Beyond Good And Evil Nietzsche Quotes

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That which is done out of love is always beyond good and evil.
Friedrich Nietzsche
Madness is something rare in individuals — but in groups, parties, peoples, and ages, it is the rule.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
One must shed the bad taste of wanting to agree with many. "Good" is no longer good when one's neighbor mouths it. And how should there be a "common good"! The term contradicts itself: whatever can be common always has little value. In the end it must be as it is and always has been: great things remain for the great, abysses for the profound, nuances and shudders for the refined, and, in brief, all that is rare for the rare.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
I obviously do everything to be "hard to understand" myself
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
One loves ultimately one's desires, not the thing desired.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
As long as you still experience the stars as something "above you", you lack the eye of knowledge.
Friedrich Nietzsche
The text has disappeared under the interpretation.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The strength of a person's spirit would then be measured by how much 'truth' he could tolerate, or more precisely, to what extent he needs to have it diluted, disguised, sweetened, muted, falsified.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Objection, evasion, joyous distrust, and love of irony are signs of health; everything absolute belongs to pathology.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Blessed are the forgetful; for they get over their stupidities, too.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The vanity of others runs counter to our taste only when it runs counter to our vanity.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
There is no such thing as moral phenomena, but only a moral interpretation of phenomena
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
In music the passions enjoy themselves.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
In the end things must be as they are and have always been--the great things remain for the great, the abysses for the profound, the delicacies and thrills for the refined, and, to sum up shortly, everything rare for the rare.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Christianity gave Eros poison to drink; he did not die of it, certainly, but degenerated to Vice.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
To recognize untruth as a condition of life--that certainly means resisting accustomed value feelings in a dangerous way; and a philosophy that risks this would by that token alone place itself beyond good and evil.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The maturity of man—that means, to have reacquired the seriousness that one had as a child at play
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Wer mit Ungeheuern kämpft, mag zusehn, daß er nicht dabei zum Ungeheuer wird. Und wenn du lange in einen Abgrund blickst, blickt der Abgrund auch in dich hinein.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The noble soul reveres itself
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
It is the business of the very few to be independent; it is a privilege of the strong. And whoever attempts it, even with the best right, but without being OBLIGED to do so, proves that he is probably not only strong, but also daring beyond measure. He enters into a labyrinth, he multiplies a thousandfold the dangers which life in itself already brings with it; not the least of which is that no one can see how and where he loses his way, becomes isolated, and is torn piecemeal by some minotaur of conscience. Supposing such a one comes to grief, it is so far from the comprehension of men that they neither feel it, nor sympathize with it. And he cannot any longer go back! He cannot even go back again to the sympathy of men!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
When we have to change our mind about a person, we hold the inconvenience he causes us very much against him.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Physiologists should think before putting down the instinct of self-preservation as the cardinal instinct of an organic being. A living thing seeks above all to discharge its strength--life itself is will to power; self-preservation is only one of the indirect and most frequent results.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Love of one is a piece of barbarism: for it is practised at the expense of all others. Love of God likewise.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Let old ones go. Dont be a memory-monger! Once you were young──now you are even younger.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Swallow your poison, for you need it badly.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
...all that is rare is for the rare.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
To him who feels himself preordained to contemplation and not to belief, all believers are too noisy and obtrusive; he guards against them.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
He who fights with monsters should be careful lest he thereby become a monster. And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Whatever is done for love always occurs beyond good and evil.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The great periods of our life occur when we gain the courage to rechristen what is bad about us as what is best.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Every profound spirit needs a mask
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The consequences of our actions take hold of us, quite indifferent to our claim that meanwhile we have 'improved.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Under peaceful conditions a warlike man sets upon himself.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Almost everything we call "higher culture" is based on the spiritualization of cruelty.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
It has gradually become clear to me what every great philosophy up till now has consisted of – namely, the confession of its originator, and a species of involuntary and unconscious autobiography; and moreover that the moral (or immoral) purpose in every philosophy has constituted the true vital germ out of which the entire plant has always grown.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
A man who wills commands something within himself that renders obedience, or that he believes renders obedience.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Was aus Liebe getan wird, geschieht immer jenseits von Gut und Böse. (What is done out of love always takes place beyond good and evil.)
Friedrich Nietzsche
Poets treat their experiences shamelessly: they exploit them
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Reality is a flux, an endless becoming that is beyond words and language - all language is metaphor, useful to us but ultimately detached from reality.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The melancholy of everything completed!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
It may be that until now there has been no more potent means for beautifying man himself than piety: it can turn man into so much art, surface, play of colors, graciousness that his sight no longer makes one suffer.---
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Success has always been the greatest liar - and the "work" itself is a success; the great statesman, the conqueror, the discoverer is disguised by his creations, often beyond recognition; the "work," whether of the artist or the philosopher, invents the man who has created it, who is supposed to have create it; "great men," as they are venerated, are subsequent pieces of wretched minor fiction
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
When we have to change an opinion about any one, we charge heavily to his account the inconvenience he thereby causes us.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
One is punished most for one’s virtues.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
There is a point in every philosophy at which the "conviction" of the philosopher appears on the scene; or, to put it in the words of an ancient mystery: adventavit asinus, / pulcher et fortissimus. (Translation: The ass arrives, beautiful and most brave.)
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Solitude is a virtue for us, since it is a sublime inclination and impulse to cleanliness which shows that contact between people, “society”, inevitably makes things unclean. Somewhere, sometime, every community makes people—“base.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Everything in proximity to the hero becomes tragedy; everything in proximity to the demigod becomes satyr-play; and everything in proximity to God becomes...what? "world" perhaps?
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
With hard men intimacy is a thing of shame- and something precious.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Alas, I have begun my loneliest walk. But whoever is of my kind, cannot escape such an hour, the hour which says to him, 'Only now are you going your way to greatness. Peak and abyss, they are now joined together, for all things are baptized in a well of eternity, and lie beyond good and evil.
Friedrich Nietzsche
One should not go into churches if one wishes to breathe pure air.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Wisdom—seems to the rabble a kind of escape, a means and a trick for getting well out of a wicked game. But the genuine philosopher—as it seems to us, my friends?—lives 'unphilosophically' and 'unwisely,' above all imprudently, and feels the burden and the duty of a hundred attempts and temptations of life—he risks himself constantly, he plays the wicked game.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Their [philosophers] thinking is, in fact, far less a discovery than a re-recognizing, a remembering, a return and a home-coming to a far-off, ancient common-household of the soul, out of which those ideas formerly grew: philosophizing is so far a kind of atavism of the highest order.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
You desire to LIVE "according to Nature"? Oh, you noble Stoics, what fraud of words! Imagine to yourselves a being like Nature, boundlessly extravagant, boundlessly indifferent, without purpose or consideration, without pity or justice, at once fruitful and barren and uncertain: imagine to yourselves INDIFFERENCE as a power—how COULD you live in accordance with such indifference? To live—is not that just endeavouring to be otherwise than this Nature? Is not living valuing, preferring, being unjust, being limited, endeavouring to be different? And granted that your imperative, "living according to Nature," means actually the same as "living according to life"—how could you do DIFFERENTLY? Why should you make a principle out of what you yourselves are, and must be? In reality, however, it is quite otherwise with you: while you pretend to read with rapture the canon of your law in Nature, you want something quite the contrary, you extraordinary stage-players and self-deluders! In your pride you wish to dictate your morals and ideals to Nature, to Nature herself, and to incorporate them therein; you insist that it shall be Nature "according to the Stoa," and would like everything to be made after your own image, as a vast, eternal glorification and generalism of Stoicism! With all your love for truth, you have forced yourselves so long, so persistently, and with such hypnotic rigidity to see Nature FALSELY, that is to say, Stoically, that you are no longer able to see it otherwise—and to crown all, some unfathomable superciliousness gives you the Bedlamite hope that BECAUSE you are able to tyrannize over yourselves—Stoicism is self-tyranny—Nature will also allow herself to be tyrannized over: is not the Stoic a PART of Nature?... But this is an old and everlasting story: what happened in old times with the Stoics still happens today, as soon as ever a philosophy begins to believe in itself. It always creates the world in its own image; it cannot do otherwise; philosophy is this tyrannical impulse itself, the most spiritual Will to Power, the will to "creation of the world," the will to the causa prima.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
It is not their love for men, rather it is the impotence of their love that hinders Christians of today from burning us.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Discovering that one is loved in return really ought to disenchant the lover with the beloved. 'What? this person is modest enough to love even you? Or stupid enough? Or-or-
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Men of profound sadness betray themselves when they are happy: they have a mode of seizing upon happiness as though they would choke and strangle it, out of jealousy--ah, they know only too well that it will flee from them!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Wanderer, who are you? I watch you go on your way, without scorn, without love, with impenetrable eyes - damp and downhearted, like a plumb line that returns unsatisfied from every depth back into the light (what was it looking for down there?), with a breast that does not sigh, with lips that hide their disgust, with a hand that only grips slowly: who are you? What have you done? Take a rest here, this spot is hospitable to everyone, - relax! And whoever you may be: what would you like now? What do you find relaxing? Just name it: I'll give you whatever I have! - "Relaxing? Relaxing? How inquisitive you are! What are you saying! But please, give me - -" What? What? Just say it! - "Another mask! A second mask!" ...
