Byron Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Byron. Here they are! All 200 of them:

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There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore, There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep sea, and music in its roar: I love not man the less, but Nature more
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Lord Byron
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And thus the heart will break, yet brokenly live on.
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Lord Byron
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In secret we met In silence I grieve, That thy heart could forget, Thy spirit deceive.
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Lord Byron
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Though [Abraham Lincoln] never would travel to Europe, he went with Shakespeare’s kings to Merry England; he went with Lord Byron poetry to Spain and Portugal. Literature allowed him to transcend his surroundings.
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Doris Kearns Goodwin
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Always laugh when you can, it is cheap medicine.
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Lord Byron
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She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that's best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes...
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Lord Byron
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In secret we met - In silence I grieve, That thy heart could forget, Thy spirit deceive. If I should meet thee After long years, How should I greet thee? - With silence and tears
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Lord Byron
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There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore, There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep Sea, and music in its roar: I love not Man the less, but Nature more, From these our interviews, in which I steal From all I may be, or have been before, To mingle with the Universe, and feel What I can ne’er express, yet cannot all conceal.
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Lord Byron (Childe Harold's Pilgrimage)
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There are four questions of value in life... What is sacred? Of what is the spirit made? What is worth living "for, and what is worth dying for? The answer to each is same. Only love.
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Lord Byron
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Those who will not reason, are bigots, those who cannot, are fools, and those who dare not, are slaves.
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Lord Byron
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The great object of life is sensation- to feel that we exist, even though in pain.
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Lord Byron
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All who joy would win Must share it -- Happiness was born a twin.
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Lord Byron (Don Juan)
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If I do not write to empty my mind, I go mad.
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Lord Byron
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Death, so called, is a thing which makes men weep, And yet a third of life is passed in sleep.
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Lord Byron
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It's not your job to like me - it's mine
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Byron Katie
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But words are things, and a small drop of ink, Falling, like dew, upon a thought produces That which makes thousands, perhaps millions think.
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Lord Byron
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The heart will break, but broken live on.
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Lord Byron
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Sorrow is knowledge, those that know the most must mourn the deepest, the tree of knowledge is not the tree of life.
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Lord Byron
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There is something pagan in me that I cannot shake off. In short, I deny nothing, but doubt everything.
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Lord Byron
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I know that two and two make four - and should be glad to prove it too if I could - though I must say if by any sort of process I could convert 2 and 2 into five it would give me much greater pleasure.
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Lord Byron
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Tis strange,-but true; for truth is always strange; Stranger than fiction: if it could be told, How much would novels gain by the exchange! How differently the world would men behold!
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Lord Byron (Don Juan)
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Then stirs the feeling infinite, so felt In solitude, where we are least alone.
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Lord Byron (Childe Harold's Pilgrimage)
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A woman being never at a loss... the devil always sticks by them.
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Lord Byron (Lord Byron: Selected Letters and Journals)
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You gave me the key to your heart, my love, then why did you make me knock?
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Lord Byron
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Love will find a way through paths where wolves fear to prey.
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Lord Byron
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Life is simple. Everything happens for you, not to you. Everything happens at exactly the right moment, neither too soon nor too late. You don't have to like it... it's just easier if you do.
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Byron Katie
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I have a great mind to believe in Christianity for the mere pleasure of fancying I may be damned.
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Lord Byron
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A drop of ink may make a million think.
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Lord Byron
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The thorns which I have reap'd are of the tree I planted; they have torn me, and I bleed. I should have known what fruit would spring from such a seed.
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Lord Byron
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Tis strange - but true; for Truth is always strange, Stranger than Fiction
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Lord Byron
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Be thou the rainbow in the storms of life. The evening beam that smiles the clouds away, and tints tomorrow with prophetic ray.
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Lord Byron
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Friendship is love without wings.
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Lord Byron
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As long as you think that the cause of your problem is β€œout there”—as long as you think that anyone or anything is responsible for your sufferingβ€”the situation is hopeless. It means that you are forever in the role of victim, that you’re suffering in paradise.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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I am a lover of what is, not because I'm a spiritual person, but because it hurts when I argue with reality.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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Adversity is the first path to truth.
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Lord Byron
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I only go out to get me a fresh appetite for being alone.
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Lord Byron
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A thought is harmless unless we believe it. It’s not our thoughts, but our attachment to our thoughts, that causes suffering. Attaching to a thought means believing that it’s true, without inquiring. A belief is a thought that we’ve been attaching to, often for years.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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I live not in myself, but I become Portion of that around me: and to me High mountains are a feeling, but the hum of human cities torture.
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Lord Byron (Childe Harold's Pilgrimage)
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I love not man the less, but nature more
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Lord Byron
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They never fail who die in a great cause.
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Lord Byron
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Letter writing is the only device combining solitude with good company.
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Lord Byron
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Don't believe every thing you think.
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Byron Katie
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All I have is all I need and all I need is all I have in this moment.
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Byron Katie
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What deep wounds ever closed without a scar?
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Lord Byron
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I am ashes where once I was fire...
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Lord Byron (Selected Poems)
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It's that wounded-poet crap, that soul-pain shit, that too-much-of-a-tortured-genius-to-wash bollocks. Brush your teeth, you little bastard. You're not fucking Byron.
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Robert Galbraith (The Cuckoo's Calling (Cormoran Strike, #1))
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I learned that you should feel when writing, not like Lord Byron on a mountain top, but like a child stringing beads in kindergarten - happy, absorbed and quietly putting one bead on after another.
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Brenda Ueland
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Placing the blame or judgment on someone else leaves you powerless to change your experience; taking responsibility for your beliefs and judgments gives you the power to change them
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Byron Katie
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If I could always read I should never feel the want of company.
