Zweig Stefan Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Zweig Stefan. Here they are! All 200 of them:

Time to leave now, get out of this room, go somewhere, anywhere; sharpen this feeling of happiness and freedom, stretch your limbs, fill your eyes, be awake, wider awake, vividly awake in every sense and every pore.
Stefan Zweig (The Post-Office Girl)
Nothing whets the intelligence more than a passionate suspicion, nothing develops all the faculties of an immature mind more than a trail running away into the dark.
Stefan Zweig (The Burning Secret and other stories)
The strength of a love is always misjudged if we evaluate it by its immediate cause and not the stress that went before it, the dark and hollow space full of disappointment and loneliness that precedes all the great events in the heart's history.
Stefan Zweig (The Burning Secret and other stories)
Only the person who has experienced light and darkness, war and peace, rise and fall, only that person has truly experienced life.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
Besides, isn't it confoundedly easy to think you're a great man if you aren't burdened with the slightest idea that Rembrandt, Beethoven, Dante or Napoleon ever lived?
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
No guilt is forgotten so long as the conscience still knows of it.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
All I know is that I shall be alone again. There is nothing more terrible than to be alone among human beings.
Stefan Zweig (Letter from an Unknown Woman: The Fowler Snared)
How terrible this darkness was, how bewildering, and yet mysteriously beautiful!
Stefan Zweig (The Burning Secret and other stories)
In chess, as a purely intellectual game, where randomness is excluded, - for someone to play against himself is absurd ... It is as paradoxical, as attempting to jump over his own shadow.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
We are happy when people/things conform and unhappy when they don't. People and events don't disappoint us, our models of reality do. It is my model of reality that determines my happiness or disappointments.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
Freedom is not possible without authority - otherwise it would turn into chaos and authority is not possible without freedom - otherwise it would turn into tyranny.
Stefan Zweig
For the more a man limits himself, the nearer he is on the other hand to what is limitless; it is precisely those who are apparently aloof from the world who build for themselves a remarkable and thoroughly individual world in miniature, using their own special equipment, termit-like.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
For I regard memory not as a phenomenon preserving one thing and losing another merely by chance, but as a power that deliberately places events in order or wisely omits them. Everything we forget about our own lives was really condemned to oblivion by an inner instinct long ago.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
For the first time in my life I began to realize that it is not evil and brutality, but nearly always weakness, that is to blame for the worst things that happen in this world.
Stefan Zweig
Wer einmal sich selbst gefunden, kann nichts auf dieser Welt mehr verlieren.
Stefan Zweig
Once a man has found himself there is nothing in this world that he can lose. And once he has understood the humanity in himself, he will understand all human beings.
Stefan Zweig (Fantastic Night & Other Stories)
In this instant, shaken to her very depths, this ecstatic human being has a first inkling that the soul is made of stuff so mysteriously elastic that a single event can make it big enough to contain the infinite.
Stefan Zweig (The Post-Office Girl)
She was at that crucial age when a women begins to regret having stayed faithful to a husband she never really loved, when the glowing sunset colors of her beauty offer her one last, urgent choice between maternal and feminine love. At such a moment a life that seemed to have chosen its course long ago is questioned once again, for the last time the magic compass needle of the will hovers between final resignation and the hope of erotic experience.
Stefan Zweig (The Burning Secret and other stories)
Yeryüzünde hiçbir şey insana hiçlik kadar baskı yapamaz
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
Formerly man had only a body and a soul. Now he needs a passport as well for without it he will not be treated like a human being.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
I hadn't had a book in my hands for four months, and the mere idea of a book where I could see words printed one after another, lines, pages, leaves, a book in which I could pursue new, different, fresh thoughts to divert me, could take them into my brain, had something both intoxicating and stupefying about it.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
Los libros sólo se escriben para, por encima del propio aliento, unir a los seres humanos, y así defendernos frente al inexorable reverso de toda existencia: la fugacidad y el olvido
Stefan Zweig (Mendel dei libri)
ولأول مرة في حياتي بدأت اتبين ان الضعف - لا الشر، ولا الوحشية - هو المسئول عن أسوأ الكوارث التي تقع في هذه الدنيا !
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
For this quiet, unprepossessing, passive man who has no garden in front of his subsidised flat, books are like flowers. He loves to line them up on the shelf in multicoloured rows: he watches over each of them with an old-fashioned gardener's delight, holds them like fragile objects in his thin, bloodless hands.
Stefan Zweig (The Post-Office Girl)
Even from the abyss of horror in which we try to feel our way today, half-blind, our hearts distraught and shattered, I look up again and again to the ancient constellations that shone on my childhood, comforting myself with the inherited confidence that, some day, this relapse will appear only an interval in the eternal rhythm of progress onward and upward.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
Art can bring us consolation as individuals,” he said, “but it is powerless against reality.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
People and events don't disappoint us, our models of reality do. It is my model of reality that determines my happiness or disappointments.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
There are two kinds of pity. One, the weak and sentimental kind, which is really no more than the heart's impatience to be rid as quickly as possible of the painful emotion aroused by the sight of another's unhappiness, that pity which is not compassion, but only an instinctive desire to fortify one's own soul agains the sufferings of another; and the other, the only one at counts, the unsentimental but creative kind, which knows what it is about and is determined to hold out, in patience and forbearance, to the very limit of its strength and even beyond.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
Aber jeder Schatten ist im letzen doch auch Kind des Lichts, und nur wer Helles und Dunkles, Krieg und Frieden, Aufstieg und Niedergang erfahren, nur der hat wahrhaft gelebt.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
Beware of pity.
Stefan Zweig
Being sent to bed is a terrible command to all children, because it means the most public possible humiliation in front of adults, the confession that they bear the stigma of childhood, of being small and having a child's need for sleep.
Stefan Zweig (The Burning Secret and other stories)
The more one limits oneself, the closer one is to the infinite; these people, as unworldly as they seem, burrow like termites into their own particular material to construct, in miniature, a strange and utterly individual image of the world
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
Mais je t'attendais, je t'attendais, je t'attendais comme mon destin...
Stefan Zweig (Brief einer Unbekannten)
It is never until one realizes that one means something to others that one feels there is any point or purpose in one’s own existence.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
He was, like everyone of a strongly erotic disposition, twice as good, twice as much himself when he knew that women liked him, just as many actors find their most ardent vein when they sense that they have cast their spell over the audience, the breathing mass of spectators before them.
Stefan Zweig (The Burning Secret and other stories)
Maybe everything’s not so hard, maybe life is so much easier than I thought, you just need courage, you just need to have a sense of yourself, then you’ll discover your hidden resources.
Stefan Zweig (The Post-Office Girl)
One only makes books in order to keep in touch with one's fellows after one has ceased to breath, and thus to defend oneself against the inexorable fate of all that lives - transitoriness and oblivion.
Stefan Zweig
Bütün yontulmamış varlıklarda olduğu gibi onda da gülünç bir kendini beğenmişlik vardı.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
وسعادتي بفهم الناس أكبر من سعادتي بالحكم عليهم
Stefan Zweig (Vingt-quatre heures de la vie d'une femme)
Plus un esprit se limite, plus il touche par ailleurs à l'infini.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
He was the kind of young man whose handsome face has brought him plenty of success in the past and is now ever-ready for a new encounter, a fresh-experience, always eager to set off into the unknown territory of a little adventure, never taken by surprise because he has worked out everything in advance and is waiting to see what happens, a man who will never overlook any erotic opportunity, whose first glance probes every woman's sensuality, and explores it, without discriminating between his friend's wife and the parlour-maid who opens the door to him. Such men are described with a certain facile contempt as lady-killers, but the term has a nugget of truthful observation in it, for in fact all the passionate instincts of the chase are present in their ceaseless vigilance: the stalking of the prey, the excitement and mental cruelty of the kill. They are constantly on the alert, always ready and willing to follow the trail of an adventure to the very edge of the abyss. They are full of passion all the time, but it is the passion of a gambler rather than a lover, cold, calculating and dangerous. Some are so persistent that their whole lives, long after their youth is spent, are made an eternal adventure by this expectation. Each of their days is resolved into hundreds of small sensual experiences - a look exchanged in passing, a fleeting smile, knees brushing together as a couple sit opposite each other - and the year, in its own turn, dissolves into hundreds of such days in which sensuous experience is the constantly flowing, nourishing, inspiring source of life.
Stefan Zweig (The Burning Secret and other stories)
A lame creature, a cripple like myself, has no right to love. How should I, broken, shattered being that I am, be anything but a burden to you, when to myself I am an object of disgust, of loathing. A creature such as I, I know, has no right to love, and certainly no right to be loved. It is for such a creature to creep away into a corner and die and cease to make other people's lives a burden with her presence.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
I realized that there was no point in denying oneself a pleasure because it was denied another, in refusing to allow oneself to be happy because someone else was unhappy.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
İnsan sabahtan akşama kadar bir şey olmasını bekler ve hiçbir şey olmaz. Bekleyip durur insan. Hiçbir şey olmaz. İnsan bekler, bekler, bekler, şakakları zonklayana dek düşünür, düşünür, düşünür. Hiçbir şey olmaz. İnsan yalnız kalır. Yalnız. Yalnız.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
But I see nothing miraculous about it. Nothing makes one as healthy as happiness, and there is no greater happiness than making someone else happy.
Stefan Zweig (Letter from an Unknown Woman and Other Stories)
They did nothing—other than subjecting us to complete nothingness. For, as is well known, nothing on earth puts more pressure on the human mind than nothing.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
Forget it all, I told myself, escape into your mind and your work, into the place where you are only your living, breathing self, not a citizen of any state, not a stake in that infernal game, the place where only what reason you have can still work to some reasonable effect in a world gone mad.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
We live through myriads of seconds, yet it is always one, just one, that casts our entire inner world into turmoil, the second when (as Stendhal has described it) the internal inflorescence, already steeped in every kind of fluid, condenses and crystallizes—a magical second, like the moment of generation, and like that moment concealed in the warm interior of the individual life, invisible, untouchable, beyond the reach of feeling, a secret experienced alone. No algebra of the mind can calculate it, no alchemy of premonition divine it, and it can seldom perceive itself.
Stefan Zweig (Confusion)
Lightly, caressingly, Marie Antoinette picked up the crown as a gift. She was still too young to know that life never gives anything for nothing, and that a price is always exacted for what fate bestows. She did not think she would have to pay a price. She simply accepted the rights of her royal position and performed no duties in exchange. She wanted to combine two things which are, in actual human experience, incompatible; she wanted to reign and at the same time to enjoy.
Stefan Zweig (Marie Antoinette: The Portrait of an Average Woman)
İnsanların arasında yalnız olmaktan daha korkunç bir şey yoktur.
Stefan Zweig (Brief einer Unbekannten)
Once more my pity had been stronger than my will.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
Moi qui pour mon malheur ai toujours eu une curiosité passionnée pour les choses de l'esprit...
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
He sensed the presence of death, he sensed the presence of undying love: something broke open inside him, and he thought of the invisible woman, incorporeal and passionate, as one might think of distant music.
Stefan Zweig (The Collected Stories of Stefan Zweig)
En la vida, los destinos están casi siempre separados: quienes comprenden no son los ejecutores, y quienes actúan no comprenden.
Stefan Zweig
For the more a man restricts himself the closer he is, conversely, to infinity.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
لا يمكن أن أصف لك مرارتي ويأسي، لكنك تستطيع أن تتخيل ما شعرت به: ألا تكون في نظر إنسان منحتَه كل حياتك، أكثر من ذبابة تهُشها يدٌ كسلى بضجر.
Stefan Zweig (Vingt-quatre heures de la vie d'une femme)
Exalt yourself by devoting yourself to others, enrich yourself by making everyone’s destiny your own, by enduring and understanding every facet of human suffering through your pity.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
A first premonition of the rich variety of life had come to him; for the first time he thought he had understood the nature of human beings - they needed each other even when they appeared hostile, and it was very sweet to be loved by them.
Stefan Zweig (The Burning Secret and other stories)
We who have been hunted through the rapids of life, torn from our former roots, always driven to the end and obliged to begin again, victims and yet also the willing servants of unknown mysterious powers, we for whom comfort has become an old legend and security, a childish dream, have felt tension from pole to pole of our being, the terror of something always new in every fibre. Every hour of our years was linked to the fate of the world. In sorrow and in joy we have lived through time and history far beyond our own small lives, while they knew nothing beyond themselves. Every one of us, therefore, even the least of the human race, knows a thousand times more about reality today than the wisest of our forebears. But nothing was given to us freely; we paid the price in full.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
Yapacak, duyacak, görecek hiçbir şey yoktu, her yerde ve sürekli hiçlikle çevriliydi insan, boyuttan ve zamandan tümüyle yoksun, boşlukta.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
لكني منذ تلك الساعة تبينت أنه ما من إثم يمكن ان يطويه النسيان .. ما دام ضمير صاحبه يذكره .!
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
Yaşlanmak, geçmişten artık korku duymuyor olmaktan başka bir şey değil zaten.
Stefan Zweig (Bir Kadının Yaşamından 24 Saat - Bir Yüreğin Ölümü)
But theoretical, imagined suffering is not what distresses a man and destroys his peace of mind. Only what you have seen with pitying eyes can really shake you.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
She could be lively only in the midst of life; in isolation she dwindled to a shadow.
Stefan Zweig (The Collected Stories of Stefan Zweig)
دائما ما نخطئ في تقدير قوة الحب لأننا نقيمه بأثره الحالي فقط ، لا بالتوتر الذي زال عند قدومه ، ثمة فضاء مظلم خاوٍ تملؤه الوحدة و اليأس يسبق كل الأحداث الرائعة في تاريخ القلب
Stefan Zweig (Burning Secret)
There’s an inherent limit to the stress that any material can bear. Water has its boiling point, metals their melting points. The elements of the spirit behave the same way. Happiness can reach a pitch so great that any further happiness can’t be felt. Pain, despair, humiliation, disgust, and fear are no different. Once the vessel is full, the world can’t add to it.