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Tethered heart, free spirit.--If one tethers one's heart severely and imprisons it, one can give one's spirit many liberties.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The familiarity of superiors embitters one, because it may not be returned.
Friedrich Nietzsche
What has shaken me is not that you lied to me, but that I no longer believe you.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
A time came when one rubbed one's eyes; one is still rubbing them today.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good And Evil)
I have done that', says my memory. I cannot have done that—says my pride and remains unshakeable. Finally—memory yields.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Books for the masses are always bad-smelling books: the odour of little people cling to them.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Every philosophy is a foreground philosophy — that is a hermit's judgment: "There is something arbitrary in his stopping here to look back and look around, in his not digging deeper here but laying his spade aside; there is also something suspicious about it." Every philosophy also conceals a philosophy; every opinion is also a hideout, every word also a mask.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The chastest expression I have ever heard: 'Dans la véritable amour c’est l’âme, qui enveloppe le corps.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good And Evil)
Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
What strange, perplexing, questionable questions!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
لابد من وجود كاتب رديء باستمرار، وذلك لأنه يشبع ذوق الأجيال الشابة التي لم تتطور بعد. ولهذه الأجيال حاجات كالآخرين تماماً، ولو كانت الحياة الإنسانية أطول لكان عدد الناضجين يفوق أو يعادل عدد اللاناضجين، أي أن هناك دوماً غالبية من العقول المتخلفة ذات الذوق الرديء. هذه العقول تطالب، وبكل عنف الشباب، بإرضاء وإشباع حاجاتها وتسبب وجود كتّاب رديئين مخصصين لها.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
When one is young, one venerates and despises without that art of nuances which constitutes the best gain of life, and it is only fair that one has to pay dearly for having assaulted men and things in this manner with Yes and No. Everything is arranged so that the worst of tastes, the taste for the unconditional, should be cruelly fooled and abused until a man learns to put a little art into his feelings and rather to risk trying even what is artificial — as the real artists of life do.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The actual stronghold of a man is inaccessible, almost invisible, until friends and enemies turn traitor- and lead him there by a secret path
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
79. A soul which knows that it is loved, but does not itself love, betrays its sediment: its dregs come up.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
It is terrible to die of thirst on the sea. Does your truth have to be so salty that it can no longer even—quench thirst?
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Every select man strives instinctively for a citadel and a privacy, where he is FREE from the crowd, the many, the majority-- where he may forget "men who are the rule," as their exception;-- exclusive only of the case in which he is pushed straight to such men by a still stronger instinct, as a discerner in the great and exceptional sense.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Love brings the high and concealed characteristics of the lover into the light--what is rare and exceptional in him: to that extent it easily deceives regarding his normality.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
One should part from life as Ulysses parted from Nausicaa-- blessing it rather than in love with it.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
love as a passion—it is our European specialty—must absolutely be of noble origin; as is well known, its invention is due to the Provencal poet-cavaliers, those brilliant, ingenious men of the "gai saber," to whom Europe owes so much, and almost owes itself.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
And do you know what “the world” is to me? Shall I show it to you in my mirror? This world: a monster of energy, without beginning, without end; a firm, iron magnitude of force that does not grow bigger or smaller, that does not expend itself but only transforms itself; as a whole, of unalterable size, a household without expenses or losses, but likewise without increase or income; enclosed by “nothingness” as by a boundary; not something blurry or wasted, not something endlessly extended, but set in a definite space as a definite force, and not a space that might be “empty” here or there, but rather as force throughout, as a play of forces and waves of forces, at the same time one and many, increasing here and at the same time decreasing there; a sea of forces flowing and rushing together, eternally changing, eternally flooding back, with tremendous years of recurrence, with an ebb and a flood of its forms; out of the simplest forms striving toward the most complex, out of the stillest, most rigid, coldest forms striving toward the hottest, most turbulent, most self-contradictory, and then again returning home to the simple out of this abundance, out of the play of contradictions back to the joy of concord, still affirming itself in this uniformity of its courses and its years, blessing itself as that which must return eternally, as a becoming that knows no satiety, no disgust, no weariness: this, my Dionysian world of the eternally self- creating, the eternally self-destroying, this mystery world of the twofold voluptuous delight, my “beyond good and evil,” without goal, unless the joy of the circle is itself a goal; without will, unless a ring feels good will toward itself— do you want a name for this world? A solution for all of its riddles? A light for you, too, you best-concealed, strongest, most intrepid, most midnightly men?— This world is the will to power—and nothing besides! And you yourselves are also this will to power—and nothing besides!
Friedrich Nietzsche (The Will to Power)
The tension of the soul in unhappiness, which cultivates its strength; its horror at the sight of the great destruction; its inventiveness and bravery in bearing, enduring, interpreting, exploiting unhappiness, and whatever in the way of depth, mystery, mask, spirit, cleverness, greatness the heart has been granted - has it not been granted them through suffering, through the discipline of great suffering?
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Il cristianesimo dette da bere il veleno a Eros. Questi non ne morì, ma ben degenerò, in vizio.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The sage as astronomer.—As long as you still feel the stars as something 'above you', you have not yet acquired the gaze of a man of deep understanding.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
We find other people's vanity contrary to our taste only when it is contrary to our vanity.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
When a woman has scholarly inclinations there is generally something wrong with her sexual nature.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
That which now calls itself democracy differs from older forms of government solely in that it drives with new horses: the streets are still the same old streets, and the wheels are likewise the same old wheels.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
But grant me from time to time—if there are divine goddesses in the realm beyond good and evil—grant me the sight, but one glance of something perfect, wholly achieved, happy, mighty, triumphant, something still capable of arousing fear! Of a man who justifies man, of a complementary and redeeming lucky hit on the part of man for the sake of which one may still believe in man!
Friedrich Nietzsche (On the Genealogy of Morals / Ecce Homo)
الحقيقة لا تقوم في الشفافية ولا في وضوح الأفكار، لأن كل وضوح مخادع. والأسلوب القائم على نزع الأقنعة والتعرية عليه أن ينزع ويعري إلى ما لا نهاية من دون أن يستطيع الزعم بأنه رفع القناع الأخير.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
He enters a labyrinth, he multiplies by a thousand the dangers already inherent in the very act of living, not the least of which is the fact that no one with eyes will see how and where he gets lost and lonely and is torn limb from limb by some cave-Minotaur of conscience.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The feelings of devotion, self-sacrifice for one's neighbor, the whole morality of self-denial must be questioned mercilessly and taken to court.... There is too much charm and sugar in these feelings of 'for others,' 'not for myself,' for us not to need to become doubly suspicious at this point and to ask: 'are these not perhaps-seductions?
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
What an age experiences as evil is usually an untimely reverberation echoing what was previously experienced as good—the atavism of an older ideal.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
138. We do the same when awake as when dreaming: we only invent and imagine him with whom we have intercourse—and forget it immediately.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
If you still experience the stars as something "over you," you still don't have the eyes of a knower.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The great epochs of our life are at the points when we gain courage to rebaptize our badness as the best in us.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil [with Biographical Introduction])
إذا أطلتَ التحديق في الهاوية، فاعلم أن الهاوية هي الأخرى تُحَدِّق فيك.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
It is to be hoped, indeed, that LANGUAGE, here as elsewhere, will not get over its awkwardness, and that it will continue to talk of opposites where there are only degrees and many refinements of gradation
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The abdomen is the reason why man does not easily take himself for a god.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
A man's stomach is the reason he does not easily take himself for a God.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
From the beginning, nothing has been more alien, repugnant, and hostile to woman than truth -- her great art is the lie, her highest concern is mere appearance of beauty.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
To live with tremendous and proud composure; always beyond —. To have and not to have one's affects, one's pro and con, at will; to condescend to them, for a few hours; to seat oneself on them as on a horse, often as on an ass — for one must know how to make use of their stupidity as much as of their fire. To reserve one's three hundred foregrounds; also the dark glasses; for there are cases when nobody may look into our eyes, still less into our "grounds." And to choose for company that impish and cheerful vice, courtesy. And to remain master of one's four virtues: of courage, insight, sympathy, and solitude.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Youth's longing misconceived inconsistency. Those whom I deemed Changed to my kin, the friends of whom I dreamed, Have aged and lost our old affinity: One has to change to stay akin to me.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Now and then, in philosophers or artists, one finds a passionate and exaggerated worship of 'pure forms': no one should doubt that a person who so needs the surface must once have made an unfortunate grab underneath it. Perhaps these burnt children, the born artists who find their only joy in trying to falsify life's images (as if taking protracted revenge against it-), perhaps they may even belong to a hierarchy: we could tell the degree to which they are sick of life by how much they wish to see its image adulterated, diluted, transcendentalized, apotheosized- we could count the homines religiosi among the artists, as their highest class.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
And now we celebrate, in victory bound, The feast of feasts: Friend Zarathustra came, the guest of guests! Now laughs the world, the ancient curtain's torn, And light and darkness wedded are as one...
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Men have hitherto treated women like birds which have strayed down to them from the heights; as something more delicate, more fragile, more savage, stranger, sweeter, soulful – but as something which has to be caged up so that it shall not fly away.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
76. David Hume – Treatise on Human Nature; Essays Moral and Political; An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding 77. Jean-Jacques Rousseau – On the Origin of Inequality; On the Political Economy; Emile – or, On Education, The Social Contract 78. Laurence Sterne – Tristram Shandy; A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy 79. Adam Smith – The Theory of Moral Sentiments; The Wealth of Nations 80. Immanuel Kant – Critique of Pure Reason; Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals; Critique of Practical Reason; The Science of Right; Critique of Judgment; Perpetual Peace 81. Edward Gibbon – The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; Autobiography 82. James Boswell – Journal; Life of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D. 83. Antoine Laurent Lavoisier – Traité Élémentaire de Chimie (Elements of Chemistry) 84. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison – Federalist Papers 85. Jeremy Bentham – Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation; Theory of Fictions 86. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe – Faust; Poetry and Truth 87. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier – Analytical Theory of Heat 88. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel – Phenomenology of Spirit; Philosophy of Right; Lectures on the Philosophy of History 89. William Wordsworth – Poems 90. Samuel Taylor Coleridge – Poems; Biographia Literaria 91. Jane Austen – Pride and Prejudice; Emma 92. Carl von Clausewitz – On War 93. Stendhal – The Red and the Black; The Charterhouse of Parma; On Love 94. Lord Byron – Don Juan 95. Arthur Schopenhauer – Studies in Pessimism 96. Michael Faraday – Chemical History of a Candle; Experimental Researches in Electricity 97. Charles Lyell – Principles of Geology 98. Auguste Comte – The Positive Philosophy 99. Honoré de Balzac – Père Goriot; Eugenie Grandet 100. Ralph Waldo Emerson – Representative Men; Essays; Journal 101. Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlet Letter 102. Alexis de Tocqueville – Democracy in America 103. John Stuart Mill – A System of Logic; On Liberty; Representative Government; Utilitarianism; The Subjection of Women; Autobiography 104. Charles Darwin – The Origin of Species; The Descent of Man; Autobiography 105. Charles Dickens – Pickwick Papers; David Copperfield; Hard Times 106. Claude Bernard – Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine 107. Henry David Thoreau – Civil Disobedience; Walden 108. Karl Marx – Capital; Communist Manifesto 109. George Eliot – Adam Bede; Middlemarch 110. Herman Melville – Moby-Dick; Billy Budd 111. Fyodor Dostoevsky – Crime and Punishment; The Idiot; The Brothers Karamazov 112. Gustave Flaubert – Madame Bovary; Three Stories 113. Henrik Ibsen – Plays 114. Leo Tolstoy – War and Peace; Anna Karenina; What is Art?; Twenty-Three Tales 115. Mark Twain – The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; The Mysterious Stranger 116. William James – The Principles of Psychology; The Varieties of Religious Experience; Pragmatism; Essays in Radical Empiricism 117. Henry James – The American; The Ambassadors 118. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche – Thus Spoke Zarathustra; Beyond Good and Evil; The Genealogy of Morals;The Will to Power 119. Jules Henri Poincaré – Science and Hypothesis; Science and Method 120. Sigmund Freud – The Interpretation of Dreams; Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis; Civilization and Its Discontents; New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis 121. George Bernard Shaw – Plays and Prefaces
Mortimer J. Adler (How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading)
Whoever reaches his ideal transcends it eo ipso.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The man who is to be great is the one who can be the most solitary, the most hidden, the most deviant, the man beyond good and evil, lord of his virtues, a man lavishly endowed with will - this is precisely what greatness is to be called: it is able to be as much a totality as something multi-faceted, as wide as it is full
Friedrich Nietzsche
He wants to be known deep down, abysmally deep down, before he is capable of being loved at all; he dares to let himself be fathomed. He feels that his beloved is fully in his possession only when she no longer deceives herself about him, when she loves him just as much for his devilry and hidden insatiability as for his graciousness, patience, and spirituality.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
O Voltaire! O humanity! O idiocy! There is something ticklish in "the truth," and in the SEARCH for the truth; and if man goes about it too humanely—"il ne cherche le vrai que pour faire le bien"—I wager he finds nothing!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Forgetfulness is a property of all action. The man of action is also without knowledge: he forgets most things in order to do one, he is unjust to what is behind him, and only recognizes one law - the law of that which is to be.
Friedrich Nietzsche (The Collected Works of Friedrich Nietzsche: Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, Ecce Homo, Genealogy of Morals, Birth of Tragedy, The Antichrist, ... Idols, The Case of Wagner, Letters & Essays)
apa yang dilakukan demi cinta, selalu terjadi diluar kebaikan dan kejahatan
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
kegilaan adalah suatu yang langka dalam individu--tapi dalam kelompok, partai politik, negara, epos, ia adalah peraturan...
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
إن من اشتقت إليهم من ظننتهم أقرباء وأشباهاً لي، نُبذوا، لأنهم شاخوا: من يتبدّل وحده يبقى قريبي.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
One does not hate as long as one disesteems, but only when one esteems equal or superior
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
dearest—every person is a prison and also a recess.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
HOW COULD anything originate out of its opposite? For example, truth out of error?
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
there may even be puritanical fanatics of conscience, who prefer to put their last trust in a sure nothing, rather than in an uncertain something.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Why might not the world WHICH CONCERNS US—be a fiction?
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
To vigorous men intimacy is a matter of shame--and something precious.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Madness is rare in individuals—but in groups, parties, nations, and ages it is the rule.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future)
It is difficult and painful for the ear to listen to anything new; we hear strange music badly.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good And Evil)
We must know how to preserve ourselves: the greatest test of independence.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
whatever is done from love always occurs beyond good and evil.
Friedrich Nietzsche
Having a talent is not enough; one also requires your permission for it--right, my friends?
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Insanity in individuals is something rare—but in groups, parties, nations, and epochs it is the rule.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil (illustrated) Grand Edition)
24. O sancta simplicitas! In what strange simplification and falsification man lives! One can never cease wondering when once one has got eyes for beholding this marvel! How we have made everything around us clear and free and easy and simple!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Our highest insights must – and should – sound like follies and sometimes like crimes when they are heard without permission by those who are not predisposed and predestined for them.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The discipline of suffering, of great suffering—know ye not that it is only this discipline that has produced all the elevations of humanity hitherto? The tension of soul in misfortune which communicates to it its energy, its shuddering in view of rack and ruin, its inventiveness and bravery in undergoing, enduring, interpreting, and exploiting misfortune, and whatever depth, mystery, disguise, spirit, artifice, or greatness has been bestowed upon the soul—has it not been bestowed through suffering?
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
It seems that in order to inscribe themselves upon the heart of humanity with everlasting claims, all great things have first to wander about the earth as enormous and awe-inspiring caricatures:
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Did I seek where the wind bites keenest, learn to live where no one lives, in the desert where only the polar bear lives, unlearn to pray and curse, unlearn man and god, become a ghost flitting across the glaciers?
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Something might be true, even if it is also harmful and dangerous in the highest degree; indeed, it might be part of the essential nature of existence that to understand it completely would lead to our own destruction.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Însă în ceea ce îi priveşte pe „prietenii cei buni“, mereu prea comozi şi care, tocmai ca prieteni, îşi închipuie că au dreptul la comoditate, faci bine dacă le avansezi un loc de joacă, o arenă a nepriceperii lor: vei avea astfel pricină de râs; - sau să-i înlături cu totul pe aceşti prieteni buni, - şi iar să râzi!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
To love mankind for the sake of God-that has been the most nobel and far-fetched feeling yet achieved by human beings. The idea that without some sanctifying ulterior motive, a love of mankind is just one more brutish stupidity, that the predisposition to such a love must first find its weight, its refinement, its grain of salt and pinch of ambergris in another even higher predisposition-whoever first felt and 'witnessed' this, and however much his tongue may have stuttered in attempting to express such a delicate idea: may he remain forever venerable and holy in our sight as the man who as yet has flown the highest and erred the most beautifully!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
hati terikat, jiwa bebas.--jika kau mengikat dan merantai hatimu kuatkuat, kau dapat memberikan banyak kebebasan pada jiwamu: itulah yang ku katakan pada suatu hari. akan tetapi orangorang tidak percaya, kecuali saat mereka benarbenar menemukannya
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
It is the business of the very few to be independent; it is a privilege of the strong. And whoever attempts it, even with the best right, but without being OBLIGED to do so, proves that he is probably not only strong, but also daring beyond measure.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil (Annotated))
Cinismul este singura formă prin care sufletele obişnuite acced la ceea ce se numeşte onestitate; iar omul superior, aflându-se în prezenta cinismului, fie el mai grosolan sau mai rafinat, trebuie să-şi ciulească urechile şi să se felicite de fiece dată când chiar în faţa lui prinde glas bufonul cel neruşinat sau satirul ştiinţific.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Insight: all evaluation is made from a definite perspective: that of the preservation of the individual, a community, a race, a state, a church, a faith, a culture.--- Because we forget that valuation is always from a perspective, a single individual contains within him a vast confusion of contradictory valuations and consequently of contradictory drives. This is the expression of the diseased condition in man, in contrast to the animals in which all existing instincts answer to quite definite tasks. This contradictory creature has in his nature, however, a great method of acquiring knowledge: he feels many pros and cons, he raises himself to justice---to comprehension beyond esteeming things good and evil. The wisest man would be the one richest in contradictions, who has, as it were, antennae for all types of men---as well as his great moments of grand harmony---a rare accident even in us! A sort of planetary motion---
Friedrich Nietzsche (The Will to Power)
4. The falseness of an opinion is not for us any objection to it: it is here, perhaps, that our new language sounds most strangely. The question is, how far an opinion is life-furthering, life- preserving, species-preserving, perhaps species-rearing, and we are fundamentally inclined to maintain that the falsest opinions (to which the synthetic judgments a priori belong), are the most indispensable to us, that without a recognition of logical fictions, without a comparison of reality with the purely IMAGINED world of the absolute and immutable, without a constant counterfeiting of the world by means of numbers, man could not live—that the renunciation of false opinions would be a renunciation of life, a negation of life. TO RECOGNISE UNTRUTH AS A CONDITION OF LIFE; that is certainly to impugn the traditional ideas of value in a dangerous manner, and a philosophy which ventures to do so, has thereby alone placed itself beyond good and evil.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Books for the general reader are always ill-smelling books, the odour of paltry people clings to them. Where the populace eat and drink, and even where they reverence, it is accustomed to stink. One should not go into churches if one wishes to breathe pure air.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
perempuan belajar membenci dengan cara yang sama saat mereka--belajar melupakan cara memperdaya
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
dalam keramahan tidak ada kebencian terhadap manusia--inilah mengapa begitu banyak hal yang menjijikkan
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
saat cinta ataupun kebencia tidak berperan, tindaka perempuan akan biasabiasa saja
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Aristotle doesn’t exist for Nietzsche.
Leo Strauss (Leo Strauss on Nietzsche's Beyond Good & Evil)
Around the hero everything turns into a tragedy; around the demi-god, into a satyr play; and around God--what? perhaps into "world"?
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Something might be true, even if it is also harmful and dangerous in the highest degree.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
What? A great man? I always see merely the play-actor of his own ideal.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Whoever does not know how to find the way to his ideal lives more frivolously and impudently than the man without an ideal.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
May heaven have mercy on the European intellect if one wanted to subtract the Jewish intellect from it.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future)
The more abstract the truth you wish to teach, the more must you allure the senses to it.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
There are no moral phenomena at all, but only a moral interpretation of phenomena.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
of us is the Oedipus here? Which the Sphinx? It would seem to be a rendezvous of questions and notes of interrogation. And could it be believed that it at last seems to us as if the problem had never been propounded before, as if we were the first to discern it, get a sight of it, and RISK RAISING it? For there is risk in raising it, perhaps there is no greater risk.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
They want more, they learn to make claims, the tribute of respect is at last felt to be well-nigh galling; rivalry for rights, indeed actual strife itself, would be preferred: in a word, woman is losing modesty. And let us immediately add that she is also losing taste. She is unlearning to fear man: but the woman who "unlearns to fear" sacrifices her most womanly instincts.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil [with Biographical Introduction])
Os homens de profunda tristeza denunciam-se quando são felizes: têm um modo de pegar na felicidade como se quisessem esmagá-la e sufocá-la, por ciúme - ah, sabem bem de mais que lhes foge!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
So what Nietzsche says here is this: the better among the contemporary atheists, with whom Nietzsche is to some extent in agreement, will come to know what they are doing. They do not know it now. Now they are perfectly self–satisfied and think that they are free thinkers. They will come to realize that there is something infinitely more terrible, depressing, and degrading than religion or theism. [...] You have no idea what you are letting yourselves in for. The utter senselessness, the irrelevance of man which is implied in that atheism and you fools don’t see it.
Leo Strauss (Leo Strauss on Nietzsche's Beyond Good & Evil)
S-ar putea să existe chiar fanatici puritani ai conştiinţei care să dorească a muri culcaţi mai degrabă pe un Nimic cert decât pe un Ceva nesigur. Dar acesta e nihilism, însemnul unui suflet deznădăjduit şi dezgustat de moarte, oricât de curajoase ar părea atitudinile unei astfel de virtuţi.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
In the end it must be as it is and always has been: great things remain for the great, abysses for the profound, nuances and shudders for the refined, and, in brief, all that is rare for the rare.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Lucrurile supreme trebuie să aibă o altă origine, una proprie lor, - ele nu ar putea lua naştere din această lume efemeră, înşelătoare, iluzorie şi mizeră, din această harababură de amăgiri şi pofte!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
على المرء أن يتخلص من الذوق الرديء الذي يريد الاتفاق مع الأكثرية. إن (الخير) لا يعود خيراً إذا تفوّه به الجار. فكيف يمكن أن يكون ثمة (خير عام) ! إن اللفظ يناقض ذاته: مايمكن أن يكون عاماً، له ابداً قيمة ضئيلة وحسب. وفي النهاية، يجب أن تكون الأمور على ما هي عليه وعلى ما كانت عليه دائماً: تبقى الأشياء العظيمة للعظماء، والأغوار للسابرين، والارتعاشات الرقيقة للمرهفين، وجملةً واختصاراً: يبقى كل نادر للنادرين.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
TO RECOGNISE UNTRUTH AS A CONDITION OF LIFE; that is certainly to impugn the traditional ideas of value in a dangerous manner, and a philosophy which ventures to do so, has thereby alone placed itself beyond good and evil.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
SUPPOSING that Truth is a woman—what then? Is there not ground for suspecting that all philosophers, in so far as they have been dogmatists, have failed to understand women—that the terrible seriousness and clumsy importunity with which they have usually paid their addresses to Truth, have been unskilled and unseemly methods for winning a woman?
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Freedom of Will"—that is the expression for the complex state of delight of the person exercising volition, who commands and at the same time identifies himself with the executor of the order—who, as such, enjoys also the triumph over obstacles, but thinks within himself that it was really his own will that overcame them. In this way the person exercising volition adds the feelings of delight of his successful executive instruments, the useful "underwills" or under-souls—indeed, our body is but a social structure composed of many souls—to his feelings of delight as commander.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Life consists of rare, isolated moments of the greatest significance, and of innumerably many intervals, during which at best the silhouettes of those moments hover about us. Love, springtime, every beautiful melody, mountains, the moon, the sea – all these speak completely to the heart but once, if in fact they ever do get a chance to speak completely. For many men do not have those moments at all, and are themselves intervals and intermissions in the symphony of real life.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Human, All Too Human/Beyond Good and Evil)
To say it for those who know how to explain a thing: women have the intelligence, men the heart and passion. This is not contradicted by the fact that men actually get so much farther with their intelligence: they have the deeper, more powerful drives; these take their intelligence, which is in itself something passive, forward. Women are often privately amazed at the great honor men pay to their hearts. When men look especially for a profound, warm-hearted being, in choosing their spouse, and women for a clever, alert, and brilliant being, one sees very clearly how a man is looking for an idealized man, and a woman for an idealized woman--that is, not for a complement, but for the perfection of their own merits.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Human, All Too Human/Beyond Good and Evil)
In all willing it is absolutely a question of commanding and obeying, on the basis, as already said, of a social structure composed of many “souls,” on which account a philosopher should claim the right to include willing-as-such within the sphere of morals—regarded as the doctrine of the relations of supremacy under which the phenomenon of “life” manifests itself.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good And Evil)
For while Copernicus has persuaded us to believe, contrary to all the senses, that the earth does NOT stand fast, Boscovich has taught us to abjure the belief in the last thing that "stood fast" of the earth—the belief in "substance," in "matter," in the earth-residuum, and particle-atom: it is the greatest triumph over the senses that has hitherto been gained on earth.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil (Annotated))
1. The Will to Truth, which is to tempt us to many a hazardous enterprise, the famous Truthfulness of which all philosophers have hitherto spoken with respect, what questions has this Will to Truth not laid before us! What strange, perplexing, questionable questions! It is already a long story; yet it seems as if it were hardly commenced. Is it any wonder if we at last grow distrustful, lose patience, and turn impatiently away? That this Sphinx teaches us at last to ask questions ourselves? WHO is it really that puts questions to us here? WHAT really is this "Will to Truth" in us? In fact we made a long halt at the question as to the origin of this Will—until at last we came to an absolute standstill before a yet more fundamental question. We inquired about the VALUE of this Will. Granted that we want the truth: WHY NOT RATHER untruth? And uncertainty? Even ignorance? The problem of the value of truth presented itself before us—or was it we who presented ourselves before the problem? Which of us is the Oedipus here? Which the Sphinx? It would seem to be a rendezvous of questions and notes of interrogation. And could it be believed that it at last seems to us as if the problem had never been propounded before, as if we were the first to discern it, get a sight of it, and RISK RAISING it? For there is risk in raising it, perhaps there is no greater risk.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Nu te ataşa de o persoană: fie ea cea mai dragă dintre toate, - fiecare persoană este o temniţă şi, totodată, un ungher. Nu te lăsa ataşat de un sentiment de compătimire: nici măcar pentru oamenii superiori al căror martiriu deosebit şi a căror neajutorare o descoperi întâmplător. Nu te ataşa de o ştiinţă: chiar dacă vreuna te-ar ademeni cu inestimabile descoperiri ce par să-ti fie hărăzite de-a dreptul ţie. Nu te ataşa de propria-ţi detaşare, de nicio depărtare voluptuoasă, ţinut îmbătător al păsării ce zboară din ce în ce mai sus, pentru a zări sub ea o întindere mereu crescândă: - primejdia celui ce zboară. Nu te ataşa de propriile-ti virtuţi, nu te jertfi în întregime pentru un oarecare şi unic detaliu, de exemplu pentru „ospitalitatea“ ta: aceasta e primejdia primejdiilor pentru sufletele alese şi bogate care, risipitoare şi aproape nepăsătoare faţă de ele însele, împing virtutea generozităţii până la viciu. Trebuie să ştii să te păstrezi: iată cea mai bună dovadă a independenţei.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
In the philosopher, on the contrary, there is absolutely nothing impersonal; and above all, his morality furnishes a decided and decisive testimony as to WHO HE IS,—that is to say, in what order the deepest impulses of his nature stand to each other.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The levelling of the European man is the great process which cannot be obstructed; it should even be accelerated. The necessity of cleaving gulfs, distance, order of rank, is therefore imperative —not the necessity of retarding this process. This homogenizing species requires justification as soon as it is attained: its justification is that it lies in serving a higher and sovereign race which stands upon the former and can raise itself this task only by doing this. Not merely a race of masters whose sole task is to rule, but a race with its own sphere of life, with an overflow of energy for beauty, bravery, culture, and manners, even for the most abstract thought; a yea-saying race that may grant itself every great luxury —strong enough to have no need of the tyranny of the virtue-imperative, rich enough to have no need of economy or pedantry; beyond good and evil; a hothouse for rare and exceptional plants.
Friedrich Nietzsche (The Will to Power)
2. "HOW COULD anything originate out of its opposite? For example, truth out of error? or the Will to Truth out of the will to deception? or the generous deed out of selfishness? or the pure sun-bright vision of the wise man out of covetousness? Such genesis is impossible; whoever dreams of it is a fool, nay, worse than a fool; things of the highest value must have a different origin, an origin of THEIR own—in this transitory, seductive, illusory, paltry world, in this turmoil of delusion and cupidity, they cannot have their source. But rather in the lap of Being, in the intransitory, in the concealed God, in the 'Thing-in-itself— THERE must be their source, and nowhere else!"—
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
It breaks my heart. Better than your words, your eye tells me all your peril. You are not yet free, you still search for freedom. Your search has fatigued you and made you too wakeful. You long for the open heights, your soul thirsts for the stars. But your bad instincts too thirst for freedom. Your fierce dogs long for freedom; they bark for joy in their cellar when your spirit aspires to break open all prisons. To me you are still a prisoner who imagines freedom: ah, such prisoners of the soul become clever, but also deceitful and base. The free man of the spirit, too, must still purify himself. Much of the prison and rottenness still remain within him: his eye still has to become pure. Yes, I know your peril. But, by my love and hope I entreat you: do not reject your love and hope! You still feel yourself noble, and the others, too, who dislike you and cast evil glances at you, still feel you are noble. Learn that everyone finds the noble man an obstruction. The good, too, find the noble man an obstruction: and even when they call him a good man they do so in order to make away with him. The noble man wants to create new things and a new virtue. The good man wants the old things and that the old things shall be preserved. But that is not the danger for the noble man — that he may become a good man — but that he may become an impudent one, a derider, a destroyer. Alas, I have known noble men who lost their highest hope. And henceforth they slandered all high hopes. Henceforth they lived impudently in brief pleasures, and they had hardly an aim beyond the day. ‘Spirit is also sensual pleasure’ — thus they spoke. Then the wings of their spirit broke: now it creeps around and it makes dirty what it feeds on. Once they thought of becoming heroes: now they are sensualists. The hero is to them an affliction and a terror. But, by my love and hope I entreat you: do not reject the hero in your soul! Keep holy your highest hope! Thus spoke Zarathustra.
Friedrich Nietzsche
believe that severity, violence, slavery, danger in the street and in the heart, secrecy, stoicism, tempter's art and devilry of every kind,—that everything wicked, terrible, tyrannical, predatory, and serpentine in man, serves as well for the elevation of the human species as its opposite
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil (Annotated))
For all the value that the true, the truthful, the selfless may deserve, it would still be possible that a higher and more fundamental value for life might have to be ascribed to deception, selfishness, and lust. It might even be possible that what constitutes the value of these good and revered things is precisely that they are insidiously related, tied to, and involved with these wicked, seemingly opposite things—maybe even one with them in essence. Maybe!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future)
Psychologists should bethink themselves before putting down the instinct of self-preservation as the cardinal instinct of an organic being. A living thing seeks above all to DISCHARGE its strength—life itself is WILL TO POWER; self-preservation is only one of the indirect and most frequent RESULTS thereof. In short, here, as everywhere else, let us beware of SUPERFLUOUS teleological principles!—one of which is the instinct of self-preservation (we owe it to Spinoza's inconsistency).
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil (Annotated))
For us, the falsity of a judgment is still no objection to that judgment — that’s where our new way of speaking sounds perhaps most strange. The question is the extent to which it makes demands on life, sustains life, maintains the species, perhaps even creates species. And as a matter of principle we are ready to assert that the falsest judgments (to which a priori synthetic judgments belong) are the most indispensable to us, that without our allowing logical fictions to count, without a way of measuring reality against the purely invented world of the unconditional and self-identical, without a constant falsification of the world through numbers, human beings could not live — that if we managed to give up false judgments, it would amount to a renunciation of life, a denial of life. To concede the fictional nature of the conditions of life means, of course, taking a dangerous stand against the customary feelings about value. A philosophy which dares to do that is for this reason alone already standing beyond good and evil.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Além do Bem e do Mal)
It has gradually become clear to me what every great philosophy up till now has consisted of—namely, the confession of its originator, and a species of involuntary and unconscious auto-biography; and moreover that the moral (or immoral) purpose in every philosophy has constituted the true vital germ out of which the entire plant has always grown.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Die Sinnlichkeit übereilt oft das Wachsthum der Liebe, so dass die Wurzel schwach bleibt und leicht auszureissen ist.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Man liebt zuletzt seine Begierde, und nicht das Begehrte.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The Olympian vice.--In defiance of that philosopher who as true Englishman tried to give any thinking person's laughter a bad reputation ('Laughter is a nasty infirmity of human nature that any thinking person will endeavour to overcome'---Hobbes), I would actually go as far as to rank philosophers according to the level of their laughter---right up to the ones who are capable of golden laughter. And assuming that gods, too, are able to philosophize, as various of my conclusions force me to believe, then I do not doubt when they do so, they know how to laugh in a new and superhuman fashion---and at the expense of everything serious! Gods like to jeer: it seems that even at religious observances they cannot keep from laughing.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
In the writings of a recluse one always hears something of the echo of the wilderness, something of the murmuring tones and timid vigilance of solitude; in his strongest words, even in his cry itself, there sounds a new and more dangerous kind of silence, of concealment. He who has sat day and night, from year's end to year's end, alone with his soul in familiar discord and discourse, he who has become a cave-bear, or a treasure-seeker, or a treasure-guardian and dragon in his cave—it may be a labyrinth, but can also be a gold-mine—his ideas themselves eventually acquire a twilight-colour of their own, and an odour, as much of the depth as of the mould, something uncommunicative and repulsive, which blows chilly upon every passer-by.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
For the indignant man, and he who perpetually tears and lacerates himself with his own teeth (or, in place of himself, the world, God, or society), may indeed, morally speaking, stand higher than the laughing and self-satisfied satyr, but in every other sense he is the more ordinary, more indifferent, and less instructive case. And no one is such a LIAR as the indignant man. 27.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Passionately yes, passionately no” is the worst of all tastes. And now after one has overcome that, after one has followed this natural inclination, one must learn to put some art into one’s feelings and rather make an experiment with the artificial as distinguished from and opposed to the natural. That is what the true artists of life do. They do not follow the natural impulses, but experiment with the artificial.
Leo Strauss (Leo Strauss on Nietzsche's Beyond Good & Evil)
Rather go out of the way! Flee into concealment! And have your masks and your ruses, that ye may be mistaken for what you are, or somewhat feared! And pray, don't forget the garden, the garden with golden trellis-work! And have people around you who are as a garden—or as music on the waters at eventide, when already the day becomes a memory. Choose the GOOD solitude, the free, wanton, lightsome solitude, which also gives you the right still to remain good in any sense whatsoever!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
If a 'superman' undoubtedly constitutes a central idea of the whole of Nietzschean thought, it is in terms of a 'positive superman', it is not that grotesqueness in the style of d’Annunzio, nor the 'blond beast of prey' (this is one of Nietzsche’s poorest expressions) and not even the exceptional individual who incarnates a maximum of the 'will to power', 'beyond good and evil', however without any light and without a higher sanction. The positive superman, which suits the 'better Nietzsche', is instead to be identified with the human type who even in a nihilistic, devastated, absurd, godless world knows how to stand on his feet, because he is capable of giving himself a law from himself, in accordance with a new higher freedom.
Julius Evola
Care-s singurele lucruri pe care le putem eterniza? Ah, numai cele care tocmai se ofilesc şi-ncep să-şi piardă parfumul! Ah, doar furtuni ce se îndepărtează vlăguite şi sentimente târzii, gălbejite! Ah, numai păsări ostenite de zbor, rătăcite-n zbor, păsări care se lasă prinse-n mână, - în mâna noastră! Noi imortalizăm cele ce nu mai au mult de trăit şi de zburat, numai lucruri istovite şi răscoapte! Şi numai pentru a putea picta după-amiaza voastră, voi, gânduri ale mele scrise şi pictate...
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
In spite of all the value which may belong to the true, the positive, and the unselfish, it might be possible that a higher and more fundamental value for life generally should be assigned to pretence, to the will to delusion, to selfishness, and cupidity. It might even be possible that WHAT constitutes the value of those good and respected things, consists precisely in their being insidiously related, knotted, and crocheted to these evil and apparently opposed things—perhaps even in being essentially identical with them.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Just as little as a reader today reads all of the individual words (let alone syllables) on a page—rather he picks about five words at random out of twenty and "guesses" at the meaning that probably belongs to these five words—just as little do we see a tree exactly and completely with reference to leaves, twigs, color, and form; it is so very much easier for us to simply improvise some approximation of a tree. Even in the midst of the strangest experiences we will still do the same: we make up the major part of the experience and can scarcely be forced not to contemplate some event as its "inventors." All this means: basically and from time immemorial we are—accustomed to lying. Or to put it more virtuously and hypocritically, in short, more pleasantly: one is much more of an artist than one knows.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Este vorba mai degrabă de credinţa lui Pascal, care se aseamănă teribil cu o sinucidere lentă a raţiunii, - a unei raţiuni îndărătnice, longevive, asemenea unui vierme ce nu poate fi ucis dintr-o dată, cu o singură lovitură. De la bun început, credinţa creştină înseamnă jertfire: jertfirea întregii libertăţi, a întregului orgoliu, a întregii conştiinţe de sine a spiritului; în plus, ea este o subjugare, autobatjocorire şi automutilare. Există şi o doză de cruzime şi de fenicianism religios în această credinţă pretinsă din partea unei conştiinţe macerate, complicate şi prea alintate: ea porneşte de la premisa că supunerea spiritului trebuie să fie indescriptibil de dureroasă, că întregul trecut şi toate deprinderile unui astfel de spirit se opun acestui absurdissimum care îl înfruntă în chip de „credinţă“.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
215. As in the stellar firmament there are sometimes two suns which determine the path of one planet, and in certain cases suns of different colours shine around a single planet, now with red light, now with green, and then simultaneously illumine and flood it with motley colours: so we modern men, owing to the complicated mechanism of our "firmament," are determined by DIFFERENT moralities; our actions shine alternately in different colours, and are seldom unequivocal—and there are often cases, also, in which our actions are MOTLEY-COLOURED.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
