christian angel in the midst of Olympus, one of those chaste figures, those calm shadows, those soft visions, which seemed to veil its virgin brow before these marble wantons. Then the three statues advanced towards him with looks of love, and approached the couch on which he was reposing, their feet hidden in their long white tunics, their throats bare, hair flowing like waves, and assuming attitudes which the gods could not resist, but which saints withstood, and looks inflexible and ardent like those with which the serpent charms the bird; and then he gave way before looks that held him in a torturing grasp and delighted his senses as with a voluptuous kiss. It seemed to Franz that he closed his eyes, and in a last look about him saw the vision of modesty completely veiled; and then followed a dream of passion like that promised by the Prophet to the elect. Lips of stone turned to flame, breasts of ice became like heated lava, so that to Franz, yielding for the first time to the sway of the drug, love was a sorrow and voluptuousness a torture, as burning mouths were pressed to his thirsty lips, and he was held in cool serpent-like embraces. The more he strove against this unhallowed passion the more his senses yielded to its thrall, and at length, weary of a struggle that taxed his very soul, he gave way and sank back breathless and exhausted beneath the kisses of these marble goddesses, and the enchantment of his marvellous dream.
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo)