Wuthering Heights Quotes

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He's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Be with me always - take any form - drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I can not live without my life! I can not live without my soul!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I wish I were a girl again, half-savage and hardy, and free.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
If he loved with all the powers of his puny being, he couldn't love as much in eighty years as I could in a day.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I have not broken your heart - you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Terror made me cruel . . .
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
She burned too bright for this world.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
If you ever looked at me once with what I know is in you, I would be your slave.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I gave him my heart, and he took and pinched it to death; and flung it back to me. People feel with their hearts, Ellen, and since he has destroyed mine, I have not power to feel for him.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I have to remind myself to breathe -- almost to remind my heart to beat!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living. You said I killed you--haunt me then. The murdered do haunt their murderers. I believe--I know that ghosts have wandered the earth. Be with me always--take any form--drive me mad. Only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! It is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Heaven did not seem to be my home; and I broke my heart with weeping to come back to earth; and the angels were so angry that they flung me out into the middle of the heath on the top of Wuthering Heights; where I woke sobbing for joy.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
It struck me as pretty ridiculous to be called Mr. Darcy and to stand on your own looking snooty at a party. It's like being called Heathcliff and insisting on spending the entire evening in the garden, shouting "Cathy" and banging your head against a tree.
Helen Fielding (Bridget Jones's Diary (Bridget Jones, #1))
I have dreamt in my life, dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas; they have gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the color of my mind. And this is one: I'm going to tell it - but take care not to smile at any part of it.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
It was not the thorn bending to the honeysuckles, but the honeysuckles embracing the thorn.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Honest people don't hide their deeds.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
It is hard to forgive, and to look at those eyes, and feel those wasted hands,' he answered. 'Kiss me again; and don’t let me see your eyes! I forgive what you have done to me. I love my murderer—but yours! How can I?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I’m wearying to escape into that glorious world, and to be always there: not seeing it dimly through tears, and yearning for it through the walls of an aching heart: but really with it, and in it.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He shall never know I love him: and that, not because he's handsome, but because he's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made out of, his and mine are the same.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods: time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees. My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Healthcliff! He's always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
A person who has not done one half his day's work by ten o'clock, runs a chance of leaving the other half undone.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He wanted all to lie in an ecstasy of peace; I wanted all to sparkle and dance in a glorious jubilee. I said his heaven would be only half alive; and he said mine would be drunk: I said I should fall asleep in his; and he said he could not breathe in mine.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Nelly, I am Heathcliff - he's always, always in my mind - not as a pleasure, any more then I am always a pleasure to myself - but, as my own being.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Treachery and violence are spears pointed at both ends; they wound those who resort to them worse than their enemies.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
You said I killed you-haunt me, then! [...] Be with me always-take any form-drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
You know that I could as soon forget you as my existence!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I cannot express it; but surely you and everybody have a notion that there is or should be an existence of yours beyond you. What were the use of my creation, if I were entirely contained here? My great miseries in this world have been Heathcliff's miseries, and I watched and felt each from the beginning: my great thought in living is himself. If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger: I should not seem a part of it. My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods: time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees. My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff! He's always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I wish I were a girl again, half savage and hardy, and free... Why am I so changed? I'm sure I should be myself were I once among the heather on those hills.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
You teach me now how cruel you've been - cruel and false. Why did you despise me? Why did you betray your own heart, Cathy? I have not one word of comfort. You deserve this. You have killed yourself. Yes, you may kiss me, and cry; and wring out my kisses and tears: they'll blight you - they'll damn you. You loved me - what right had you to leave me? What right - answer me - for the poor fancy you felt for Linton? Because misery, and degradation, and death, and nothing that God or Satan could inflict would have parted us, you, of your own will did it. I have no broken your heart - you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine. So much the worse for me that I am strong. Do I want to live? What kind of living will it be when you - Oh, God! would you like to lie with your soul in the grave?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
And I pray one prayer--I repeat it till my tongue stiffens--Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living! You said I killed you--haunt me, then!...Be with me always--take any form--drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I am now quite cured of seeking pleasure in society, be it country or town. A sensible man ought to find sufficient company in himself.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Time brought resignation and a melancholy sweeter than common joy.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
It is for God to punish wicked people; we should learn to forgive.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I'll be as dirty as I please, and I like to be dirty, and I will be dirty!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Kiss me again, but don't let me see your eyes! I forgive what you have done to me. I love my murderer--but yours! How can I?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
May you not rest, as long as I am living. You said I killed you - haunt me, then.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I hate him for himself, but despise him for the memories he revives.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
If I were in heaven, Nelly, I should be extremely miserable." "Because you are not fit to go there," I answered. "All sinners would be miserable in heaven.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
You loved me-then what right had you to leave me? What right-answer me-for the poor fancy you felt for Linton? Because misery and degradation, and death, and nothing that God or Satan could inflict would have parted us, you, of your own will, did it. I have not broken your heart- you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine." ~Heathcliff
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
How cruel, your veins are full of ice-water and mine are boiling.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I pray every night that I may live after him; because I would rather be miserable than that he should be — that proves I love him better than myself.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Because misery, and degradation, and death, and nothing that God or Satan could inflict would have parted us, you, of your own will did it. I have no broken your heart - you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine. So much the worse for me that I am strong.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
How strange! I thought, though everybody hated and despised each other, they could not avoid loving me.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I’ve dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas: they’ve gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
The entire world is a collection of memoranda that she did exist, and that I have lost her.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I had to read Wuthering Heights for English and I never enjoyed a book in all my life as much as that one.
