Adj Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Adj. Here they are! All 175 of them:

livid, adj. Fuck You for cheating on me. Fuck you for reducing it to the word cheating. As if this were a card game, and you sneaked a look at my hand. Who came up with the term cheating, anyway? A cheater, I imagine. Someone who thought liar was too harsh. Someone who thought devastator was too emotional. The same person who thought, oops, he’d gotten caught with his hand in the cookie jar. Fuck you. This isn’t about slipping yourself an extra twenty dollars of Monopoly money. These are our lives. You went and broke our lives. You are so much worse than a cheater. You killed something. And you killed it when its back was turned.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
libidinous, adj. I never understood why anyone would have sex on the floor. Until I was with you and I realized: you don't ever realize you're on the floor.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
breathtaking, adj. Those mornings when we kiss and surrender for an hour before we say a single word.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Selfish, adj. Devoid of consideration for the selfishness of others.
Ambrose Bierce (The Unabridged Devil's Dictionary)
Ahenny (adj.) - The way people stand when examining other people's bookshelves.
Douglas Adams (The Deeper Meaning of Liff)
yearning, n. and adj. At the core of this desire is the belief that everything can be perfect.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Positive, adj.: Mistaken at the top of one's voice.
Ambrose Bierce (The Unabridged Devil's Dictionary)
ethereal, adj. You leaned your head into mine, and I leaned my head into yours. Dancing cheek to cheek. Revolving slowly, eyes closed, heartbeat measure, nature’s hum. It lasted the length of an old song, and then we stopped, kissed, and my heart stayed there, just like that.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
ubiquitous, adj. When it’s going well, the fact of it is everywhere. It’s there in the song that shuffles into your ears. It’s there in the book you’re reading. It’s there on the shelves of the store as you reach for a towel and forget about the towel. It’s there as you open the door. As you stare off into the subway, it’s what you’re looking at. You wear it on the inside of your hat. It lines your pockets. It’s the temperature. The hitch, of course, it that when it’s going badly, it’s in all the same places.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
only, adj. Thats the dilemma isn't it? when you're single, there's the sadness and joy of only me. And when you're paired, there's the sadness and joy of only you.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
candid, adj. "Most times, when I'm having sex, I'd rather be reading." This was, I admit, a strange thing to say on a second date. I guess I was just giving you a warning. "Most times when I'm reading," you said, "I'd rather be having sex".
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Hash, x. There is no definition for this word - nobody knows what hash is. Famous, adj. Conspicuously miserable. Dictionary, n. A malevolent literary device for cramping the growth of a language and making it hard and inelastic. This dictionary, however, is a most useful work.
Ambrose Bierce (The Unabridged Devil's Dictionary)
contiguous, adj. I felt silly for even mentioning it, but once I did, I knew I had to explain. "When I was a kid, "I had this puzzle with all fifty states on it--you know, the kind where you have to fit them all together. And one day I got it in my head that California and Nevada were in love. I told my mom, and she had no idea what I was talking about. I ran and got those two pieces and showed it to her--California and Nevada, completely in love. So a lot of the time when we're like this"--my ankles against the backs of your ankles, my knees fitting into the backs of your knees, my thighs on the backs of your legs, my stomach against your back, my chin folding into your neck--"I can't help but think about California and Nevada, and how we're a lot like them. If someone were drawing us from above as a map. that's what we'd look like; that's how we are." For a moment, you were quiet. And then you nestled in and whispered. "Contiguous." And I knew you understood.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
aloof, adj. It has always been my habit, ever since junior high school, to ask that question: “What are you thinking?” It is always an act of desperation, and I keep on asking, even though I know it will never work the way I want it to.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
ineffable, adj. these words will ultimately end up being the barest of reflections, devoid of the sensations words cannot convoy. Trying to write about love is ultimately like trying to have a dictionary represent life. No matter how many words there are, there will never be enough.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
elliptical, adj. The kiss I like the most is one of the slow ones. It’s as much breath as touch, as much no as yes. You lean in from the side, and I have to turn a little to make it happen.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Self-evident, adj. Evident to one's self and to nobody else.
Ambrose Bierce (The Devil's Dictionary)
dumbfounded, adj. And still, for all the jealousy, all the doubt, sometimes I will be struck with a kind of awe that we're together. That someone like me could find someone like you - it renders me wordless. Because surely words would conspire against such luck, would protest the unlikelihood of such a turn of events. I didn't tell any of my friends about our first date. I waited until after our second, because I wanted to make sure it was real. I wouldn't believe it had happened until it had happened again. Then, later on, I would be overwhelmed by the evidence, by all the lines connecting you to me, and us to love.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
jaded, adj. In the end, we both want the right thing to happen, the right person to win, the right idea to prevail. We have no faith that it will, but still we want it. Neither of us has given up on anything.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
TRUTHFUL, adj. Dumb and illiterate.
Ambrose Bierce (The Unabridged Devil's Dictionary)
obstinate, adj. Sometimes it becomes a contest: Which is more stubborn, the love or the two arguing people caught within it?
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
incessant, adj. The doubts. You had to save me from my constant doubts. That deep-seeded feeling that I wasn't good enough for anything I was a fake at my job I wasn't your equal my friends would forget me if I moved away for a month. It wasn't as easy as hearing voices nobody was telling me this. It was just something I knew. Everyone else was playing along but I was sure that one day they would all stop.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
healthy, adj. There are times when I'm alone that I think, This is it. This is actually the natural state. All I need are my thoughts and my small acts of creation and my ability to go or do whatever I want to go or do. I am myself, and that is the point. Pairing is a social construction. It is by no means necessary for everyone to do it. Maybe I'm better like this. Maybe I could live my life in my own world, and then simply leave it when it's time to go.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
ardent, adj. It was after sex, when there was still heat and mostly breathing, when there was still touch and mostly thought... it was as if the whole world could be reduced to the sound of a single string being played, and the only thing this sound could make me think of was you. Sometimes desire is in the air; sometimes desire is liquid. And every now and then, when everything else is air and liquid, desire solidifies, and the body is the magnet that draws its weight.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
better, adj. and adv. Will it ever get better? It better. Will it ever get better? It better. Will it ever get better? It better.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Serrated, adj. And you said, "I'm not sure we can.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
fraught, adj. Does every “I love you” deserve an “I love you too”? Does every kiss deserve a kiss back? Does every night deserve to be spent on a lover? If the answer to any of these is “No,” what do we do?
David Levithan
taciturn, adj. There are days you come home silent. You say words, but you're still silent. I used to bombard you with conversational crowbars, but now I simply let the apartment fall mute. I hear you in the room -- turning on music, typing on the keys, getting up for a drink, shifting in your chair. I try to have my conversation with those sounds.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
JEALOUS, adj. Unduly concerned about the preservation of that which can be lost only if not worth keeping.
Ambrose Bierce (The Unabridged Devil's Dictionary)
yearning n. and adj. At te core of this desire is the belief that everything can be perfect.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
ABNORMAL, adj. Not conforming to standards in matters of thought and conduct. To be independent is to be abnormal, to be abnormal is to be detested. A striving toward the straiter [sic] resemblance of the Average Man than he hath to himself, whoso attaineth thereto shall have peace, the prospect of death and the hope of Hell.
Ambrose Bierce (The Devil's Dictionary and Other Works)
placid, adj. Sometimes I love it when we just lie on our backs, gaze off, stay still.
David Levithan
obstinate, adj. Sometimes it becomes a contest: Which is more stubborn, the love or the two arguing people caught within it?
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Fallible, adj. I was hurt. Of course I was hurt. But in a perverse way, I was relieved that you were the one who mad the mistake. It made me worry less about myself.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Alone, adj. In bad company.
Ambrose Bierce (The Unabridged Devil's Dictionary)
dumbfounded, adj. And still, for all the jealousy, all the doubt, sometimes I will be struck with a kind of awe that we’re together. That someone like me could findsomeone like you — it renders me wordless. Because surely words would conspire against such luck, would protest the unlikelihood of such a turnof events.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Indelible, adj. That first night, you took your finger and pointed to the top of my head, then traced a line between my eyes, down my nose, over my lips, my chin, my neck, to the center of my chest. It was so surprising. I knew I would never mimic it. That one gesture would be yours forever.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
EDIBLE, adj. Good to eat, and wholesome to digest, as a worm to a toad, a toad to a snake, a snake to a pig, a pig to a man, and a man to a worm.
Ambrose Bierce (The Devil's Dictionary (Illustrated))
PITIFUL, adj. The state of an enemy or opponent after an imaginary encounter with oneself.
Ambrose Bierce (The Unabridged Devil's Dictionary)
commonplace, adj. ... But then I'll walk into the bathroom and find you've forgotten to put the cap back on the toothpaste again, and it will be this splinter that I just keep stepping on.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Positive, adj. Mistaken at the top of one’s voice.
Ambrose Bierce (The Devil's Dictionary)
avant-garde, adj. This was after Alisa' show, the reverse-blackface rendition of Gone With the Wind, including songs from the Empire Records soundtrack and an interval of nineteenth-century German poetry, recited with a lisp. "What does avant-garde mean, anyway?" I asked. "I believe it translates as favor to your friends," you replied.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Dumbfounded adj. And still for all the jealousy, all the doubt, sometimes I will be struck with a kind of awe that we're together. That someone like me could find someone like you - it renders me wordless.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
MATERIAL, adj. Having an actual existence, as distinguished from an imaginary one. Important.
Ambrose Bierce (The Unabridged Devil's Dictionary)
Blusterous -- adj. a word used to describe those Atmospheric Conditions in which one's ears are adversely affected {and possibly one's house}.
A.R. Melrose (Winnie the Pooh: The Pooh Dictionary)
Ardent, adj.: It was as if the whole world could be reduced to the sound of a single string being played, and the only thing this sound could make me think of was you.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
yearning, n. and adj. At the core of this desire is the belief that everything can be perfect.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
placid, adj. Sometimes I love it when we just lie on our backs, gaze off, stay still.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Callous, adj. Gifted with great fortitude to bear the evils afflicting another.
Ambrose Bierce (The Devil's Dictionary)
Abilene (AB-a-lene) adj. Descriptive of the pleasing coolness on the reverse side of the pillow.
Douglas Adams (The Deeper Meaning of Liff)
in•fi•nite (ˈinfənit) adj. 1. The state of not knowing where one body ends and another begins: Our joy is infinite.
Nicola Yoon (Everything, Everything)
transient, adj. In school, the year was the marker. Fifth grade. Senior year of high school. Sophomore year of college. Then after, the jobs were the marker. That office, this desk. But now that school is over and I've been working at the same desk for longer than I can truly believe, I realize: You have become the marker. This is your era. And it's only if it goes on and on that I will have to look for other ways to identify the time.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
ABOMINABLE, adj. The quality of another's opinions.
Ambrose Bierce (Collected Works: The Devil's Dictionary, Fantastic Fables and More! (18 Works))
solipsistic, adj. Go ahead, I thought. Go ahead. Go ahead. I got stuck there. Go ahead. Go ahead. Because I genuinely couldn't see anything after that.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
arduous, adj. Sometimes during sex, I wish there was a button on the small of your back that I could press and cause you to be done with it already.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
ALONE, adj. In bad company.
Ambrose Bierce (The Devil's Dictionary)
fem·i·nist   n. a person who supports feminism.   adj. of, relating to, or supporting feminism: feminist literature.  late 19th cent.: from French féministe, from Latin femina 'woman'.
Oxford University Press (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
flagrant, adj. I would be standing right there, and you would walk out of the bathroom without putting the cap back on the toothpaste.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Sesquihoral (adj.) Lasting an hour and a half. Because sometimes you just don’t feel like saying “an hour and a half.” Short-thinker
Ammon Shea (Reading the Oxford English Dictionary: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages)
Monodynamic (adj.) Having only a single talent. The technical word to describe a one-trick pony. Moreish
Ammon Shea (Reading the Oxford English Dictionary: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages)
Unasinous (adj.) Being equal to another in stupidity. If you are uncertain how one might use this word, just think of any two political parties. also
Ammon Shea (Reading the Oxford English Dictionary: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages)
AUTHENTIC, adj. Indubitably true — in somebody's opinion.
Ambrose Bierce (The Devil's Dictionary)
Cartesian,adj. Relating to Descartes, a famous philosopher, author of the celebrated dictum, Cogito ergo sum- whereby he was pleased to suppose he demonstrated the reality of human existence. The dictum might be improved, however, thus: Cogito cogito ergo sum- 'I think I think, therefore I think that I am'; as close an approach to certainty as any philosopher has yet made.
Ambrose Bierce (The Devil's Dictionary)
Imperceptible, adj. We stopped counting our relationship in dates (first date, second date, fifth, date, seventh) and started counting it in months. That might have been the first true commitment, this shift in terminology. We never talked about it, but we were at a party and someone asked how long we`d been together, and when you said, "A month and a half,” I knew we had gotten there.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Adj hát vetkőzni most erőt, érezni e kevés időre magamat s a világot, te nagy igazság, szeretet s még nagyobb igazság, fájdalom. Te adj a szemeimre könnyet, mert könny nélkül én csak nem-látó, vak vagyok.
Dezső Kosztolányi
fraught, adj. Does every “I love you” deserve an “I love you too”? Does every kiss deserve a kiss back? Does every night deserve to be spent on a lover? If the answer to any of these is “No,” what do we do?
Anonymous
Supervacaneous (adj.) Vainly added over and above what is needed. This word is in some way an example of itself, a redundant way of saying redundant, with a touch of vanity thrown in for good measure. Surfeited
Ammon Shea (Reading the Oxford English Dictionary: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages)
ABRUPT, adj. Sudden, without ceremony, like the arrival of a cannon- shot and the departure of the soldier whose interests are most affected by it. Dr. Samuel Johnson beautifully said of another author's ideas that they were "concatenated without abruption.
Ambrose Bierce (The Devil's Dictionary)
Preantepenult (adj.) Not the last, not the one before the last, and not the one before the one before the last. The next one. A sterling example of how it often can be far more confusing to use one word than several. It is far easier to say “the third from the last” than preantepenult. Prend
Ammon Shea (Reading the Oxford English Dictionary: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages)
indelible, adj. That first night, you took your finger and pointed to the top of my head, then traced a line between my eyes, down my nose, over my lips, my chin, my neck, to the center of my chest. It was so surprising, I knew I would never mimic it. That one gesture would be yours forever.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
arcane, adj. It was Joanna who noticed it first. We were over at her house for dinner, and she said something about being able to see the woman across the street doing yoga in the mornings, and how strange it looked when you were watching it from afar. “So how is Miss Torso doing?” you asked. And I said, “Perhaps we should ask the pianist.” Joanna just looked at us and said, “It used to be that you each had your own strange, baffling references. And now you have them together.” People often say that when couples are married for a long time, they start to look alike. I don’t believe that. But I do believe their sentences start to look alike.
David Levithan
OBSOLETE, adj. No longer used by the timid. Said chiefly of words. A word which some lexicographer has marked obsolete is ever thereafter an object of dread and loathing to the fool writer, but if it is a good word and has no exact modern equivalent equally good, it is good enough for the good writer. Indeed, a writer's attitude toward "obsolete" words is as true a measure of his literary ability as anything except the character of his work. A dictionary of obsolete and obsolescent words would not only be singularly rich in strong and sweet parts of speech; it would add large possessions to the vocabulary of every competent writer who might not happen to be a competent reader.
Ambrose Bierce (The Unabridged Devil's Dictionary)
Redeless (adj.) Not knowing what to do in an emergency. Redeless has a variety of meanings, but this is the one that speaks to me the most. In yet another case of the rare thing enjoying a common word and vice versa, it is interesting to note that redeless has largely (or entirely) fallen by the linguistic wayside, while savoir faire (which originally meant “knowing what to do in an emergency”) has survived. Redonation
Ammon Shea (Reading the Oxford English Dictionary: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages)
Kinetic, adj. Joanna asked me to describe you, and I said, “Kinetic.” We were both surprised by this respond. Usually, with a date, it was “I don`t know… cool” or “Not that bad” or, at highest level of excitement, “Maybe it will work out.” But there was something about you that made me think of sparks and motion. I still see that now. Less when we`re alone. More when we`re with other people. When you`re surrounded by life. Reaching out to t, gathering energy.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
daunting, adj. Really, we should use this more as a verb. You daunted me, and I daunted you. Or would it be that I was daunted by you and you were daunted by me? That sounds better. it daunted me that you were so beautiful, that you were so ate ease in social situations, as if every room was heliotropic, with you at the center. And I guess it daunted you that I had so many more friends than you, that I could put words together like this, on paper, and could sometimes conjure a certain sense out of things. The key is to never recognize these imbalances. To not let the dauntingness daunt us.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Makeshift, adj. I had always thought there were two types of people: the helpless and the fixers. Since I`d always been in the first group, calling my landlord whenever the faucet dripped, I was hoping you`d be a fixer. But once we moved it together, I realized there is a third group: the inventors. You possessed only a vague notion of hot to fix things, but that doesn`t stop you from using bubble gum as a sealant, or trying to create ouchless mousetraps out of peanut-butter crackers, a hollowed-out Dustbuster, and a picture of a scarecrow torn out of a magazine fashion spread, Things rarely get fixed the way they need to be.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Fish sticks are without a doubt the most disgusting things ever created. Regular fish is bad enough, but fish sticks … well, they raise disgustingness to an entirely new level. It’s like they exist just to make us writers come up with new words to describe them, since the old words just aren’t horrible enough. I’m thinking of using crapaflapnasti. Definition of “crapaflapnasti”: “Adj. Used to describe an item that is as disgusting as fish sticks.” (Note: This word can only be used to describe fish sticks themselves, as nothing has yet been found that is equally crapaflapnasti. Though the unclean, moldy, cluttered space under Brandon Sanderson’s bed comes close.)
Brandon Sanderson (The Knights of Crystallia (Alcatraz, #3))
MAD, adj. Affected with a high degree of intellectual independence; not conforming to standards of thought, speech and action derived by the conformants from study of themselves; at odds with the majority; in short, unusual. It is noteworthy that persons are pronounced mad by officials destitute of evidence that themselves are sane. For illustration, this present (and illustrious) lexicographer is no firmer in the faith of his own sanity than is any inmate of any madhouse in the land; yet for aught he knows to the contrary, instead of the lofty occupation that seems to him to be engaging his powers he may really be beating his hands against the window bars of an asylum and declaring himself Noah Webster, to the innocent delight of many thoughtless spectators.
Ambrose Bierce (The Devil's Dictionary)
fuck VULGAR SLANG  v. [trans.] 1 have sexual intercourse with (someone).  [intrans.] (of two people) have sexual intercourse. 2 ruin or damage (something).  n. an act of sexual intercourse.  [with adj.] a sexual partner.  exclam. used alone or as a noun (the fuck) or a verb in various phrases to express anger, annoyance, contempt, impatience, or surprise, or simply for emphasis.    go fuck yourself an exclamation expressing anger or contempt for, or rejection of, someone.  not give a fuck (about) used to emphasize indifference or contempt.    fuck around spend time doing unimportant or trivial things.  have sexual intercourse with a variety of partners.  (fuck around with) meddle with.  fuck off [usu. in imperative] (of a person) go away.  fuck someone over treat someone in an unfair or humiliating way.  fuck someone up damage or confuse someone emotionally.  fuck something up (or fuck up) do something badly or ineptly.   fuck·a·ble adj.  early 16th cent.: of Germanic origin (compare Swedish dialect focka and Dutch dialect fokkelen); possibly from an Indo-European root meaning 'strike', shared by Latin pugnus 'fist'.   Despite the wideness and proliferation of its use in many sections of society, the word fuck remains (and has been for centuries) one of the most taboo words in English. Until relatively recently, it rarely appeared in print; even today, there are a number of euphemistic ways of referring to it in speech and writing, e.g., the F-word, f***, or fk. fuck·er  n. VULGAR SLANG a contemptible or stupid person (often used as a general term of abuse). fuck·head  n. VULGAR SLANG a stupid or contemptible person (often used as a general term of abuse). fuck·ing  adj. [attrib.] & adv. [as submodifier] VULGAR SLANG used for emphasis or to express anger, annoyance, contempt, or surprise. fuck-me  adj. VULGAR SLANG (of clothing, esp. shoes) inviting or perceived as inviting sexual interest. fuck-up  n. VULGAR SLANG a mess or muddle.  a person who has a tendency to make a mess of things. fuck·wit  n. CHIEFLY BRIT., VULGAR SLANG a stupid or contemptible person (often used as a general term of abuse). fu·coid
Oxford University Press (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
Word For The Day PICAYUNE (PIK uh yoon’) adj. Trivial or petty, small or small-minded.
Deb Baker (Murder Passes the Buck (Gertie Johnson, #1))
antsy, adj. I swore I would never take you to the opera again.
David Levithan
Defunct, adj. You brought home a typewriter for me.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
Ersatz, adj. Sometimes we`d go to a party and I would feel like an artificial boyfriend, a placeholder, a boyfriend-shaped space where a charming person should be. Those were the only times when my love for you couldn`t overcome my shyness. And every degree of disappointment I`d feel from you – whether real or of my own invention – would make me disappear further and further, leaving the fake front to not, to sip, to say, “Finish drinking, we are leaving.
David Levithan (The Lover's Dictionary)
lud • i • cra • thet • ic \lú-dǝ-krǝ-thé-tik\ adj. : A combination of ludicrous and apathetic, describing a state in which the divinely ridiculous has become so commonplace that it is no longer of special interest or compelling.
Anonymous (Embracing Obscurity: Becoming Nothing in Light of God's Everything: Becoming Nothing in Light of God's Everything)
placid, adj. Sometimes I love it when we just lie on our backs, gaze off, stay still...
David Levithan
and recrimination.  late 17th cent.: from early modern Dutch (denoting a mythical whirlpool supposed to exist in the Arctic Ocean, west of Norway), from maalen 'grind, whirl' + stroom 'stream'. mae·nad   n. (in ancient Greece) a female follower of Bacchus, traditionally associated with divine possession and frenzied rites.   mae·nad·icadj.  late 16th cent.: via Latin from Greek Mainas, Mainad-, from mainesthai 'to rave'. ma·es·to·so [MUSIC]   adv. & adj. (esp. as a direction) in a majestic manner.   n. (pl.-sos) a movement or passage marked to be performed in this way.  Italian, 'majestic', based on Latin majestas 'majesty'. maes·tro   n. (pl.maes·tri or maes·tros) a distinguished musician, esp. a conductor of classical music.  a great or distinguished figure in any sphere: a movie maestro.  early 18th cent.: Italian, 'master', from Latin magister.
Oxford University Press (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
or undertaking, esp. to pay a debt.  a person who fails to complete a course of medical treatment. de·fea·sance   n. [LAW] the action or process of rendering something null and void.  a clause or condition which, if fulfilled, renders a deed or contract null and void.  late Middle English (as a legal term): from Old French defesance, from defaire, desfaire 'undo' (see DEFEAT). Linked entries: DEFEAT de·fea·si·ble   adj. [CHIEFLY LAW] [PHILOSOPHY] open in principle to revision, valid objection, forfeiture, or annulment.   de·fea·si·bil·i·tyn.de·fea·si·blyadv.  Middle English: via Anglo-Norman French from the stem of Old French desfesant 'undoing' (see also DEFEASANCE).
Oxford University Press (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
APODICTICAL  (APODI'CTICAL)   adj.[from    evident truth; demonstration.]Demonstrative; evident beyond contradiction. Holding an apodictical knowledge, and an assured knowledge of it; verily, to persuade their apprehensions otherwise, were to make Euclid believe, that there were more than one centre in
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ANTHELMINTHICK  (ANTHELMI'NTHICK)   adj.[   against, and eklimho, a worm.]That which kills worms.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
Az életnek, a priori, semmi értelme nincs (…), a te dolgod, hogy értelmet adj neki, és az érték semmi más, mint az értelem, melyet választottál.
Sartre Jean-Paul
Amikor a világnak esőre volt szüksége, a rabbik tanuló ifjakat küldtek hozzá [Hananhoz], s azok megragadták köntösének szegélyét, és azt mondták neki, „Abba, Abba, adj nekünk esőt!” Ő így szólt Istenhez: „Mindenség Ura, tégy szívességet azoknak, akik nem tudják megkülönböztetni Abbát, aki esőt ad, az Abbától, aki nem tud esőt adni.” Erre eleredt az eső. Babilóniai Talmud 23a-b
Géza Vermes (Christian Beginnings: From Nazareth to Nicaea, AD 30–325)
sen·ten·tious adj. given to moralizing in a pompous or affected manner:
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
fub·sy adj. (fub·si·er, fub·si·est) BRIT., INFORMAL fat and squat.
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
ACCOSTABLE  (ACCO'STABLE)   adj.[from accost.]Easy of access; familiar. They were both indubitable, strong, and high-minded men, yet of sweet and accostable nature, almost equally delighting in the press and affluence of dependents and suitors.Wotton.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ACTUOSE  (ACTUO'SE)   adj.[from act.]That which hath strong powers of action; a word little used.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ABSONANT  (A'BSONANT)   adj.[See ABSONOUS.]Contrary to reason, wide from the purpose.   ABSONOUS  (A'BSONOUS)   adj.[absonus, Lat. ill-sounding.]Absurd, contrary to reason.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ABSTRICTED  (ABSTRI'CTED)   part. adj.[abstrictus, Lat.] Unbound.Dict.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ANTICHACHECTICK  (ANTICHACHE'CTICK)   adj.[from    against, and j  a bad habit.]Things adapted to the cure of a bad constitution.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ANTICK  (A'NTICK)   adj.[probably from antiquus, ancient, as things out of use appear old.]Odd; ridiculously wild; buffoon in gesticulation. What! dares
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
To ADDLE  (A'DDLE)   v.a.[from addle, adj.]To make addle; to corrupt; to make barren. This is also evidenced in eggs, whereof the sound ones sink, and such as are addled swim; as do also those that are termed hypenemiæ, or wind-eggs.Brown’sVulgar Errours,b. iv.   To ADDLE  (To A'DDLE)   v.n.To grow; to encrease. Obsolete. Where ivy embraceth the tree very sore,Kill ivy, else tree will addle no more.Tusser’sHusbandry.   
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
a·vun·cu·lar adj. 1 of or relating to an uncle. kind and friendly toward a younger or less experienced person:
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
To ACCUMB  (ACCU'MB)   v.a.[accumbo, Lat.] To lie at the table, according to the ancient manner.Dict.   ACCUMBENT  (ACCU'MBENT)   adj.[accumbens, Lat.]Leaning. The Roman recumbent, or, more properly, accumbent posture in eating, was introduced after the first Punic war.Arbuthnoton Coins.   
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
AFFABLE  (A'FFABLE)   adj.[affable, Fr. affabilis, Lat.]1. Easy of manners; accostable; courteous; complaisant. It is used of superiours. He was affable, and both well and fair spoken,
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
commandant. late 17th century: from French commandant, or Italian or Spanish commandante, all from late Latin commandare ‘to command’ (see COMMAND). command-driven adj. [COMPUTING] (of a program or computer) operated by means of commands keyed in by the user or issued by another program or computer. command economy n. another term for PLANNED ECONOMY. commandeer v. [with obj.] officially take possession or control of (something), especially for military purposes: a nearby house had been commandeered by the army. take possession of (something) by force: the truck was commandeered by a mob. [with obj. and infinitive] enlist (someone) to help in a task: he commandeered the men to find a table. early 19th century: from Afrikaans kommandeer, from Dutch commanderen, from French commander ‘to command’ (see COMMAND).
Angus Stevenson (Oxford Dictionary of English)
APERITIVE  (APE'RITIVE)   adj.[from aperio, Lat. to open.]That which has the quality of opening the excrementious passages of the body.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
APERT  (APE'RT)   adj.[apertus, Lat.]Open.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
Gyors halált adj, Istenem, ha úgy döntöttél, hogy magadhoz szólítasz! – fohászkodott alig hallhatóan. A sebészek pengéitől ments meg, uram!
Csikász Lajos (A kuruc király (A félhold alkonya, #2))
bi·sex·u·al   adj. sexually attracted to both men and women.  [BIOLOGY] having characteristics of both sexes.   n. a person who is sexually attracted to both men and women.   bi·sex·u·al·i·tyn.
Oxford University Press (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
gas sta·tion   n. a service station. gas·sy   adj. (-si·er, -si·est) 1 of, like, or full of gas: the carbonated water has a gassy, soda-pop character;gassy planets like Jupiter. 2 INFORMAL (of people or language) inclined to be verbose: a long and gassy book. 3 (of people) flatulent.   gas·si·nessn. Gast·ar·beit·er   n. (pl. same or -beit·ers) German term for GUEST WORKER.  German, from Gast 'guest' + Arbeiter 'worker'. Linked entries: GUEST WORKER gast·haus (also Gast·haus)  
Oxford University Press (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
Aussie (also Ozzie) n. & adj. informal term for AUSTRALIA or AUSTRALIAN.
Angus Stevenson (Oxford Dictionary of English)
Az Avraham Bogatir hét napjában Avraham elmeséli: egyszer megkérdezték a rabbijukat, mi a különbség az Ószövetség meg az Újszövetség között. A rabbi így válaszolt: „… A gojok prófétája azt mondja: Szeresd a te ellenségedet. A mi Tóránkban pedig ez áll: Ha éhes a te ellenséged, adj neki enni, ha szomjas, adj neki inni.
Spiró György
bloodroot (sense 1) early 17th century: from Algonquian poughkone. puce adj. of a dark red or purple-brown colour: his face was puce with rage and frustration. n. [mass noun] a dark red or purple-brown colour. late 18th
Angus Stevenson (Oxford Dictionary of English)
ob·scene   adj. (of the portrayal or description of sexual matters) offensive or disgusting by accepted standards of morality and decency:
Oxford University Press (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
To understand this, you need frist to Know some words which are formed from Arabic to English by me : 1- farcashize (V) : يُفركش 2- farcashization (N) : الفركشة 3- farcashized/farcashizational (Adj) : مُفركش 4- farcashizationally (Adv) : مُفركشآ The logic of the dating does not express the relationship, it is the relationship, otherwise the time that I spend with special someone is a neutral phenomenon and the observation of the neutral phenomenon in the term of the relationships changes its nature. Like every single Sudanese man, I know that I would like to be a one-man multinational fashion phenomenon but to be described as farcashizational man by some students is something I don't expect it at all. The phenomenon of farcashization becomes a part of Sudanese girl's speech, unfortunately it is like gossiping, I was chicken-hearted when my closed friend told me that many female students at EDC said that we were in love together and then you were farcashized by me. At that time we were laughing but deeply inside myself, an idea was rambling which was "maybe I am one of their desires" because when one has achieved the object of one's desires, it is evident that one's real desire was not the ignorant possession of the desired object but to know it as possessed as actually contemplated as within one, so maybe I was farcashizationally farcashized by my friend in thier mind as a wish that the same thing to be done with me by them and that leads to say "girls are dangerous creatures especially when they are your students". When there is both love and friendship, we dwell in the realm of the relationship and when there is neither love nor friendship, we exist in a vacuity of relationships, we can feel and we can express feelings but the more we feel, the further off we are, so what is not yet felt can't be shown and what is already desired can't be hidden so farcashization and desire are not distant, it's their principle that can't be seen. It would be a very naive sort of dogmatism to assume that every beautiful girl is an impossible creature to be got or to accept the man as he is and she is always going to embarrass and farcashize him, as if she is an indocile black wild cat, the beautiful girl is not a unique and homogeneous but she is immensely diversified, having as many different schemes and patterns as there are different ways of beauty, so the phenomenons which we find in our certain relationships such as farcashization are not transferable with all people but the attitude of the relationship, therefore the dating of two people is like the contact of two chemical substances, if there is any reaction between them depending on that attitude, both are transformed. Finally there is no relationship between any two partners looks like what we really see, yours doesn't, mine doesn't and people are much more complicated than what we imagine, then their relationships are more perplexing too, so you can't judge any relationship according the actions of the relationship's partners, it is true of every relation.
Omer Mohamed
paraveredus, from Greek para ‘beside, extra’ + Latin veredus ‘light horse’. Palgrave Francis Turner (1824–97), English critic and poet, known for his anthology The Golden Treasury of Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language (1861). Pali n. [mass noun] an Indic language, closely related to Sanskrit, in which the sacred texts of southern Buddhism are written. Pali developed in northern India in the 5th–2nd centuries BC. adj. relating to Pali. from Pali pāli(-bhāsā) ‘canonical texts’. pali n. (pl. same or palis) (in Hawaii) a cliff. Hawaiian. palilalia
Angus Stevenson (Oxford Dictionary of English)
dis·pir·it   v. [trans.] (often be dispirited) cause (someone) to lose enthusiasm or hope: the army was dispirited by the uncomfortable winter conditions | [as adj.] (dispiriting) it was a dispiriting occasion.   dis·pir·it·ed·lyadv.dis·pir·it·ed·nessn.dis·pir·it·ing·lyadv.
Oxford University Press (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
EUrotic, adj. 1. A psychological condition characterized by episodes of complete divorcement from reality; 2. A strong sexual attraction to political power.
Ted Seay
  Word For The Day BOONDOGGLE (BOON dahg’uhl) n. A pointless project. Work of no value, done merely to appear busy. Alternate Word ICKY (IK ee) adj. Very distasteful; disgusting.
Deb Baker (Murder Talks Turkey (Gertie Johnson, #3))
oliente adj. Que huele o exhala olor.
Real Academia Española (Diccionario de la lengua española)
dispéptico, ca (Del gr. δύσπεπτος, que digiere mal). 1. adj. Perteneciente o relativo a la dispepsia. 2. adj. Enfermo de dispepsia. U. t. c.
Real Academia Española (Diccionario de la lengua española)
orquidáceo, a (De Orchis, nombre de un género de plantas). 1. adj. Bot. Se dice de las hierbas angiospermas monocotiledóneas vivaces, de hojas radicales y envainadoras, con flores de forma y coloración muy raras, fruto en cápsula y semillas sin albumen, y raíz con dos tubérculos elipsoidales y simétricos; p. ej., el compañón de perro, el satirión y la vainilla.
Real Academia Española (Diccionario de la lengua española)
built-in adj. forming an integral part of a structure: a worktop with a built-in cooker. (of a characteristic) inherent; innate: the system has a built-in resistance to change.
Amazon Dictionary Account (Oxford Dictionary of English)
connection or cooperative link between people or organizations: he developed a close association with the university | the program was promoted in association with the Department of Music. - the action or state of becoming a member of an organization with subordinate status: [as adj.] Slovenia signed association agreements with the European Union. - [CHEMISTRY] the linking of molecules through hydrogen bonding or other interaction short
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
ANSATED  (A'NSATED)   adj.[ansatus, Lat.]Having handles; or something in the form of handles.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ANACAMPTICK  (ANACA'MPTICK)   adj.[   or reflected: an anacamptick sound, an echo; an anacamptick hill, a hill that produces an echo.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ANNIHILABLE  (ANNI'HILABLE)   adj.[from annihilate.]That which may be reduced to nothing; that which may be put out of existence.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ALTIVOLANT  (ALTI'VOLANT)   adj.[altivolans, Lat. from altus and volo.] High flying.Dict.  
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ANIENTED  (A'NIENTED)   adj.[anneantir, Fr.]Frustrated; brought to nothing.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
AMENTACEOUS  (AMENTA'CEOUS)   adj.[amentatus, Lat.]Hanging as by a thread. The pine tree hath amentaceous flowers or katkins.Miller.   
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
AMENABLE  (AME'NABLE)   adj.[amesnable, Fr. amener quelqu’un, in the French courts, signifies, to oblige one to appear to answer a charge exhibited against him.]Responsible; subject so as to be liable to enquiries or accounts.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ANGUST  (ANGU'ST)   adj.[angustus, Lat.] Narrow; strait.Dict.   ANGUSTATION  (ANGUSTA'TION)   n.s.[from angustus.]The act of making narrow; straitening; the state of being narrowed.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ALIQUANT  (A'LIQUANT)   adj.[aliquantus, Lat.]Parts of a number, which, however repeated, will never make up the number exactly; as, 3 is an aliquant of 10, thrice 3 being 9, four times 3 making 12.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ALDERLIEVEST  (ALDERLI'EVEST)   adj. superl.[from ald, alder, old, elder, and lieve, dear, beloved.]Most beloved; which has held the longest possession of the heart. The mutual conference that my mind hath had,By day, by night, waking, and in my dreams,In courtly company, or at my beads,With you, mine alderlievest sovereign;Makes me the bolder to salute my kingWith ruder terms.Shakesp.Henry VI. p.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
cane n. 1 the hollow, jointed stem of a tall grass, esp. bamboo or sugar cane, or the stem of a slender palm such as rattan. - any plant that produces such stems. - stems of bamboo, rattan, or wicker used as a material for making furniture or baskets: [as adj.] a cane coffee table. - short for SUGAR CANE. - a flexible, woody stem of the raspberry plant or any of its relatives. 2 a length of cane or a slender stick, esp. one used as a support for plants, as a walking stick, or as an instrument of punishment. (the cane) CHIEFLY BRIT. a form of corporal punishment used in certain schools, involving beating with a cane: wrong answers were rewarded by the cane.
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
ADJUTOR  (ADJU'TOR)   n.s.[adjutor, Lat.] A helper.Dict.   ADJUTORY  (ADJU'TORY)   adj.[adjutorius, Lat.] That which helps.Dict.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ADMINICLE  (ADMI'NICLE)   n.s.[adminiculum, Lat.] Help; support; furtherance.Dict.   ADMINICULAR  (ADMINI'CULAR)   adj.[from adminiculum, Lat.] That which gives help.Dict.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ADESPOTICK  (ADESPO'TICK)   adj. Not absolute; not despotick.Dict.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
AGHAST  (AGHA'ST)   adj.[either the participle of agaze,(see AGAZE)  and then to be written agazed, or agast,or from a and gast, a ghost, which the present orthography favours; perhaps they were originally different words.]Struck with horrour, as
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
AGMINAL  (A'GMINAL)   adj.[from agmen, Lat.] Belonging to a troop.Dict.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
quo·tid·i·an adj. [attrib.] of or occurring every day; daily: the car sped noisily off through the quotidian traffic. - ordinary or everyday, esp. when mundane: his story is an achingly human one, mired in quotidian details.
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
ACROAMATICAL  (ACROAMA'TICAL)   adj.[   Gr. I bear.]Of or pertaining to deep learning; the opposite of exoterical.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ADVENIENT  (ADVE'NIENT)   adj.[adveniens, Lat.]Advening; coming from outward causes; superadded.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ADVENTINE  (ADVE'NTINE)   adj.[from advenio, adventum.]Adventitious; that which is extrinsically added; that which comes from outward causes: a word scarcely in use. As for the peregrine heat, it is thus far true, that, if the proportion of the adventine heat be greatly predominant to the natural heat and spirits of the body, it tendeth to dissolution or notable alteration.Bacon’sNatural History,No 836.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ADVENTITIOUS  (ADVENTI'TIOUS)   adj.[adventitius, Lat.]That which advenes; accidental; supervenient; extrinsically added, not essentially inherent.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ABLUENT  (A'BLUENT)   adj.[abluens, Lat. from abluo, to wash away.]1. That which washes clean.2. That which has the power of cleansing.Dict.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ABASED  (ABA'SED)   adj.[with heralds] is a term used of the wings of eagles, when the top looks downwards towards the point of the shield; or when the wings are shut; the natural way of bearing them being spread with the top pointing to the chief of the angle.Bailey.Chambers.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
ABDITIVE  (A'BDITIVE)   adj.[from abdo, to hide.] That which has the power or quality of hiding.Dict.  
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
strabismic adj. late 17th century: modern Latin, from Greek strabismos, from
Angus Stevenson (Oxford Dictionary of English)
  ABUNDANT  (ABU'NDANT)   adj.[abundans, Lat.]1. Plentiful. Good the moreCommunicated, more abundant grows;The author not impair’d, but honour’d more.Par. Lost,b. v.2.
Samuel Johnson (A Dictionary of the English Language (Complete and Unabridged in Two Volumes), Volume One)
come/bring to a standstill erlịscht [εəˈlI∫t] 3. pers sing pres von erlöschen erlogen [εəˈloːgn] adj not true pred; (= erfunden) made-up attr, made up pred; das ist erstunken und erlogen (inf) that's a rotten lie (inf) Erlös [εəˈløːs] m -es, -e [-zə] proceeds pl erlọ̈schen
Collins (Collins Concise German-English Dictionary (Collins Concise German Dictionary))
Starving (adj.)— When the only self-talk you gorge yourself on is ugly. —your beauty is so lush you could feast on it
Ashley Asti (The Moon and Her Sisters)
bedruggled adj. Describes the appearance
VIZ (Roger's Profanisaurus: Das Krapital)
perentorio, ria (Del lat. peremptorĭus). 1. adj. Se dice del último plazo que se concede, o de la resolución final que se toma en cualquier asunto. 2. adj. Concluyente, decisivo, determinante. 3. adj. Urgente, apremiante.
Real Academia Española (Diccionario de la lengua española)
ar·rant adj. [attrib.] DATED complete, utter: what arrant nonsense! Middle English: variant of ERRANT, originally in phrases such as arrant thief ('outlawed, roving thief'). Linked entries: ERRANT
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
a·bid·ing adj. [attrib.] (of a feeling or a memory) lasting a long time; enduring: he had an abiding respect for her. a·bid·ing·ly adv.
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
antepasado, da (Del part. de antepasar). 1. adj. Dicho de un período de tiempo: Anterior a otro tiempo pasado ya. 2. m. Ascendiente más o menos remoto de una persona o de un grupo de personas. U. m. en pl.
Real Academia Española (Diccionario de la lengua española)
[COMPUTING] change (a piece of text within a program) from being a comment to being part of the program that is run by the computer by removing tagging that identifies the text as a comment. un·com·mer·cial adj. not making, intended to make, or allowing a profit. not having profit as a primary aim: a seemingly uncommercial verse drama. un·com·mit·ted adj. not committed to a particular
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
pad (also launch·ing pad ) n. the area on which a rocket stands for launching, typically consisting of a platform with a supporting structure. launch ve·hi·cle n. a rocket-powered vehicle used to send artificial satellites or spacecraft into space. laun·der v. [trans.] wash, or wash and iron, (clothes or linens): he wasn't used to laundering his own bed linens | [as adj., with submodifier] (laundered) freshly laundered sheets. - conceal the origins of (money obtained illegally) by transfers involving foreign banks or legitimate businesses. - alter (information) to make it appear more acceptable: we began to notice
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
short for POET LAUREATE. ■ adj. POETIC/LITERARY wreathed with laurel as a mark of honor. (of a crown or wreath) consisting of laurel. lau·re·ate·ship n. late Middle English (as an adjective): from Latin laureatus, from laurea 'laurel wreath', from laurus 'laurel'. Linked entries: POET LAUREATE ■ Lau·rel a city in central Maryland, between Washington, DC, and Baltimore; pop. 19,960. lau·rel n. 1 any of a number of shrubs and other plants with dark green
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
late 18th cent. (in the general sense 'washing, a wash'): from French, from laver 'to wash'. la·va lamp n. a transparent electric lamp containing a viscous liquid in which a brightly colored waxy substance is suspended, rising and falling in irregular and constantly changing shapes. la·vash n. a Middle Eastern crisp flatbread. Armenian, from Turkish. lav·a·to·ri·al adj. of or relating to lavatories, in particular: - (of conversation or humor) characterized by undue reference to toilets and their use: the comic's lavatorial schoolboy humor. - resembling the style or
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
DATED used in reference to refinement or gentility: [as adj.] she had a certain lavender charm. 2 a pale blue color with a trace of mauve. ■ v. [trans.] perfume with lavender. Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French lavendre, based on medieval Latin lavandula. lav·en·der cot·ton (CHIEFLY BRIT. also cotton lavender) n. a small aromatic shrubby plant of the daisy family, with silvery or greenish lavenderlike foliage and yellow button flowers. Native to the Mediterranean area, it has insecticidal properties and is widely cultivated for garden plantings.  Genus Santolina, family Compositae: several species, in particular
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
la·ver 2 n. ARCHAIC or POETIC/LITERARY a basin or similar container used for washing oneself. (in biblical use) a large brass bowl for the ritual ablutions of Jewish priests. Middle English: from Old French laveoir, from late Latin lavatorium 'place for washing' (see LAVATORY). Linked entries: LAVATORY ■ lav·ish adj. sumptuously rich, elaborate, or luxurious: a lavish banquet. - (of a person) very generous or extravagant: he was lavish with his hospitality. - spent or given in profusion: lavish praise. See note at PROFUSE. ■ v. [trans.] (lavish something
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
fly·blow   n. flies' eggs contaminating food, esp. meat. fly·blown   adj. dirty or contaminated, esp. through contact with flies and their eggs and larvae: the room was filthy and flyblown.
Oxford University Press (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
pe·dan·tic adj. of or like a pedant: many of the essays are long, dense, and too pedantic to hold great appeal. pe·dan·ti·cal·ly adv.
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
She is afraid I will get lost.   Lost adj. 1. No longer known. 2. Unable to find the way. 3. Ruined or destroyed.   I’m afraid I already am.
Mary E. Pearson (The Adoration of Jenna Fox (Jenna Fox Chronicles, #1))
adv. ■ o·ver·ex·er·cise v. ■ o·ver·ex·ert v. ■ o·ver·ex·er·tion n. ■ o·ver·ex·pan·sion n. ■ o·ver·fa·tigue n. ■ o·ver·feed v.; -fed ■ o·ver·fond adj. ■ o·ver·fond·ly adv. ■ o·ver·fond·ness n. ■ o·ver·full adj. ■ o·ver·gen·er·ous adj. ■ o·ver·hast·y adj. ■ o·ver·im·ag·i·na·tive adj. ■ o·ver·large adj. ■ o·ver·op·ti·mism n. ■ o·ver·op·ti·mis·tic adj. ■ o·ver·op·ti·mis·ti·cal·ly adv.
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
cloy v. [trans.] [usu. as adj.] (cloying) disgust or sicken (someone) with an excess of sweetness, richness, or sentiment: a romantic, rather cloying story; a curious bittersweetness that cloyed her senses | [intrans.] the first long sip gives a malty taste that never cloys. cloy·ing·ly adv. late Middle English: shortening of obsolete accloy 'stop up, choke', from Old French encloyer 'drive a nail into', from medieval Latin inclavare, from clavus 'a nail'.
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
im·pe·cu·ni·ous adj. having little or no money: a titled but impecunious family.
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
ex·pi·ate v. [trans.] atone for (guilt or sin): their sins must be expiated by sacrifice. ex·pi·a·ble adj. ex·pi·a·tion n. ex·pi·a·tor n. ex·pi·a·to·ry adj. late 16th cent. (in the sense 'end (rage, sorrow, etc.) by suffering it to the full'): from Latin expiat- 'appeased by sacrifice', from the verb expiare, from ex- 'out' + piare (from pius 'pious').
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
educación o de buenos modales. inefabilidad (Del lat. ineffabilĭtas, -ātis). f. Cualidad de inefable. inefable (Del lat. ineffabĭlis, indecible). adj. Que no se puede explicar con palabras.
Real Academia Española (Diccionario de la lengua española)
con·tu·me·li·ous adj. ARCHAIC (of behavior) scornful and insulting; insolent.
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
un·der·cov·er adj. (of a person or their activities) involved in or involving secret work within a community or organization, esp. for the purposes of police investigation or espionage: an undercover police operation. ■ adv. as an undercover agent: a special unit of the police that operates undercover.
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
adj.
Erin McKean (The New Oxford American Dictionary)
ablaze adj. [predic.] burning fiercely: his clothes were ablaze | [as complement] farm buildings were set ablaze. very brightly coloured or lighted: New England is ablaze with color in autumn | FIGURATIVE his eyes were ablaze with anger.
Angus Stevenson (Oxford Dictionary of English)
bored 1   adj. feeling weary because one is unoccupied or lacks interest in one's current activity: she got bored with staring out of the window;they would hang around all day, bored stiff.
Oxford University Press (The New Oxford American Dictionary)