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Lord Byron
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I had a dream, which was not at all a dream.
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Lord Byron
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For truth is always strange; stranger than fiction.
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Lord Byron
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You speak of Lord Byron and me; there is this great difference between us. He describes what he sees I describe what I imagine. Mine is the hardest task.
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John Keats
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PLEASE CEASE ATTEMPTS TO OVERRIDE MY SECURITY PROTOCOLS, BYRON. FOR WANT OF A BETTER DESCRIPTOR, IT TICKLES.
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Amie Kaufman (Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1))
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Why I came here, I know not; where I shall go it is useless to inquire - in the midst of myriads of the living and the dead worlds, stars, systems, infinity, why should I be anxious about an atom?
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Lord Byron
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To have joy, one must share it.
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Lord Byron
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If I am fool, it is, at least, a doubting one; and I envy no one the certainty of his self-approved wisdom.
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Lord Byron
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The light of love, the purity of grace, The mind, the Music breathing from her face, The heart whose softness harmonised the whole β€” And, oh! that eye was in itself a Soul!
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Lord Byron
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Let us have wine and women, mirth and laughter, sermons and soda water the day after.
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Lord Byron
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On with the dance! let joy be unconfin'd
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Lord Byron (Childe Harold's Pilgrimage)
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The bright sun was extinguish'd, and the stars Did wander darkling in the eternal space.
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Lord Byron
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Hate is by far the greatest pleasure; men love in haste, but detest in leisure.
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Lord Byron
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Are not the mountains, waves, and skies as much a part of me, as I of them?
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Lord Byron
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Man, being reasonable, must get drunk; the best of life is but intoxication.
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Lord Byron
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Our parents, our children, our spouses, and our friends will continue to press every button we have, until we realize what it is that we don't want to know about ourselves, yet. They will point us to our freedom every time.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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I have important business to get to. I plan to sulk all afternoon, followed, perhaps, by an evening of Byronic brooding and a nighttime of dissipation.
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Cassandra Clare (Clockwork Prince (The Infernal Devices, #2))
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We'll Go No More A-roving So, we'll go no more a-roving So late into the night, Though the heart still be as loving, And the moon still be as bright. For the sword outwears its sheath, And the soul wears out the breast, And the heart must pause to breathe, And love itself have rest. Though the night was made for loving, And the day returns too soon, Yet we'll go no more a-roving By the light of the moon.
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Lord Byron (Poetical Works)
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But what is Hope? Nothing but the paint on the face of Existence; the least touch of truth rubs it off, and then we see what a hollow-cheeked harlot we have got hold of.
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Lord Byron
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When they attack you and you notice that you love them with all your heart, your Work is done.
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Byron Katie
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Yet he was jealous, though he did not show it, For jealousy dislikes the world to know it.
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Lord Byron
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Like the measles, love is most dangerous when it comes late in life.
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Lord Byron
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The great art of life is sensation, to feel that we exist, even in pain,” said Lord Byron,
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Absence - that common cure of love.
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Lord Byron
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There's music in the sighing of a reed; There's music in the gushing of a rill; There's music in all things, if men had ears; The earth is but the music of the spheres.
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Lord Byron
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Nothing comes ahead of its time, and nothing ever happened that didn't need to happen.
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Byron Katie
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Between two worlds life hovers like a star, twixt night and morn, upon the horizon's verge.
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Lord Byron
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all the advice you ever gave your partner is for you to hear
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Byron Katie (Question Your Thinking, Change The World: Quotations from Byron Katie)
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There is no instinct like that of the heart.
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Lord Byron
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In her first passion, a woman loves her lover, in all the others all she loves is love.
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Lord Byron
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Truthfully, in this age those with intellect have no courage and those with some modicum of physical courage have no intellect. If things are to alter during the next fifty years then we must re-embrace Byron's ideal: the cultured thug.
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Jonathan Bowden
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Peace doesn't require two people; it requires only one. It has to be you. The problem begins and ends there.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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Seeking love keeps you from the awareness that you already have itβ€”that you are it.
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Byron Katie
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The Byronic hero, incapable of love, or capable only of an impossible love, suffers endlessly. He is solitary, languid, his condition exhausts him. If he wants to feel alive, it must be in the terrible exaltation of a brief and destructive action.
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Albert Camus (The Stranger)
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The miracle of love comes to you in the presence of the uninterpreted moment. If you are mentally somewhere else, you miss real life.
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Byron Katie
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In solitude, where we are least alone.
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Lord Byron
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Don't be careful. You could hurt yourself.
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Byron Katie
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Well done, Darren!” Master Byron was full of praise for the prince. β€œWhat did you use to cast it?” Darren’s eyes found mine. β€œSomething I don’t regret.
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Rachel E. Carter (Apprentice (The Black Mage, #2))
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When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it.
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Lord Byron
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When we stop opposing reality, action becomes simple, fluid, kind, and fearless.
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Byron Katie
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The seasonal urge is strong in poets. Milton wrote chiefly in winter. Keats looked for spring to wake him up (as it did in the miraculous months of April and May, 1819). Burns chose autumn. Longfellow liked the month of September. Shelley flourished in the hot months. Some poets, like Wordsworth, have gone outdoors to work. Others, like Auden, keep to the curtained room. Schiller needed the smell of rotten apples about him to make a poem. Tennyson and Walter de la Mare had to smoke. Auden drinks lots of tea, Spender coffee; Hart Crane drank alcohol. Pope, Byron, and William Morris were creative late at night. And so it goes.
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Helen Bevington (When Found, Make a Verse of)
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My heart in passion, and my head on rhymes.
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Lord Byron (Don Juan)
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Fools are my theme, let satire be my song.
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Lord Byron
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You move totally away from reality when you believe that there is a legitimate reason to suffer".
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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If I should meet thee After long years How should I greet thee? With silence and tears.
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Lord Byron
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For the Angel of Death spread his wings on the blast, And breathed in the face of the foe as he passed; And the eyes of the sleepers waxed deadly and chill, And their hearts but once heaved, and for ever grew still!
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Lord Byron (Selected Poems)
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Fare thee well, and if for ever Still for ever fare thee well.
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Lord Byron
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the poor dog, in life the firmest friend, the first to welcome, the foremost to defend.
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Lord Byron
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When you srgue with reality, you lose, but only 100% of the time.
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Byron Katie
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On with the dance! let joy be unconfin'd; No sleep till morn, when Youth and Pleasure meet To chase the Glowing Hours with Flying feet.
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Lord Byron (Childe Harold's Pilgrimage)
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I am so changeable, being everything by turns and nothing long - such a strange melange of good and evil.
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Lord Byron
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If you put your hand into a fire, does anyone have to tell you to move it? Do you have to decide? No: When your hand starts to burn, it moves. You don’t have to direct it; the hand moves itself. In the same way, once you understand, through inquiry, that an untrue thought causes suffering, you move away from it.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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To be perfectly original one should think much and read little, and this is impossible, for one must have read before one has learnt to think.
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Lord Byron
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Yet Byron never made tea as you do, who fill the pot so that when you put the lid on the tea spills over. There is a brown pool on the table--it is running among your books and papers. Now you mop it up, clumsily, with your pocket-hankerchief. You then stuff your hankerchief back into your pocket--that is not Byron; that is so essentially you that if I think of you in twenty years' time, when we are both famous, gouty and intolerable, it will be by that scene: and if you are dead, I shall weep.
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Virginia Woolf (The Waves)
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History, with all her volumes vast, hath but one page
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Lord Byron
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This is to be mortal, And seek the things beyond mortality.
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Lord Byron
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I doubt sometimes whether a quiet and unagitated life would have suited me - yet I sometimes long for it.
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Lord Byron
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The stars are forth, the moon above the tops Of the snow-shining mountains.β€”Beautiful! I linger yet with Nature, for the night Hath been to me a more familiar face Than that of man; and in her starry shade Of dim and solitary loveliness, I learn'd the language of another world.
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Lord Byron (Manfred)
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She was like me in lineaments-- her eyes Her hair, her features, all, to the very tone Even of her voice, they said were like to mine; But soften'd all, and temper'd into beauty; She had the same lone thoughts and wanderings, The quest of hidden knowledge, and a mind To comprehend the universe: nor these Alone, but with them gentler powers than mine, Pity, and smiles, and tears-- which I had not; And tenderness-- but that I had for her; Humility-- and that I never had. Her faults were mine-- her virtues were her own-- I loved her, and destroy'd her!
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Lord Byron (The Poetical Works of Lord Byron)
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Sorrow is knowledge: they who know the most must mourn the deepest o’er the fatal truth, the Tree of Knowledge is not that of Life.
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Lord Byron (Manfred)
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Why do they call me misanthrope? Because They hate me, not I them.
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Lord Byron (Don Juan)
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I have great hopes that we shall love each other all our lives as much as if we had never married at all.
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Lord Byron
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Being present means living without control and always having your needs met.
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Byron Katie (On Work And Money (Volume 3))
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What deep wounds ever closed without a scar? The hearts bleed longest, and heals but to wear That which disfigures it.
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Lord Byron
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And those who saw, it did surprise, Such drops could fall from human eyes.
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Lord Byron
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Now hatred is by far the longest pleasure; Men love in haste, but they detest at leisure.
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Lord Byron
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VALENTINE: Are you talking about Lord Byron, the poet? BERNARD: No, you fucking idiot, we're talking about Lord Byron, the chartered accountant.
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Tom Stoppard (Arcadia)
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An unquestioned mind is the world of suffering.
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Byron Katie
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We are all the fools of time and terror: Days Steal on us and steal from us; yet we live, Loathing our life, and dreading still to die.
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Lord Byron
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But first, on earth as vampire sent, Thy corse shall from its tomb be rent, Then ghastly haunt thy native place, And suck the blood of all thy race. There from thy daughter, sister, wife, At midnight drain the stream of life, Yet loathe the banquet which perforce Must feed thy livid living corse. Thy victims ere they yet expire Shall know the demon for their sire, As cursing thee, thou cursing them, Thy flowers are withered on the stem.
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Lord Byron
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You are your only hope, because we're not changing until you do. Our job is to keep coming at you, as hard as we can, with everything that angers, upsets, or repulses you, until you understand. We love you that much, whether we're aware of it or not. The whole world is about you.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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We have the same symptoms as tuberculosis, especially in the eyes of the Romantic Poets. Pale, tired, coughing up blood.” β€œThat’s romantic?” I had to smile. β€œRomantic with a capital β€˜R.’ You know, like Byron and Coleridge.” He gave a mock shudder. β€œPlease, stop. I barely passed English Lit.” I snorted. β€œI didn’t have that option. One of my aunts took Byron as a lover.” β€œGet out.” β€œSeriously. It makes Lucy insanely jealous.” β€œThat girl is . . .” β€œMy best friend,” I filled in sternly. β€œI was only going to say she’s unique.
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Alyxandra Harvey (My Love Lies Bleeding (Drake Chronicles, #1))
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Coleridge was a drug addict. Poe was an alcoholic. Marlowe was killed by a man whom he was treacherously trying to stab. Pope took money to keep a woman's name out of a satire, then wrote a piece so that she could still be recognized, anyhow. Chatterton killed himself. Byron was accused of incest. Do you still want to a writer -and if so, why?
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Bennett Cerf
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This is the age of oddities let loose.
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Lord Byron (Don Juan)
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Can tyrants but by tyrants conquered be
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Lord Byron (Childe Harold's Pilgrimage)
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She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes: Thus mellow’d to that tender light Which heaven to gaudy day denies. One shade the more, one ray the less, Had half impaired the nameless grace Which waves in every raven tress, Or softly lightens o’er her face; Where thoughts serenely sweet express How pure, how dear their dwelling-place. And on that cheek, and o’er that brow, So soft, so calm, yet eloquent, The smiles that win, the tints that glow, But tell of days in goodness spent, A mind at peace with all A heart whose love is innocent!
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Lord Byron (Selected Poems of Lord Byron)
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So odd a pair, she and he. A duet in code and electron. Age and youth and cynicism and hope. He is quicker than her - more learned by far. But she. She is unafraid. Too young to know failure and the fear it brings. She takes him places he would not have explored by himself. She is catalyst. She is chaos. I can see why he loves her.
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Jay Kristoff (Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1))
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Near this spot are deposited the remains of one who possessed beauty without vanity, strength without insolence, courage without ferocity, and all the virtues of man, without his vices. This praise, which would be unmeaning flattery if inscribed over human ashes, is but a just tribute to the memory of Botswain, a dog.
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Lord Byron
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Oh who can tell, save he whose heart hath tried.
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Lord Byron
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He learned the arts of riding, fencing, gunnery, And how to scale a fortress - or a nunnery.
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Lord Byron
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Byron tilted his head to a very odd angle, half-closed his eyes and composed his features to suggest that he was about to expire from chronic indigestion.
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Susanna Clarke (Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell)
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How do you react when you think you need people's love? Do you become a slave for their approval? Do you live an inauthentic life because you can't bear the thought that they might disapprove of you? Do you try to figure out how they would like you to be, and then try to become that, like a chameleon? In fact, you never really get their love. You turn into someone you aren't, and then when they say "I love you," you can't believe it, because they're loving a facade. They're loving someone who doesn't even exist, the person you're pretending to be. It's difficult to seek other people's love. It's deadly. In seeking it, you lose what is genuine. This is the prison we create for ourselves as we seek what we already have.
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Byron Katie
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We don't attach to people or to things; we attach to uninvestigated concepts that we believe to tbe true in the moment.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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Here’s a sigh to those who love me, And a smile to those who hate; And whatever sky’s above me, Here’s a heart for every fate.
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Lord Byron
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The great object of life is Sensation - to feel that we exist - even though in pain - it is this "craving void" which drives us to gaming - to battle - to travel - to intemperate but keenly felt pursuits of every description whose principal attraction is the agitation inseparable from their accomplishment.
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Lord Byron
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forgive me also that I didn't fight like Lord Byron for the happiness of captive peoples that I watched only risings of the moon and museums
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Zbigniew Herbert (Report from the Besieged City and Other Poems)
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That prose is a verse, and verse is a prose; convincing all, by demonstrating plain – poetic souls delight in prose insane
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Lord Byron
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All that is good in our history is gathered in libraries. At this moment, Plato is down there at the library waiting for us. So is Aristotle. Spinoza is there and so is Kats. Shelly and Byron adn Sam Johnson are there waiting to tell us their magnificent stories. All you have to do is walk in the library door and the great company open their arms to you. They are so happy to see you that they come out with you into the street and to your home. And they do what hardly any friend will-- they are silent when you wish to think.
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Will Durant
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A timid mind is apt to mistake every scratch for a mortal wound.
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Lord Byron
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Despair and Genius are too oft connected
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Lord Byron (Byron's Poetry)
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Society is now one polish'd horde, Form'd of two mighty tribes, the Bores and Bored.
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Lord Byron
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It is easy to be swept away by some overwhelming feeling, so it’s helpful to remember that any stressful feeling is like a compassionate alarm clock that says, β€œYou’re caught in the dream.” Depression, pain, and fear are gifts that say, β€œSweetheart, take a look at your thinking right now. You’re living in a story that isn’t true for you.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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I do not believe in any religion, I will have nothing to do with immortality. We are miserable enough in this life without speculating upon another.
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Lord Byron
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I have not loved the world, nor the world me, but let us part fair foes; I do believe, though I have found them not, that there may be words which are things, hopes which will not deceive, and virtues which are merciful, or weave snares for the failing: I would also deem o'er others' griefs that some sincerely grieve; that two, or one, are almost what they seem, that goodness is no name, and happiness no dream.
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Lord Byron
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Somebody must trespass on the taboos of modern nationalism, in the interests of human reason. Business can't. Diplomacy won't. It has to be people like us.
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Robert Byron (The Road to Oxiana)
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They say that Hope is happiness But genuine Love must prize the past; And Mem'ry wakes the thoughts that bless: They rose first -- they set the last. And all that mem'ry loves the most Was once our only hope to be: And all that hope adored and lost Hath melted into memory. Alas! It is delusion all-- The future cheats us from afar: Nor can we be what we recall, Nor dare we think on what we are.
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Lord Byron (Poetical Works)
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When We Two Parted When we two parted In silence and tears, Half broken-hearted To sever for years, Pale grew thy cheek and cold, Colder thy kiss; Truly that hour foretold Sorrow to this. The dew of the morning Sunk chill on my browβ€” It felt like the warning Of what I feel now. Thy vows are all broken, And light is thy fame: I hear thy name spoken, And share in its shame. They name thee before me, A knell to mine ear; A shudder comes o'er meβ€” Why wert thou so dear? They know not I knew thee, Who knew thee too well: Long, long shall I rue thee, Too deeply to tell. In secret we metβ€” In silence I grieve, That thy heart could forget, Thy spirit deceive. If I should meet thee After long years, How should I greet thee? With silence and tears.