I do not believe that an “impulse to knowledge” is the father of philosophy; but that another impulse, here as elsewhere, has only made use of knowledge (and mistaken knowledge!) as an instrument.But whoever considers the fundamental impulses of man with a view to determining how far they may have here acted as INSPIRING GENII (or as demons and cobolds), will find that they have all practiced philosophy at one time or another, and that each one of them would have been only too glad to look upon itself as the ultimate end of existence and the legitimate LORD over all the other impulses.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Fiziologii ar trebui să mai chibzuiască înainte de a afirma că in¬stinctul primordial al unei fiinţe organice este instinctul de conser¬vare. Fiinţa vie năzuieşte înainte de toate să dea curs liber puterii sale -viata, ea însăşi, este voită de putere -: instinctul de con¬servare fiind doar o consecinţă indirectă, una dintre cele mai frec¬vente ale ei. - Pe scurt, aici precum şi în altă parte, atenţie faţă de principiile teleologice inutile! – cum este acela al instinctului de conservare (pe care îl datorăm inconsecvenţei lui Spinoza). În acest fel se ordonează metoda ce trebuie să fie, în esenţă, economie de principii.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
The people on their part may think that cognition is knowing all about things, but the philosopher must say to himself: "When I analyze the process that is expressed in the sentence, 'I think,' I find a whole series of daring assertions, the argumentative proof of which would be difficult, perhaps impossible: for instance, that it is I who think, that there must necessarily be something that thinks, that thinking is an activity and operation on the part of a being who is thought of as a cause, that there is an 'ego,' and finally, that it is already determined what is to be designated by thinking—that I KNOW what thinking is.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
That individual philosophical concepts are not anything capricious or autonomously evolving, but grow up in connection and relationship with each other; that, however suddenly and arbitrarily they seem to appear in the history of thought, they nevertheless belong just as much to a system as all the members of the fauna of a continent - is betrayed in the end also by the fact that the most diverse philosophers keep filling in a definite fundamental scheme of possible philosophies. Under an invisible spell, they always revolve once more in the same orbit; however independent of each other they may feel themselves with their critical or systematic wills, something within them leads them, something impels them in a definite order, one after the other - to wit, the innate systematic structure and relationship of their concepts. Their thinking is, in fact, far less a discovery than a recognition, a remembering, a return and a homecoming to a remote, primordial, and inclusive household of the soul, out of which those concepts grew originally: philosophizing is to this extent a kind of atavism of the highest order.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Alas! what are you, after all, my written and painted thoughts! Not long ago you were so variegated, young and malicious, so full of thorns and secret spices, that you made me sneeze and laugh — and now? You have already doffed your novelty, and some of you, I fear, are ready to become truths, so immortal do they look, so pathetically honest, so tedious! And was it ever otherwise? What then do we write and paint, we mandarins with Chinese brush, we immortalizers of things which lend themselves to writing, what are we alone capable of painting? Alas, only that which is just about to fade and begins to lose its odour! Alas, only exhausted and departing storms and belated yellow sentiments! Alas, only birds strayed and fatigued by flight, which now let themselves be captured with the hand — with our hand! We immortalize what cannot live and fly much longer, things only which are exhausted and mellow! And it is only for your afternoon, you, my written and painted thoughts, for which alone I have colours, many colours, perhaps, many variegated softenings, and fifty yellows and browns and greens and reds; — but nobody will divine thereby how ye looked in your morning, you sudden sparks and marvels of my solitude, you, my old, beloved — evil thoughts!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Fiecare epocă îşi are felul ei propriu de adorabilă naivitate pe care celelalte secole i-o invidiază: - şi cât de multă naivitate respectabilă, puerilă şi infinit de prostească se află în această credinţă a savantului în superioritatea sa, în buna-credinţă a toleranţei sale, în siguranţa neştiutoare şi candidă cu care îl tratează instinctiv pe omul religios ca pe un tip mediocru şi inferior, pe care el l-a întrecut, l-a ocolit, l-a depăşit, - el, micul spiriduş arogant, plebeul sprinten şi harnic, meşteşugarul intelectual şi manual al „ideilor“, al „ideilor moderne“!
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
At the risk of displeasing innocent ears, I propose that egoism belongs to the nature of a noble soul, I mean that unshakable faith that to a being such as 'we are' other beings must be subordinate by nature and have to sacrifice themselves. The noble soul accepts this fact of its egoism without any question mark, without a feeling that it might contain hardness, constraint, or caprice, but rather as something that may be founded in the primordial law of things: if it sought a name for this fact it would say ‘it is justice itself.’ Perhaps it admits under certain circumstances, which, at first, make it hesitate, that there are some who have rights equal to its own; as soon as this matter of rank is settled, it moves among these equals, with their equal privileges, showing the same sureness of modesty and delicate reverence that characterize its relations with itself – in accordance with an innate heavenly mechanism, understood by all stars. It is merely another aspect of its egoism, this refinement and self-limitation in its relations with its equals – every star is such an egoist – it honors itself in them, and in the rights it cedes to them; it does not doubt that the exchange of honors and rights is of the nature of all social relations, and thus also belongs to the natural condition of things. The noble soul gives as it takes from that passionate and irritable instinct of repayment that lies in its depth. The concept of grace has no meaning or good odor inter pares; there may be a sublime way to let presents from above happen to one, as it were, and to drink them up thirstily, like drops, but for this art and gesture the noble soul has no aptitude. Its egoism hinders it: quite generally it does not like to look 'up,' but either ahead , horizontally and slowly, or down: it knows itself to be at a height.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Întreaga psihologie de până acum a rămas împotmolită în prejudecăţi şi temeri de ordin moral: ea nu s-a încumetat să pătrundă în adâncuri. A o concepe, precum o fac eu, în chip de morfologie şi genetică a voinţei de putere, -iată o idee care nu i-a trecut nimănui prin cap, în măsura în care ne este îngăduit să ghicim din toate cele câte s-au scris până acum şi a ceea ce a fost trecut sub tăcere. Puterea prejudecăţilor morale a impregnat profund sfera spiritualităţii pure, în aparenţă sfera cea mai rece şi mai lipsită de idei preconcepute - exercitând bineînţeles o acţiune vătămătoare, paralizantă, orbitoare, deformantă. O fizio-psihologie autentică întâmpină rezistenţe inconştiente în ini-ma cercetătorului, ea are de luptat cu „inima“: chiar şi o teorie despre interdependenta instinctelor „bune“ şi „rele“ pare un rafinament de imoralitate care provoacă suferinţa şi dezgustul unei conştiinţe încă viguroase şi îndrăzneţe -, şi, cu atât mai mult, o teorie despre derivarea tuturor instinctelor bune din cele rele. Însă, presupunând că s-ar găsi cineva care să ia afectele de ură, invidie, cupiditate, patima puterii drept afecte esenţiale ale vieţii, drept lucruri care trebuie să facă parte, în esenţă şi în principiu, din economia generală a vieţii, dacă vrem ca viaţa să fie intensificată -, acest om ar suferi din pricina unei asemenea orientări a judecăţilor sale ca de un rău de mare. şi aceasta nu este încă nici pe departe cea mai penibilă şi mai ciudată ipoteză din acest imens şi aproape nedesţelenit domeniu de cunoştinţe primejdioase: iar cel care vrea va găsi o sută de temeiuri pentru a se tine la distantă de ea - de va fi în stare! Iar dacă totuşi nava vi s-a abătut prin aceste meleaguri, ei bine, curaj! strângeţi zdravăn din dinţi! deschideţi-vă ochii! apucaţi timona cu nădejde! - vom depăşi de-a dreptul morala, cu riscul de a strivi, de a zdrobi poate restul propriei noastre moralităţi, cutezând să pornim pe acest drum - dar ce contăm noi! Niciodată navigatorilor şi aventurierilor temerari nu li s-a mai înfăţişat vreo lume de cunoştinţe, mai profundă: iar psihologului care consimte la o asemenea „jertfă“ - acesta nu este sacrifizio dell'inteletto, dimpotrivă! - i se va îngădui cel puţin să pretindă în schimb ca psihologia să fie recunoscută iarăşi ca regină a ştiinţelor, pe care celelalte ştiinţe au menirea s-o slujească şi s-o pregătească. Căci de acum îna¬inte psihologia este din nou calea ce duce spre problemele fundamentale.