Stefan Zweig (The Post-Office Girl)
...διάβαζε με τον τρόπο που άλλοι προσεύχονται, που οι παίκτες παίζουν κι οι μεθυσμένοι στυλώνουν ναρκωμένοι τα μάτια στο κενό. Διάβαζε με μια τόσο συγκινητική κατάνυξη, που έκτοτε κάθε άλλος άνθρωπος που διαβάζει πάντα μου μοιάζει βέβηλος... Ο Παλαιοβιβλιοπώλης Μέντελ
Stefan Zweig
ولا بد دائماً أن تنسرب الملايين من الساعات في تاريخ العالم هدراً، قبل أن تظهر إلى حيز الوجود ساعة تاريخية حقاً، ساعة حاسمة من ساعات البشرية
Stefan Zweig (Twenty Four Hours in the Life of a Woman & The Royal Game)
My today and each of my yesterdays, my rises and falls, are so diverse that I sometimes feel as if I had lived not one, but several existences, each one different from the others.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
It is only the immeasurable, the limitless that terrifies us. That which is set within defined, fixed limits is a challenge to our powers, comes to be the measure of our strength.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
Shaken to the depths of your soul, you know that day and night someone is waiting for you, thinking of you, longing and sighing for you - a woman, a stranger. She wants, she demands, she desires you with every fiber of her being, with her body, with her blood. She wants your hands, your hair, your lips, your night and your day, your emotions, your senses, and all your thought and dreams. She wants to share everything with you, to take everything from you, and to draw it in with her breath. Henceforth, day and night, whether you are awake or asleep, there is somewhere in the world a being who is feverish and wakeful and who waits for you, and you are the centre of her waking and her dreaming. It is in vain that you try not to think of her, of her who thinks always of you, in vain that you seek to escape, for you no longer dwell in yourself, but in her. Of a sudden a stranger bears your image within her as though she were a moving mirror - no, not a mirror, for that merely drinks in your image when you offer yourself willingly to it, whereas she, the woman, this stranger who loves you, she has absorbed you into her very blood.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
Our decisions are to a much greater extent dependent on our desire to conform to the standards of our class and environment than we are inclined to admit. A considerable proportion of our reasoning is merely an automatic function, so to speak, of influences and impressions which have become part of us...
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
But love truly becomes love only when, no longer an embryo developing painfully in the darkness of the body, it ventures to confess itself with lips and breath. However hard it tries to remain a chrysalis, a time comes when the intricate tissue of the cocoon tears, and out it falls, dropping from the heights to the farthest depths, falling with redoubled force into the startled heart.
Stefan Zweig (Journey into the Past)
But is it not already an insult to call chess anything so narrow as a game? Is it not also a science, an art, hovering between these categories like Muhammad's coffin between heaven and earth, a unique yoking of opposites, ancient and yet eternally new, mechanically constituted and yet an activity of the imagination alone, limited to a fixed geometric area but unlimited in its permutations, constantly evolving and yet sterile, a cogitation producing nothing, a mathematics calculating nothing, an art without an artwork, an architecture without substance and yet demonstrably more durable in its essence and actual form than all books and works, the only game that belongs to all peoples and all eras, while no one knows what god put it on earth to deaden boredom, sharpen the mind, and fortify the spirit?
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
I had learned and written too much history not to know that the great masses always and at once respond to the force of gravity in the direction of the powers that be. I knew that the same voices which yelled “Heil Schuschnigg” today would thunder “Heil Hitler” tomorrow.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
Söz konusu başkalarının derdi olunca nasıl da daha zeki, daha nesnel oluruz.
Stefan Zweig (Amok Koşucusu)
In medicine the use of the knife is often the kinder course.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
Celui qui n'est pas passionné devient tout au plus un pédagogue; c'est toujours par l'intérieur qu'il faut aller aux choses, toujours, toujours en partant de la passion.
Stefan Zweig (La Confusion des sentiments)
in the general throng, many a fool receives decorations and titles.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday: Memoirs of a European)
Toutes nos créations originales et puissantes sont le fruit d'une concentration, d'une monomanie sublime, proche de la folie.
Stefan Zweig (Angst)
¿Para qué vivimos, si el viento tras nuestros zapatos ya se está llevando nuestras últimas huellas?
Stefan Zweig
But since those days in Vienna I had been aware that Austria was lost, not yet suspecting, to be sure, how much I had lost thereby.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
Bir insan kendisini bulduktan sonra, onun bu dünyada kaybedebileceği hiçbir şey yoktur. Ve o kişi kendi içindeki insanlığı anladıktan sonra, bütün insanları anlayacaktır.
Stefan Zweig (Olağanüstü Bir Gece)
Bize hiçbir şey yapmadılar, bizi tümüyle hiçliğin içine yerleştirdiler, çünkü bilindiği gibi yeryüzünde hiçbir şey insan ruhuna hiçlik kadar baskı yapmaz.
Stefan Zweig
I will tell you the whole story of my life, and it is a life that truly began only on the day I met you. Before that, there was nothing but murky confusion into which my memory never dipped again, some kind of cellar full of dusty, cobwebbed, sombre objects and people.
Stefan Zweig (Letter from an Unknown Woman and Other Stories)
For the first time I began to perceive that true sympathy cannot be switched on and off like an electric current, that anyone that identifies himself with the fate of another is robbed to some extent of his own freedom.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
Lightly, caressingly, Marie Antoinette picked up the crown as a gift. She was still too young to know that life never gives anything for nothing, and that a price is always exacted for what fate bestows. She did not think she would have to pay a price.
Stefan Zweig (Marie Antoinette: The Portrait of an Average Woman)
It always demands a far greater degree of courage for an individual to oppose an organized movement than to let himself be carried along with the stream — individual courage, that is, a variety of courage that is dying out in these times of progressive organization and mechanization.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
The herd instinct of the mob was not yet as offensively powerful in public life as it is today; freedom in what you did or did not do in private life was taken for granted - which is hardly imaginable now - and toleration was not, as it is today, deplored as a weakness and debility, but was praised as an ethical force.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
Mutluyken adil davranmak, mutsuzken adil davranmaktan daima daha kolaydır. syf- 160
Stefan Zweig (Magellan: Der Mann und seine Tat)
On the day I lost my passport I discovered, at the age of fifty-eight, that losing one’s native land implies more than parting with a circumscribed area of soil.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
It remains an irrefragable law of history that contemporaries are denied a recognition of the early beginnings of the great movements which determine their times.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
happiness would prevail where trees were planted.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
Even if I had gone further than in all honesty I should have done, my lies, those lies born of pity, had made her happy; and to make a person happy could never be a crime.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
I had an irresistible desire to make a last effort to awaken your memory.
Stefan Zweig (Fantastic Night & Other Stories)
There is nothing more vindictive, nothing more underhanded, than a little world that would like to be a big one.
Stefan Zweig (The Post-Office Girl)
El que no tiene patria posee el mundo, el que se ha desprendido de todo posee la vida entera y el que no tiene culpa goza de paz.
Stefan Zweig (Los ojos del hermano eterno)
yet it may serve to show that courage is often nothing but inverted weakness.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
Korku cezadan çok daha beterdir, çünkü ceza bellidir, ağır da olsa, hafif de, hiçbir zaman belirsizliğin dehşeti kadar, o sonsuz gerilimin ürkünçlüğü kadar kötü değildir.
Stefan Zweig (Angst)
Bize bir şey yapmadılar, sadece mutlak hiçliğe soktular, çünkü dünyada hiçbir şeyin insan ruhu üzerinde hiçlik kadar baskı yapmayacağı bilinir....
Stefan Zweig (Satranç)
Dünyayı işler tutan şey, umut, yalnızca umuttu…
Stefan Zweig (Olağanüstü Bir Gece)
Je sentis inconsciemment que tu mènes une double vie, une vie dont une face claire est franchement tournée vers le monde, tandis que l'autre, plongée dans l'ombre, n'est connue que de toi seul. Cette profonde dualité, le secret de ton existence
Stefan Zweig (Letter from an Unknown Woman: The Fowler Snared)
Y eso era justamente lo que pretendían, que me intoxicara cada vez más con mis propios pensamientos, hasta que ya no pudiera más y los tuviera que escupir, que vomitar, y tuviese que confesar
Stefan Zweig
ان الطبيعة -وهي تحقق مهمتها السامية في الحفاظ على تدفق الابداع-تغرس في نفوس الابناء كرها بل نفورا من الاذواق الموروثة عن الاباء والاجداد.ان الطبيعة لا ترضى بتراث سهل سائغ يتناقله جيل عن جيل نسخا وتكرارا .انها تقيم ضربا من التناقض بين اجيال البشر...ثم لا تلبث بعد (دورة)شاقة خصيبة ان تعود بالاحفاد لتضعهم على درب الاسلاف
Stefan Zweig (La Confusion des sentiments)
He was welcome everywhere he went, and was well-aware of his inability to tolerate solitude. He felt no inclination to be alone and avoided it as far as possible; he didn't really want to become any better acquainted with himself. He knew that if he wanted to show his talents to best advantage, he needed to strike sparks off other people to fan the flames of warmth and exuberance in his heart. On his own he was frosty, no use to himself at all, like a match left lying in its box.
Stefan Zweig (The Burning Secret and other stories)
وما من سعادة في مصير إنسان أعظم من أن يكتشف ، وهو في منتصف العمر، أي في سنوات الرجولة الخلاقة، رسالة حياته!
Stefan Zweig (Decisive Moments in History)
الحظ دائماً شريك متطوع لخدمة المغامر الجسور.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
Hiçbir şey zekayı tutkulu bir kuşku kadar bileyemez. Hiçbir şey olgunlaşmamış bir zihnin bütün olanaklarını karanlıkta kaybolan bir iz kadar harekete geçiremez.
Stefan Zweig (Burning Secret)
ان المعلومات أو "الايحاءات" المبتورة هي مبعث أكثر الشرور في هذه الدنيا
Stefan Zweig
What a mercy, I thought, that the crippled, the maimed, those whom Fate has cheated, at least in sleep have no knowledge of the shapeliness or unshapeliness of their bodies,
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
Querer jugar contra uno mismo representa, en definitiva, una paradoja tan grande como querer saltar sobre la propia sombra
Stefan Zweig
But spite is a wonderful thing for keeping people alive.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
no one would have pity on the foolish slave of his own pity.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
For vanity, too, inebriates; gratitude, too, intoxicates; tenderness, too, can blissfully confuse the senses.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
Çünkü sadece kendi kaderlerini bir gizem olarak yaşayabilenlerin gerçek anlamda yaşadıklarına inanıyorum.
Stefan Zweig (Phantastische Nacht. Erzählung)
No hay nada en el mundo que sea equiparable al secreto amor de una niña que permanece en la penumbra y tiene pocas esperanzas.
Stefan Zweig (Carta de una desconocida, La Institutriz, Veinticuatro horas en la vida de una mujer)
No te culpo, te quiero tal como eres, ardiente y distraído, olvidadizo, entregado e infiel, te quiero así, sólo así, como siempre has sido y como aún eres.
Stefan Zweig (Carta de una desconocida, La Institutriz, Veinticuatro horas en la vida de una mujer)
Arrived at an age when others had already long been married and had children and held important positions, and were obliged to produce the best that was in them with all their energy, I still regarded myself as youthful, a beginner who faced immeasurable time, and I was hesitant about final decisions of any kind.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
l'amour, pour toi, ne peut être que quelque chose de léger, revêtant la forme d'un jeu et dénué d'importance ; tu redoutes de t'immiscer dans une destinée. Tu veux t'abandonner sans mesure à toutes les joies du monde, mais tu ne veux pas de sacrifice.
Stefan Zweig (Letter from an Unknown Woman: The Fowler Snared)
He listened yet more intently to what was within him, to the past, to see whether that voice of memory truly foretelling the future would not speak to him again, revealing the present to him as well as the past.
Stefan Zweig (Journey into the Past)
And if I am asked today to advise a young writer who has not yet made up his mind what way to go, I would try to persuade him to devote himself first to the work of someone greater, interpreting or translating him.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
In the last analysis it seems likely that they were wiser than I, all those friends in Vienna, because they suffered everything only when it really happened, whereas I had already suffered the disaster in advance in my fantasy, and then again when it became reality.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
لقد كشف انذاك عن سره الاكبر اى التركيز التام اللائق بالفنان وبالعالم والحكيم الحق والمجنون بالكامل فتلك التراجيديا الناجمة عن السعادة والبؤس معا هى مايجعل الانساس ممسوسا
Stefan Zweig (Mendel, el de los libros)
A book is a handful of silence that assuages torment and unrest
Zweig, Stefan
Nothing gives so keen an edge to the intelligence as a passionate suspicion.
Stefan Zweig (Burning Secret)
Two suitcases, in one the wardrobe, the earthly essentials, in the other- manuscripts, the spiritual supplies, then you are at home everywhere-Zweig GW Tagebuecher p. 383
Stefan Zweig (Gesammelte Werke)
the natural animosity between those who slept and those who were stirring in the sleeping city.
Stefan Zweig (The Post-Office Girl)
Nationalism is the sworn enemy of civilization, whether past, present or future, its malodorous presence thwarting the development of intelligence,
Stefan Zweig (Messages from a Lost World: Europe on the Brink)
In history as in human life, regret does not bring back a lost moment and a thousand years will not recover something lost in a single hour.
Stefan Zweig
Nothing on earth puts more pressure on the human mind than nothing.
Stefan Zweig
IF I TRY TO FIND some useful phrase to sum up the time of my childhood and youth before the First World War, I hope I can put it most succinctly by calling it the Golden Age of Security.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday: Memoirs of a European)
But you smiled at me and said consolingly, "People come back again." "Yes" I said, "they come back, but then they have forgotten". There must have been something odd, something passionate in the way I said that to you. For you rose to your feet as well and looked at me, affectionately and very surprised. You took me by the shoulders. "What's good is not forgotten; I will not forget you," you said, and as you did so you gazed intently at me as if to memorise my image.
Stefan Zweig (Letter from an Unknown Woman and Other Stories)
Being beautiful in itself, youth needs no transfiguration: in its abundance of strong life it is drawn to the tragic, and is happy to let melancholy suck sweetly from its still inexperienced bloom, and the very same phenomenon accounts for the readiness of young people to face danger and reach out a fraternal hand to all spiritual suffering
Stefan Zweig
İstedigimiz ve bizi mutlu eden bir hayatı mı yaşıyoruz yoksa istenilen ve çevremizdekileri mutlu eden bir hayatı mı? İnsanların takdirini kazanmak matah bir şey mi? Hata sandıklarımız gerçek birer hata mı?
Stefan Zweig (Olağanüstü Bir Gece)
My child died last night—and now I shall be alone again, if I must really go on living. They will come tomorrow, strange, hulking, black-clad men bringing a coffin, and they will put him in it, my poor boy, my only child.
Stefan Zweig (The Collected Stories of Stefan Zweig)
All my life I have been passionately interested in monomaniacs of any kind, people carried away by a single idea. The more one limits oneself, the closer one is to the infinite; these people, as unworldly as they seem, burrow like termites into their own particular material to construct, in miniature, a strange and utterly individual image of the world.
Stefan Zweig (Chess Story)
ولا بد دائماً أن تنسرب الملايين من الساعات في تاريخ العالم هدراً، قبل أن تظهر إلى حيز الوجود ساعة تاريخية حقاً، ساعة حاسمة من ساعات البشرية
Stefan Zweig (Decisive Moments in History)
الانسان لا يحس اي معنى او هدف لوجوده حتى يتبين انه في نظر غيره مخلوق له وزن واهمية واعتبار :! .
Stefan Zweig
tokluk da açlıktan daha az kışkırtıcı değildir
Stefan Zweig (Angst)
Memory is so corrupt that you remember only what you want to; if you want to forget about something, slowly but surely you do.
Stefan Zweig (The Post-Office Girl)
For tradition also and always means inhibition.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
¡Cómo vivían al margen de todas las crisis y los problemas que oprimen el corazón, pero a la vez lo ensanchan!
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
Sana bunu anlatmak istedim, çünkü senin, beni hiç tanımayan senin, bir yaşamın nasıl sana bağlandığını ve kaybolduğunu nihayet kavramaya başlamanı istedim.
Stefan Zweig (Brief einer Unbekannten)
Live and let live” was the famous Viennese motto, which today still seems to me to be more humane than all the categorical imperatives, and it maintained itself throughout all classes.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
No me reconociste, ni entonces ni en ningún otro momento, nunca me has reconocido. ¿Cómo te puedo describir, querido, la decepción de aquel instante? Por primera vez fui consciente de estar predestinada a que no me reconocieras durante toda mi vida
Stefan Zweig (Carta de una desconocida, La Institutriz, Veinticuatro horas en la vida de una mujer)
كان يظن أنه يعرف كل شئ ، و الآن يشعر أنه عبَرَ أمام آلاف الأسرار و المشكلات دون أن يفكر فيها للحظة ، و يشعر بالعار لأن كمية المعرفة الفقيرة التي يمتلكها تعثّرت عند أول عقبة تواجهه في الحياة
Stefan Zweig (Burning Secret)
Pity, like morphine, does the sick good only at first. It is a means of helping them to feel better, but if you don't get the dose right and know where to stop it becomes a murderous poison.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
In times of exceptional stress, nature will often give people's behavior so tragical a complexion that neither a picture nor a verbal description is competent to represent its titanic energy.
Stefan Zweig
Just as an astronomer, alone in an observatory, watches night after night through a telescope the myriads of stars, their mysterious movements, their changeful medley, their extinction and their flaming-up anew, so did Jacob Mendel, seated at his table in the Cafe Gluck, look through his spectacles into the universe of books, a universe that lies above the world of our everyday life, and, like the stellar universe, is full of changing cycles.
Stefan Zweig (Selected Stories)
Mr. Zweig always encouraged his friends to set down their reminiscences, not necessarily for publication but for the pleasure and benefit of their children, their families. In his opinion every life includes inner or external experiences worthy of record.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
He lived one of those lives that seem otiose because they are not linked to any community of interest, because all the riches stored in them by a thousand separate valuable experiences will pass when their last breath is drawn, without anyone to inherit them.
Stefan Zweig (The Collected Stories of Stefan Zweig)
La gratitud nos hace felices porque son raras las ocasiones en que se nos hace visible; toda delicadeza nos produce un efecto saludable, y para mí, naturaleza fría y mesurada, aquella superabundancia de sentimiento significaba algo nuevo, agradable y felicísimo.
Stefan Zweig (Vingt-quatre heures de la vie d'une femme)
…три пъти бях канен от големи вестници да отида в армията като техен кореспондент. Но всеки вид репортаж по задължение изискваше да се представя войната в изключително положителен и патриотичен дух, а аз бях дал клетва – спазих я до 1940 година – да не пиша никога ни дума, с която да одобря войната или с която да унижа друга нация.
Stefan Zweig (Die Welt von gestern: Erinnerungen eines Europäers)
For I have indeed been torn from all my roots, even from the earth that nourished them, more entirely than most in our times. I was born in 1881 in the great and mighty empire of the Habsburg Monarchy, but you would look for it in vain on the map today; it has vanished without trace. I grew up in Vienna, an international metropolis for two thousand years, and had to steal away from it like a thief in the night before it was demoted to the status of a provincial German town. My literary work, in the language in which I wrote it, has been burnt to ashes in the country where my books made millions of readers their friends. So I belong nowhere now, I am a stranger or at the most a guest everywhere. Even the true home of my heart’s desire, Europe, is lost to me after twice tearing itself suicidally to pieces in fratricidal wars. Against my will, I have witnessed the most terrible defeat of reason and the most savage triumph of brutality in the chronicles of time. Never—and I say so not with pride but with shame—has a generation fallen from such intellectual heights as ours to such moral depths.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
The instinct of self-deception in human beings makes them try to banish from their minds dangers of which at the bottom they are perfectly aware by declaring them nonexistent, and a warning such as mine against cheap optimism was bound to prove particularly unwelcome at a moment when a sumptuously laid supper was awaiting for us in the next room.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
...her defasında odada oturmuş camın dışındaki yağmuru seyreden biri gibi hissettim kendimi; doğrudan yakınımda olan şeylerle bile aramda camdan bir duvar vardı ve kendi irademle onu yıkacak gücü bulamıyordum.
Stefan Zweig (Olağanüstü Bir Gece)
¿Puede acaso explicarse que ciertos individuos, que ni siquiera saben nadar, intenten lanzarse desde lo alto de un puente para salvar a alguien que se ahoga? Esos individuos se mueven sencillamente a impulsos de una fuerza mágica; una fuerza los impele antes de que tengan tiempo a darse cuenta de se insensata temeridad; y exactamente así, sin meditarlo, sin una consciente reflexión, seguí yo a aquel desgraciado desde la sala de juego al vestíbulo del Casino, y desde el vestíbulo a la terraza.
Stefan Zweig (Vingt-quatre heures de la vie d'une femme)
Wie ich heimschritt bemerkte ich mit einemmal vor mir meinen eigenen Schatten so wie ich den Schatten des anderen Krieges hinter dem jetzigen sah. Er ist durch all diese Zeit nicht mehr von mir gewichen dieser Schatten er überhing jeden meiner Gedanken bei Tag und bei Nacht vielleicht liegt sein dunkler Umriß auch auf manchen Blättern dieses Buches. Aber jeder Schatten ist im letzten doch auch Kind des Lichts und nur wer Helles und Dunkles Krieg und Frieden Aufstieg und Niedergang erfahren nur der hat wahrhaft gelebt.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
La máquina de 1792, la guillotina, inventada para suprimir toda resistncia contra el Estado, es una herramienta torpe comparada con la maquinaria policíaca, combinada y refinada por la superioridad espiritual del José Fouché de 1799.
Stefan Zweig (Fouché)
Yalnızca başlangıçtaki vesileye bakmakla yetinirseniz bir sevginin gücünü yanlış değerlendirirsiniz, aslında daha öncesindeki gerilime, ruhun bütün büyük sarsıntılarına zemin hazırlayan, yalnızlığın ve düş kırıklıklarının yarattığı o bomboş karanlığa bakmak gerekir. Yaşanmamış duygular burada birikerek aşırı ağırlaşır ve değeceğine inanılan ilk kişiyle karşılaşıldığında alabildiğine boşalır.
Stefan Zweig (Burning Secret)
[...] je mehr sich einer begrenzt, um so mehr ist er andererseits dem Unendlichen nah; gerade solche scheinbar Weltabseitigen bauen in ihrer besonderen Materie sich termitenhaft eine merkwürdige und durchaus einmalige Abbreviatur der Welt.
Stefan Zweig (Schachnovelle)
For when a woman resists an unwelcome passion, she is obeying to the full the law of her sex; the initial gesture of refusal is, so to speak, a primordial instinct in every female, and even if she rejects the most ardent passion she cannot be called inhuman. But how disastrous it is when fate upsets the balance, when a woman so far overcomes her natural modesty as to disclose her passion to a man, when, without the certainty of its being reciprocated, she offers her love, and he, the wooed, remains cold and on the defensive! An insoluble tangle this, always; for not to return a woman's love is to shatter her pride, to violate her modesty. The man who rejects a woman's advances is bound to wound her in her noblest feelings. In vain, then, all the tenderness with which he extricates himself, useless all his polite, evasive phrases, insulting all his offers of mere friendship, once she has revealed her weakness! His resistance inevitably becomes cruelty, and in rejecting a woman's love he takes a load of guild upon his conscience, guiltless though he may be. Abominable fetters that can never be cast off!
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
The woman who had been born in an imperial palace, and then, as Queen of France, had had hundreds of rooms in her dwelling house, was now imprisoned in a tiny basement cell, its walls streaming with damp, and its grated window half occluded.
Stefan Zweig (Marie Antoinette: The Portrait of an Average Woman)
Why love the healthy, confident, proud and happy?They don't need it. They take love as their rightful due, as the duty owed to them, they accept it indifferently and arrogantly. Other people's devotion is just another gift to them, a clasp to wear in the hair, a bangle for the wrist, not the whole meaning and happiness of their lives. Love can truly help only those not favoured by fate, the distressed and disadvantaged, those who are less than confident and not beautiful, the meek-minded. When love is given to them it makes up for what life has taken away. They alone know how to love and be loved in the right way, humbly and with gratitude.
Stefan Zweig
her first glance at me would be bound to hold the question: have you forgiven me? And perhaps that still more critical question: will you bear with my love, and can you return it? That first moment when she would gaze up with a blush, a look of controlled and yet uncontrollable impatience, might be at once the most hazardous and decisive.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
There are two kinds of pity. One, the weak and sentimental kind, which is really no more than the heart’s impatience to be rid as quickly as possible of the painful emotion aroused by the sight of another’s unhappiness ...; and the other, the only kind that counts, the unsentimental but creative kind, which knows what it is about and is determined to hold out, in patience and forbearance, to the very limit of its strength and even beyond.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity (New York Review Books Classics))
Innen tat noch leise etwas weh, aber es war ein verheißender Schmerz, glühend und doch so wie Wunden brennen, ehe sie für immer vernarben wollen.
Stefan Zweig
Tarihte bir başarının ahlaki değeri asla pratik faydasıyla ölçülmez, insanlığa kalıcı bir zenginlik katanlar, insanlığın bilgisini çoğaltıp yaratıcı gücünü arttıranlardır. syf-230
Stefan Zweig (Magellan: Der Mann und seine Tat)
… her bir ayrıntıyı sığ bellekten değil de, sadece yürekten gelebilecek bir berraklıkla görebiliyorum.
Stefan Zweig (Olağanüstü Bir Gece)
Only in youth does coincidence seem the same as fate. Later, we know that the real course of our lives is decided within us; our paths may seem to diverge from our wishes in a confused and pointless way, but in the end the way always leads us to our invisible destination.
Stefan Zweig
Od onog ondašnjeg čovjeka ja sam se, i to upravo zbog onog doživljaja, potpuno odvojio, promatram ga sa strane, sasvim mirno i hladno, i mogu ga opisati kao prijatelja o kojem znam mnogo i sve ono što je bitno, ali ja uopće više nisam taj čovjek. Mogao bih pričati o njemu, prekoravati ga ili ga osuđivati a da uopće ne osjetim da je on jednom bio sastavni dio mene.
Stefan Zweig (Fantastic Night & Other Stories)
The end of the war brought the closing of the borders cutting off Austria’s coal supply from Czechoslovakia, leaving the Austrians at peace but hungry, cold, and vulnerable to tuberculosis and a virulent form of influenza (Grosskurth, 1991, p. 82). Writer Stefan Zweig described postwar Vienna as “an uncertain, gray, and lifeless shadow of the former imperial monarchy” (qtd. in Gay, 1988, p. 380).
Daniel Benveniste (The Interwoven Lives of Sigmund, Anna and W. Ernest Freud: Three Generations of Psychoanalysis)
And the child—your child—was born there in the midst of misery. It was a deadly place: strange, everything was strange, we women lying there were strange to each other, lonely and hating one another out of misery, the same torment in that crowded ward full of chloroform and blood, screams and groans.
Stefan Zweig (The Collected Stories of Stefan Zweig)
Nationalism emerged to agitate the world only after the war, and the first visible phenomenon which this intellectual epidemic of our century brought about was xenophobia; morbid dislike of the foreigner, or at least fear of the foreigner. The world was on the defensive against strangers, everywhere they got short shrift. The humiliations which once had been devised with criminals alone in mind now were imposed upon the traveler, before and during every journey. There had to be photographs from right and left, in profile and full face, one’s hair had to be cropped sufficiently to make the ears visible; fingerprints were taken, at first only the thumb but later all ten fingers; furthermore, certificates of health, of vaccination, police certificates of good standing, had to be shown; letters of recommendation were required, invitations to visit a country had to be procured; they asked for the addresses of relatives, for moral and financial guarantees, questionnaires, and forms in triplicate and quadruplicate needed to be filled out,
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
What decides whether a man will become immortal, is not his character but his vitality. Nothing save intensity confers immortality. A man manifests himself more vividly, in proportion as he is strong and unified, effective and unique. Immortality knows nothing of morality or immorality, of good or evil; it measures only work and strength; it demands from a man not purity but unity. Here, morality is nothing; intensity, all.
Stefan Zweig (Casanova: A Study in Self-Portraiture)
No envy is more mean than that of small-minded beings when they see a neighbor lifted, as though borne aloft by angels, out of the dull drudgery of their common existence; petty spirits are more ready to forgive a prince the most fabulous wealth than a fellow-sufferer beneath the same yoke the smallest degree of freedom.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
The desire to ascend in the social scale does not make itself felt until the intellect awakens. Up to the tenth, and often up to the fifteenth year, almost every child belonging to a well-to-do family envies its proletarian schoolmates, to whom so many things are permissible which for the “respectable” are placed under taboo.
Stefan Zweig (Marie Antoinette: The Portrait of an Average Woman)
The newspapers recommended preparations which hastened the growth of the beard, and twenty-four- and twenty-five-year-old doctors, who had just finished their examinations, wore mighty beards and gold spectacles even if their eyes did not need them, so that they could make an impression of “experience” upon their first patients.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
In so much firm, pleasure-loving flesh, we cannot find the merest trace of a moral nervous system. That explains the whole enigma of Casanova's subtle genius. Lucky man that he is, he has only sensuality, and lacks the first beginnings of a soul. Bound by no ties, having no fixed aim, restrained by no prudent considerations, he can move at a different tempo from his fellow mortals, who are burdened with moral scruples, who aim at an ethical goal, who are tied by notions of social responsibility. That is the secret of his unique impetus, of his incomparable energy.
Stefan Zweig (Casanova: A Study in Self-Portraiture)
All the bourgeois virtues, caution, obedience, zeal and thoughtfulness- they all melt away powerless in the fire of the great fateful moment that always demands only genius and forms it into a a lasting image. Contemptuously it repulses the timid man; it, another god of the earth, with fiery arms, lifts only the bold into the heaven of heroes.
Stefan Zweig
Ah, canlılığım her zaman vardı elbette, sadece yaşamaya cesaret edememiştim, kendimi boğazlamış ve kendimden gizlemiştim; fakat şimdi bütün o baskı altındaki güç patlamıştı, yaşam denen o zenginlik, o tarifsiz kuvvet bana galip gelmişti.
Stefan Zweig (Olağanüstü Bir Gece)
Hemen şöyle düşündüm, eğer bir avans veriyorlarsa temiz bir iş olmalı, bu ateşli arazilerde mezar taşlarının bizdekinden üç kat hızlı çoğaldığını biliyordum, ama insan genç olunca ateşin ve ölümün her zaman başkalarına sıçrayacağını düşünür.
Stefan Zweig (Amok Koşucusu)
Not one of the European rulers would put himself about in the attempt to save Marie Antoinette, so that Mercy scornfully declared: “They would not have tried to save her even if they had with their own eyes seen her mounting the steps to the guillotine.
Stefan Zweig (Marie Antoinette: The Portrait of an Average Woman)
C'est seulement à partir de ce moment que je commençai à comprendre (ce que taisent la plupart du temps les écrivains) que les malades, les estropiés, les gens laids, fanés, flétris, les êtres physiquement inférieurs aiment au contraire avec plus de passion et de violence, que les gens heureux et bien portants ; ils aiment d'un amour fanatique, sombre, aucune passion sur terre n'est plus violente et avide que celle de ces désespérés, de ces bâtards de Dieu qui ne trouvent que dans l'amour d'autrui et pour autrui leur raison de vivre. Le fait que c'est précisément de l'abîme le plus profond de la détresse que s'élève le plus furieusement le cri panique du désir de vivre, ce terrible secret, jamais, dans mon inexpérience, je ne l'avais soupçonné. Et c'est seulement en cette minute qu'il avait pénétré en moi comme un fer brûlant.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
Y de nuevo, cuando terminó de repente con un pasaje del discurso de Goethe sobre Shakespeare, nuestra excitación se desvanecio bruscamente. Y de nuevo como en la víspera, se apoyó exhausto en la mesa, el semblante pálido, pero todavía surcado por pequeños temblores y estremecimientos de los nervios y en la mirada brillaba extrañamente la voluptuosidad de la efusión todavía viva como la de la mujer que acaba de desasirse de un poderoso abrazo.
Stefan Zweig (La Confusion des sentiments)
Time is helpless, he thought to himself, helpless in the face of our feelings. Nine years have passed, and not a note in her voice is different, not a nerve in my body hears her in any other way. Nothing is lost, nothing is past and over, her presence is as much of a tender delight now as it was then.
Stefan Zweig
I regarded it more as an honor than a disgrace to be permitted to share this fate of the complete destruction of literary existence in Germany with such eminent contemporaries as Thomas Mann, Heinrich Mann, Werfel, Freud, Einstein, and many others whose work I consider incomparably more important than my own,
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
Homeward bound I suddenly noticed before me my own shadow as I had seen the shadow of the other war behind the actual one. During all this time it has never budged from me, that irremovable shadow, it hovers over every thought of mine by day and by night; perhaps its dark outline lies on some pages of this book, too. But, after all, shadows themselves are born of light. And only he who has experienced dawn and dusk, war and peace, ascent and decline, only he has truly lived.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
Ben... Benim bütün sırrım huzursuzluğumu fazla çalışarak bastırmaktır. Bunu da çok şeyle uğraşarak başarıyorum. Bir şeylerle meşgul olmam gerekiyor. Yalnızca meşgul olduğum zaman bu huzursuzluk hali geçiyor. O zaman korkmama gerek kalmıyor. Çünkü yalnızlık korkusu zehirden beterdir. Bunun yerine çalışmak daha iyidir. Arkamda huzursuzluğun beni beklediğini hissettiğimde beni yakalayamaması için koşarım; tüm meslektaşlarımın hayranlık duyduğu çalışkanlığımın ardındaki son sır işte budur.
Stefan Zweig (Clarissa)
ah ! tu m'as appris à comprendre bien des choses ! le visage d'une jeune fille, d'une femme, est forcément pour un homme un objet extrêmement variable ; le plus souvent, il n'est qu'un miroir, où se reflète tantôt une passion, tantôt un enfantillage, tantôt une lassitude, et il s'efface si vite, comme une image dans une glace, qu'un homme peut sans difficulté oublier le visage d'une femme, d'autant mieux que l'âge y fait alterner l'ombre et la lumière et que des costumes nouveaux l'encadrent différemment.
Stefan Zweig (Letter from an Unknown Woman and Other Stories)
...My husband made my dreams come true, and because he could do that I married him." Then he says softly, as if to himself, "But what about love?" She heard that. A slight smile comes to her lips. "Do you still have all the ideals, all the ideals that you took to that distant world with you? Are they all still intact , or have some of them died or withered away? Haven't they been torn out of you by force and flung in the dirt, where thousands of wheels carrying vehicles to their owners' destination in life crushed them? Or have you lost none of them?
Stefan Zweig (Letter from an Unknown Woman and Other Stories)
Никой от никого не се стесняваше; най-красивите момичета не се срамуваха да влязат под ръка със смолисточерен негър или тесноок китаец в най-близкия малък хотел – кой го беше грижа в Париж за тези едва по-късно разтръбени лозунги плашила, като раса, класа, произход? Можеше да ходиш, да разговаряш, да спиш с когото или с която ти се нрави и да не даваш пет пари за другите.
Stefan Zweig (Die Welt von gestern: Erinnerungen eines Europäers)
Es gibt eben zweierlei Mitleid. Das eine, das schwachmütige und sentimentale, das eigentlich nur Ungeduld des Herzens ist, sich möglichst schnell freizumachen von der peinlichen Ergriffenheit vor einem fremden Unglück, jenes Mitleid, das gar nicht Mit-leiden ist, sondern nur instinktive Abwehr des fremden Leidens von der eigenen Seele. Und das andere, das einzig zählt - das unsentimentale, aber schöpferische Mitleid, das weiß, was es will, und entschlossen ist, geduldig und mitduldend alles durchzustehen bis zum Letzten seiner Kraft und noch über dies Letzte hinaus.
Stefan Zweig (Beware of Pity)
I saw how the idea, still colourless, nothing but pure and flowing heat, streamed from the furnace of his impulsive excitement like the molten metal to make a bell, then gradually, as it cooled, took shape, I saw how that shape rounded out powerfully and revealed itself, until at last the words rang from it and gave human language to poetic feeling, just as the clapper gives the bell its sound.
Stefan Zweig (La Confusion des sentiments)
Yaptığı o kadar da kötü bir şey değildi. Niçin bu kadar sert bir ceza veriyorsun? Küçük kızına acımıyor musun hiç ? Küçüğe acıyıp acımadığımı sordun, değil mi? Cevabım, artık acımıyorum, olacak. Çünkü bu zor gelse de, cezalandırıldığı andan itibaren içi rahatlamıştır. Asıl dün mutsuzdu, zavallı atı kırıp ocağa attıktan sonra evdeki herkes onu ararken, her an, her dakika bulunacağı korkusuyla yaşıyordu. Korku cezadan çok daha beterdir, çünkü ceza bellidir, ağır da olsa, hafif de, hiçbir zaman belirsizliğin dehşeti kadar, o sonsuz gerilimin ürkünçlüğü kadar kötü değildir. Kızımız da, cezası kesinleşir kesinleşmez hafifledi. Ağlaması seni şaşırtmamalı, bu sadece bir boşalmaydı, önceden baskı altında duruyordu. İçte tutulan gözyaşları akıtılanlardan daha acıtıcıdır. O eğer çocuk olmasaydı veya içini en gizli noktasına kadar görme olanağımız olsaydı, inanıyorum ki aldığı cezaya ve döktüğü gözyaşlarına rağmen, dün olduğundan çok daha hoşnut olduğunu görürdük. Oysa dün, görünürde kaygısızca ortalıkta dolaşıyordu ve kimse onu suçlamıyordu.