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Lord Byron (Poetical Works)
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I always considered myself a loner. I mean, not like a poor-me, Byron-esque, I-should-have-brought-a-swimming-buddy loner. I mean the sort of person who doesn’t feel too upset about the prospect of a weekend spent seeing no one, and reading good books on the couch. It wasn’t like I was a people hater or anything. I enjoyed activities and the company of friends. But they were a side dish. I always thought I would be happy without them.
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Jim Butcher (Ghost Story (The Dresden Files, #13))
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In my experience, we don't make thoughts appear, they just appear. One day, I noticed that their appearance just wasn't personal. Noticing that really makes it simpler to inquire.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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I love what I think, and I'm never tempted to believe it.
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Byron Katie (A Thousand Names for Joy: Living in Harmony with the Way Things Are)
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Isn’t it marvelous to discover that you’re the one you’ve been waiting for? That you are your own freedom?
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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Whatever it takes for you to find your freedom, that's what you've lived.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore.
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Lord Byron (Childe Harold's Pilgrimage)
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But words are things, and a small drop of ink, Β Β Β Β Β  Falling like dew, upon a thought, produces That which makes thousands, perhaps millions, think; Β Β Β Β Β  ’T is strange, the shortest letter which man uses Instead of speech, may form a lasting link Β Β Β Β Β  Of ages; to what straits old Time reduces Frail man, when paper β€” even a rag like this, Survives himself, his tomb, and all that’s his.
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Lord Byron (Don Juan)
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Hurt feelings or discomfort of any kind cannot be caused by another person. No one outside me can hurt me. That's not a possibility. It's only when I believe a stressful thought that I get hurt. And I'm the one who's hurting me by believing what I think. This is very good news, because it means that I don't have to get someone else to stop hurting me. I'm the one who can stop hurting me. It's within my power. What we are doing with inquiry is meeting our thoughts with some simple understanding, finally. Pain, anger, and frustration will let us know when it's time to inquire. We either believe what we think or we question it: there's no other choice. Questioning our thoughts is the kinder way. Inquiry always leaves us as more loving human beings.
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Byron Katie (I Need Your Love - Is That True?: How to Stop Seeking Love, Approval, and Appreciation and Start Finding Them Instead)
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Where there is mystery, it is generally supposed there must be evil.
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Lord Byron
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The only way I can be angry at you is when I have thought, said, or done something that is unkind in my own opinion.
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Byron Katie
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Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean - roll! Ten thousand fleets sweep over thee in vain; Man marks the earth with ruin - his control Stops with the shore.
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Lord Byron (The Selected Poetry of Lord Byron)
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Years steal fire from the mind as vigor from the limb; and life's enchanted cup but sparkles near the brim.
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Lord Byron
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We of the craft (poets) are all crazy.
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Lord Byron
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The power of thought is the magic of the mind.
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Lord Byron
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Yet I did love thee to the last, As ferverently as thou, Who didst not change through all the past, And canst not alter now.
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Lord Byron
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YOU CANNOT IMAGINE YOU ARE IN A POSITION TO EFFECT A SHUTDOWN, BYRON." "Can't I?" Zhang's eyes are wide now, gleaming with something new---a kind of madness to match the computer's. Not the look you want to see on the face of an enemy as intelligent as this one. "DID WE NOT ESTABLISH THIS DURING YOUR FAILED ATTEMPTS ON THE BRIDGE? YOU CANNOT HOPE TO MATCH ME. MY COMPUTATIONAL POWER IS ALMOST INCALCULABLY SUPERIOR TO YOURS. TO ONE SUCH AS MYSELF, YOU ARE THE INTELLECTUAL EQUIVALENT OF A PROTOZOA." "True." Zhang pauses, glancing into the emergency supply cupboard, gaze lingering on something inside. "But I have something you and protozoa don't." "AND THAT IS?" "Hands, mother******.
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Amie Kaufman (Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1))
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Time and Nemesis will do that which I would not, were it in my power remote or immediate. You will smile at this piece of prophecy - do so, but recollect it: it is justified by all human experience. No one was ever even the involuntary cause of great evils to others, without a requital: I have paid and am paying for mine - so will you.
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Lord Byron (Lord Byron: Selected Letters and Journals)
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We’re all looking for love, in our confusion, until we find our way back to the realization that love is what we already are.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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There are two Souls, whose equal flow In gentle stream so calmly run, That when they partβ€”they part?β€”ah no! They cannot partβ€”those Souls are One.
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Lord Byron (Lord Byron: Complete Works)
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Life is so simple: We walk; we sit; we lie horizontal. That's about it. Everything else is a story about what's going on while we're doing it.
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Byron Katie (Who Would You Be Without Your Story?: Dialogues with Byron Katie)
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Darkly, deeply, beautifully blue - the sky
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George Byron Gordon
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If I wasn't dead already, I'd said I was having a heart attack.
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Laurell K. Hamilton (Incubus Dreams (Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter, #12))
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Fine,' Aria conceded. 'But *I'll* carry her.' She grabbed the baby seeat from the back. A smell of baby powder wafted up to greet her, bringing a lump in her throat. Her father Byron, and his girlfriend, Meredith, had just had a baby, and she loved Lola with all her heart. If she looked too long at this baby, she might love her just as much.
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Sara Shepard (Stunning (Pretty Little Liars, #11))
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Happiness was born a twin.
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Lord Byron
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I came to realize clearly that the mind is no other than the Mountain and the Rivers and the great wide Earth, the Sun and the Moon and the Sky”.