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Năzuinţa omului spre „liberul arbitru“, în înţelesul superlativ şi metafizic care din păcate mai domneşte încă în creierele semidocte, vrerea de a purta întreaga şi ultima responsabilitate pentru actele sale, descărcând-o din spinarea lui Dumnezeu, a lumii, a eredităţii, a întâmplării, a societăţii, este nici mai mult, nici mai puţin decât dorinţa de a fi însăşi causa sui. Cu o cutezanţă mai mare decât aceea a baronului de Munchhausen, omul încearcă, trăgându-se de păr, să se smulgă din mlaştina neantului, pentru a se înălţa în existentă. Iar de s-ar hotărî vreunul să-i facă vânt neroziei rustice a acestei noţiuni faimoase a „liberului arbitru“ şi să şi-o scoată din cap l-aş ruga să mai facă un pas pe calea „iluminării“ sale şi să procedeze aşijderea şi în privinţa contrariului acestei pseudonoţiuni a „liberului arbitru“: mă refer la „vrerea încătuşată“ care conduce la un abuz al noţiunilor de cauză şi efect. „Cauza“ şi „efectul“ nu trebuie concretizate, precum o fac în mod greşit naturaliştii (şi toţi cei care naturalizează azi în gândire, asemenea lor), care se conformează neroziei mecaniciste dominante ce îşi imaginează cauza drept ceva care trage şi împinge până în momentul în care este obţinut efectul: trebuie să ne folosim de „cauză“ şi de „efect" doar ca de nişte noţiuni pure, adică în chip de ficţiuni convenţionale în scopul desemnării, al comunicării, şi nu pentru cel al explicaţiei. Noţiunea de „în sine“ nu conţine nici un dram de „legătură cauzală“, de „necesitate“, de „determinism psihologic“, în cazul ei efectul nu este urmarea cauzei, în cadrul ei nu domneşte nici o „lege“. Noi singuri am fost cei care am inventat cauzele, succesiunea, reciprocitatea, relativitatea, obligativitatea, numărul, legea, libertatea, temeiul, ţinta; iar când introducem şi amestecăm în lucruri această lume de semne născocite de noi înşine, în chip de lucruri „în sine“, procedăm iarăşi precum am făcut întotdeauna, şi anume mitologic. „Voinţa încătuşată“ este un mit: în realitate, se poate vorbi doar despre voinţe puternice şi slabe. - Când un gânditor simte că a descoperit deodată în întreaga „înlănţuire cauzală" şi în întreaga „necesitate psihologică“ ceva ce seamănă a constrângere, a necesitate, a succesiune obligatorie, a presiune, a încătuşare - aceasta este mai întotdeauna semnul că în cazul lui ceva nu este în regulă: a simţi astfel e un simptom revelator, - respectivul se demască pe sine; şi, în general, în caz că observaţiile mele sunt exacte, problema determinismului este cercetată sub două aspecte diametral opuse, însă întotdeauna într-un mod profund personal: unii nu vor să cedeze cu niciun preţ din „responsabilitatea“ lor, din credinţa în sine, din dreptul personal asupra meritelor tor (acesta e cazul raselor vanitoase), ceilalţi, dimpotrivă, nu vor să-si asume responsabilitatea şi vinovăţia pentru nimic, dorind, dintr-un tăinuit dispreţ de sine, să poată da bir cu fugiţii, indiferent în ce direcţie, din faţa eului lor. Când scriu cărţi, aceştia din urmă obişnuiesc să ia apărarea în zilele noastre răufăcătorilor; deghizarea lor preferată este un fel de compătimire socialistă. Si, într-adevăr, fatalismul celor cu voinţa slabă se înfrumuseţează uimitor din momentul în care reuşeşte să se dea drept la religion de la souffrance humaine: este felul său de a-si demonstra „bunul gust“.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
Printre cei care în Germania zilelor noastre trăiesc în afara religiei, găsesc „liber cugetători“ de diverse soiuri şi origini, dar mai cu seamă o majoritate de oameni a căror muncă asiduă dusă din generaţie în generaţie le-a anihilat instinctele religioase: astfel că ei nu mai au habar la ce servesc religiile, mărginindu-se să le înregistreze existenţa cu un soi de uimire tâmpă. Ei se simt de-acum într-atât de preocupaţi, aceşti oameni cumsecade, fie cu afacerile lor, fie cu plăcerile lor, nemaivorbind de „patrie“, de ziare, de „îndatoririle de familie“, încât se pare că nu le mai rămâne timp deloc pentru religie, mai ales că ei nu sunt siguri dacă e vorba cumva de vreo afacere nouă sau de o nouă plăcere, - căci e cu neputinţă, spun ei, să mergi la biserică numai şi numai pentru a-ţi strica buna dispoziţie.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
And do ye know what “the universe” is to my mind? Shall I show it to you in my mirror? This universe is a monster of energy, without beginning or end; a fixed and brazen quantity of energy which grows neither bigger nor smaller, which does not consume itself, but only alters its face; as a whole its bulk is immutable, it is a household without either losses or gains, but likewise without increase and without sources of revenue, surrounded by nonentity as by a frontier. It is nothing vague or wasteful, it does not stretch into infinity; but is a definite quantum of energy located in limited space, and not in space which would be anywhere empty. It is rather energy everywhere, the play of forces and force-waves, at the same time one and many, agglomerating here and diminishing there, a sea of forces storming and raging in itself, for ever changing, for ever rolling back over incalculable ages to recurrence, with an ebb and flow of its forms, producing the most complicated things out of the most simple structures; producing the most ardent, most savage, and most contradictory things out of the quietest, most rigid, and most frozen material, and then returning from multifariousness to uniformity, from the play of contradictions back into the delight of consonance, saying yea unto itself, even in this homogeneity of its courses and ages; for ever blessing itself as something which recurs for all eternity, — a becoming which knows not satiety, or disgust, or weariness: — this, my Dionysian world of eternal self-creation, of eternal self-destruction, this mysterious world of twofold voluptuousness; this, my “Beyond Good and Evil,” without aim, unless there is an aim in the bliss of the circle, without will, unless a ring must by nature keep goodwill to itself, — would you have a name for my world? A solution of all your riddles? Do ye also want a light, ye most concealed, strongest and most
Friedrich Nietzsche (Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche)
Spaima profundă şi suspicioasă de scufundare într-un pesimism incurabil este cea care constrânge întregi secole să se tină cu dinţii de o interpretare religioasă a existentei: acea spaimă a instinctului care îşi închipuie că s-ar putea ajunge prea devreme în posesia adevărului, mai înainte ca omul să fi devenit îndeajuns de puternic, îndeajuns de dur, îndeajuns de artist... Considerată din acest punct de vedere, pietatea, "viaţa întru Dumnezeu“ ar apărea ca fiind cel din urmă şi cel mai rafinat produs al spaimei de adevăr, ca o divinizare şi o beţie artistică în faţa celei mai consecvente falsificări posibile, ca o vrere de răsturnare a adevărului, o vrere spre neadevăr cu orice preţ. Poate că nici n-a existat până acum vreun mijloc mai eficace pentru înfrumuseţarea omului ca pietatea însăşi: prin pietate omul se poate transfigura într-o asemenea măsură în artă şi superficie, în joc de culori, în bunătate, încât priveliştea pe care o oferă să nu mai provoace suferinţă.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil)
You desire to live "according to Nature"? Oh, you noble Stoics, what fraud of words! Imagine to yourselves a being like Nature, boundlessly extravagant, boundlessly indifferent, without purpose or consideration, without pity or justice, at once fruitful and barren and uncertain: imagine to yourselves indifference as a power—how could you live in accordance with such indifference? To live—is not that just endeavouring to be otherwise than this Nature? Is not living valuing, preferring, being unjust, being limited, endeavouring to be different? And granted that your imperative, "living according to Nature," means actually the same as "living according to life"—how could you do differently? Why should you make a principle out of what you yourselves are, and must be? In reality, however, it is quite otherwise with you: while you pretend to read with rapture the canon of your law in Nature, you want something quite the contrary, you extraordinary stage-players and self-deluders! In your pride you wish to dictate your morals and ideals to Nature, to Nature herself, and to incorporate them therein; you insist that it shall be Nature "according to the Stoa," and would like everything to be made after your own image, as a vast, eternal glorification and generalism of Stoicism! With all your love for truth, you have forced yourselves so long, so persistently, and with such hypnotic rigidity to see Nature falsely, that is to say, Stoically, that you are no longer able to see it otherwise—and to crown all, some unfathomable superciliousness gives you the Bedlamite hope that because you are able to tyrannize over yourselves—Stoicism is self-tyranny—Nature will also allow herself to be tyrannized over: is not the Stoic a PART of Nature?... But this is an old and everlasting story: what happened in old times with the Stoics still happens today, as soon as ever a philosophy begins to believe in itself. It always creates the world in its own image; it cannot do otherwise; philosophy is this tyrannical impulse itself, the most spiritual Will to Power, the will to "creation of the world," the will to the causa prima. 10.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Beyond Good and Evil (Illustrated))