Marlon Brando (Songs My Mother Taught Me)
May she wake in torment!" he cried, with frightful vehemence, stamping his foot, and groaning in a sudden paroxysm of ungovernable passion. "Why, she's a liar to the end! Where is she? Not there—not in heaven—not perished—where? Oh! you said you cared nothing for my sufferings! And I pray one prayer—I repeat it till my tongue stiffens—May she wake in torment!" he cried, with frightful vehemence, stamping his foot, and groaning in a sudden paroxysm of ungovernable passion. "Why, she's a liar to the end! Where is she? Not there—not in heaven—not perished—where? Oh! you said you cared nothing for my sufferings! And I pray one prayer—I repeat it till my tongue stiffens—Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I lingered round them, under that benign sky; watched the moths fluttering among the heath and hare-bells; listened to the soft wind breathing through the grass; and wondered how anyone could ever imagine unquiet slumbers for the sleepers in that quiet earth.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Existence, after losing her, would be hell
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I've no more business to marry Edgar Linton than I have to be in heaven and if the wicked man in there had not brought Heathcliff so low I shouldn't have thought of it. It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now so he shall never know how I love him and that not because he's handsome Nelly but because he's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of his and mine are the same and Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lightning or frost from fire.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Am I a romantic? I've seen "Wuthering Heights" ten times. I'm a romantic.
Johnny Depp
I have lost the faculty of enjoying their destruction, and I am too idle to destroy for nothing.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
She was a wild, wicked slip of a girl. She burned too brightly for this world.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
The thing that irks me most is this shattered prison, after all. I’m tired of being enclosed here. I’m wearying to escape into that glorious world, and to be always there: not seeing it dimly through tears, and yearning for it through the walls of an aching heart: but really with it, and in it.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
By this curious turn of disposition I have gained the reputation of deliberate heartlessness; how undeserved, I alone can appreciate.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Oh, Cathy! Oh, my life! how can I bear it?" was the first sentence he uttered, in a tone that did not seek to disguise his despair. And now he stared at her so earnestly that I thought the very intensity of his gaze would bring tears into his eyes; but they burned with anguish: they did not melt.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
What kind of living will it be when you - Oh, God! Would you like to live with your soul in the grave?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
You must forgive me, for I struggled only for you.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Your presence is a moral poison that would contaminate the most virtuous
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Books help to form us. If you cut me open, you will find volume after volume, page after page, the contents of every one I have ever read, somehow transmuted and transformed into me. Alice in Wonderland. the Magic Faraway Tree. The Hound of the Baskervilles. The Book of Job. Bleak House. Wuthering Heights. The Complete Poems of W H Auden. The Tale of Mr Tod. Howard''s End. What a strange person I must be. But if the books I have read have helped to form me, then probably nobody else who ever lived has read exactly the same books, all the same books and only the same books as me. So just as my genes and the soul within me make me uniquely me, so I am the unique sum of the books I have read. I am my literary DNA.
Susan Hill (Howards End Is on the Landing: A Year of Reading from Home)
Hush, my darling! Hush, hush, Catherine! I'll stay. If he shot me so, I'd expire with a blessing on my lips.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
They forgot everything the minute they were together again.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He'll love and hate equally under cover, and esteem it a species of impertinence to loved or hated again.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I was on HPD--Heathcliff Protection Duty--in Wuthering Heights for two years, and believe me, the ProCaths tried everything. I personally saved him from assassination eight times.
Jasper Fforde (Lost in a Good Book (Thursday Next, #2))
He's always, always in my mind — not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself — but as my own being.
Emily Brontë
But you might as well bid a man struggling in the water, rest within arm's length of the shore! I must reach it first, and then I'll rest.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I wish you had sincerity enough to tell me whether Catherine would suffer greatly from his loss: the fear that she would restrains me. And there you see the distinction between our feelings: had he been in my place and I in his, though I hated him with a hatred that turned my life to gall, I never would have raised a hand against him. You may look incredulous, if you please! I never would have banished him from her society as long as she desired his. The moment her regard ceased, I could have torn his heart out, and drunk his blood! But, till then - if you don't believe me, you don't know me - till then, I would have died by inches before I touched a single hair of his head!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Your cold blood cannot be worked into a fever; your veins are full of ice water; but mine are boiling, and the sight of such chillness makes them dance.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
If I had caused the cloud, it was my duty to make an effort to dispel it.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Good words," I replied. "But deeds must prove it also; and after he is well, remember you don't forget resolutions formed in the hour of fear.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
In the first place, his startling likeness to Catherine, connected him fearfully with her. That, however, which you may suppose the most potent to arrest my imagination, is actually the least – for what is not connected with her to me? and what does not recall her? I cannot look down to this floor, but her features are shaped on the flags! In every cloud, in every tree – filling the air at night, and caught by glimpses in every object, by day I am surrounded with her image! The most ordinary faces of men, and women – my own features mock me with a resemblance. The entire world is a dreadful collection of memoranda that she did exist, and that I have lost her!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Terror made me cruel; and finding it useless to attempt shaking the creature off, I pulled its wrist on to the broken pane, and rubbed it to and fro till the blood ran down and soaked the bedclothes...
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
It’s no company at all, when people know nothing and say nothing,’ she muttered.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
It was once suggested to me that, as an antidote to crying, I put my head in a paper bag. As it happens, there is a sound physiological reason, something to do with oxygen, for doing exactly that, but the psychological effect alone is incalculable: it is difficult in the extreme to continue fancying onceself Cathy in "Wuthering Heights" with one's head in a Food Fair bag.
Joan Didion (Slouching Towards Bethlehem)
I'd be glad of a retaliation that wouldn't recoil on myself; but treachery and violence are spears pointed at both ends: they wound those who resort to them, worse than their enemies.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He might as well plant an oak in a flowerpot, and expect it to thrive, as imagine he can restore her to vigour in the soil of his shallow cares!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I 'never told my love' vocally; still, if looks have language, the merest idiot might have guessed I was over head and ears;
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
As different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Heathcliff, make the world stop right here. Make everything stop and stand still and never move again. Make the moors never change and you and I never change.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
This is it--what all the hoopla is about, what Wuthering Heights is about--it all boils down to this feeling rushing through me in this moment with Joe as our mouths refuse to part. Who knew all this time I was one kiss away from being Cathy and Juliet and Elizabeth Bennet and Lady Chatterley!?
Jandy Nelson (The Sky Is Everywhere)
I wish I were a girl again, half savage and hardy, and free; and laughing at injuries, not maddening under them! Why am I so changed? why does my blood rush into a hell of tumult at a few words?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I have no pity! I have no pity! The more worms writhe, the more I yearn to crush out their entrails! It is a moral teething, and I grind with greater energy, in proportion to the increase of pain.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He’s more myself than I am
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Hereafter she is only my sister in name; not because I disown her, but because she has disowned me.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
But I begin to fancy you don't like me. How strange! I thought, though everybody hated and despised each other, they could not avoid loving me. (Catherine Linton, nee Earnshaw)
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
People feel with their hearts, Ellen: and since he has destroyed mine, I have not power to feel for him.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
In secret pleasure — secret tears This changeful life has slipped away
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Heathcliff. The "hero" of Wuthering Heights. Although no one knows why. He's mean, moody, and possibly a bit on the pongy side. Cathy loves him, though. She shows this by viciously rejecting him and marrying someone else for a laugh. Still, that is true love on the moors for you.
Louise Rennison (A Midsummer Tights Dream (The Misadventures of Tallulah Casey, #2))
...I couldn't let go of the thought that it had, in fact, been he, restless and moody Heathcliff. Day after day, he floated through all the Wal-Marts in America, searching for me in a million lonely aisles.
Marisha Pessl (Special Topics in Calamity Physics)
Oliver was Oliver,' I said, as if that summed things up. 'Parce que c'était lui, parce que c'était moi,' my father added, quoting Montaigne's all-encompassing explanation for his friendship with Etienne de la Boétie. I was thinking, instead, of Emily Brontë's words: because 'he's more myself than I am.
André Aciman (Call Me by Your Name)
I take so little interest in my daily life, that I hardly remember to eat and drink.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I'm not going to act the lady among you, for fear I should starve .
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Thoughts are tyrants that return again and again to torment us.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Yet I was a fool to fancy for a moment that she valued Edgar Linton's attachment more than mine -- If he love with all the powers of his puny being, he couldn't love as much in eighty years, as I could in a day. And Catherine has a heart as deep as I have; the sea could be as readily contained in that horse-trough, as her whole affection be monopolized by him -- Tush! He is scarcely a degree dearer to her than her dog, or her horse -- It is not in him to be loved like me, how can she love in him what he has not?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff! He’s always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Would you like to live with your soul in the grave?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Nay, you'll be ashamed of me everyday of your life," he answered; "and the more ashamed, the more you know me; and I cannot bide it.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Proud people breed sad sorrows for themselves. But if you be afraid of your touchiness, you must ask pardon, mind, when she comes in.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Any relic of the dead is precious, if they were valued living
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
You have been compelled to cultivate your reflective faculties for want of occasions for frittering away your life on silly trifles.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Nonsense, do you imagine he has thought as much of you as you have of him?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him: and that, not because he's handsome, Nelly, but because he's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same; and Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
If he loved you with all the power of his soul for a whole lifetime, he couldn’t love you as much as I do in a single day.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I am Heathcliff!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I also read about Heathcliff's unexpected three-year career in Hollywood under the name Buck Stallion and his eventual return to the pages of Wuthering Heights.
Jasper Fforde (Lost in a Good Book (Thursday Next, #2))
What do you think is my favourite book? Just now, I mean; I change every three days. "Wuthering Heights." Emily Bronte was quite young when she wrote it, and had never been outside of Haworth churchyard. She had never known any men in her life; how could she imagine a man like Heathcliff? I couldn't do it, and I'm quite young and never outside the John Grier Asylum - I've had every chance in the world. Sometimes a dreadful fear comes over me that I'm not a genius. Will you be awfully disappointed, Daddy, if I don't turn out to be a great author?
Jean Webster (Daddy-Long-Legs (Daddy-Long-Legs, #1))
I forgive what you have done to me. I love my murderer - but yours! How can I?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Now, my bonny lad, you are mine! And we’ll see if one tree won’t grow as crooked as another, with the same wind to twist it!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Sea cual fuere la sustancia de la que están hechas las almas, la suya y la mía son idénticas
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
You fight against that devil for love as long as you may; when the time comes, not all the angels in heaven shall save him!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
And I pray one prayer--I repeat it till my tongue stiffens--Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you--haunt me, then! The murdered DO haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts HAVE wandered on earth. Be with me always--take any form--drive me mad! only DO not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I CANNOT live without my life! I CANNOT live without my soul!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
They say I killed you, haunt me then. Be with me always. Take any form, drive me mad, but do not leave me. Not in a place where I cannot find you. I cannot live without my life. I cannot live without my soul
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
El mundo es para mi una horrenda colección de recuerdos diciéndome que ella vivió y que la he perdido.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Cathy, this lamb of yours threatens like a bull!' he said. 'It is in danger of splitting its skull against my knuckles. By God! Mr. Linton, I'm mortally sorry that you are not worth knocking down!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He had the hypocrisy to represent a mourner: and previous to following with Hareton, he lifted the unfortunate child on to the table and muttered, with peculiar gusto, 'Now, my bonny lad, you are mine! And we'll see if one tree won't grow as crooked as another, with the same wind to twist it!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Who do readers expect to see when they pick up this book? Who has won the Most Troubled Romantic Lead at the BookWorld Awards seventy-seven times in a row? Me. All me.
Jasper Fforde (The Well of Lost Plots (Thursday Next #3))
Joseph is the wearisomest and self-righteous Pharisee who ever ransacked the Bible to rake the promises to himself and fling the curses on his neighbor.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I have fled my country and gone to the heather.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same; and Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I am seldom otherwise than happy while watching in the chamber of death... . I see a repose that neither earth nor hell can break, and I feel an assurance of the endless and shadowless hereafter--the Eternity they have entered--where life is boundless in its duration, and love in its sympathy, and joy in its fulness.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I never told my love vocally still.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Choosing between day and night. Edgar and Heathcliff.
Eileen Favorite (The Heroines)
I have not broken your heart - you have broken it - and in breaking it, you have broken mine ... I forgive what you have done to me. I love my murderer - but yours! How can I?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
There is nothing quite like this novel with its rage and ragings, its discontent and angry restlessness. Wuthering Heights is a virgin's story.
Elizabeth Hardwick (Seduction and Betrayal: Women and Literature)
I didn't want him to become gray and multi-dimensional and complicated like everyone else. Was every Heathcliff a Linton in disguise?