Stefan Zweig (Angst)
Böyle olağanüstü, dahice bir oyunun ister istemez göreceli ustalar yaratacağı gerçeğini uzun zaman önce anlamıştım; ama dünyayı yalnızca siyah ile beyaz arasındaki dar yola indirgeyen, otuz iki taşı bir oraya bir buraya, bir ileri bir geri oynatarak hayatının zaferini kazanmaya çalışan kıvrak zekalı bir insanın yaşamını kafada canlandırmak ne kadar güç, ne kadar olanaksızdı; bu insanın yeni bir oyuna başlarken piyon yerine atı yeğlemesi olay yaratır ve bir satranç kitabının ufacık bir köşesinde adının geçmesiyle ölümsüzlüğe ulaşmasını sağlar; bu insan, bu akıl insanı, aklını kaçırmadan on, yirmi, otuz, kırk yıl boyunca bütün düşünme gücünü tekrar tekrar aynı gülünç amaca yöneltir: bir tahtanın üzerinde tahta bir şahı köşeye sıkıştırmak! Sayfa :23
Stefan Zweig (Satranç)
Balzac has incomparably described how the example of Napoleon electrified an entire generation in France. To Balzac the brilliant rise of the insignificant Lieutenant Bonaparte to the rank of emperor of the world meant not only the triumph of an individual, but the victory of the idea of youth. That one did not have to be born a prince or a duke to achieve power at an early age, that one might come from any humble and even poor family and yet be a general at twenty-four, ruler of France at thirty and of the entire world, caused hundreds, after this unique success, to abandon petty vocations and provincial abodes. Lieutenant Bonaparte had fired the minds of an entire generation of youth. He drove them to aspire to higher things, he made the generals of the Grande Armée the heroes and careerists of the comédie humaine. It is always an individual young person who achieves the unattainable for the first time in any field, and thus encourages all the youngsters around him or who come after him, by the mere fact of his success.
Stefan Zweig (The World of Yesterday)
And are we not guilty of offensive disparagement in calling chess a game? Is it not also a science and an art, hovering between those categories as Muhammad’s coffin hovered between heaven and earth, a unique link between pairs of opposites: ancient yet eternally new; mechanical in structure, yet made effective only by the imagination; limited to a geometrically fixed space, yet with unlimited combinations; constantly developing, yet sterile; thought that leads nowhere; mathematics calculating nothing; art without works of art; architecture without substance – but nonetheless shown to be more durable in its entity and existence than all books and works of art; the only game that belongs to all nations and all eras, although no one knows what god brought it down to earth to vanquish boredom, sharpen the senses and stretch the mind. Where does it begin and where does it end? Every child can learn its basic rules, every bungler can try his luck at it, yet within that immutable little square it is able to bring forth a particular species of masters who cannot be compared to anyone else, people with a gift solely designed for chess, geniuses in their specific field who unite vision, patience and technique in just the same proportions as do mathematicians, poets, musicians, but in different stratifications and combinations. In the old days of the enthusiasm for physiognomy, a physician like Gall might perhaps have dissected a chess champion’s brain to find out whether some particular twist or turn in the grey matter, a kind of chess muscle or chess bump, is more developed in such chess geniuses than in the skulls of other mortals. And how intrigued such a physiognomist would have been by the case of Czentovic, where that specific genius appeared in a setting of absolute intellectual lethargy, like a single vein of gold in a hundredweight of dull stone. In principle, I had always realized that such a unique, brilliant game must create its own matadors, but how difficult and indeed impossible it is to imagine the life of an intellectually active human being whose world is reduced entirely to the narrow one-way traffic between black and white, who seeks the triumphs of his life in the mere movement to and fro, forward and back of thirty-two chessmen, someone to whom a new opening, moving knight rather than pawn, is a great deed, and his little corner of immortality is tucked away in a book about chess – a human being, an intellectual human being who constantly bends the entire force of his mind on the ridiculous task of forcing a wooden king into the corner of a wooden board, and does it without going mad!
Stefan Zweig (Chess)
Строгата дисциплина, безмилостният контрол и презрението на обществото се отнасяха само за армията от хиляди и хиляди жени, които трябваше да защитават с тялото и унижената си душа свободните и естествени форми на любовта срещу старото и отдавна подкопано морално схващане. Тази огромна армия на проституцията – така както истинската армия има части: кавалерия, артилерия, пехота, крепостна артилерия – беше подразделена на свои собствени категории… […] И това беше същият град, същото общество, същият морал, който се възмущаваше, когато младите момичета караха велосипед, и обявяваше, че се осквернява достойнството на науката, когато Фройд със своя спокоен, ясен и проницателен маниер изказваше истини, които те не желаеха да признаят. Същият свят, който така патетично защитаваше чистотата на жената, търпеше това жестоко самопродаване, организираше го и дори печелеше от него. […] това беше тъжно време за тогавашната младеж – девойките херметически изолирани от живота и под контрола на семейството, възпирани във физическото, така и в духовното си развитие; младите мъже тласкани към потайности и сдържаност от един морал, в който всъщност никой не вярваше и на който никой не се подчиняваше. […] Щастлива, днешната младеж се наслаждава на младостта си с устрем, със свежест, лекота и безгрижие, присъщи на нейната възраст. Но най-голямото щастие в това щастие се крие според мене в обстоятелството, че тя не е принудена да лъже другите и може да бъде честна както към себе си, така и към естествените си чувства и желания.
Stefan Zweig (Die Welt von gestern: Erinnerungen eines Europäers)
From that first meeting he had loved this woman, but passionately as his feelings surged over him, following him even to his dreams, the crucial factor that would shake him to the core was still lacking - his conscious realization that what, denying his true feelings, he still called admiration, respect and devotion was in fact love - a burning, unbounded, absolute and passionate love. Some kind of servile instinct in him forcibly suppressed that realization; she was too distant, too far away, too high above him, a radiant woman surrounded by a circle of stars, armoured by her wealth and by all that he had ever known of women before. It would have seemed blasphemous to think of her as a sexual being, subject to the same laws of the blood as the few other women who had come his way during his youth spent in servitude [...]. No, this was different. She shone down from another sphere, beyond desire, pure and inviolable, and even in his most passionate dreams he did not venture so far as to undress her. In boyish confusion, he loved the fragrance of her presence, appreciating all her movements as if they were music, glad of her confidence in him and always fearing to show her any of the overwhelming emotion that stirred within him, an emotion still without a name, but long since fully formed and glowing in its place of concealment. But love truly becomes love only when, no longer an embryo developing painfully in the darkness of the body, it ventures to confess itself with lips and breath. However hard it tries to remain a chrysalis, a time comes when the intricate tissue of the cocoon tears, and out it falls, dropping from the heights to the farthest depths, falling with redoubled force into the startled heart.
Stefan Zweig (Journey into the Past)