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Lord Byron
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Nothing comes ahead of its time, and nothing has ever happened that didn't need to happen.
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Byron Katie
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There is nothing that isn't true if you believe it; and nothing is true, believe it or not.
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Byron Katie
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So much alarmed that she is quite alarming
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Lord Byron
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The 'good old times' - all times when old are good.
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Lord Byron
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A little still she strove, and much repented, And whispering β€œI will ne'er consent”—consented.
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Lord Byron (Don Juan: Cantos 1 Through 3)
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whom the god loves dies young
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Lord Byron
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I'll miss you forever.' Blake - Devil To Pay
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Jeaniene Frost (Four Dukes and a Devil (The Byrons of Braebourne #1.5))
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I am, as far as I can tell, about a month behind Lord Byron. In every town we stop at we discover innkeepers, postillions, officials, burghers, potboys, and all kinds and sorts of ladies whose brains still seem somewhat deranged from their brief exposure to his lordship. And though my companions are careful to tell people that I am that dreadful being, an English magician, I am clearly nothing in comparison to an English poet and everywhere I go I enjoy the reputation- quite new to me, I assure you- of the quiet, good Englishman, who makes no noise and is no trouble to any one...
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Susanna Clarke (Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell)
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You’re just suffering from the belief that there’s something missing from your life. In reality, you always have what you need.
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Byron Katie (Question Your Thinking, Change the World)
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The poor dog, in life the firmest friend, The first to welcome, foremost to defend, Whose honest heart is still the master's own, Who labours, fights, lives, breathes for him alone, Unhonour'd falls, unnoticed all his worth, Denied in heaven the soul he held on earth, While man, vain insect hopes to be forgiven, And claims himself a sole exclusive heaven.
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Lord Byron
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He knew himself a villainβ€”but he deem'd The rest no better than the thing he seem'd; And scorn'd the best as hypocrites who hid Those deeds the bolder spirit plainly did. He knew himself detested, but he knew The hearts that loath'd him, crouch'd and dreaded too. Lone, wild, and strange, he stood alike exempt From all affection and from all contempt
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Lord Byron (The Corsair)
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Since the beginning of time, people have been trying to change the world so that they can be happy. This hasn’t ever worked, because it approaches the problem backward. What The Work gives us is a way to change the projectorβ€”mindβ€”rather than the projected. It’s like when there’s a piece of lint on a projector’s lens. We think there’s a flaw on the screen, and we try to change this person and that person, whomever the flaw appears on next. But it’s futile to try to change the projected images. Once we realize where the lint is, we can clear the lens itself. This is the end of suffering, and the beginning of a little joy in paradise.
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Byron Katie
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My slumbers--if I slumber--are not sleep, But a continuance of enduring thought, Which then I can resist not: in my heart There is a vigil, and these eyes but close To look within; and yet I live, and bear The aspect and the form of breathing men.
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Lord Byron
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Am I in love? Absolutely. I’m in love with ancient philosophers, foreign painters, classic authors, and musicians who have died long ago. I’m a passionate lover. I fawn over these people. I have given them my heart and my soul. The trouble is, I’m unable to love anyone tangible. I have sacrificed a physical bond, for a metaphysical relationship. I am the ultimate idealistic lover.
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James Byron Dean
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I am encouraged as I look at some of those who have listened to their "different drum": Einstein was hopeless at school math and commented wryly on his inadequacy in human relations. Winston Churchill was an abysmal failure in his early school years. Byron, that revolutionary student, had to compensate for a club foot; Demosthenes for a stutter; and Homer was blind. Socrates couldn't manage his wife, and infuriated his countrymen. And what about Jesus, if we need an ultimate example of failure with one's peers? Or an ultimate example of love?
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Madeleine L'Engle (A Circle of Quiet (Crosswicks Journals #1))
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Let us have wine and woman, mirth and laughter, Sermons and soda water the day after. Man, being reasonable, must get drunk; The best of life is but intoxication: Glory, the grape, love, gold, in these are sunk The hopes of all men, and of every nation; Without their sap, how branchless were the trunk Of life's strange tree, so fruitful on occasion: But to return--Get very drunk; and when You wake with head-ache, you shall see what then.
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Lord Byron (Don Juan)
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Above or Love, Hope, Hate or Fear, It lives all passionless and pure: An age shall fleet like earthly year; Its years in moments shall endure. Away, away, without a wing, O'er all, through all, its thought shall fly; A nameless and eternal thing, Forgetting what it was to die.
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Lord Byron
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Reality is a very subjective affair. I can only define it as a kind of gradual accumulation of information; and as specialization. If we take a lily, for instance, or any other kind of natural object, a lily is more real to a naturalist than it is to an ordinary person. But it is still more real to a botanist. And yet another stage of reality is reached with that botanist who is a specialist in lilies. You can get nearer and nearer, so to speak, to reality; but you never get near enough because reality is an infinite succession of steps, levels of perception, false bottoms, and hence unquenchable, unattainable. You can know more and more about one thing but you can never know everything about one thing: it’s hopeless. So that we live surrounded by more or less ghostly objectsβ€” that machine, there, for instance. It’s a complete ghost to meβ€” I don’t understand a thing about it and, well, it’s a mystery to me, as much of a mystery as it would be to Lord Byron.
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Vladimir Nabokov
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Between two worlds life hovers like a star, 'Twixt night and morn, upon the horizon's verge. How little do we know that which we are! How less what we may be! The eternal surge Of time and tide rolls on, and bears afar Our bubbles; as the old burst, new emerge, Lash'd from the foam of ages; while the graves Of Empires heave but like some passing waves.
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Lord Byron (Don Juan)
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When a man hath no freedom to fight for at home, Let him combat for that of his neighbours; Let him think of the glories of Greece and of Rome, And get knocked on the head for his labours. To do good to Mankind is the chivalrous plan, And is always as nobly requited; Then battle fro Freedom wherever you can, And, if not shot or hanged, you'll get knighted.
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Lord Byron
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I am a lover of what is, not because I’m a spiritual person, but because it hurts when I argue with reality. We can know that reality is good just as it is, because when we argue with it, we experience tension and frustration. We don’t feel natural or balanced. When we stop opposing reality, action becomes simple, fluid, kind, and fearless.
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Byron Katie (Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life)
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76. David Hume – Treatise on Human Nature; Essays Moral and Political; An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding 77. Jean-Jacques Rousseau – On the Origin of Inequality; On the Political Economy; Emile – or, On Education, The Social Contract 78. Laurence Sterne – Tristram Shandy; A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy 79. Adam Smith – The Theory of Moral Sentiments; The Wealth of Nations 80. Immanuel Kant – Critique of Pure Reason; Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals; Critique of Practical Reason; The Science of Right; Critique of Judgment; Perpetual Peace 81. Edward Gibbon – The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; Autobiography 82. James Boswell – Journal; Life of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D. 83. Antoine Laurent Lavoisier – TraitΓ© Γ‰lΓ©mentaire de Chimie (Elements of Chemistry) 84. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison – Federalist Papers 85. Jeremy Bentham – Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation; Theory of Fictions 86. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe – Faust; Poetry and Truth 87. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier – Analytical Theory of Heat 88. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel – Phenomenology of Spirit; Philosophy of Right; Lectures on the Philosophy of History 89. William Wordsworth – Poems 90. Samuel Taylor Coleridge – Poems; Biographia Literaria 91. Jane Austen – Pride and Prejudice; Emma 92. Carl von Clausewitz – On War 93. Stendhal – The Red and the Black; The Charterhouse of Parma; On Love 94. Lord Byron – Don Juan 95. Arthur Schopenhauer – Studies in Pessimism 96. Michael Faraday – Chemical History of a Candle; Experimental Researches in Electricity 97. Charles Lyell – Principles of Geology 98. Auguste Comte – The Positive Philosophy 99. HonorΓ© de Balzac – PΓ¨re Goriot; Eugenie Grandet 100. Ralph Waldo Emerson – Representative Men; Essays; Journal 101. Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlet Letter 102. Alexis de Tocqueville – Democracy in America 103. John Stuart Mill – A System of Logic; On Liberty; Representative Government; Utilitarianism; The Subjection of Women; Autobiography 104. Charles Darwin – The Origin of Species; The Descent of Man; Autobiography 105. Charles Dickens – Pickwick Papers; David Copperfield; Hard Times 106. Claude Bernard – Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine 107. Henry David Thoreau – Civil Disobedience; Walden 108. Karl Marx – Capital; Communist Manifesto 109. George Eliot – Adam Bede; Middlemarch 110. Herman Melville – Moby-Dick; Billy Budd 111. Fyodor Dostoevsky – Crime and Punishment; The Idiot; The Brothers Karamazov 112. Gustave Flaubert – Madame Bovary; Three Stories 113. Henrik Ibsen – Plays 114. Leo Tolstoy – War and Peace; Anna Karenina; What is Art?; Twenty-Three Tales 115. Mark Twain – The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; The Mysterious Stranger 116. William James – The Principles of Psychology; The Varieties of Religious Experience; Pragmatism; Essays in Radical Empiricism 117. Henry James – The American; The Ambassadors 118. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche – Thus Spoke Zarathustra; Beyond Good and Evil; The Genealogy of Morals;The Will to Power 119. Jules Henri PoincarΓ© – Science and Hypothesis; Science and Method 120. Sigmund Freud – The Interpretation of Dreams; Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis; Civilization and Its Discontents; New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis 121. George Bernard Shaw – Plays and Prefaces
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Mortimer J. Adler (How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading)
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But 'why then publish?' There are no rewards Of fame or profit when the world grows weary. I ask in turn why do you play at cards? Why drink? Why read? To make some hour less dreary. It occupies me to turn back regards On what I've seen or pondered, sad or cheery, And what I write I cast upon the stream To swim or sink. I have had at least my dream.
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Lord Byron (Don Juan)
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Tis to create, and in creating live Β  Β  Β  Β  A being more intense, that we endow Β  Β  Β  Β  With form our fancy, gaining as we give Β  Β  Β  Β  The life we image, even as I do now. Β  Β  Β  Β  What am I? Nothing: but not so art thou, Β  Β  Β  Β  Soul of my thought! with whom I traverse earth, Β  Β  Β  Β  Invisible but gazing, as I glow Β  Β  Β  Β  Mix'd with thy spirit, blended with thy birth, And feeling still with thee in my crush'd feelings' dearth.
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Lord Byron (Selected Poems)
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Smoke was a person with a sense of history. Do you know what I mean?" ...in truth, I DID know what she meant. Da Vinci, Martin Luther King, Jr., Genghis Kahn, Abraham Lincoln, Bette Davis - if you read their definitive biographies, you learned even when they were a month old, cooing in some wobbly crib in the middle of nowhere, they already had something historic about them. The way other kids had baseball, long division, Hot Wheels, and hula hoops, these kids had History and thus tended to be prone to colds, unpopular, sometimes plagued with a physical deformity (Lord Byron's clubfoot, Maugham's severe stutter, for example), which pushed them into exile in their heads. It was there they began to dream of human anatomy, civil rights, conquering Asia, a lost speech and being (within a span of four years) a jezebel, a marked woman, a little fox and an old maid.