Margaret Atwood (Lady Oracle)
Take my books away, and I should be desperate!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
And wondered how anyone could ever imagine unquiet slumbers, for the sleepers in that quiet earth.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
It's wrong to anticipate evil.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Two words would comprehend my future -- death and hell: existence, after losing her, would be hell.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
It was a strange way of killing, not by inches, but by fractions of hairbreadths, to beguile me with the spectre of a hope, through eighteen years!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I'm now quite cured of seeking pleasure in society, be it country or town. A sensible man ought to find sufficient company in himself.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Wish and learn to smooth away the surly wrinkles, to raise your lids frankly, and change the fiends to confident, innocent angels, suspecting and doubting nothing, and always seeing friends where they are not sure of foes.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
At night, when we were little, we tented Bailey's covers, crawled underneath with our flashlights and played cards: Hearts, Whist, Crazy Eights, and our favourite: Bloody Knuckles. The competition was vicious, All day, every day, we were the Walker Girls - two peas in a pod thick as thieves - but when Gram closed the door for the night, we bared our teeth. We played for chores, for slave duty, for truths and dares and money. We played to be better, brighter, to be more beautiful, more, just more. But it was all a ruse - we played so we could fall asleep in the same bed without having to ask, so we could wrap together like a braid, so while we slept our dreams could switch bodies. (Found written on the inside cover of Wuthering Heights, Lennie's room)
Jandy Nelson (The Sky Is Everywhere)
He turned, as he spoke, a peculiar look in her direction, a look of hatred unless he has a most perverse set of facial muscles that will not, like those of other people, interpret the language of his soul.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
But there's this one difference: one is gold put to the use of paving-stones, and the other is tin polished to ape a service of silver. Mine has nothing valuable about it; yet I shall have the merit of making it go as far as such poor stuff can go. His had first-rate qualities, and they are lost, rendered worst than unavailing.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He’s not a rough diamond - a pearl-containing oyster of a rustic; he’s a fierce, pitiless, wolfish man.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Nunca le declaré abiertamente mi amor, pero si las miradas hablan, el más tonto habría podido advertir que me tenía trastornado el juicio.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
And there you see the distinction between our feelings: had he been in my place, and I in his, though I hated him with a hatred that turned my life to gall, I never would have raised a hand against him. You may look incredulous, if you please! I never would have banished him from her society as long as she desired his. The moment her regard ceased, I would have torn his heart out and drank his blood! But, till then - if you don't believe me, you don't know me - til then, I would have died by inches before I touched a single hair on his head!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Oh, I’m burning! I wish I were out of doors! I wish I were a girl again, half savage and hardy, and free . . . and laughing at injuries, not maddening under them! Why am I so changed? Why does my blood rush into a hell of tumult at a few words? I’m sure I should be myself were I once among the heather on those hills. Open the window again wide: fasten it open!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
And sometimes then he sat with us for an hour or so, sharing our limbo, listening while I read. Books from any shelf, opened at any page, in which I would start and finish anywhere, mid-sentence sometimes. Wuthering Heights ran into Emma, which gave way to The Eustace Diamonds, which faded into Hard Times, which ceded to The Woman in White. Fragments. It didn't matter. Art, its completeness, its formedness, its finishedness, had no power to console. Words, on the other hand, were a lifeline.
Diane Setterfield (The Thirteenth Tale)
The intense horror of nightmare came over me: I tried to draw back my arm, but the hand clung to it, and a most melancholy voice sobbed, 'Let me in - let me in!' 'Who are you?' I asked, struggling, meanwhile, to disengage myself. 'Catherine Linton,' it replied, shiveringly (why did I think of LINTON? I had read EARNSHAW twenty times for Linton) - 'I'm come home: I'd lost my way on the moor!' As it spoke, I discerned, obscurely, a child's face looking through the window.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
We must be for ourselves in the long run; the mild and generous are only more justly selfish than the domineering.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Are you acquainted with the mood of mind in which, if you were seated alone, and the cat licking its kitten on the rug before you, you would watch the operation so intently that puss's neglect of one ear would put you seriously out of temper?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I was only going to say that heaven did not seem to be my home; and I broke my heart with weeping to come back to earth; and the angels were so angry that they flung my out into the middle of the heath on the top of Wuthering Heights; where I woke sobbing for joy. That will do to explain my secret, as well as the other. I've no more business to marry Edgar Linton than I have to be in heaven; and if the wicked man in there had not brought Heathcliff so low, I shouldn't have thought of it. It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him: and that, not because he's handsome, but because he's more myself than I am. What ever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same; and Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.' Ere this speech ended, I became sensible of Heathcliff's presence. Having noticed a slight movement, I turned my head, and saw him rise from the bench, and steal out noiselessly. He had listened till he heard Catherine say it would degrade her to marry him, and then he stayed to hear no further.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger: I should not seem a part of it. My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods: time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes trees. My love for Heatcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
It is astonishing how sociable I feel myself compared with him.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I'll go with him as far as the park,' he said. 'You'll go with him to hell!' exclaimed his master,
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Si es cierto que yo te maté, persígueme. Se asegura que la víctima persigue a su asesino. Hazlo, pues, sigueme, hasta que me enloquezcas. Pero no me dejes solo en este abismo. ¡no puedo vivir sin mi vida! ¡no puedo vivir sin mi alma!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I wish I could hold you,' she continued, bitterly, 'till we were both dead! I shouldn't care what you suffered. I care nothing for your sufferings. Why shouldn't you suffer? I do! Will you forget me? Will you be happy when I am in the earth? Will you say twenty years hence, "That's the grave of Catherine Earnshaw? I loved her long ago, and was wretched to lose her; but it is past. I've loved many others since: my children are dearer to me than she was; and, at death, I shall not rejoice that I are going to her: I shall be sorry that I must leave them!" Will you say so, Heathcliff?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods. Time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees - my love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath - a source of little visible delight, but necessary.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He was, and is yet, most likely, the wearisomest, self-righteous pharisee that ever ransacked a Bible to rake the promises to himself, and fling the curses on his neighbours.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Le di mi corazón, lo cogió, lo pisoteó hasta dejarlo sin vida y me lo devolvió luego.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He shall never know how I love him
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
and the more hurt she gets, the more venomous she grows. a
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I love my murderer--but yours? How can I?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
This progressive effacement of human relationships is not without certain problems for the novel. How, in point of fact, would one handle the narration of those unbridled passions, stretching over many years, and at times making their effect felt on several generations? We’re a long way from Wuthering Heights, to say the least. The novel form is not conceived for depicting indifference or nothingness; a flatter, more terse, and dreary discourse would need to be invented.
Michel Houellebecq (Whatever)
You should never lie till ten. There's the very prime of the morning long gone before that time. A person who has not done one half of his day's work by ten o'clock, runs a chance of leaving the other half undone.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Most of the novels that I’ve read led me to believe quarrels come and go in the blink of an eye, a simple apology will bandage any problem and everything will be worked out within minutes. The novels lie. Maybe that’s why I’m so enamored with Wuthering Heights and Pride and Prejudice; both are incredibly romantic in their own way, but they reveal the truth behind blind love and promises of forever
Anna Todd (After We Collided (After, #2))
A perfect misanthropist's heaven: and Mr. Heathcliff and I are such a suitable pair to divide the desolation between us.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
The whole world awake and wild with joy.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I wish I could hold you," she continued bitterly, "till we were both dead!
Emily Brontë
The tyrant grinds down his slaves and they don't turn against him, they crush those beneath them.
Emily Brontë
In every cloud, in every tree – filling the air at night, and caught by glimpses in every object, by day I am surrounded with her image! The most ordinary faces of men, and women – my own features mock me with a resemblance. The entire world is a dreadful collection of memoranda that she did exist, and that I have lost her!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Gimmerton chapel bells were still ringing and the full, mellow flow of the beck in the valley came soothingly on the ear. It was a sweet substitute for the yet absent murmur of the summer foliage, which drowned that music about the Grange when the trees were in leaf.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
However , it’s over, and I’ll take no revenge on his folly – I can afford to suffer anything, hereafter! Should the meanest thing alive slap me on the cheek, I’d not only turn the other, but I’d ask pardon for provoking it – and, as proof, I’ll go make my peace with Edgar instantly – Good night – I’m an angel!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I got the sexton, who was digging Linton’s grave, to remove the earth off her coffin lid, and I opened it. I thought, once, I would have stayed there, when I saw her face again—it is hers yet—he had hard work to stir me; but he said it would change, if the air blew on it...
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
My great miseries in this world have been Heathcliff's miseries, and I watched and felt each from the beginning; my great thought in living is himself. If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and, if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the Universe would turn into a mighty stranger. I should not seem a part of it. My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods. Time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees - my love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath - a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff [...]
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He had been content with daily labour and rough animal enjoyments, 'till Catherine crossed his path. Shame at her scorn, and hope of her approval, were his first prompts to higher pursuits; and, instead of guarding him from one and winning him to the other, his endeavors to raise himself had produced just the contrary result.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Together, they would brave satan and all his legions.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
No, God won't have the satisfaction that I shall.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
You are my son, then, I'll tell you' and your mother was a wicked slut to leave you in ignorance of the sort of father you possessed.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Don't get the expression of a vicious cur that appears to know the kicks it gets are its desert, and yet hates all the world, as well as the kicker, for what it suffers.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Love never dies.
Emily Brontë
The flash of her eyes had been succeeded by a dreamy and melancholy softness; they no longer gave the impression of looking at the objects around her: they appeared always to gaze beyond, and far beyond—you would have said out of this world.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
You talk of her mind being unsettled. How the devil could it be otherwise in her frightful isolation? And that insipid, paltry creature attending her from duty and humanity ! From pity and charity ! He might as well plant an oak in a flower-pot, and expect it to thrive, as imagine he can restore her to vigour in the soil of his shallow cares!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
My great miseries in this world have been Heathcliff's miseries, and I watched and felt each from the beginning: my great thought in living is himself. If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger: I should not seem a part of it.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Earnshaw was not to be civilized with a wish, and my young lady was no philosopher, and no paragon of patience; but both their minds tending to the same point—one loving and desiring to esteem, and the other loving and desiring to be esteemed—they contrived in the end to reach it.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Една неистова любов, обсебване, зараза на душата, от която никъде не можеш да се скриеш, от която никога не можеш да избягаш. Любов по-страшна от страха, по-жива от живота. Няма думи, свещи, комплименти. Няма тела. Нито цветя и усмивки. Няма аз и ти, ние двамата. Любов, в която аз съм ти." - Брулени Хълмове
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I ran to the children's room: their door was ajar, I saw they had never laid down, though it was past midnight; but they were calmer, and did not need me to console them. The little souls were comforting each other with better thoughts than I could have hit on: no parson in the world ever pictured heaven so beautifully as they did, in their innocent talk; and, while I sobbed, and listened. I could not help wishing we were all there safe together.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
It's a rough journey, and a sad heart to travel it; and we must pass by Gimmerton Kirk, to go that journey! We've braved its ghosts often together, and dared each other to stand among the graves and ask them to come. But Heathcliff, if I dare you now, will you venture? If you do, I'll keep you. I'll not lie there by myself; they may bury me twelve feet deep, and throw the church down over me, but I won't rest till you are with me. I never will!" She paused, and resumed with a strange smile, "He's considering-he'd rather I'd come to him! Find a way, then! not through that Kirkyard. You are slow! Be content, you always followed me!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
The red firelight glowed on their two bonny heads and revealed their faces, animated with the eager interest of children; for, though he was twenty-three and she eighteen, each had so much of novelty to feel, and learn, that neither experienced nor evinced the sentiments of sober disenchanted maturity.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I don't know if it be a peculiarity in me, but I am seldom otherwise than happy while watching in the chamber of death, should no frenzied or despairing mourner share the duty with me. I see a repose that neither earth nor hell can break; and I feel and assurance of the endless and shadowless hereafter - the Eternity they have entered - where life is boundless in its duration, and love in its sympathy, and joy in its fulness.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
No he sido yo quien ha roto tu corazón, te lo has roto tú misma, y al hacerlo has destrozado, de paso, él mío. Y la peor parte me toca a mí, porque aún tengo fortaleza. ¿Crees que me apetece vivir? ¿Qué clase de vida podrá ser la mía cuando tú...? ¡Oh, Dios mío! ¿Acaso te gustaría a ti vivir si te encerraran el alma en una tumba?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
He leant his two elbows on his knees, and his chin on his hands and remained rapt in dumb meditation. On my inquiring the subject of his thoughts, he answered gravely 'I'm trying to settle how I shall pay Hindley back. I don't care how long I wait, if I can only do it at last. I hope he will not die before I do!' 'For shame, Heathcliff!' said I. 'It is for God to punish wicked people; we should learn to forgive.' 'No, God won’t have the satisfaction that I shall,' he returned. 'I only wish I knew the best way! Let me alone, and I'll plan it out: while I'm thinking of that I don't feel pain.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Two words would comprehend my future—death and hell: existence, after losing her, would be hell. Yet I was a fool to fancy for a moment that she valued Edgar Linton’s attachment more than mine. If he loved with all the powers of his puny being, he couldn’t love as much in eighty years as I could in a day. And Catherine has a heart as deep as I have: the sea could be as readily contained in that horse-trough as her whole affection be monopolised by him. Tush! He is scarcely a degree dearer to her than her dog, or her horse. It is not in him to be loved like me: how can she love in him what he has not?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
And you love Edgar, and Edgar loves you. All seems smooth and easy: where is the obstacle?" "Here! and here!" replied Catherine, striking one hand on her forehead, and another on her breast: "in whichever place the soul lives. In my soul and in my heart, I'm convinced I'm wrong!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
The guest was now the master of Wuthering Heights: he held firm possession, and proved to the attorney, who, in his turn, proved it to Mr. Linton, that Earnshaw had mortaged every yard of land he owned for cash to supply his mania for gaming; and he, Heathcliff, was the mortgagee. In that manner, Hareton, who should now be the first gentleman in the neighbourhood, was reduced to a state of complete dependence on his father's inveterate enemy; and lives in his own house as a servant deprived of the advantage of wages, and quite unable to right himself, because of his friendlessness, and his ignorance that he has been wronged.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees — my love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath — a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff — he's always, always in my mind — not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself — but as my own being — so, don't talk of our separation again — it is impracticable.-
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I remember the master, before he fell into a doze, stroking her bonny hair - it pleased him rarely to see her gentle - and saying - 'Why canst thou not always be a good lass, Cathy?' And she turned her face up to his, and laughed, and answered, 'Why cannot you always be a good man, father?
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Nu ştiu din ce sunt plămădite sufletele noastre, dar ştiu că al lui şi al meu sunt la fel. (...) Iubirea mea pentru Linton seamănă cu frunzele pădurii, timpul o va schimba, îmi dau bine seama, aşa cum iarna schimbă pomii. Iubirea mea pentru Heathcliff însă e asemeni stâncilor eterne de sub pământ: nu prilej de încântare, ci necesitate.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
One could not but play for a moment with the thought of what might have happened if Charlotte Brontë had possessed say three hundred a year — but the foolish woman sold the copyright of her novels outright for fifteen hundred pounds; had somehow possessed more knowledge of the busy world, and towns and regions full of life; more practical experience, and intercourse with her kind and acquaintance with a variety of character. In those words she puts her finger exactly not only upon her own defects as a novelist but upon those of her sex. at that time. She knew, no one better, how enormously her genius would have profited if it had not spent itself in solitary visions over distant fields; if experience and intercourse and travel had been granted her. But they were not granted; they were withheld; and we must accept the fact that all those good novels, VILLETTE, EMMA, WUTHERING HEIGHTS, MIDDLEMARCH, were written by women without more experience of life than could enter the house of a respectable clergyman; written too in the common sitting-room of that respectable house and by women so poor that they could not afford to, buy more than a few quires of paper at a time upon which to write WUTHERING HEIGHTS or JANE EYRE.
Virginia Woolf (A Room of One's Own)
Afraid? No!" he replied. "I have neither a fear, nor a presentiment, nor a hope of death. Why should I? With my hard constitution and temperate mode of living, and unperilous occupations, I ought to, and probably shall, remain above ground till there is scarcely a black hair on my head. And yet I cannot continue in this condition! I have to remind myself to breathe - almost to remind my heart to beat! And it is like bending back a stiff spring: it is by compulsion that I do the slightest act not prompted by one thought; and by compulsion that I notice anything alive or dead, which is not associated with one universal idea. I have a single wish, and my whole being and faculties are yearning to attain it. They have yearned towards it so long, and so unwaveringly, that I'm convinced it will be reached - and soon - because it has devoured my existence: I am swallowed up in the anticipation of its fulfillment. My confessions have not revieved me; but they may account for some otherwise unaccountable phases of humour which I show. Oh God! It is a long fight; I wish it were over!
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods. Time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees — my love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath — a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff — he's always, always in my mind — not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself — but as my own being — so, don't talk of our separation again — it is impracticable.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
This is nothing," cried she: "I was only going to say that heaven did not seem to be my home; and I broke my heart with weeping to come back to earth; and the angels were so angry that they flung me out into the middle of the heath on the top of Wuthering Heights; where I woke sobbing for joy. That will do to explain my secret, as well as the other. I've no more business to marry Edgar Linton than I have to be in heaven; and if the wicked man in there had not brought Heathcliff so low, I shouldn't have thought of it. It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him: and that, not because he's handsome, Nelly, but because he's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same; and Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
I obeyed, so far as to quit the chamber; when, ignorant where the narrow lobbies led, I stood still, and was witness, involuntarily, to a piece of superstition on the part of my landlord which belied, oddly, his apparent sense. He got on to the bed, and wrenched open the lattice, bursting, as he pulled at it, into an uncontrollable passion of tears. 'Come in! come in!' he sobbed. 'Cathy, do come. Oh, do - ONCE more! Oh! my heart's darling! hear me THIS time, Catherine, at last!' The spectre showed a spectre's ordinary caprice: it gave no sign of being; but the snow and wind whirled wildly through, even reaching my station, and blowing out the light.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
Si él estuviera en mi lugar y yo en el suyo, aunque le odiara con un odio que convirtiera mi vida en hiel, nunca hubiera levantado la mano contra él. [...] nunca le hubiera echado de su compañía, mientras ella la deseara. En el momento en que el afecto desapareciera, yo le hubiera arrancado el corazón y bebido su sangre. Pero hasta entonces [...] me hubiera dejado morir a pedazos antes de tocar un solo pelo de su cabeza.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)
While enjoying a month of fine weather at the sea-coast, I was thrown into the company of a most fascinating creature: a real goddess in my eyes, as long as she took no notice of me. I 'never told my love' vocally; still, if looks have language, the merest idiot might have guessed I was over head and ears: she understood me at last, and looked a return - the sweetest of all imaginable looks. And what did I do? I confess it with shame - shrunk icily into myself, like a snail; at every glance retired colder and farther; till finally the poor innocent was led to doubt her own senses, and, overwhelmed with confusion at her supposed mistake, persuaded her mamma to decamp. By this curious turn of disposition I have gained the reputation of deliberate heartlessness; how undeserved, I alone can appreciate.
Emily Brontë (Wuthering Heights)