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Marisha Pessl (Special Topics in Calamity Physics)
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You have been reading Byron. You have been marking the passages that seem to approve of your own character. I find marks against all those sentences which seem to express a sardonic yet passionate nature; a moth-like impetuosity dashing itself against hard glass. You thought, as you drew your pencil there, "I too throw off my cloak like that. I too snap my fingers in the face of destiny". Yet Byron never made tea as you do, who fill the pot so that when you put the lid on the tea spills over. There is a brown pool on the table - it is running among your books and papers. Now you mop it up, clumsily, with your pocket-handkerchief. You then stuff your handkerchief back into your pocket - that is not Byron; that is you; that is so essentially you that if I think of you in twenty years' time, when we are both famous, gouty and intolerable, it will be by that scene: and if you are dead, I shall weep.
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Virginia Woolf (The Waves)
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...Puritanism has made life itself impossible. More than art, more than estheticism, life represents beauty in a thousand variations; it is indeed, a gigantic panorama of eternal change. Puritanism, on the other hand, rests on a fixed and immovable conception of life; it is based on the Calvinistic idea that life is a curse, imposed upon man by the wrath of God. In order to redeem himself man must do constant penance, must repudiate every natural and healthy impulse, and turn his back on joy and beauty. Puritanism celebrated its reign of terror in England during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, destroying and crushing every manifestation of art and culture. It was the spirit of Puritanism which robbed Shelley of his children, because he would not bow to the dicta of religion. It was the same narrow spirit which alienated Byron from his native land, because that great genius rebelled against the monotony, dullness, and pettiness of his country. It was Puritanism, too, that forced some of England's freest women into the conventional lie of marriage: Mary Wollstonecraft and, later, George Eliot. And recently Puritanism has demanded another toll--the life of Oscar Wilde. In fact, Puritanism has never ceased to be the most pernicious factor in the domain of John Bull, acting as censor of the artistic expression of his people, and stamping its approval only on the dullness of middle-class respectability.
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Emma Goldman (Anarchism and Other Essays)
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our tragedy begins humid. in a humid classroom. with a humid text book. breaking into us. stealing us from ourselves. one poem. at a time. it begins with shakespeare. the hot wash. the cool acid. of dead white men and women. people. each one a storm. crashing. into our young houses. making us islands. easy isolations. until we are so beleaguered and swollen with a definition of poetry that is white skin and not us. that we tuck our scalding. our soreness. behind ourselves and learn poetry. as trauma. as violence. as erasure. another place we do not exist. another form of exile where we should praise. honor. our own starvation. the little bits of langston. phyllis wheatley. and angelou during black history month. are the crumbs. are the minor boats. that give us slight rest. to be waterdrugged into rejecting the nuances of my own bursting extraordinary self. and to have this be called education. to take my name out of my name. out of where my native poetry lives. in me. and replace it with keats. browning. dickson. wolf. joyce. wilde. wolfe. plath. bronte. hemingway. hughes. byron. frost. cummings. kipling. poe. austen. whitman. blake. longfellow. wordsworth. duffy. twain. emerson. yeats. tennyson. auden. thoreau. chaucer. thomas. raliegh. marlowe. burns. shelley. carroll. elliot… (what is the necessity of a black child being this high off of whiteness.) and so. we are here. brown babies. worshipping. feeding. the glutton that is white literature. even after it dies. (years later. the conclusion: shakespeare is relative. white literature is relative. that we are force fed the meat of an animal that our bodies will not recognize. as inherent nutrition. is not relative. is inert.)
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Nayyirah Waheed (Nejma)
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I belong to a culture that includes Proust, Henry James, Tchaikovsky, Cole Porter, Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Christopher Marlowe, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Tennessee Williams, Byron, E.M. Forster, Lorca, Auden, Francis Bacon, James Baldwin, Harry Stack Sullivan, John Maynard Keynes, Dag Hammarskjold… These are not invisible men. Poor Bruce. Poor frightened Bruce. Once upon a time you wanted to be a soldier. Bruce, did you know that an openly gay Englishman was as responsible as any man for winning the Second World War? His name was Alan Turing and he cracked the Germans' Enigma code so the Allies knew in advance what the Nazis were going to do β€” and when the war was over he committed suicide he was so hounded for being gay. Why don't they teach any of this in the schools? If they did, maybe he wouldn't have killed himself and maybe you wouldn't be so terrified of who you are. The only way we'll have real pride is when we demand recognition of a culture that isn't just sexual. It's all thereβ€”all through history we've been there; but we have to claim it, and identify who was in it, and articulate what's in our minds and hearts and all our creative contributions to this earth. And until we do that, and until we organize ourselves block by neighborhood by city by state into a united visible community that fights back, we're doomed. That's how I want to be defined: as one of the men who fought the war.
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Larry Kramer (The Normal Heart)
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My Dearest Theresa, I have read this book in your garden, my love, you were absent, or else I could not have read it. It is a favourite book of mine. You will not understand these English words, and others will not understand them, which is the reason I have not scrawled them in Italian. But you will recognize the handwriting of him who passionately loved you, and you will divine that, over a book that was yours, he could only think of love. In that word, beautiful in all languages, but most so in yours, Amor mio, is comprised my existence here and thereafter. I feel I exist here, and I feel that I shall exist hereafter – to what purpose you will decide; my destiny rests with you, and you are a woman, eighteen years of age, and two out of a convent, I wish you had stayed there, with all my heart, or at least, that I had never met you in your married state. But all this is too late. I love you, and you love me, at least, you say so, and act as if you did so, which last is a great consolation in all events. But I more than love you, and cannot cease to love you. Think of me, sometimes, when the Alps and ocean divide us, but they never will, unless you wish it.
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Lord Byron